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Somewhat puzzled photos from Lange's website (pics)

February 3 2005 at 2:06 AM

RT  (Login RTsai)
AP Discussion Group

I was browsing Lange's website earlier today and came across the section "How Lange watches are made", which contains a step-by-step manufacturing processes of a Lange. Here's a photo from the initial asssembly stage of a Lange 1 movement, and the watchmaker is wearing finger-cots so that his fingerprints will not appear on the movement plate.



What really surprised me was the following photo from the re-assembly stage. Here the watchmaker is trying to fit the movement and the dial into the case. But noticed that the watchmaker is touching the dial with his bare fingers, and his fingerprints will most likely appear on the dial once finished.



This really puzzled me as I would assume that the watchmakers wear finger-cots at all times when their fingers come into contact with the inner parts of a watch? I hope this was an unintentional mistake as I certianly wouldn't want the dial of my Lange to be installed this way. Hopefully Lange can take notice of this and change the picture soon.

Regards,


 
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Farhad
(no login)

Very interesting and

February 3 2005, 7:40 AM 

good observation, I must say that Lange must also start taking notice of a few more things.
I sent a e-mail off to them a few weeks ago asking them for some information and they have not even bothered to reply me , where as here I am trying to intruduce the Lange brand to friends of mine who knew no better that PP, VC and AP .
Another friend of mine has just bought a GP watch for the auction on the web , he wrote to GP and the very next day he got all the information he needed along with a thank you e-mail from the company as well for his interest.
I must admit that I love my Lange1 and most of their watches but this sort of attitude towards their customers is IMHO not acceptable.
L&S make great watches but now they have possibly found new markets to sell their products , I do not want to mention these nouveau riche countries but who knows how long it will last.
Regards
Farhad

 
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Anonymous
(Login octop8)
PP Discussion Group

Re: Very interesting and

February 3 2005, 7:55 AM 

I find it interesting you refer to "nouveau riche" countries, which ones might you be referring to???

 
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RT
(no login)

Farhad send me an e-mail and I will see what I can do to help you (click on my name).

February 3 2005, 12:39 PM 

nt

 
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Gary
(Login stanwich)

My experience differed

February 3 2005, 1:03 PM 

Farhad,

Sorry to hear about your recent experiences trying to communicate with Lange. Last year, I had an issue that needed to be taken care of with my Lange 1 moonphase and Lange in Germany responded same day to my inquiries by e-mail and was extremely helpful and also sent follow-up e-mails to ensure all was OK. I was really satisfied with their attitude and responsiveness (which contrasted with my experiences with PP). By the way, I reside in New York as an FYI. Hope you get better response soon.

--Gary

 
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Edwin H. Heusinkveld
(Login EdHe)
PP Discussion Group

good observation but...

February 3 2005, 11:36 AM 

isnt it the material of which the movement is made (German silver or Alpacca) that reacts to accids and the like found on a human vinger. The dial, made from 'plain' silver and the case (gold or Pt) arent that prone to react.

Not the best expenation but you prob. get my intention. It would have been (much) nicer though if Lange would have taken all photographs with those 'finger-cots' as you call them.

Regards,

Edwin

 
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RT
(no login)

The "finger-cots" was borrowed from one of John Davis' reviews, just to be clear. nt

February 3 2005, 12:42 PM 

nt

 
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steveluk
(no login)

Nothing to worry about...

February 3 2005, 1:28 PM 

Edwin is right, the reason why they wear the "finger-cots" is to avoid touching the German silver directly, this material is very sensitive to oil and other impurities which may be found on our finger tips. If the German silver is "contaminated", it'll tarnish or discolour as time goes by. I believe what you see in the pictures is unintentional mistakes. I've visited the Lange factory a few times and never seen anyone assemble the movements without their fingers covered. They are supremely carefully about that. No sweat!

As for the problem with communicationwith Lange, I'm sure we all have very different experiences. In all fairness, I'd assume that everybody at the factory are extremely busy at the moment in preparing for the SIHH in April, this is not the best time of the year to get in touch with them as they're all fully engaged in other things. Personally I've never had any problem getting my Lange serviced. Hope what you experienced is just an isolated incident.

 
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damien
(Login dalim)
AP Discussion Group

Uncharacteristic lack of attention to details

February 3 2005, 1:11 PM 

Roger, when you look at the first picture, the right hand should arguably also be doning finger-cots. The movement holder just seems kinda small and precaution is always better given that Lange's reputation has been built on quality of finish.

