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The Rebel Yell, Battle Cries, and The USMC!

October 25 2002 at 8:53 PM
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Dick G  (Login Dick Gaines)
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from IP address 209.130.221.8

 


From: "H-War Editor Mark P.Parillo" <war@ksu.edu>
List Editor: "H-War Editor Mark P.Parillo" <war@ksu.edu>
Editor's Subject: REPLY: U.S. Battle Cries in World War One
Author's Subject: REPLY: U.S. Battle Cries in World War One
Date Written: Tue, 26 Oct 1999 08:51:02 -0500
Date Posted: Tue, 26 Oct 1999 08:51:02 -0500

REPLIES:

1) Albert A. Nofi
2) Jeffrey Grey
3) David Homsher
4) Patrick Jennings
5) Lydia Smith

---------------

1) Albert A. Nofi

From: ANofi@aol.com
Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 18:38:42 EDT

On Fri, 22 Oct 1999 09:09:53 -0400, Joseph R. Frechette wrote:
> Wasn't it Dan Daly who said, "Come on you sons of bitches! Do you
> want to live forever?"

Whenever he was asked, Daly replied that he had actually said, "Come on you
chaps, let's have at the foe!" or some such other proper phrase, because
"an NCO would never use strong language."

Albert A. Nofi

---------------

2) Jeffrey Grey

Date: Wed, 27 Oct 1999 09:22:11 +1000
From: j-grey@adfa.edu.au

Gavin Long notes the following in To Benghazi (1952), dealing with the
Australian advance into battle at Bardia on 3 January 1941:

Several war correspondents stated that the Australians as they advanced at
Bardia sang 'The Wizard of Oz', from a recent fairy-tale film of that name.
The story has been repeated in many writings since then. The truth appears
to be that, while men of the 2/2 Bn were moving forward from the start-line
after the barrage had begun, making silence no longer necessary, a sergeant
set some of the troops singing 'South of the Border', which was probably
the most popular song in both Australian and British armies in 1940 and
1941. Later that day, when a group of Fleet Street correspondents arrived
they were conducted to Capt P. J. Woodhill (2/2 Bn) who mentioned that the
men had sung as they advanced. 'What did they sing?' asked one
correspondent. Woodhill, who had a puckish sense of humour, and was very
weary, searched his mind for the most incongruous song he could think of
and replied, 'The Wizard of Oz'. In an advance in open order, with the din
of the bombardment drwoning men's voices only small groups could hear one
another singing.

The image of heavily-laden Australian soldiers singing 'We're off to see
the wizard' as they get stuck into the Italian positions is delightful.
Shame it isn't true. An Australian officer taking a rise out of an English
newspaperman, however, is utterly plausible!

Jeffrey Grey
History/ADFA

---------------

3) David Homsher

From: "David Homsher" <DavidHomsher@email.msn.com> Date: Mon, 25 Oct 1999 19:59:13 -0400

Having spent the better part of ten years reading AEF combat accounts,
unit histories, etc., etc., I can assure you that there was very little in
the way of standardized "battle cries." That is, other than that of
"Eeeeee---yaaaah-Yip!" of the Marine Corps.

Secondly, I dislike seeing the mythology of Dan Daly having uttered his
alleged cry of, "C'mon you sonsabitches, do you want to live forever!"
passed on. Dan personally disavowed ever having said it, and no one who
was near Dan at the time ever remembered the famous cry. The whole story
evidently flowed from the pen of one of the war correspondents of the time,
probably Floyd Gibbons or the like.

The correspondents of the time seemingly had a penchant for glowing
prose, much of which was so much malarkey designed to sell newspapers. This
is how the USMC got all of the publicity which so angered the army for many
years after World War I. However, this is another story. It was Captain
Lloyd W. Williams, USMC, who said, "Retreat, Hell! We just got here!" There
were on-the-spot witnesses to that classic utterance in June, 1918. Oh, and
Sergeant John H. Quick never made that famous hell-for-leather ride into
Bouresches with the much needed ammunition, either. Although the ride was
made, according to those who were there, Quick was not.

Keep up the fire--we've got the Boche on the run! This is by me,

David Homsher

---------------

4) Patrick Jennings

Date: Tue, 26 Oct 1999 08:07:40 -0400
From: Patrick_Jennings@nps.gov (Patrick Jennings)

Try "Fix Bayonets." Primarily about the Marines, it is full of the
language and feelings of that time.

