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william poole
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24.131.98.24

richard acker

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September 13 2003, 2:45 PM 

keith,

Iwas with your father on the march to ribbon creek, april 8th. 1956, first of all i'm very sorry to hear of your fathers passing, its sorta strange but of all 78 of my fellow recruits i remember just a very few by name,i've listened through the years to different people talk about how un-disciplined we were as a platoon. take my word we weren't any different than any other platoon of raw 17 year old kids. our drill instructor was a drunk and 6 kids[future marines] paid the altimate price,if you have a recruit graduation picture i'm the 6th person in the front row, from left to right. The evening of the march we were playing chicken in back of the barracks,you know the game you get on each others back and try to knock the other guys off, Mckeon got upset over this, but if he had been doing his job instead of drinking non of the events would have taken place.hoping to hear from you. will poole

 
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Larry Shunkwiler
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24.88.14.80

We were there.

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July 31 2003, 10:49 PM 

I don't know how it was or how the Platoon numbering system worked at the time, but we of Platoon #113 were on the Rifle Range at the same time as with Platoon #71. Perhaps they were at the end of their qualifying and we were just beginning? We were located on the same floor of the same wooden barracks. I remember the commotion the evening of April 8, 1956.

 
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John C. Stevens
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24.128.162.106

Ribbon Creek

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November 4 2003, 9:10 PM 

Hello Gunny,

Gene Ervin tipped me off to your web site. I found the exchange of comments very fascinating and was pleased to learn more about the experiences Will Poole as well as the other comments.

I am the author of COURT-MARTIAL AT PARRIS ISLAND,an account of the events of April 8,1956 and the McKeon court-martial. Matt McKeon was very forthcoming when I interviewed him, as were most of the surviving members of Platoon 71 ( I found about 25 of them and all but one was very cooperative.)

Matt McKeon is still alive but suffering from terminal cancer. One of the qualities that I most admire about him is his willingness to accept responsibility for his own behavior.

Semper Fi'

John Stevens

 
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Dick Gaines
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65.41.151.75

Thank you...

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November 5 2003, 3:37 AM 

...for your post--appreciated!

I spoke to Matt McKeon, briefly, last week--I had been attempting to find him for several years for Marines of Plt #71; however, I had been advised that he passed away, and I had accepted that as factual and abandoned my search, until learning recently that he was still about.

 

Semper Fidelis

Dick Gaines

 


 
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Dick Gaines
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65.41.13.53

Attn: Matthew C. McKeon, 79, dead....

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November 15 2003, 7:46 PM 


 
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will poole
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24.131.98.24

sgt. mckeon

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November 16 2003, 1:45 PM 

hey gunny,
i seen your message that sgt. mckeon had pass away.
i talked to his daughter and son-in-law a few days before. it was a very emotional conversation. they are a very close knit family it seems.
I was very happy i was able to retrieve sgts. phone number and was able to have the conversation with him. i hope other members of the plt. were able to talk to him.
i seen the author of incident at ribbon e-mailed you . i wrote several e-mails to him. and erased them with out sending. just thought i leave sleeping dogs lay.
i've always thought the sgt. was really a good guy. very soft spoken. he just got put in a bad situation.
enough said. good night sgt. mckeon.
will poole

 
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Dick Gaines
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65.41.13.53

Hey Will...

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November 16 2003, 3:10 PM 

...might be a good idea if you do write to Stevens--remember, he's not just the author of that book, he's a Marine too!
You're the one who prompted me to call Matt McKeon on the Friday before his death, you know--and I feel better for it, and I was certainly not anywhere near as close to him as you and the other Plt #71 Marines. And, too, S/Sgt McKeon and 1956 has become a part of all of us who were in the Corps back then, and, maybe to a lesser extent, all Marines since.

