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14" vs 16" quarter tip

May 23 2017 at 5:28 PM
danh  (no login)

I'm looking at replacing my Oregon brand quarter tip bar on my 40cc saw since it drips black staining oil over whatever I'm carving, I suspect it's metal particles from the worn bar that causes the black staining since the saw is clean. I've got a 12" dime tip on my detail saw, and a 20" toonie on my 60cc. I love my 40cc, love the weight, feel, balance... I think the Oregon bar is a 14.

I'm wondering if there are any benefits or drawbacks of length besides the obvious and would appreciate your 2ยข about what might be a better option.

I know it probably doesn't make much of a difference.

Thanks

 
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Indy
(Login D.R.)

danh I'm curious

May 23 2017, 9:41 PM 

Having only used a 1/4 tip bar several times. I may be not the one to answer this for you. But do use the dime tip on my detail saws. On them I have noticed that if the chain is to tight it makes the tip super hot. That burns the oil on the tip and does exactly what you described. Plus wares down the tip faster. This might be your problem also. I'm sure you know this but, the chain on the sold tip bars can not be as tight as on the roller tip bars. Hope this helps.

I don't mean to side track your post but feel this is a good time and subject to ask a question on the use of 1/4 tip bar.

My question would also be to anyone.

What is the advantage of using a 1/4 tip bar over a stock bar? After 20+ some years of doing thousands of carvings I still don't see why some use a 1/4 tip bars. Could someone explain?

I guess I could see the advantage if one was to be doing a bear 12' tall out of a 60" diam log for detail. Bigger detail on bigger carvings maybe.

But just don't see the advantage of using a 1/4 tip over a stock roller tip bar.
Like I said I've used one before and seemed to me I had to use more brut force on the saw to make the block out cuts even with a super sharp chain.

 
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danh
(no login)

Re: danh I'm curious

May 24 2017, 1:49 AM 

Thanks for your thoughts and insight Indy. I only have a small fraction of the carving experience you do. I do keep my chains snug, when loose, they feel less precise because the drivers aren't firmly seated in the bar on some cuts, though I'm sure with more experience I'd get the feel for it. Sounds like keeping chains on carving bars snug comes with a price.

I do my blocking with a stock bar mostly on my 60cc, and to be honest haven't used the quarter tip as much since I bought a dime tip. But I've found the 14" quarter tip to be more maneuverable and also capable of more detail than the stock bar on that saw (the saw I started out on). Also, it will never kick. I've used my stock bar in the grey area between blocking and detail, and have had the tip jump/kick an inch or two, enough to uppercut areas I didn't want to.

I burned out the 40cc saw I got started on (also used it for tree work), bought another then burned out the stock bar on that plunging. Maybe I should slap my Lowe's replacement (treework) bar on and see how she handles detail. Thanks for the thoughts!


 
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Steve backus
(Login flashbackus)

One of each

May 24 2017, 9:10 AM 

Chains to tight for one and you need more saws for another.

My analogy to the causal observer that asks how many saws we use is to reply that it is much like a chef that has a knife holder on his butcher block that holds many knives and each has a specific purpose.
The big knives to reduce the carcass into workable chunks and as the deboneing or filleting proceeds they progressively use smaller knives.

If the carving game is to make money one must constantly keep upgrading and replacing saws and bars until the balance of whats necessary is suited to your needs.

so its not a question so much of one bar size/power head combo over another as having the choice of what you need in the moment, each has a certain use at a certain time in the carving process.
the right knife for right slice or cut so to speak.

Indy has some great points and has more then likely got some bars for sale as he exits the building.

Experiment often,wreck some wood and have fun....
Plus your chain is to tight!












and remember carve or starve...

 
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Art
(Login buck893)

Re: One of each

May 24 2017, 10:12 AM 

I think I have several quarter tip bars ,never used them much for whatever reason. 12,14 and 16 methinks. I'll have to look in that messy shop for them. sad.gif

 
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Ron Kane
(no login)

Re: 14" vs 16" quarter tip

May 24 2017, 10:15 AM 

You wont look back if you go with a .043 gage dime tip. Cuts fast and smooth.

 
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Indy
(Login D.R.)

Re: 14" vs 16" quarter tip

May 24 2017, 5:40 PM 

Steve's right I do have some bars. I think I have the 1/4 tip I mentioned someplace. Its like new. But I think it was a 18 or 20". Most defiantly will be for sale. I'm thinking by winter I'll have a good list of items to move on to someone that can use them.

Bad thing is the doggone shipping on UPS is ridicules.

I have moved a ton of big stuff on craigslist in the last month. Cant believe I have room in the shop to move around now.

Ron I've heard you guys talk about that .043 gage. Never got one, but should, just to try it out. I still do a few on-sites just to keep from getting rusty.

 
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Ron Kane
(no login)

Re: 14&quot; vs 16&quot; quarter tip

May 24 2017, 7:20 PM 

Doug, you will love that .043 gage chain. It cuts a lot faster than .050 gage.

 
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danh
(no login)

Re: 14" vs 16" quarter tip

May 24 2017, 9:45 PM 

I was able to carve this afternoon for a few hours, I put my 16" 35$ Oregon Lowe's bought bar I use for tree work on my 40cc and it was great, no black oil mess, the tip is the same size as the toonie I use sometimes on my 60cc and it has a sprocket. I won't be buying another quarter tip. Thanks for your insightful comments.

 
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Kelly D
(Login MacboyCanada)

Re: 14" vs 16" quarter tip

May 25 2017, 1:47 AM 

Nobody has mentioned the reduced kickback or better maneuverability on the quarter tip vs a stock roller tip - regardless of tip diameter. I only run one roller tip and it's on my old dog 026 which I only use for burning through bark or in my beam machine. I have three saws equipped with quarter tips and by far my favourite roughing saw is the 250 with the 20" quarter tip. I can do some good roughing plus carve sweet curves at the same time. Can't curl a big roller tip that way. Not nearly as tight at least. I can run a nice curve just a few inches deep and then plunge the saw into the cut and it just sweeps through following the line. So nice. I find I carve mostly with the quarter tips which saves the dimes for the real detail work.

And yes - the chain needs to be LOOSE. I run mine just past that point where they won't jump off the bar on me. I can't get my pinky between the bar and chain but can slip a business card through no problem. Any tighter and the heat buildup is scary. It's like burning money - especially on a high speed saw like the 201. With Cannon so far behind the world I need my bars to last as long as I can get them to last.

 
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