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There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009 at 1:08 PM
Bruce Dorskind  (Login Yankeefan51)



For those of you who ever thought about investing in post 1960s baseball cards
and/o bought cards from the 1980's for your kids or nephews...you'll want to read
this April 23rd Wall Street Journal story... and weep

Lesson Learned: There is no cardboard like oldcardboard.


Link: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB124045610966946695.html

 
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Robert Klevens
(Login prestigecollectibles)

How about 1975?

April 23 2009, 1:32 PM 


 
 
barrysloate
(Login barrysloate)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009, 1:46 PM 

I guess PSA should be expecting about 100,000 Topps Minis submitted in the near future.

 
 
PC
(Login PC-T206)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009, 2:06 PM 

The article does not address 1960s and 1970s cards.

Adjusted for inflation (using the article's 1989 benchmark), I suspect 1960s and 1970s HOFers have not appreciated much, but have fared much better than 1980s stuff.

 
 

T206Collector
(Login T206Collector)

It's all relative

April 23 2009, 3:00 PM 

I bought a really nice 1933 Goudey Grove at a show in Manhattan in March 1989. It cost me about $225, and for a 16 year old kid was about all I could afford to spend on a baseball card back then. About 15 years later, I had it graded by SGC and it came back a 60. That card in that condition just sold for about $350 on ebay. So while I am happy that there was an appreciation in value there -- as opposed to my collection of 1980s and 1990s Topps cards -- mid-grade Goudeys have only somewhat appreciated since the late 1980s.

Similarly, I bought a beautiful T206 Bender Portrait in 1997 for about $150. The card later graded an SGC 50 and is not worth much more than what I paid for it. The $350 I put on a Matty White Cap that came back an SGC 60 on the same day is a different story, as that card has basically tripled in value.

All I'm saying is that there is some luck involved and it is not as simple as just picking card collecting eras.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Visithttp://www.t206collector.com for Net54 T206 archive, signed deadball card galleries, articles and more!

 
 
Jason
(Login kehfee)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009, 3:06 PM 

I remember buying a beautiful Hal Chase Port Blue Background. The dealer advertised it as Nr-Mt and when I got it I didn't think otherwise.

Of course, years later I got it graded and it was only a 5 and I didn't make much on that purchase.

I was really confused about grading after all the years of dealers saying their cards were Mint+ and learning what grades cards really were.

 
 

boxingcardman
(Login boxingcardman)

Supply and demand; what a novel concept...

April 23 2009, 4:21 PM 

Any card being bought and sold in 100 or 1,000 card bricks of identical top condition items wasn't destined to pay for the kids' college tuition through long term appreciation. That was apparent in 1989 and it is playing out now. Plenty of people made tons of money on modern cards; they just had to time it right. It was pure casino capitalism, the poor man's penny stocks.

Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc

 
 
barrysloate
(Login barrysloate)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009, 4:45 PM 

I bought 100 Dave Magadan rookies in 1987. I plan to sell them and use the proceeds for my retirement.


    
This message has been edited by barrysloate on Apr 23, 2009 4:48 PM


 
 

John
(Login wonkaticket)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009, 4:49 PM 

Barry I would never tell someone how to spend his money but when you sell those cards this might be something you would want to look at...

[linked image]

 
 

Greg Ecklund
(Login Gecklund311)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009, 4:51 PM 

Those 500 and 1000 card brick of rookie cards are great for wallpaper...I'm still trying to decide between Pete Incaviglia and Kal Daniels to do the upstairs bathroom.

 
 
barrysloate
(Login barrysloate)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009, 4:52 PM 

John- my neighbor threw out a really sturdy cardboard box when he bought a new refrigerator. I think I can build it into a two room condo. I will have enough money to finance the supplies.

 
 

Frank Jennings
(Login castaways)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009, 5:15 PM 

Barry,

If you are looking for a high rise with the proceeds, I will be willing to let this baby go at a reasonable price? If you act now, I'll throw in the pool for free.

[linked image]
[linked image]

Frank

 
 
barrysloate
(Login barrysloate)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009, 5:22 PM 

That's a little too upscale for my pocketbook.


