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More info about the 1968 hydraulic 2-bolt 427

June 4 2001 at 7:04 AM
Average Score 5.0 (3 people)

(Premier Login FEfinaticP)
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from IP address 64.3.243.34

 
Hi fellow FE’ers. I’ve been dormant for a while here on the forum, but having just gotten over a major hurdle that has been sucking away all my free time and keeping me up at night, I’ve got some time now to spend back with this great forum. (And from what I've been dealing with, this is great therapy, at last!!)

One thing I wanted to respond to in the past, but ran out of time, was the hydraulic 2-bolt 427 of 1968. I found some interesting info from a 1983 article in the old (large newspaper format) Autoweek “Escape Road” section, July 4 edition, and also a January 1999 edition of Musclecar Review (which I bought due to the 427 article).

The articles indicate Ford had intentions of offering the “fabulous 427 side-oiler” as an option for the Mustang, in order to give the Stang the top cubic inch performance image in the ponycar field of 1968. Autoweek says: “Remembering 1967, Chevrolet had toped Ford’s 390 Thunderbird Special with its famous 396 big block in its Camaro. Ford then trumped Chevy’s Porcupine headed 396 with its 427 powerhouse, an engine which had earned a world-famous record of durability at the 24-hour LeMans Grand Prix (in 1966 and 1967 in the Cobras)- as well as on the stock car racing tracks in the fastback Galaxies”.

Of course, we all know the LeMans was won by the GT-40’s and not the Cobra’s, and so should have Autoweek writer Jerry Heasley. Heasley continues: “Since the Cougar had been using the same performance engines as the Mustang, then quite naturally, the little Mercury would also have the 427 in its lineup. However, the strange marketing strategy which followed was that Ford Division did not promote the 427 in the Mustang, but Lincoln-Mercury Divisiion did in its Cougar. Apparently, Ford was worried about warranty problems with 427 Mustangs, as already, the four-speed was unavailable with the 427, and the engine had been de-tuned with lower-revving hydraulic lifters (as opposed to the solid lifters seen in the earlier production 427s), and a two-bolt main bearing block as opposed to the famous cross-bolt block with four-bolt mains.”

Power numbers for the 2-bolt hydraulic were 390 HP at 5600 RPM, and 460 foot-pounds of torque at 3200 RPM, still a very potent engine. Midway through 1968 the 27 was changed out to the 428 in the Cougar, and only 358 of the 602 GT-E’s were the “W-code” 427 powered.

The Musclecar Review article mirrors the numbers, but adds the note that compression was 10.9:1 and quarter mile time was 15.1 with a C-6 automatic transmission.

I recall another article about the 1968 427 Cougar GT-E somewhere, and it had a photograph of the car cornering with the front tire smoking from the load. Wish I could find it.

Ford was concerned about putting a high powered 427 in the Mustang with a 4-speed due to the obvious results; a lot of blown up engines and recalls. With the 4-speeds, people would obviously be out there “proving the point” with the equipment, and this would require high RPM action. Automatic transmissions have a way of knowing when to shift, despite adrenaline and a planted right foot. Standard 4-speeds rely on the big nut located behind the steering wheel, and this is far less reliable a factor than the automatic tranny, when considering the so-called “general public”. It is a puzzle to me as to why Ford chose to eliminate the 4-bolt main bearing configuration for the “detuned 390 HP” Cougar GT-E in favor of a 2-bolt design when power was still up there in the 390 HP range. Perhaps this has more to do with the forces encountered with the higher RPM reached with the solid lifter motors, rather than horsepower ratings, and also probably due to the fact that high RPM wouldn’t be encountered with the automatic tranny. Who knows. Guess they saved a couple bucks per engine, and I guess the 4-bolt configuration really wasn’t needed in this application.

Thought you guys would be interested in hearing about this. Time to crawl back under my rock.

Regards, P








 
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Theo
(Login racecrafterFE)
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195.252.157.38

Glad you you've overcome that major hurdle, keep on the good work, thanx. n m

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June 4 2001, 12:38 PM 

nm

Theo (Germany)


 
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Jake
(Login FordFan)
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209.240.221.77

2 BOLT 68 427 B/S.....

Average Score 1.0 (9 people)
June 5 2001, 5:50 AM 

You and Theo need to crawl back under a rock. The 68 390/427 was a crossbolt block. Theo your just as stupid on this forum as the other one. Go back over there and spread you stupid remarks.

 
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P
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64.3.243.34

BS, eh? How come I have the reference data ?

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June 5 2001, 7:01 AM 

What do you have, a motor from another car, stuffed in a 68 Cougar?

There is a lot of reference about the two-bolt 427, and I certainly don't want to spread around incorrect info, but hey, I can read. There was a lot of info posted a while back regarding this subject too, and you might want to look that up before you attempt to re-write history.

Give me some facts, BS is easy to find, it's everywhere.

P

 
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Alan Casida
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I own one. So there!