I want you guys to keep in touch.
Best, and Semper fidleis!
Dick

 
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John Stevens
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24.128.162.106

Tribute to a fallen Marine

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November 17 2003, 7:33 PM 

Gunny,

I thought you and the other Marines who knew or knew of Matt McKeon might be interested in the obituary I wrote after attending his funeral last Saturday:
November 15, 2003




On a hardscrabble hill overlooking the rural neighborhood where he was born, Matthew McKeon was buried today. More than a hundred of his friends and family huddled together in the face of the late autumn winds as an admixture of Catholic blessings and Marine Corps salutes paid final tribute to the flawed but noble spirit whose lifeless embodiment was laid to its final rest.

Forty-seven years ago, this same man was reviled by all too many people as a heartless butcher, a sadist whose momentous error of judgment caused six Marine recruits to drown in the black waters of Ribbon Creek. His life thereafter was in many ways an effort to seek redemption for the act that he could never undo. At his court-martial he testified that had he been asked to walk to the gallows he would have done so. A devout man, he prayed every day of his life thereafter for the souls of his lost recruits and for forgiveness.

But there was so much more to this man than was revealed by the publicity surrounding the events from which he derived such notoriety. Until that time he had an unblemished military record, serving in World War II aboard the carrier “Essex” and as a machine gunner on the frigid battlefields at the Chosin Reservoir. He was a battle-tested Marine who had faithfully and honorably served his country in the face of peril.

Matt McKeon was a gregarious man without hint of guile or pretense. Tears flowed down his cheeks as he recounted to me the events of Ribbon Creek forty years earlier. He was faithful to his wife, Betty, loyal to his friends, and loving to his extended family. He never sought to escape responsibility or to cast the burden on others for the deaths at Parris Island. Say what one will, he was a man of character.

Matt McKeon died at his home, quite appropriately on Veterans Day, his family at his side. May he rest in peace enjoying now the redemption never attainable in his lifetime. If there is a place beyond, may he forever be joined in serenity with the six young men who preceded him there.

 
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Dick Gaines
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65.41.13.53

Thank you, John...

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November 17 2003, 8:59 PM 

Your words are needed, and appreciated, at this time for the many Marines who will read this.

Again, thank you, Marine.

Semper Fidelis
Dick

 
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Kevin Coughlin
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68.164.92.169

God Bless and Semper Fi

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November 19 2003, 10:22 PM 

May Almighty God richly bless John Stevens, Dick Gaines, Matt McKeon, his family, the families of the deceased recruits, and all Marines, especially the ones in uniform today going in harm's way.

Semper Fi!
Kevin Coughlin
USMC 2327700
CAP Marine South of Phu Bai
Village of Loc Bon
July '67-April '68

 
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Mike McKeon
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12.9.207.199

Matt McKeon

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March 18 2005, 7:06 PM 

Gunny,
While doing some research on family history, I found a link to your site mentioning Sgt McKeon and Ribbon Creek. I had never heard about this and did a little checking into it. What I got from all that I read was that it was an error in judgment on Sgt McKeon part and as a man and what I believe a good Marine he took responsibility for his actions. Thank you for the history lesson and well done on Sgt Matt McKeon's Obit.

 
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Dick Gaines
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65.41.13.53

Milinet: Response...

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November 17 2003, 7:36 AM 

17 November

MILINET: Resp "Taps for Mathew C. McKeon"

===============================

Surely there are other 63-year-olds out there who have the same thing to say that I have to say on the passing of SSgt. McKeon.

In 1956 when he disciplined his recruits on Ribbon Creek, I was 16. It hit the news - recruits at P.I. died. With my 17th birthday coming up the next February I was bound and determined to tell my girl friends that I was going to go where people died. And so I did, 35 years later to retire. If I made any contributuion in those 35 years to Country and Corps, Mathew McKeon deserves the credit.

God rest his soul.

Semper Fi,

Mike Wyly
Col., USMC (ret)

 
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Dick Gaines
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Response...

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November 18 2003, 8:07 AM 

18 November

MILINET: 2nd Resps (3) "Taps for Mathew C. McKeon"

============================================

History and perspective change many things, while time has a tendency to forgive and even forget.

