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Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

August 21 2017 at 6:50 AM
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Prado   (Login PradoTLC)
Shaheens (Pakistan)

ISLAMABAD: President Donald Trump has finally made a decision on his new policy for Afghanistan and the region but is keeping it under wraps, though the White House says an official announcement in this regard will be made shortly.

There is certainly no good news for Pakistan with several US media outlets reporting that officials are speaking about Trump’s strategy which sees sending nearly 4,000 additional troops to Afghanistan while all military aid to Pakistan could also be stopped.

Trump an addict of Twitter through which he announces all major policy decisions said in a Tweet, “Important day spent at Camp David with our very talented Generals and military leaders. Many decisions made, including on Afghanistan”.

However, the Foreign Policy has reported that one of the reasons that draws Trump into this land-locked country is “abundant natural resources”.

The FP speaks about a meeting in July with the head
of an American chemical company that transformed his view of the US military presence in Afghanistan.

Exploiting the country’s abundant natural resources could result in an incredible economic windfall, Trump was told.

The publication points out that it was in this meeting that “Trump learned of the enormous wealth buried beneath Afghan soil: perhaps more than $1 trillion in untapped mineral resources in the form of copper, iron, and rare-earth metals.”

“Trump wants to be repaid,” said a source close to the White House. “He’s trying to see where the business deal is”, notes FP.

According to the publication in May, Erik Prince published an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal calling for an “East India Company approach” with a “viceroy” and private contractors.

Prince, whose idea captured the eye of Trump’s chief strategist, Steve Bannon, and other officials, was invited to the White House to outline his ideas.

Prince has since presented his case to lawmakers on Capitol Hill and in a Washington media blitz, arguing that it’s time for a new model after years of failure and frustration.

The tantalizing idea that Afghanistan’s mineral potential could transform the country and save the fragile Kabul government has proved elusive.

Gen. David Petraeus, who was commander of US-led troops in Afghanistan in 2010-2011, touted the country’s mineral wealth as offering “stunning potential.” But Afghanistan lacks the infrastructure of roads, trains, and bridges needed to extract the minerals, not to mention the security required to ensure private companies can operate safely the report adds.

Coveted rare-earth minerals in Afghanistan are located in Helmand province in the country’s southwest, most of which is now controlled by Taliban.

Moreover, commodity prices for iron and copper have sharply declined in recent years, and the Afghan government has been accused of corruption in some of its mining ventures.

“Whichever military proposal wins out, the mining idea remains a top priority for Trump. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross is currently conducting an overall assessment of mining opportunities in Afghanistan, while Tillerson, the former head of ExxonMobil, is looking at whether the country would be stable enough for long-term American investments”, notes FP.

Silver, the chemical executive who pitched Trump on the idea, said Afghanistan’s mineral wealth could provide a similar boost to the one China experienced during the 1990s.

“When China opened to the world in the early ’90s under Deng [Xiaoping]’s policy of global engagement, the sale of minerals formed the backbone of their GDP growth,” Silver told FP.

But the report cautions that though “Trump may want a deal that brings peace to Afghanistan, paving the way for economic opportunities, but it’s unclear how the White House believes it can persuade Kabul, regional powers, and key players — including Pakistan, Iran, China and Russia — to help broker a peace agreement.”

source:https://www.thenews.com.pk/print/224737-No-good-news-for-Pakistan-in-US-new-Afghan-policy

 
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Prado
(Login PradoTLC)
Shaheens (Pakistan)

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 21 2017, 6:50 AM 

QOUTE


Gen. David Petraeus, who was commander of US-led troops in Afghanistan in 2010-2011, touted the country’s mineral wealth as offering “stunning potential.” But Afghanistan lacks the infrastructure of roads, trains, and bridges needed to extract the minerals, not to mention the security required to ensure private companies can operate safely the report adds.

 
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WAFFer
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WAFFer

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 21 2017, 7:14 AM 

China is and always will be the reason the United States of North America is in Afghanistan.

 
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WAFFer
(Login PradoTLC)
Shaheens (Pakistan)

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 21 2017, 7:34 AM 

that is one of the reasons... but extraction of mineral wealth was always the real reason..

you really did not think it was bcos of some guys in with AK-47 and RPGs did you ?