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June 5 2001, 10:22 AM 

I have a two bolt hydraulic 427 block in my garage. It is an industrial block however. It has the bosses for the crossbolt caps and it is drilled for hydraulic lifters. It is at least a 66 block as it has 66-427 cast on the back of the block as well as HP427 in the lifter valley. It also has the squared off cylinders inside the water jackets. I believe it came off an irrigation pump in western Kansas.

 
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P
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64.3.243.34

The mystery continues!

Score 5.0 (1 person)
June 5 2001, 11:58 AM 

It never ceases to amaze me how Ford built the 427 "to order", for industrial use, for specific marine use, etc., and in two bolt configuration "to save a buck er two". Why in the blazes would an irrigation pump need the 427 cubic inches, when a 390 had more meat around the bores and would probabaly have worked just as well.....why the 427? Probably has as much logic associated with it as a "business contact" or an "accounting decision".

Great info though, thanx for sharing it with us, now I know of two places that used the 2-bolt, the 1968 Cougar and the Kansas irrigation pumps! (They must have been one hell of a good lookin pump, eh?)



P

 
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Royce Peterson
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1968 Cougar 427's were crossbolted. I own two of them. Your information is faulty.

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June 6 2001, 3:16 PM 

Please don't quote clueless magazine articles as if they had some basis in fact. The 427 1968 Mustang and Shelby didn't exist so speculating on why is pointless and a waste of time. The 427 Cougar GTE's were produced and many original cars are documented and several are still in the original owner's garages. All are crossbolted and hydraulic lifter equipped side oilers. There were 357 427 Cougars built in 1968. About 155 are known to exist.

Royce Peterson
68 427 GTE Cougars (two of them)
68 1/2 Cougar 428 CJ Ram Air

 
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P
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No, you own one of em (one 427 and one 428) N/m

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June 7 2001, 7:17 AM 

.

 
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P
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64.3.243.34

Original equipment?

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June 7 2001, 7:24 AM 

Now I wouldn't want to rile a 427 Cougar by suggesting his motor only had one testicle, but I do have two articles written by different automotive journalists that say the same thing, written 17 years apart.

In 33 years, are you sure you have original equipment? It sounds stupid to me that Ford would take the time to adjust the 427 to a 2-bolt configuration, however, stranger things were done.

Perhaps there's is some truth to it. Your post is not as convincing as the articles. Got anything to back it up other than a growl?

P

 
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RJP
(Login RJP)
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198.81.17.156

No mystery here, simple explaination

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June 6 2001, 4:11 PM 

Ford used blocks that were rejected for car or racing use due to casting porosity, core shift, casting fissures or other defects that wouldn't make much difference in a irrigation pump, vineyard fan or some other stationary unit that usually runs at a consistent speed and load. This is why you can find many oddball parts such as undersize cranks and oversize pistons in many of these engines. Bores that were flawed @ std. or cranks that wouldn't machine to std. specs. This was Ford's way of saving money and parts. So your industrial 427 may not be such a good buy afterall. Sorry.

 
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Alan Casida
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65.193.82.253

No argument there

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June 6 2001, 6:24 PM 

I am aware of the pitfalls of industrial blocks. Needless to say I payed very little for it. I live within a half days drive of Gess Machine in Nebraska and when I get ready to use I am going to let them check it over first. I was just wanting to see if I could get anyone fired up!LOL

 
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Anonymous
(Login digger460)
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Untitled

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June 6 2001, 9:03 PM 

I found a 360 block(thats what the owner told me) with the 427 66 upside down on the back of the block. No cross bolts and no bosses, so what could that be? Hyd. lifters,didn't see any oil lines along the side of the block.

 
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Royce Peterson
(Login RoyceP)
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63.87.74.235

It's a 360. Many engines used the rear face with 427-66 cast in.

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June 7 2001, 3:32 AM 

Ford used the rear face mold with 427 - 66 cast into it on all FE sizes after 1966 randomly. Like many other casting marks it is meaningless. I have owned 390's and 428 CJ's with that casting.

Royce Peterson
68 Cougar GTE 427 (two of them)
68 1/2 Cougar 428 CJ

 
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Alan Casida
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You're so bright I bet your Dad calls you son!!!

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June 7 2001, 7:49 AM 

If you would have read my message closer you have seen I said it was at least a 66 block because of that casting number. I did NOT say that made it a 427. It is a standard bore 427 and my main indication of it being a 427 was the squared off cylinders and the fact that it weighs about 25 lbs. more than my 428 block, which also has 66 427 cast into it.

 
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Royce
(Login RoyceP)
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173.218.248.122

LOL

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April 11 2014, 4:24 PM 

This thing still works!
[linked image]
1910 Model T Ford touring Red / Black
1914 Model T Ford touring Maroon / Black
1917 Model T Ford Torpedo runabout green
1915 Model T Ford touring Black of course!
1968 Mercury Cougar 428CJ Ram Air Red / Black/ Black
1968 Cougar XR7-G 390-2V X code Red / Black
1968 Cougar GTE 427 Augusta Green / Saddle
http://www.supermotors.net/vehicles/registry/15029/50071-2

 
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