Patrick Jennings

---------------

5) Lydia Smith

Date: Tue, 26 Oct 1999 08:12:12 -0500
From: lydia smith <lwsmith@bama.ua.edu> We all know about the "Rebel Yell" during the Yankee Invasion; check out
McWhiney's book on the connection between the Celts and the Southerners. I
wrote one paper comparing/ contrasting World War I and the Civil War.

Lydia Smith
Sweet Home Alabama

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The Rebel Yell

A distinctive feature of the Southern soldier was the rebel yell, a long, quavering sound that became legendary. One of the challenges of reenacting is to determine what this famous call actually sounded like.

After the war a number of veterans sought to describe the yell in print. One of the most detailed descriptions came from J. Harvie Drew, a soldier in the 9th Virginia Cavalry. He gave this transcription of the rebel yell:
"Woh--who--ey! Who--ey! Who--ey! Woh--who--ey! Who--ey! (The best illustration of this "true yell" which can be given the reader is by spelling it as above, with directions to sound the first syllable "woh" short and low, and the second "who" with a very high and prolonged note deflecting upon the third syllable "ey.")

Others rendered the yell as "yai, yai, yi, yai, yi" and "y-yo yo-wo-wo." From these examples, it would appear the yell was both multi-syllable and also composed of pattern that was repeated several times.

Many have traced the origins of the rebel yell to the rural life int he prewar south. Drew believed in this derivation, stating
Hollering, screaming, yelling for one person or another, to their dogs, or at some of the cattle on the plantation, with the accompanying reverberations from hilltops, over valleys and plains, were familiar sounds throughout the farming districts of the South in the days gone by.
Hunting, which was enjoyed and indulged in more or less by nearly every citizen of the South, was also conducive to this characteristic development.

The rebel yell stood in definite contrast to the more disciplined cheer of the Yankees. The latter was described by Drew in these terms:
The Federal or "Yankee" yell, compared with that of the Confederate, lacked in vocal breadth, pitch, and resonance. This was unquestionably attributable to the fact that the soldiery of the North was drawn and recruited chiefly from large cities and towns, from factory districts and from the more densely settled portions of the country.
*. . . their peculiar, characteristic yell [was] -- "Hoo-ray! Hoo-ray! Hoo-ray!" (This yell was called by the Federals a "cheer," and was intended for the word "hurrah," but that pronunciation I never heard in a charge. The sound was as though the first sylllable, if heard at all, was "hoo," uttered with an exceedingly short,low, and indistinct tone, and the second was "ray," yelled with a long and high tone slightly deflecting its termination. In many instances the yell seemed to be the simple interjection "heigh," rendered with the same tone which was given to "ray.")

Whatever the sound or the origins of the rebel yell, its use and effect on the battlefield was undeniable. Col. O. M. Roberts commanded the 11th Texas Infantry in several battles in Louisiana, and left this account of Texans and the rebel yell:
The Texas soldiers in line of battle, with their attention intensely alive to what they were doing and how they should act, were cool enough and intelligent enough to pass the word along the whole line of battle like an electric current; and when the command was given, "Forward, charge!" it, too, would be rapidly passed, and then simultaneously the Texas "rebel yell" burst out from the whole line, as all together they dashed at double quick toward the enemy. The effect of that yell was marvelous....Such yells exploded on the air in one combined sound have been heard distinctly three miles off across a prairie, above the din of musketry and artillery.

Return to Co. H homepage
http://members.aol.com/h4texas/yell.htm


    
This message has been edited by Dick Gaines from IP address 209.130.221.8 on Oct 25, 2002 9:13 PM


 
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Dick G
(Login Dick Gaines)
Owner
209.130.221.58

Ref H-War....

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October 26 2002, 1:15 PM 

4) David Homsher

From: "David Homsher" <DavidHomsher@email.msn.com> Date: Sun, 24 Oct 1999 21:17:16 -0400

Mark,

The U.S. Marines had a war cry which which they evidently used with
some frequency. I have read hundreds of USMC WWI battle accounts and have
come across their cry of, "Eeeeee-Yahhhhh-Yip!" every once in a while.
Unfortunately, I am not able to provide you with any specific references
for this battle cry, but I do remember it quite clearly from notes. It
seems that they were taught this cry when in basic training.

Concerning the U.S. Army, I do not remember any generalized battle cry
for them.

The business of doughboys going over the top with cries of "Remember
the Lusitania" and the like are evidently just so much bull. Having read
hundreds of AEF unit histories and personal accounts of the AEF in battle,
I can assure you that, although there may have been some specific cries of
the like, it rarely happened in real life.