    
This message has been edited by PradoTLC on Aug 21, 2017 8:47 AM


 
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WAFFer
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Shaheens (Pakistan)

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 21 2017, 7:34 AM 

Go home America, Taliban says in letter to Trump
The militants say the US president has recognised the errors of his predecessors by seeking a review of the US strategy for Afghanistan

Associated Press
Associated Press
August 15, 2017
Updated: August 15, 2017 12:42 PM
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Afghan security forces keep watch near the site of a US airstrike on a civilian vehicle in Haska Mina district, Nangarhar province, on August 12, 2017. Noorullah Shirzada / AFP
Afghan security forces keep watch near the site of a US airstrike on a civilian vehicle in Haska Mina district, Nangarhar province, on August 12, 2017. Noorullah Shirzada / AFP
The Taliban have sent an "open letter" to US president Donald Trump, reiterating their calls for the United States to leave Afghanistan after 16 years of war.

In a long and rambling note in English that was sent to journalists on Tuesday by Zabihullah Mujahid, the Taliban spokesman, the militants say Mr Trump has recognised the errors of his predecessors by seeking a review of the US strategy for Afghanistan.

Mujahid says the US president should not hand control of the US policy on Afghanistan to the military but instead announce the withdrawal of American troops — not an increase in troops as the Trump administration has planned.

The letter, which is 1,600 words long, also says a US withdrawal would "truly deliver American troops from harm's way" and bring about "an end to an inherited war".

The US has about 8,400 troops in Afghanistan and Mr Trump has so far resisted the Pentagon's recommendations to send almost 4,000 more to expand training of Afghan military forces and bolster US counterterrorism operations. The deployment has been held up amid broader strategy questions, including how to engage regional powers in an effort to stabilise Afghanistan.

What is evident is that the Afghan government has struggled to halt Taliban advances on its own and is now also battling an ISIL affiliate that has carved out a foothold, mostly in eastern Afghanistan. In its most recent report, the US Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction said the Taliban hold sway in nearly 50 per cent of the country.

The Taliban letter sought to flatter Mr Trump for initiating the Afghan policy review while warning against handing it to "warmongering generals".

"We have noticed that you have understood the errors of your predecessors and have resolved to thoroughly rethinking your new strategy in Afghanistan," it said. "You must also not hand over the Afghan issue to warmongering generals, but must make a decision where history shall remember you as an advocate of peace."

The letter gave a long list of complaints against Afghanistan's US-orchestrated unity government.

https://www.thenational.ae/world/asia/go-home-america-taliban-says-in-letter-to-trump-1.619879

 
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WAFFer
(Login ephialtes)
The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 21 2017, 7:41 AM 

For the international heroin poppy trade


Big source if income for via projects

 
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WAFFer
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WAFFer

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 21 2017, 8:01 AM 

PAckee sees no one gives a phuck about him or his country if he stops posting about it, so he goes and posts a stupid packee article about some issue no one gives a chit about.

Like a hooker standing on the street corner scratching her crotch every-time she sees a car pass by. Now it's mining natural resources from Afghanistan..and transporting them to where and how you inbred retard? From Pigletistan, which has no roads or rail and sees terror attacks daily, or Iran which is constantly fighting with America?

If there's anyone who is eyeing Afghanistan's resources its YOU and CHINA since Pakistan is probably the only country that cares to publish articles on minerals in its NEIGHBOURING country.

 
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WAFFer
(Login PradoTLC)
Shaheens (Pakistan)

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 21 2017, 8:45 AM 

********************For the international heroin poppy trade ***********

RE: it is a by product of what the US did of toppling the afgan taliban...

i doubt this was their primary objective. Keep in mind US and Afgan Taliban were pals... until things with Unocal piple line deal fell out....


Hamid Karzai was a Unocal employee....


    
This message has been edited by PradoTLC on Aug 21, 2017 8:49 AM


 
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WAFFer
(Login india66)
Satyameva Jayate (India)

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 21 2017, 3:50 PM 


PAckee sees no one gives a phuck about him or his country if he stops posting about it, so he goes and posts a stupid packee article about some issue no one gives a chit about.

Like a hooker standing on the street corner scratching her crotch every-time she sees a car pass by. Now it's mining natural resources from Afghanistan..and transporting them to where and how you inbred retard? From Pigletistan, which has no roads or rail and sees terror attacks daily, or Iran which is constantly fighting with America?

If there's anyone who is eyeing Afghanistan's resources its YOU and CHINA since Pakistan is probably the only country that cares to publish articles on minerals in its NEIGHBOURING country
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lol
Man I always like the way u response to the pardo the pig. You always stab him in the heart.
Poor Pardo the pig.

