The New Forum for Classical Singers

 


  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to index  

Impostazione, appoggio and other fun Italian jargon

December 7 2009 at 8:51 AM

Toreadorssong/Jean-Ronald LaFond  (Login Toreadorssong)
NFCS Member

 
Few are as respectful of the Italian traditions as I am, mainly because the most I learned about vocal technique was from an old Italian mezzo who claimed to be able to trace an unbroken line of her teachers back to the time of Tosi. She could not tell you where the vocal folds were and nothing concrete about anatomy, but it did not matter, for she knew how everything felt and she could communicate it. Much of what I learn in science confirms her ideas. So I am not only respectful of those traditions but spend much time trying to find out what they mean concretely.

It is for that reason that I find the tendency to toss around Italian terminology, as if a Holy Grail that requires no explanation, disturbing at least. The Italian traditions are only worthwhile if we are able to understand the entire history, including where misunderstandings and disagreements cause splits from the original traditions. The aim of the best vocal scientists is to make sense of those terminologies with empirical information for there is truth to be found in them, and the traditions are written in the language of singing.

I am getting to the point where the science is actually making sense of the paradoxical nature of the jargon.

Voix Claire makes a wonderful point in the earlier thread when she explains that "imposto" should facilitate breath support. The truth is "placement" (impostazione), "support" (appoggio), etc, always beg the question of "the chicken or the egg". The feeling of support, or the sensation of placement, etc are based on correct coordination of the few issues for which the singer is consciously responsible: engagement of the core musculature, full breath intake, balance onset (resulting in a tone that is clear and flowing, and neither breathy nor pressed)and the best vowel formation possible that is both intelligible and reinforces the fold vibration acoustically instead of hinder it.

By adhering to these basic principles that most good and experienced teachers agree on, we can begin to make sense of the sensory information that the Italian masters passed on, as well as discovering where their language fails.

It is no less silly to take the old Italian writings literally as it is to take Jesus' parables in the Bible literally.
Singing is a living thing and we need to observe the importance of tradition without being limited by it.

TS

Be not the slave of your own past. Plunge into the sublime seas, dive deep and swim far, so you shall come back with self-respect, with new power, with an advanced experience that shall explain and overlook the old.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

TS's Blog:http://tsvocaltech.blogspot.com

 
 Respond to this message   
AuthorReply
schnoodc
(Login schnoodc)
NFCS Member

Beautifully put! NT

December 7 2009, 4:14 PM 


 
 Respond to this message   

GypsyGirl1974
(Login GypsyGirl1974)
NFCS Member

So true! nt

December 7 2009, 5:10 PM 



GypsyGirl1974...
___________________________________________________________________________
"But that's the beauty of grand opera. You can do anything so long as you sing it." (Anna Russell)

"The only unnatural sex act is that which you cannot perform." (Dr. Alfred Kinsey)

 
 Respond to this message   

TenorVox
(Login TenorVox)
NFCS Regular

Yes SIR.

December 7 2009, 6:20 PM 



Adding my bravos.
I particularly like your "I am getting to the point where the science is actually making sense of the paradoxical nature of the jargon."

Would that we ALL could be there.


0:>)=


T.V.



-- I AM the people my parents warned me about. --

 
 Respond to this message   

LaTosca
(Login LaTosca)
NFCS Regular

Yep. Spot on.

December 8 2009, 7:48 AM 

I too liked the bit TV highlighted.  Keep up the good work!

TS definitely knows whereof he speaks.

LaTosca



"I always carry a large flagon of whisky in case of snakebite, and furthermore always carry a small snake." (Attributed to W.C. Fields)


 
 Respond to this message   
Susan Eichhorn Young
(Login Susala)
NFCS Member

beautifully said!

December 7 2009, 10:29 PM 

as always Brother dear - you've said it eloquently and clearly!!! BRAVO!

 
 Respond to this message   

Voix Claire
(Login voix_claire)
NFCS Member

Re: Impostazione, appoggio and other fun Italian jargon

December 8 2009, 3:06 AM 

Wow. I don't even care what else you've said.

--> Voix Claire makes a wonderful point...

Works for me. LOL

Well... I "do" care about what you've said. Really. No, really.

******************************
There are no shortcuts to any place worth going. - Beverly Sills

 
 Respond to this message   

TS
(Login Toreadorssong)
NFCS Member

You make wonderful points on a regular basis, VC!

December 8 2009, 10:19 PM 

I mean that. Your contribution on this forum has been invaluable. Sometimes we disagree (though not so often), but on the whole I find your posts impassioned, eloquent and logical. So don't be surprised!

TS

Be not the slave of your own past. Plunge into the sublime seas, dive deep and swim far, so you shall come back with self-respect, with new power, with an advanced experience that shall explain and overlook the old.
Ralph Waldo Emerson

TS's Blog:http://tsvocaltech.blogspot.com

 
 Respond to this message   
 
  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to index  
Find more forums on Network54Create your own forum at Network54
 Copyright © 1999-2017 Network54. All rights reserved.   Terms of Use   Privacy Statement  

All posts are © their original authors.