I entered the Marine Corps a few months after April 1956 and arrived at Parris Island when the incident at Ribbon Creek was still fresh in the headlines. I had just turned 17.

I remember seeing McKeon being escorted, in handcuffs, by two MP's and our DI bringing it to our attention by saying he had "...violated the code of Marines...." I did not understand what he meant by that. I wrote a letter to my brother, a USMC captain at the time, teaching the 60mm Mortar at The Basic School in Quantico. I asked him what he knew and what it meant. He replied that he knew McKeon from Korea, and knew him to be a fine Marine with an outstanding combat record. He went on to say that the unfortunate incident at Ribbon Creek will not tarnish the reputation of the Corps, and that he supported the statements made at McKeon's court-martial by LtGen Lewis B. Puller in mitigation of the incident.

Two different perspectives of a Marine and a tragedy that had great impact on our Marine Corps.

I remember for the remainder of my time and training at Parris Island, it seemed that everywhere we looked there was an officer, usually a Field Grade officer, watching and noting every aspect of our training and process to becoming Marines. Everyone was under close scrutiny. I was not sure why, but things were changing even as our Parris Island "adventure" was ongoing.

I don't know what Parris Island was like before "my time" or before Ribbon Creek. I know, however, that we were not "abused" during my training, but did "enjoy" some of the more unorthodox methods of instilling discipline. None of us were the worst for it but took pride in the fact that we graduated from what we considered a "rigorous" experience that tested us, and our reward for passing the test was most worthy-- we were Marines!

In hindsight, I do believe that Ribbon Creek marked a line of demarcation from training practices that may have become a bit arcane, to a more rigorous, structured and evolving program that has proven to be critical in preserving the ethos of Marines that we espouse today. Marines since then, in Vietnam, Beirut, Desert Storm and today in Iraq, have all acquitted themselves with distinction in the finest of Marine Corps traditions and continue to earn the respect of other military forces and the world as an elite, courageous, and disciplined fighting force.

Those of us who hold the title "Marine" and do so with pride, still speak of "Old Corps" versus "New Breed."Â We poke at each other in bravado gesticulation, pontificating on which era was the most arduous-- like bantering for position of who is the "Best of the Best."Â Beneath it all I do believe that we love and respect each other as Marines; and that will always hold true because we share the common bond of having endured a great personal trial and earned the respect and title of Marine.

Mathew C. McKeon has passed away. He was a principal character in a vital chapter in the annals of our history. He served well, at least as well as he knew how. In spite of the tragic training accident that had a life-long impact on McKeon and the Marine Corps, I believe our Corps is better and stronger for it. I salute him and bid him farewell. Semper Fi, Marine!Â

And let us not forget those six recruits from Platoon 71 who perished that fateful day, 8 April 1956. They, too, have served and are worthy of the title, Marine.

Mitchell P. Paradis
MGySgt USMC (Ret)

----------------------------------------ANOTHER RESPONSE---------

Anthony, In April 1956 when I heard the news of the drowning of six recruits at Parris Island I was a Corporal on an APA somewhere in the Pacific Ocean heading for Japan. We heard the news over the loud-speakers. Later we heard that Drill Instructor Staff Sergeant McKeon was being court-martialed. When the book came out later called "Ribbon Creek: The Marine Corps on Trial" I bought the book. There were many at the time that believe McKeon was a good Marine who made a horrible mistake when he took his platoon on a night disciplinary march in the tidal swamps near the rifle range at PI. There was an unusually high tide that night. Major General Chesty Puller testified for the defense stating that Marines did not get enough night-training. None-the-less, McKeon was found guilty and busted to Private. I believe that he made it back to Sergeant before being discharged for a medical problem. I also understand he was remorseful and felt guilty for the rest of his life.

There were a lot of reforms that resulted from the Ribbon Creek incident that prevail to this day. After that Drill Instructors had to be NCO's. Before that a DI could be a PFC and I had two of them. There was closer supervision of recruits by Officers. I didn't see an Officer until my third week. Also, it was about that time that DI's started wearing Campaign Hats.