 
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WAFFer
(Login Avcitavsan)
WAFFer

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 21 2017, 4:33 PM 

^^^^^^^^

More proof the Chinese were the ones beating the Indians on that lake,,,,,seems this is the guy who copped the fly 'DRAGON' kick


    
This message has been edited by Avcitavsan on Aug 21, 2017 4:35 PM


 
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WAFFer
(Login Huelague2)
The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 22 2017, 12:06 AM 

Afghanistan has huge resources.

 
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WAFFer
(Login PradoTLC)
Shaheens (Pakistan)

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 22 2017, 6:55 AM 


******************More proof the Chinese were the ones beating the Indians on that lake,,,,,seems this is the guy who copped the fly 'DRAGON' kick
******************

RE: indians get beaten by every one... victory over the indians doesnt even count.

 
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WAFFer
(Login w00tnessz)
WAFFer

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 22 2017, 6:57 AM 

Like how you won in 1971 and secured free train ride back from East Pakistan for your 90,000 bravehearts?

[linked image]

 
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WAFFer
(Login PradoTLC)
Shaheens (Pakistan)

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 22 2017, 6:57 AM 


************Afghanistan has huge resources.****

RE: Yes, that is one of the secondary obect of CPEC to gain access and extract those resources.... Pakistan, Russia, China and iran are going to make sure US doesnt win... and of course their indian dog....

 
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WAFFer
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WAFFer

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 22 2017, 7:03 AM 

Yes, superpowa Pakistan who has lost every war its fought and supapowa china - whose soldiers run away at the sight of a fight will get together and mine resources in Afghanistan..LOL!

I'd like to see if you have the balls to go after it, now that Trump has cancelled withdrawal and increased troop count.

 
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Prado the truth seeker
(Login PradoTLC)
Shaheens (Pakistan)

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 22 2017, 7:08 AM 

'Afghanistan to become graveyard for US,' warn Taliban after Trump clears way for more troops

AFPAugust 22, 2017

https://i.dawn.com/large/2017/08/599bc0293e78a.jpg

The Taliban warned on Tuesday that Afghanistan would become a “graveyard” for the United States after President Donald Trump cleared the way for thousands more American troops to be sent to the war-torn country.

“If America doesn't withdraw its troops, soon Afghanistan will become another graveyard for this superpower in the 21st century,” Taliban spokesman Zabiullah Mujahid said in a statement.

The Taliban further dismissed Donald Trump's strategy for Afghanistan as vague and “nothing new”.

“For now I can tell you there was nothing new in his speech and it was very unclear,” Mujahid told AFP.

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He added that the militants were preparing a formal statement which would be released later.

Trump backtracked from his promise to rapidly end America's longest war in his first formal address to the nation as commander-in-chief late on Monday, though he did not offer specifics.

He said he had concluded “the consequences of a rapid exit are both predictable and unacceptable”, leaving a vacuum that terrorists “would instantly fill.”

A senior Taliban commander told AFP that Trump was just perpetuating the “arrogant behaviour” of previous presidents such as George Bush.

“He is just wasting American soldiers. We know how to defend our country. It will not change anything.

“For generations, we have fought this war, we are not scared, we are fresh and we will continue this war until our last breath,” he told AFP by telephone from an undisclosed location.

He added that the statement proved the current Afghan government “is a US puppet”.

The insurgents also signalled their intentions minutes after Trump spoke by claiming the US embassy in Kabul had been the target of a rocket attack late Monday.

The rocket landed in a field in the city's diplomatic quarter, with no casualties reported.

While Trump refused to offer detailed troop numbers, senior White House officials said he had already authorised his defence secretary to deploy up to 3,900 more troops to Afghanistan.

He also lambasted ally Pakistan for offering safe haven to “agents of chaos.” A commander from the Taliban-allied Haqqani network, long believed to have links to Pakistan's shadowy military establishment, told AFP that Trump “has proved it's a Crusade”.

“His statement has proved that he wants to eliminate the entire Muslim umma (community),” he said.

Prior to Trump's announcement the Taliban had written an open letter warning him not to send more troops and calling for the complete withdrawal of foreign forces from Afghanistan.

https://www.dawn.com/news/1353170/afghanistan-to-become-graveyard-for-us-warn-taliban-after-trump-clears-way-for-more-troops

 
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WAFFer
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WAFFer

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 22 2017, 7:31 AM 

3900 american troops could probably invade and occupy Pakistan for 20 years...