    
This message has been edited by barrysloate on Apr 23, 2009 5:22 PM


 
 

jdrum
(Login hrbaker)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009, 5:27 PM 

Hey I kind of like that trailer on stilts, it could double as a deer stand.

 
 

T206Collector
(Login T206Collector)

Modern Deals

April 23 2009, 5:27 PM 

<<Plenty of people made tons of money on modern cards; they just had to time it right. It was pure casino capitalism, the poor man's penny stocks.>>

I was smart when I sold my Frank Thomas rookie cards for a couple dollars a piece, after buying them for $.50 each. (No such luck on Marquis Grissom.)

I also sold a rare Travis Lee insert, limited to 100, in 1998 for $100 over the Internet -- before I had ever even heard of ebay. It really is all about timing, opportunity and luck.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Visithttp://www.t206collector.com for Net54 T206 archive, signed deadball card galleries, articles and more!

 
 
Rich Klein
(Login sabrgeek)

The real issue

April 23 2009, 6:01 PM 

Is the glut of cards from let's say 1986-1993 which everyone and their brother "put away" for their retirement fund; kid's college education; etc.

Those cards are still out there a dime a dozen; last night I went on Craig's List for the heck of it to see what was available and realized that

1) I'm better off with BST right here.

2) At least 3/4 of the posters had cards from that era and they were all asking 1/2 Beckett or more. In reality; those cards should be 10-25 of Beckett.

50's, 60's, 70's are obviously better than mid 80's - early 90's but even then; there are no guarantees.

Buy what you like; enjoy it -- and be happy

Rich

 
 

Greg Ecklund
(Login Gecklund311)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 23 2009, 10:54 PM 

Many 60's and 70's rookie cards have softened quite a bit in the past few years, and the recession has made things even worse. Lately I've picked up a few rookie cards from that era that I always wanted, but never wanted to pay up for. In the past few months I've added Fisk, Brett, Billy Willams, and Marichal rookies to my collection - all were graded SGC 88 and I bought each for half or less of the prices in a Beckett I have from 1993.

Funny thing is that the conventional wisdom back in the day was that you couldn't go wrong investing in rookie cards. The especially popular method was to buy rookie cards of soon to be Hall of Famers like Carlton, Schmidt, or Nolan Ryan before they got elected to the Hall. The problem, of course, was that those guys getting in surprised absolutely nobody and the event was already priced into the cards and then some.

 
 
Fred C
(Login JudgeDred2)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 24 2009, 1:07 AM 

It was all about timing in the late 80s and early 90s. Get in, get out and try to predict the next hot product or card. I remember buying close out 1984 wax football cases for $125 a case (8 of them) because of the Marino, Elway and Dickerson rookies. This is right when the rookie card craze started for baseball cards. I remember when people were trying to get $2 for the '84 Topps Mattingly rookies and thinking everyone was nuts but hey, why not play the game. I dumped the last of the 84T wax football for $1600 a case and I could have sold more if I had more of them. I was never into that rookie card crap, to me I liked reading the stats of the players at the end of their careers. I liked those '76 Aaron cards with that huge HR total on the back.

People can't seem to give away the cards from the 80s or 90s now. The sad part is that a lot of people got turned off when they saw the value of the cards go down so drastically. It soured a whole generation on baseball cards. However, there were a few that stuck around and are now part of this vintage collecting crowd. Heck, I don't even know what's being sold these days.

 
 

Todd
(Login deadballera)

Re: There's No CardBoard Like Old Cardboard

April 24 2009, 10:57 AM 

A couple of years ago, I donated thousands of cards from the 90s to a local Kids Shriners Hospital. They were very appreciative.




 
 

Jason L
(Login smallcapdaddy)
Registered Users

Actually, the 1980s overproduction

April 24 2009, 11:27 AM 

does have one positive outcome...I use those boxes to occasionally satisfy my hunger for opening packs...and depending on the issue, you can pick up an entire box for the same price as some of today's packs!

and 1984 Fleer will always have a special place in my heart, -as a single cello pack of those cards that my Mom brought home from the grocery store is what first got me interested in blowing all my money on baseball cards...

 
 
 
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