Semper Fi.
Major Bob Farmer USMC (retired)Â

--------------------------------------ANOTHER RESPONSE---------

November 15, 2003

Tribute to a fallen Marine

by John Stevens

On a hardscrabble hill overlooking the rural
neighborhood where he was born, Matthew McKeon
was buried today. More than a hundred of his
friends and family huddled together in the face
of the late autumn winds as an admixture of
Catholic blessings and Marine Corps salutes paid
final tribute to the flawed but noble spirit
whose lifeless embodiment was laid to its final
rest.

Forty-seven years ago, this same man was reviled
by all too many people as a heartless butcher, a
sadist whose momentous error of judgment caused
six Marine recruits to drown in the black waters
of Ribbon Creek. His life thereafter was in many
ways an effort to seek redemption for the act
that he could never undo. At his court-martial he
testified that had he been asked to walk to the
gallows he would have done so. A devout man, he
prayed every day of his life thereafter for the
souls of his lost recruits and for forgiveness.

But there was so much more to this man than was
revealed by the publicity surrounding the events
from which he derived such notoriety. Until that
time he had an unblemished military record,
serving in World War II aboard the carrier
“Essex” and as a machine gunner on the frigid
battlefields at the Chosin Reservoir. He was a
battle-tested Marine who had faithfully and
honorably served his country in the face of
peril.

Matt McKeon was a gregarious man without hint of
guile or pretense. Tears flowed down his cheeks
as he recounted to me the events of Ribbon Creek
forty years earlier. He was faithful to his wife,
Betty, loyal to his friends, and loving to his
extended family. He never sought to escape
responsibility or to cast the burden on others
for the deaths at Parris Island. Say what one
will, he was a man of character.

Matt McKeon died at his home, quite appropriately
on Veterans Day, his family at his side. May he
rest in peace enjoying now the redemption never
attainable in his lifetime. If there is a place
beyond, may he forever be joined in serenity with
the six young men who preceded him there.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/message?forumid=220604&messageid=1069115614

Note:
Former Marine John Stevens is the author of,
"Court-martial At Parris island: The Ribbon Creek Incident"

---------------------------------------END RESPONSES----------



 
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Dick Gaines
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65.41.236.185

Responses...

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November 19 2003, 7:14 AM 

19 November

MILINET: 3rd Resps (2) "Taps for Mathew C. McKeon"

=================================

Thanks, Anthony. I think your email dispatch is a nice tribute to a Marine who was very misunderstood, but stood accountable for his actions in true Marine fashion. I especially like the tribute by John Stevens. It shows that MeKeon was a man of some character after all.

Well done.

Mitch Paradis

-----------------------------------ANOTHER RESPONSE---------

I was a Sergeant, stationed at Headquarters, 12th Marine Corps Reserve & Recruitment District, 100 Harrison Street, San Francisco, CA when we heard the news of "Ribbon Creek," and the tragic loss of some Marine Recruit's lives, involving Drill Instructor S/Sgt McKeon.

Of course we were shocked that this could happen, but realized that accidents can, and do happen during the course of training. We were proud to hear that my former regimental commanding officer at the Chosin Reservoir, LtGen Lewis B. (Chesty) Puller would be testifying on behalf of S/Sgt McKeon. May S/Sgt McKeon be remembered for the remorse that he felt, and for the good Marine that he was. God Bless him, and may he rest in eternal peace.


Clyde H. Queen, Sr.
Former S/Sgt USMC

-----------------------------------END RESPONSES--------


 
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Dick Gaines
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65.41.134.214

The Day The Corps Changed

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November 20 2003, 9:45 PM 

The day the corps changed

RIDGELAND: On April 8, 1956, six Marine Corps recruits drowned in a disciplinary march into Ribbon Creek. The aftermath caused an overhaul of basic training.

