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Review of Ken Burn's "The War"

September 25 2007 at 11:53 AM
  (Login stringbag)
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(Login huxley602)
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I disagree...

September 25 2007, 12:45 PM 

I think the limited scope is the only way this film could be made.

I have been studying WWII since I was a kid and I bet I have yet to even scratch the surface on the topic.

It is an infinite topic. 15 hours, 15 days or perhaps even 15 years could not cover the war and leave every stone unturned.

I think even today we cannot grasp the size of this war.

Just my thoughts of course... but I ahve enjoyed what I have seen so far and have learned some of the lesser stories which may have never come out otherwise.

Huxley

 
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Glenn
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I agree with Hux....

September 26 2007, 9:15 AM 

This is but one person's opinion on this War series. I believe far more can be learned about the war when taken from an individual's perspective, namely what he or she actually encountered during the war years. So many millions were affected in so many different ways, and on so many levels. How many stories can be told? This really does only scratch the surface, but I am enjoying the series.

 
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Huxley
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That being said...

September 26 2007, 10:18 AM 

I realized that there was a huge gaff in the first episode.

They spoke of the five Sullivan Brothers who all died on the USS Juneau off of Guadacanal.

They mistakenly listed them as from Fredericksburg, Iowa... they were actually from Waterloo, Iowa.

It would be o.k. except it may be inconvenient to move the Sullivan Brothers Covention Center and the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veteran's Museum (all in Waterloo) to Fredericksburg...

Regardless... I have enjoyed the series to this point.

Huxley
Dyersville, Iowa
(Home of the Field of Dreams Movie Site... but NOT the Sullivan Brothers)

 
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(Login EWJ)
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Ken Burns

September 28 2007, 11:55 AM 

Insular is a good word to describe this series. Parochial is another. Typical Mainstream American attitude is probably best.

This year I was invited to provide the liaison for the reenactor community and the State of Minnesota for their dedication of the WWII memorial. Yes it’s took them 62 years to get their act together for this. First meeting I went to I was told “We don’t want any Germans to come” which is fair. I asked if they wanted any Allies. “No this is a purely American affair” and went on to tell me “…you have to understand is the war didn’t start until December 1941”. I responded “I wish I could have told my grandfather that he wasn’t killed during the ‘Battle’ of France in 1940, know it wasn’t WWII would have made him feel really differently about the affair.” I didn’t walk out.

I did, however, find something else to watch.

 
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Huxley
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Exactly as advertised...

October 2 2007, 9:11 AM 

If you were to read the opening lines, it states that is the war from the perspective of four AMERICAN towns... Sacramento, CA, Mobile, AL, Luverne, MN and Waterbury, CT.

From this perspective the documentary does an excellent job telling their stories and their relationship to the bigger picture of the war.

As a history "buff" I revel in any chance to see the war from a different perspective.

I would look forward to seeing a similar offering from the other side of the pond... and not criticize it outright as insular or parochial.

Give it a chance... I think you may learn something about Americans that you may not have known. You are surrounded by them now you know! LOL!

As far as your experience with the Minnesota memorial... if it is a memorial to MINNESOTA veterans of the war I would understand their insistence on the dates and focus on their own.

Sorry about your grandfather... and at least most on this forum know of the sacrifice and hardships that your countrymen went through during their war period from 1939 until 1945.

All the best -

Huxley


 
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(Login AirMarshall)
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Re: Ken Burns

October 2 2007, 10:26 AM 

Hux is again correct. If the USA was but an island nation as Great Britain, and was brought into a war via treaty in 1939, as was bombed continuously, and at one point for 90 consercutive days, we here would certainly have a different mindset and attitude. But that was not the case. The United States did not experince a "Blitz". If the United States did not enter the war on all fronts, what then? What if it did not become a bastion of production for both material and manpower for the allies? Would that be parochial and mainstream? You were respected and invited to Minnesota to provide liason, not to provide opinion towards Americans. This may be a pro-Commonwealth Forum, but there are many Americans here as well, and some very proud of what was accomplished "together" during WWII.....If the Burns program is not to your liking, get your popcorn and watch Piece of Cake again......No offense taken here, just an opinion as you voiced yours. This is an incredible forum. My prayers and thanks offered to your Grandfather.

 
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(Login stringbag)
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MPT's profile on a WAAF have a look!

September 28 2007, 2:56 PM 

Nice to see a public television station doing a more thorough Veteran profiles!

http://www.mpt.org/thewar/profiles/hotz.html

 
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