 
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Prado the truth seeker
(Login PradoTLC)
Shaheens (Pakistan)

Third American-Afghan war?

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August 22 2017, 7:40 AM 

Third American-Afghan war?

Zahid HussainUpdated June 21, 2017
224
26
The writer is an author and journalist.
The writer is an author and journalist.
THE decision by the Trump administration to bolster the presence of US troops in Afghanistan raises questions about America’s getting into the third phase of its Afghan war. The number of additional troops is likely to be 3,000 to 5,000 in addition to the 8,800 or so American soldiers already engaged in the war that is in its 16th year.

Intriguingly, there has not been any formal Afghan policy announcement by the US president. Instead, he has just authorised the Pentagon to take a decision on the surge figure, indicating the increasing US reliance on a military solution to the Afghan crisis. What is described by the White House as a stopgap measure ie ‘setting troops levels’, may push the US deeper into the Afghan quagmire in the absence of an exit plan.

This decision to send additional troops underscores a reversal of the Obama administration’s policy envisioning the complete withdrawal of US combat forces from Afghanistan; it is also a departure from Trump’s own election pledge to not get militarily involved in foreign conflicts.

Surely the troop surge was necessitated by the spreading Afghan Taliban insurgency causing an increasing number of military and civilian casualties in the war-torn country. The most recent series of terrorist attacks in Kabul are the deadliest since the US invasion in 2001. And the killing of more than 160 Afghan National Army soldiers in an attack on a military garrison in Herat, believed to be a more secure region, underlines the deteriorating security situation in the country.

The challenges confronting the US in Afghanistan are similar to those faced immediately after 9/11.

Thousands of Afghan soldiers have been killed in insurgent attacks since the drawdown of US troops in December 2014. The few thousand residual troops are largely engaged in training and providing support to the Afghan National Army in combat. The Taliban have extended their area of influence. But can the addition of a few thousand troops reverse the situation and achieve what more than 160,000 US and allied troops could not? This ‘stopgap’ arrangement is certainly not going to work.

More disconcerting is the failure to contain the insurgency that could lead to a demand from the military commanders to deploy more troops, thus getting the United States into what is described by some US security experts as potentially the “third American-Afghan war”. In the words of Robert Grenier, a former CIA counterterrorism expert, America has already fought two wars in Afghanistan. The first one that started in October 2001 ended in a quick victory for US forces with the routing of the Taliban regime.

But the triumph was short-lived. Four years later, in 2005, the US found itself involved in its second Afghan war with thousands of coalition forces engaged in a fierce battle with revitalised and regrouped insurgents. This phase has continued despite the winding up of the US combat mission — with no victory, illusory or otherwise.

With a deteriorating security situation and a weak and divided government in Kabul unable to maintain its control over territory, the challenges that confront the US in Afghanistan now are somewhat similar to those faced in the immediate aftermath of 9/11. In fact, the situation has worsened with the conflict extending to both sides of the Durand Line dividing Afghanistan and Pakistan. Further exacerbating matters is the rise of the militant Islamic State group which has claimed many of the recent terrorist attacks in Afghanistan that have taken a huge civilian toll.

While the Trump administration is still in the process of reviewing its Afghan policy, there seems to be no clear thinking in Washington on exploring the possibility of a political solution to the Afghan crisis. The use of the ‘mother of all bombs’ cannot bring an end to this bloody war. The war will be further prolonged with more disastrous consequences — for Afghanistan and the region — if the surge in troops is not accompanied by intensified political and diplomatic efforts to bring the Afghan Taliban to the negotiating table. The suggestion for reviving the Afghanistan-Pakistan-US-China quadrilateral forum sounds positive, but there is a need for a more proactive approach.

Missing in the policy matrix is the source of tension between Afghanistan and Pakistan that makes prospects for Afghan peace bleaker. Cross-border insurgent sanctuaries are a symptom and not the cause of the growing divide. Relations between the two countries have never been cordial since 2001, but they have hit a new low with the escalation in terrorist attacks that Kabul blames on the Haqqani network allegedly operating from Pakistan’s border areas. There has been a further breakdown of relations between the two countries with the recent measures taken by Pakistan to tighten border management.

But the main reason for the increasing trust deficit is Pakistan’s concern at the growing Indian presence in Afghanistan. That is also the reason for Pakistan using the Afghan Taliban as a hedge against this development. The heightening tension between India and Pakistan has further intensified Islamabad’s apprehensions. Despite its own problem of violent militancy, Islamabad is not willing to take tougher action against the Afghan insurgent sanctuaries.

