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Boys versus girls - who is naughtier?

February 16 2010 at 6:03 AM

KK 

 
Excerpts from:

Boys Achievement: A Synthesis of the Data


The focus of this report is on boys participation, engagement and achievement at different levels of education.

Author: Learning Policy Frameworks, Ministry of Education

Date Published: December 2007

http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/publications/schooling/25052/4

Chapter 3 - School Disengagement

Regular school attendance is essential to encourage all young people to stay at school until at least the age of 16 and benefit from being there. This chapter aims to create a picture of gender differences in student disengagement from school by considering information regarding truancy, early leaving exemptions, stand-downs, suspensions, exclusions and expulsions.

Key Findings

* Truancy rates have increased from 2004 to 2006 but there are no differences by gender. However, the truancy rate is higher for Maori and Pasifika boys than NZ European and Asian boys. This is also true for girls.

* Males are stood-down and suspended more frequently than females. Gender differences exist across all ethnic groupings but Maori and Pasifika students have the highest rates of stand-downs and suspensions and the largest gender difference.

* The formal removal (exclusion and expulsion) of students from school is principally a male problem, with Maori and Pasifika males having the highest rates.

* Males account for 62% of all early leaving exemptions. Maori males have the highest rate, with 20 % of Maori males granted early leave. Males granted early leave are more likely to go into full-time employment than females granted early leave.

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Jenny

Re: Boys versus girls - who is naughtier?

February 16 2010, 2:05 PM 



* Truancy rates have increased from 2004 to 2006 but there are no differences by gender.

Is that no difference in rates or rate of increase?

* Males are stood-down and suspended more frequently than females.

So boys are more likely to be stood down (expelled?) than girls but it says nothing about which is the worse behaved.

* Males account for 62% of all early leaving exemptions. Maori males have the highest rate, with 20 % of Maori males granted early leave. Males granted early leave are more likely to go into full-time employment than females granted early leave.

So the boys want to leave and start work (good for them) but the girls just want to leave.

That doesn't tell us much. The first point isn't clear and other points simply show which sex is more likely to be punished: which doesn't necessarily correlate with their respective levels of misbehaviour.

When I was at school it seemed that overall levels of misbehaviour were about equal. That could be due to the fact both boys and girls were likely to receive equal punishments. The type of misbehaviour was sometimes different. For example, not many boys broke the rules regarding make-up and fewer boys than girls broke the rules regarding jewellery.


 
 
 
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