By William H. Whitten
Special to the Carolina Morning News

Matthew C. McKeon, the Parris Island drill instructor who received national attention when he was court-martialed after six of his recruits drowned during a disciplinary march into Ribbon Creek on April 8, 1956, has died at the age of 79.

Ironically, he died on Veterans Day, Nov. 11.

For days, news of the death of the man whose actions caused an overhaul of Marine Corps basic training - some say the demise of the "Old Corps" - has circulated by word of mouth and e-mail throughout the Marine Corps community.

McKeon's obituary appeared in the Worchester (Mass.) Telegram & Gazette but without reference to the Ribbon Creek tragedy.

After the most publicized court martial in Marine Corps history - even Life magazine sent a sketch artist to the trial - McKeon was acquitted on Aug. 4, 1956, of charges of manslaughter and oppression of troops. He was found guilty of negligent homicide and drinking on duty.

The sentence was a $270 fine, nine months of confinement at hard labor, rank reduced to private and a bad conduct discharge.

The secretary of the Navy later reduced the sentence to three months in the brig, reduction to private with no discharge and no fine.

McKeon went back on active duty, regained his sergeant's stripes in about a year and served another 16 years, retiring in 1972 with time credited for his Navy service during World War II.

But in a real sense it was the Marine Corps which had been on trial. For Gen. Randolph Pate, the only Marine Corps commandant to have been born in the local area (Port Royal, Feb. 11, 1898), the failure of the training system was a larger issue than McKeon.

Pate ordered a separate recruit training command to be established at Parris Island, and in San Diego, Calif., to be commanded by a brigadier general selected by the commandant and answering directly to him.

Each of the recruit training commands was to be staffed with specially trained officers "to supervise and monitor but not to supplant the drill instructors" in the training of recruits.

An inspector general was established at Marine headquarters in Washington, D.C.

What has been described as an "uninterrupted flood of publicity by the press, radio and television" divided the nation into opposing camps - those who condemned McKeon and the perception of cruel, sometimes injurious, recruit training, and those who sympathized with him, not wanting to see the nation's premier military service "go soft."

The story began some minutes after 10 p.m. on Sunday, Apr. 8, 1956, when McKeon - a staff sergeant and drill instructor - marched the 74 men of Platoon 71, "A" Company, 3d Recruit Training Battalion from their barracks to Ribbon Creek.

After the recruits, with their individual equipment, entered the tidal stream under darkness some stepped or slid into water over their heads and panicked.

Later testimony indicated that McKeon knew the area and if the recruits had strictly followed his directions, they might not have drowned.

But because he had been drinking earlier, and he decided the platoon needed an unannounced disciplinary night march and was the DI in charge when the drownings took place, the court placed the blame squarely on McKeon.

"In conducting an unauthorized and unnecessary march by night into an area of hazard ... which resulted in the deaths of six brother Marines, (he) not only broke established regulations but violated the fine traditions of the noncommissioned officers of the United States Marine Corps and betrayed the trust reposed in him by his country, his Corps, his lost comrades and the families of the dead," said the Corps, in ordering a general court martial.

But, with national attention centered on the already historic courtroom building and DI facility at Parris Island (since destroyed by fire), a celebrated New York civilian lawyer, Emile Zola Berman - who later defended Robert Kennedy assassin Sirhan Sirhan - volunteered to defend McKeon without pay.

He mounted a massive public relations campaign on behalf of McKeon.

For three weeks there was testimony, including defense testimony by one of the Corps' most renowned heroes, Lt. Gen. Lewis "Chesty" Puller, and the Marine Corps commandant himself.

There was also testimony that McKeon was graduated from the base's DI school just three months earlier, ranking 14th in a class which began with 90 men and ended up with 55.

Documentary evidence showed that McKeon had also undergone a routine psychiatric screening three months before and had been given the highest possible rating on "motivation," "emotional stability" and "hostility factors," and a better than average rating on "achievement."

The psychiatric unit's conclusion was that McKeon was a "mature, stable appearing Marine."