It is apparent, that no matter how intense the US administration’s pressure, it cannot force Pakistan to change its position. Even the deployment of more troops cannot help stabilise the situation in Afghanistan without persuading Pakistan to withdraw its support to Afghan insurgents particularly the Haqqani network. But that can only be possible with the US addressing Pakistan’s security concerns however exaggerated they may be.

One cannot agree more with what Stephen Hadley and Moeed Yusuf have written in their op-ed piece in New York Times last week: “United States policies towards Pakistan have long underestimated the centrality of this regional dynamic in defining Pakistani choices.” According to them an approach that links efforts to enlist Pakistan’s support in Afghanistan to a strategy aimed at improving India-Pakistan ties could change this.

This is perhaps the only way for the United States to avoid getting mired in the third war in Afghanistan.

The writer is an author and journalist.

zhussain100@yahoo.com

Twitter: @hidhussain

Published in Dawn, June 21st, 2017

https://www.dawn.com/news/1340794/third-american-afghan-war

 
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WAFFer
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WAFFer

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 22 2017, 7:52 AM 

LMAO, Trump warned pakistan that they would be bombed to the stone age and this packee dreaming of mining lithium in Afghanistan and selling to China.

[linked image]

Can't even dig up dirt without taking a chinese loan for the bulldozer and has delusions like these.

 
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WAFFer
(Login PradoTLC)
Shaheens (Pakistan)

Re: Why US still hangs on Afghanistan?

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August 22 2017, 9:00 AM 

Taliban dismiss Trump's Afghan strategy as 'nothing new'
US president Donald Trump backtracked from his promise to rapidly end America's longest war in his first formal address to the nation as commander-in-chief late Monday

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse
August 22, 2017
Updated: August 22, 2017 08:34 AM
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US Marines fill sand bags around their light mortar position on the front lines of the US Marine Corps base in southern Afghanistan, on December 1, 2001. Nearby a cardboard sign reminding everyone that the Taliban forces could be anywhere and everywhere. Jim Hollander /AFP
US Marines fill sand bags around their light mortar position on the front lines of the US Marine Corps base in southern Afghanistan, on December 1, 2001. Nearby a cardboard sign reminding everyone that the Taliban forces could be anywhere and everywhere. Jim Hollander /AFP

The Taliban dismissed Donald Trump's strategy for Afghanistan as vague and "nothing new" Tuesday after the US president cleared the way for thousands more American troops to be sent to the war-torn country.

"For now I can tell you there was nothing new in his speech and it was very unclear," Zabiullah Mujahid, a spokesman for the Taliban in Afghanistan, told AFP.

He added that the militants were preparing a formal statement which would be released later.

Mr Trump backtracked from his promise to rapidly end America's longest war in his first formal address to the nation as commander-in-chief late Monday, though he did not offer specifics.

He said he had concluded "the consequences of a rapid exit are both predictable and unacceptable", leaving a vacuum that terrorists "would instantly fill".

A senior Taliban commander told AFP that Mr Trump was just perpetuating the "arrogant behaviour" of previous presidents such as George Bush.

"He is just wasting American soldiers. We know how to defend our country. It will not change anything.

"For generations we have fought this war, we are not scared, we are fresh and we will continue this war until our last breath," he told AFP by telephone from an undisclosed location.

He added that the statement proved the current Afghan government "is a US puppet".

The insurgents also signalled their intentions minutes after Mr Trump spoke by claiming the US embassy in Kabul had been the target of a rocket attack late Monday.

The rocket landed in a field in the city's diplomatic quarter, with no casualties reported.

While Mr Trump refused to offer detailed troop numbers, senior White House officials said he had already authorised his defence secretary to deploy up to 3,900 more troops to Afghanistan.

He also lambasted ally Pakistan for offering safe haven to "agents of chaos".

A commander from the Taliban-allied Haqqani network, long believed to have links to Pakistan's shadowy military establishment, told AFP that Mr Trump "has proved it's a Crusade".

"His statement has proved that he wants to eliminate the entire Muslim umma [community]," he said.

Prior to Mr Trump's announcement the Taliban had written an open letter warning him not to send more troops and calling for the complete withdrawal of foreign forces from Afghanistan.


https://www.thenational.ae/world/asia/taliban-dismiss-trump-s-afghan-strategy-as-nothing-new-1.621722

 
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