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DHEA info (not sure if I've posted this before)

November 21 2005 at 9:48 PM
Elaine  (no login)

 
Hi everyone

I have been researching DHEA now for some months. I have been in fairly regular contact with Dr Gleicher and have compiled a list of questions and answers that I have asked him and his responses.

If anyone has any further questions I'd be happy to contact him... I have now been taking DHEA for 6 weeks and hope to cycle again in Feb/Mar...

Here it is:

The following are questions I have asked Dr Norbert Gleicher and his exact responses:

Is the dosage 75 mg per day?:
Yes, 75mg is daily and we usually prescribe it as 50mg in AM and 25 mg in PM.

Period of time to be taking DHEA before trying another stim cycle:
DHEA peaks in its effects after at least 4 months (maybe even a little later). Consequently, if the patient’s age allow it, we will wait for 3-4 months before starting a cycle. In this waiting period we have seen more spontaneous pregnancies than in subsequent IVF cycles. We, therefore, encourage relationships during this time. If patients are over age 43, and we don’t have time to wait, we try to get at least one month of DHEA in before cycle start.

What protocol do you put the patients on after they have been treated with DHEA:
We always use a microdose GnRH-agonist protocol, followed by stimulation with 600 IU of gonadotropins daily, with those split between FSH (450 IU) and hMG (150 IU). If patients are above age 42, we do not pretreat with OCPs; if they are younger, we do.

What is the treatment with OCP's before hand. Is that birth control pills?? And why do you treat with these?
We pretreat most patients with 10-14 days of Aygestin, though this is not absolutely necessary and, indeed, in many, especially older, patients we don’t do this because of its depressive effects on the ovary. The potential benefit is less cyst formation and therefore less cycle cancellations for cysts. (Aygestin is a form of progestin, a synthetic substance that chemically resembles progesterone, that may be prescribed in ovulation induction therapies to inhibit ovulation and quiet the ovaries in advance of egg stimulation using injectable hormones. This "down time" helps the ovaries respond better to treatment. In much the same way that oral contraceptives prevent pregnancy by inhibiting normal ovulation, Aygestin is used in IVF and related procedures to turn off the body's natural ovulatory cycle).

When do patients stop taking DHEA?:
"Patients stop their DHEA once they have a confirmed positive pregnancy test".

Does DHEA cause any problems to a developing fetus?:
"There is no evidence to suggest that DHEA is harmful. PCOD patients, who get pregnant all the time, have very high DHEA levels".

"Pregnancy, itself, is a high DHEA state since the placenta is a "DHEA factory."

Is there any change to the luteal phase support with DHEA?:
"DHEA does not change the routine luteal phase support".

Have any of your patients to date suffered any adverse side effects from taking 75mg of DHEA per day?
The one side effect we have seen is transitional acne.

Will I need some kind of monitoring (ie blood tests) whilst taking the DHEA?
We don’t recommend any blood tests because normal ranges for DHEA are very wide. We do recommend, however, that our patients be sexually active while taking DHEA as we have seen a very significant number of spontaneous pregnancies in patients waiting to go into IVF.

Not sure that I want to know the answer to this question, but here goes, have there been any of your patients who have shown no improvement in cycles after being treated with DHEA?
Yes, there are some patients who don’t respond but they are more frequently seen amongst the older patients.

I know that number of eggs retrieved relates strongly with the success rate with IVF, does this apply to those taking and responding well with DHEA?
Retrieved egg numbers, indeed, correlate to success in pregnancy.

Elaine
www.preciousbabyangels.com

 
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thump
(no login)

thank you for posting this info -- it was extremely informative and very kind of you ..nt

November 21 2005, 11:19 PM 

nt

 
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Detny
(no login)

Here's one...

November 21 2005, 11:49 PM 

Does DHEA have any effect, one way or the other, on FSH?

Thanks for posting these wonderful questions and answers!

 
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mm
(no login)

I don't think it lowers fsh

November 22 2005, 6:59 AM 

I took it for 3 mths prior to my 3rd ivf and my fsh was 15.2 (up from 11.7 at ivf#2)


 
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Kimberle
(no login)

i have one, too..

November 22 2005, 4:54 AM 

thanks for posting that, i'm seriously considering it now....

Can you ask what effects it has on women w/advanced endo? I don't know if there's a correlation but i'd be curious to know before i start taking it....

thanks!

Kimberle

 
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Morvern
(no login)

I wouldn't take DHEA if you have endo

November 22 2005, 8:23 AM 

Endo is worsened by high levels of estrogen and DHEA boosts estrogen levels.

This site is singing the praises of DHEA but it says at the bottom
"people suffering from benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), cancer, and endometriosis should not take DHEA."

http://www.worldhealth.net/p/aadr-dhea-dehydroepiandrosterone.html

 
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Anonymous
(no login)

On the Over 40 board

November 22 2005, 10:49 AM 

I've seen a couple of women with endo who took DHEA posting that it didn't worsen it. Don't think they had really severe endo though.

 
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sleo
(no login)

question -- any reason for under 40's not to take it?

November 22 2005, 8:23 AM 

My question is, even if it's not proven to be effective in women under 40, does he recommend that all high FSH women take it, just in case? Is there any downside?

 
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Elaine
(no login)

Lastest Results Published

November 22 2005, 2:34 PM 

I'm not sure why you think DHEA is not recommended for under 40's, but thought I post a snippet of the latest findings:

What this analysis demonstrated is that women with prematurely aging ovaries, under age 38 years, have excellent pregnancy chances with the use of DHEA. Women with prematurely aging or physiologically aged ovaries, between ages 39 and 42 years also still have surprisingly good pregnancy rates, though lower than the former group. Above age 42, the establishment of pregnancy is difficult, even with DHEA, though our oldest ongoing pregnancy is in a patient who was age 45 years at time of conception.

Elaine
www.preciousbabyangels.com

 
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sleo
(no login)

thanks for clearing that up

November 23 2005, 5:45 AM 

I thought I had read in a bunch of earlier posts that DHEA was being recommended only for women around 40 (not sure I have the exact age right), but it looks like I was wrong so thanks for clearing that up.

 
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