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CF and GSA coaches, did you watch the EURO final?

July 1 2012 at 5:48 PM
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Anonymous 

 
Soccer is a game of skill. None of those guys have NFL bodies. Teach the game the right way. Parents will flock to your clubs.

 
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Anonymous

The game is not something you learn from a teacher,

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July 1 2012, 6:19 PM 

It is inherited -- just like crop; when one has a good crop , all you do is water it and let it grow.


Flock are for lambs and they get slaughtered


 
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Anonymous

The only reason anybody goes to the afore mentioned teams

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July 1 2012, 6:22 PM 

Is for brand recognition, not coaches or training hence the business model

 
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Anonymous

You mean...

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July 1 2012, 7:38 PM 

that having the biggest and fastest kids doesnt win a soccer game? Maybe you get away with that in the youth levels, but as you get later skills override.


 
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Anonymous

Spain isn't big but they have speed

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July 1 2012, 7:56 PM 

Collectively they have plenty of speed but their quickness is more important to their style than straightline speed. They create all manner of havoc for defenders given the style they play.

Big and strong doesn't matter nearly as much as speed and agility.

 
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Anonymous

No one is faster than the ball

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July 1 2012, 8:15 PM 

They pick you apart with 10-15 yard passes, size and speed doesn't help the opposing team to negate Spain

 
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Anonymous

Speed and quickess will negate slower players. Size isn't the factor

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July 1 2012, 10:09 PM 

Spain has speed to take advantage of their passing game on angles of attack as they open otherwise a faster defense will be able to close off the angles and put more pressure on the attack.

The system is beautiful to watch but they have a lot of guys who can run on the field. If they wanted to play direct soccer, they could do it but why bother when nobody can stop what they do so well.

 
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Anonymous

If playing a direct style was more effective

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July 1 2012, 10:22 PM 

They would do it. But it's not so they don't.

Direct is easier to learn to play but an inferior style vs a team that has soccer skills.

 
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Anonymous

speed matters phttt!

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July 1 2012, 11:32 PM 

To play this game you need immaculate touch, high work rate,creativity,vision,and you need to be able to read the game faster than your opponent (anticiapate).These things can not be coached I dont care who the coach or teacher is. This is the area where Spain beats everyone.Speed,agility,and size,those traits are great ,however they can be negated by the player who is very creative and seems to know what will happen before it even happens.Elite futbal players are born not made!

 
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EuGene

Bourne a gain

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July 2 2012, 12:03 AM 

by frequent, consistent, early, and multiple sessions to develop TOUCH and TIMING and TEAM play. If we only relied on the beautiful blob that comes forth during birth, humanity would have disappeared long ago. Boom ball, TNT, and the so called "Big Bang" theory are all limited by human and earthly force. Tell Pirlo or any of the Spaniards they don't need to train, because they were born with skills. See what kind of response you get from the likes of Zidane or Beckham. Selling out business and trade secrets to other countries has nothing to do with American DNA. The United States has plenty of potential soccer prospects. Putting it all together is the key. We could watch and learn a few things from the past week of Euro soccer.

 
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Anonymous

Hold that thought...for another 30-40 years

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July 2 2012, 12:16 AM 

From ESPN - The Magazine

Until the 1970s, the U.S. soccer team was not so good. Since then, its rise has been inexorable, as the chart shows. The cumulative winning percentage of the national team eclipsed .500 for the first time in 2006, during a spectacular decade that saw the squad reach the World Cup quarterfinals in 2002. But when will the U.S. actually lift the trophy? To answer that, we let the numbers do the kicking. Since 1970, the cumulative winning percentage of the eventual World Cup winner going into the tournament has averaged .669; the highest was .728 (Brazil, 2002), and the lowest was .625 (France, 1998). If we extrapolate the remarkably consistent progression of Team USA, it should take another 30 years (2042) for the team to break the minimum Cup threshold -- and another decade to achieve even odds. America's soccer moment is coming. Although, look out -- the Chinese probably won't be far behind. -- Stefan Szymanski, co-author of Soccernomics

 
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Anonymous

You read well?

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July 2 2012, 3:42 AM 

Well no where in my must have list did I mention that all you have to do is walk on the field and Bang you are an elite player. But if you can train me some creativity,and vision I will kiss Messi's ***. What an incoherent rant you went on to say " oh damn I gotta train"?There are some things the best of the best have that the rest of us dont.That can not be taught or coached.Train all you want to but you have a limit to your potential.Some have higher limits than others At the highest levels of sports the only difference is the mental part of the game. Cant teach that its a gift.

 
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Anonymous

really too bad

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July 2 2012, 6:27 AM 

that many youth club coaches train the wrong things, then.. opportunity lost in many cases.

 
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MonsieurDuncan

So if

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July 2 2012, 7:46 AM 

you have a full grown man trying to dunk a basketball in the NBA from the height of 5'3" and the typical soccer build, it is mental? Oh yeah, you are ripe. Fruit has a finite destiny with limited shelf life, but no matter when it is ready to be plucked, the apple will always fall down. When people grown wings or come equipped with jet packs, they may overcome gravity temporarily. Spain has a good ground game as they use their heads wisely.

 
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OP

Awesome Post, EUGENE

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July 2 2012, 7:43 AM 

I am a high school teacher. I have found that what ever we value, the kids will produce.
Right now, Atlanta's "top" coaches love feeding it to the big, fast forward at the expense of team play. My son is a midfielder with nascent creative passing skills. He gets reemed for playing one-two or EVER passing it back. His new coach tells him to boom it down the line even if nobody is there. You laugh, but this guy has won a lot at very high levels. He is terrible for our kids and the sport. Our games are uglier than hell and joyless. We will never raise U.S. technical skill with guys like him in charge.

 
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Anonymous

More than just a coach problem

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July 2 2012, 9:32 AM 

The problem with youth soccer right now is bigger than just the coaches. It's a business. It begins with the consumer (parents) who, for the most part, want to win. The clubs then focus on winning, not skill development. The clubs provide a $ incentive to coaches who win and move up levels at a young age, so the coach is likely to pick kids who help him/her win and teach skills needed to win games. Do you really think that people will flock to a club that is teaching kids to pass (not score goals so their parents can brag) and working on everyone's skills (even the smaller kid who's fast but hasn't developed yet) and working on passing in the back (which means the other team can score on your mistakes and end up winning)? Sadly, I don't think so. There are a few coaches/teams here and there focusing on the right things at the young ages, but they are typically not at the big clubs or the big name coaches. Until there are enough parents demanding the right type of training and ready to sacrifice being the #1 team at U9, it will never occur on a big scale.

 
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Anonymous

You are the chumps

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July 2 2012, 9:55 AM 

if you focus on wins and stats for tweeners instead of real development, which includes love (PASSION) for the game and its people. No 12 year old kid is ready for the big time anywhere or anytime. Quit misleading them and shutting down the natural desire to get better on their own. No single coach can lead the little pony to the proverbial pond of prowess. It is not about you or your team or your club.

 
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Anonymous

AMEN

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July 3 2012, 12:36 AM 

It is ultimately up to the individual player as to the level he/she reaches.Tons of individual on their own work needs to be done to reach the highest levels!

 
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