On Oct. 18, 1956, McKeon - having already served part of his time prior to sentencing - was released from custody and restored to active duty, but with reduced rank.

Over the years at least two books have been written about the Ribbon Creek tragedy and infrequent interviews were done with McKeon, who lived out his life in the Worchester suburb of West Boylston.

John Stevens III, a former Marine and now a Massachusetts judge, authored the most recent book, "Court-Martial at Parris Island: The Ribbon Creek Incident," and was at Parris Island in October signing copies.

McKeon is survived by his wife, five children and eight grandchildren. He remained a member of the Marine Corps League. Burial on Nov. 15 was in St. Joseph's Cemetery, Leicester, Mass.

Reporter Mark Kreuzwieser contributed to this report.

http://www.lowcountrynow.com/stories/112103/LOCmarinedeath.shtml
http://www.lowcountrynow.com/stories/112103/LOCmarinedeath.shtml

Copyright 2002 Carolina Morning News. All rights reserved. Privacy Policy.
Optimized for 800x600 screen resolution.



 
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Dick Gaines
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Owner
69.34.39.166

Court-martial At Parris Island!

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December 20 2003, 8:53 AM 

Authors return to Parris Island for book signing
Published "Tuesday
By MICHAEL KERR
Gazette staff writer
Eugene Alvarez and John C. Stevens III try to make it back to Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island at least once a year.

The former Devil Dogs come to see how the legendary base where they became Marines -- and in Alvarez's case made Marines -- has changed.

They come to see old friends and recount stories of the good ol' days aboard the depot.

Last week, however, they came to mix a little business with the pleasure of visiting a place that helped form the men they are now.

Thursday afternoon, Alvarez and Stevens set up shop at the depot's Marine Corps Exchange for a dual book signing of Alvarez's latest work "Images of America: Parris Island," and Stevens' first book, "Court-Martial at Parris Island: The Ribbon Creek Incident."

"I always love to come back and visit Parris Island," said Alvarez, who went through boot camp aboard the depot in 1950 and served as a drill instructor there from 1953 to 1954 and again from 1956 to 1959. "It just changes all the time."

Sitting behind a desk adorned with a flower vase, American flag and stacks of their books, Alvarez and Stevens signed copies of their latest works for anyone who wanted one.

Some of the folks getting signatures were already fans. Others had never heard of the books before they wandered into the store Thursday afternoon.

"I was just always interested in (Parris Island)," said Alvarez, who received a research grant from the Marine Corps to get started with his first book.

"Images of America: Parris Island," his fifth book, is now in its third printing and is going strong, he said.

"It's going over very well," said Alvarez, who lives in Georgia.

The book, filled with photographs chronicling the history and legacy of Parris Island, is a visual trip through time as the depot, and the Corps, expanded and changed.

While Alvarez is a veteran in military nonfiction, Stevens is a newcomer.

"Court-Martial at Parris Island" is his first book and consumed three years of his life, two to research the Ribbon Creek incident and one to write the manuscript.

"When I went through Parris Island, Ribbon Creek had just occurred," said Stevens, now a judge in Massachusetts. "The drill instructors were very sensitive about it. They thought one of their (drill instructors) was railroaded at the time."

Years after he had left the Corps and become a lawyer, Stevens decided to give a doctoral dissertation on the April 8, 1956, incident in which drill instructor Staff Sgt. Matthew McKeon led his platoon on a forced night march through Ribbon Creek to restore sagging discipline.

A strong tidal current in the creek swept through and six men drowned, sparking a national news story and a court-martial for McKeon.

Stevens never gave the dissertation, but the story -- which affected his and every recruit's training from then on and changed Parris Island forever -- stayed with him, eventually becoming a critically acclaimed debut book.

"Marines from all over the country have found me and have written me," Stevens said. "It's gotten an outstanding reception."

The most rewarding aspect of the undertaking was the opportunity to meet and discuss the incident with McKeon himself, Stevens said.