Apart from fingerprints/smudges, the lack of finger-cots in the second picture also seems like an invitation for hairline scratches unless watchmakers have regular manicures. I'm basing this on highly subjective data and a population of one - I don't use tools in my work but my fingers are pretty rough; I've left hairline scratches on the case just from winding my watch.

On Farhad's point, I too can't help but feel that with the tremendous rise in popularity of mechanical timepieces, there has been some slippage in manufacturers service quality. Maybe it's just my tough luck but I've had a week old watch stop on me, another still in the factory after the first service failed to fix the problem (it's been almost 6 month), and another with a crown that refuses to screw down any more. All this in a 6 month period.

 
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farhad
(no login)

Damien,

February 3 2005, 2:02 PM 

I sympathize with you for the problems you have had with your watches and hope they sort it out soon but I must say that both my Langes the 1815 and L1 have had no technical problems and have been good time keepers.
May be my question to Lange was of a nature they were not willing to discuss.
The gentleman with the anonymous post , there is no need to worry, the reason I did not mention any countries is because I did not want to offend anyone, it does not matter where you buy your Lange ,good customer service is always important IMHO.
regards
Farhad
Thank you Roger, I have sent you an e-mail.

 
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damien
(no login)

My Lange is fine...

February 4 2005, 11:06 PM 

Hi Farhad, just a quick clarification that my watch woes are with other makes. My L1 is running a little fast but not some enough to make me send it in.

 
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SuitbertW
(Login wsw_de)

Some info on "finger protections"......

February 3 2005, 3:02 PM 

Hi Damien,
one problem with pictures like this, they are very often not made under "real life" circumstances. Perhaps the photographer just asked the watchmaker (and perhaps it even wasn't a watchmaker.. ) "...could you please place your hands closed to the watch now..." just because he wanted to "compose" it this way? Very often the tools visible in the pictures don't make a lot of sense for the work presented in the same picture for example.
I'm sure the people creating websites, ads....don't have an idea what we, watch crazy people, try to read out of their pictures.

As for the finger protections, the usual way to use them is on the left hand only and as shown two fingers (thumb and index finger).
The right hand doesn't touch the movement directly at all and working with the screw drivers and tweezers with the rubber protections is very uncomfortable to impossible.
Wearing the finger protections is standard for nearly all processes and industry wide - has nothing to do with german silver in special as finger prints and sweat are a strict "no no" in any case.
The harm done to german silver is nothing to what happens to steel parts on the long view.

The movement holder is a special tool designed for this special caliber, as usual - it isn't too small like you mention. In this special picture in question, the right hand holds a small knob of the movement holder while the left hand touches the plate - no direct contact to the movement with the right hand.

Incredible which sort of discussion can be created by some pictures from a website ....


Best regards
Suitbert

 
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damien
(no login)

Re: Some info on "finger protections"......

February 4 2005, 11:13 PM 

Hi Suitbert

Congratulations on your appointment as moderator of the PP forum.

Discussion started by just some pictures? WIS can talk about anything related to timepieces, as our significant others will testify to.

 
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SuitbertW
(Login wsw_de)

Thank you, Damien....

February 5 2005, 3:51 PM 

...and well, my comment was not exactly refering to pure fact that some pictures release a discussion - it's more the kind of conclusions beeing the outcome of this pictures...
Someone really should make the photographer aware of this discussion here. He'll be shocked....

Best regards
Suitbert

 
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jtbradley
(Login jtbradley)
PP Discussion Group

Uh...guys, do think for a moment that this is someone other than just a hand model?

February 3 2005, 5:49 PM 

This may be unrepresentative of the actual process. I suspect that the photo merely depicts a hand model posing for a picture.

John

 
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Anthony Tsai
(Login AnthonyTsai)
AP Discussion Group

The hand model needs to cut his fingernails :) (nt)

February 3 2005, 11:11 PM 

.

.

 
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watching7
(no login)

Strange customers...

February 5 2005, 2:55 AM 

Sorry it sounds odd to me...

In other industries, enquiries, emails, snail mails, etc would have flooded into the manufacturer's customer service department, demanding for an explanation or clarification if it was indeed a hand model or the true process.

For Lange, we defend them!!!

 
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m
(Login mattiemattie)

if you need to know........

February 6 2005, 2:47 AM 

I always find the best approach to finding out somehting important is to make that personal call.......if you cannot see them in person, a phone call is the next best thing.....An email is at best a secondary soultion..I don't know how many emails get lost in the system...is you want to take it up with them about their less than enthusiastic response, then may I suggest you tag your emaill to them with a delivery notice from now onwards....and see how they react......

 
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