"He has lived with that burden and he always will," Stevens said, adding that he hopes the interview helped McKeon in some small way.

"It enabled him to purge himself of some of the shame," he said. "I found it very rewarding."

Gunnery Sergeants Robert Bergmann and John Spencer both stumbled upon the book signing Thursday afternoon and picked up copies of "Court-Martial at Parris Island."

Bergmann said he had no idea anyone had written a book about Ribbon Creek, but was looking forward to delving into it.

Spencer knew the book was out there, but hadn't had the chance to read it yet.

"I knew about the incident," he said. "I just want to find out more about it."

For Alvarez and Stevens, the trip to Parris Island was both a vacation and a chance to meet some young Marines and see how things are done today.

Like many former Marines who return to the depot, Alvarez said there is a litany of physical changes aboard Parris Island, but that the men and women in uniform are the same as they always have been.

"They're still quality people," Alvarez said. "Older guys like us like to talk about back then, but they do a good job today."

Stevens said he couldn't agree more.

"I'm so impressed with these young Marines," he said. "The greatest thing about this book for me is that it reconnected me with the Marine Corps. That's a priceless heritage."
Copyright 2003 The Beaufort Gazette • May not be republished in any form without the express written permission of the publisher.

http://www.beaufortgazette.com/local_news/military/story/2927032p-2688933c.html



 
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Bill Kana
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141.154.181.44

Ribbon Creek

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February 15 2004, 9:37 AM 

Hi Dick, I will miss church this morning because I can't tare myself away from your website, especially the forum on Matthew McKeon & Ribbon Creek!! I acquired a book a few years back (which I havn't read yet) concerning "The Incident". It is simply titled "RIBBON CREEK", written by William B. McKean, Brig. Gen. USMC (Ret), published in 1958. I have read most of the emails and comments posted, however no one makes reference to this book. Have you read this book, and if so how does it compare to Stevens book, which I will acquire soon now that you have renewed my intrest in this facinating piece of our history. I live in Westfield MA., a few miles from the gravesite. My wife and I will pay our respects soom.

Semper Fi

Bill Kana
Gysgt. USMC (Ret) 64-85

 
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Dick Gaines
(Login Dick Gaines)
Owner
65.41.151.210

Hi, Bill...

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February 18 2004, 10:40 AM 

thanx for posting--good to hear from ya.

No, I have not read general McKean's book--in fact, I had not read the Stevens book until after matt McKeon's death and Stevens having posted to this forum. Even so, I would say that Stevens' book would be hard to beat, judging from my reading of it. It was one of those books that I had intended to buy and read for years, but something I put off until...

Best wishes, and...
Semper Fidelis
Dick Gaines

 
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will poole
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24.131.98.24

ribbon creek

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February 18 2004, 11:44 AM 

hey gy
you probaly seen my name on some e-mails to the gy concerning sgt. M. Mckeon.i read the book by stevens and one other by the legal officer at parris island at the time of the parris island march.If i'm not mistaken his name was Major Faw.Stevens book seemed to center mostly on the aftermath and the court-martiel. The Majors book had a little more leading up to the march its self.At least it seemed that way to me. I never seen the book your referring to. but i did call my library and they did have a copy in their store room. i'll get it in a few days. I turn 65 on the 20th of this month and went to parris island on my 17th birthday.i have no idea how many members of plt. 71 are still living but i was the youngest. So they have to be thinning out some what. Feel free to e-mail me with any questions you might have about the march and i'll answer to the best of my ability. But do remember that was 48 years ago.
Will Poole

 
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gene ervin
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128.114.166.94

Hey Poole

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March 27 2004, 12:28 AM 

Hey Poole...this is Gene Ervin. I remember you in the platoon. I think we may have exchanged emails a few years ago also. I was the Right Guide.
Jay Stevens came through my town of Santa Cruz California a couple of weeks ago. I met with him and we talked about the incident. I was just surfing through the 'Net and saw your name.
Hope all is well.
Semper Fidelis
Gene

 
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By
R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952-72

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