Most men when they went into battle were decidedly silent about it all.
They did not have the energy to scream and yell, and they would have felt
like damned fools had they done so. The only time when such animated cries
would issue forth would be when the combat was at decidedly close quarters,
and then it would be very profane--"Get that sonofabitch, don't let him get
away!" or the like. A surrendering German machine gunner who was out of
ammunition would likely be greeted with a loud cry of, "F*** you,
Fritzie!," and then with a rifle or pistol shot, or with a bayonet. War
cries seem to be mostly the stuff of Hollywood movies. You might try the
USMC Historical Center, Washington, DC for verification of the WWI war cry.

Good luck in your research.

David Homsher

*************************************************
*************************************************


 
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Dick G
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209.130.219.72

Response - WW I List....

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October 27 2002, 4:40 PM 

Date: Sun, 27 Oct 2002 13:14:54 -0500
From: "bj omanson" <skipper@labyrinth.net> | This is Spam | Add to Address Book
To: wwi-l@raven.cc.ku.edu
Subject: Re: The Marines' E-E-E-YAH-YIP of WW I?

Found another reference to the warcry in an article from the Chicago Tribune, but no explanation as to its origin. Have included the full article.

BJ Omanson

skipper@labyrinth.net
____________________

?EE-YAH-YIP!' IS CRY AS MARINES HUNT RECRUITS ~ ~ ~

?This is the Life,' Appeal to Men of Brains & Brawn ~ ~ ~ Chicago, July 11, 1918 With all the pep that is implied in their war-cry ?Ee-Yah-Yip' the Marines' drive for recruits was shoved into high yesterday to procure 2600 men and 600 each month hereafter.

The usual means of corralling the prospective fighters were resorted to at the five stations in the loop, and applicants were lined up to have their scrapping qualities probed. Twenty-five excellent specimens left last night for Paris Island, S.C., to commence training.

This is the Life "There isn't any other life in the world that can touch that of the Marine for adventure, daring and chance for service, sacrifice, and heroism." said Lieut. Frederic W. Kensel of the main recruiting office. "The Marines are in the forefront in service on land and sea.

They are the pick of the men of the land, magnificent fellows, clean as whistles, with minds that work like lightning, bodies that can stand anything, and indomitable souls that will take them through hell without a whimper. "We have to turn down about 2/3 of the men who apply but the standard must be kept up. It's this almost fierce rigidity regarding the type of men that has produced the Marines making such a magnificent record in France.

High Class Men Wanted "If there are any men left in Chicago of the highest class in brain and brawn we want them for the Marines. Then they have their chance to become officers, as virtually all the officers in the Marine Corps come up from the ranks.

They know the life from the ground up and, therefore, being natural leaders, make officers men are glad to die for." Men who enlist now have a chance to see action in France by Oct 1, especially those in the signal battalion.

Recruits are sent for training from here to Paris Island S.C. The Marine officers' training camp is in Quantico, Va. Men between 18 and 21 may enlist without consent of parents or guardians.

Men within draft age may enlist by getting certificates from their draft boards. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

On Sun, 27 Oct 2002 05:12:26 -0800 (PST), R.W.GAINES wrote: >

Request info on E-E-E-YAH-YIP, said to have been >a war cry/battle cry of Marines during WWI; >taught to Marines during basic training; possibly >related to the "Rebel Yell" of the Civil War, >etc. > >

There is a recruiting poster indicating this, but >I can find nothing of it in the few books I have >onhand dealing w/WWI Marines. >Ref >

http://www.network54.com/Forum/message?forumid=220604&messageid=10355 >93625

 
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Dick G
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209.130.218.19

Allied Topic: OohRah....

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October 28 2002, 10:28 AM 

OohRah!
Ref
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/oohrah.html

Ever wonder where some of the most common items of our Marine Corps history came from? Things like the term "Jarhead," etc.? Most of these things are pretty well known by all Marines. But, then, there are also numerous cases where our accepted history is just plain inaccurate. For instance, Major Devereaux's last message from the besieged Wake Island in early World War Two--"Send Us More Japs"--or that the red stripe on the blue uniform trousers of officers and NCOs (sometimes referred to as bloodstripes) commemorates the Marine blood spilled at the battle of Chapultapec in 1847. These two items are not true, and there are many more things like this that I have addressed elsewhere on my websites.

And then there are some cases where the origin of certain traditions are altogether unknown. Take for example, the case of the well known OohRah! What is its origin? What is its meaning? When and where did it start? Is it related to similar cries now in use by other military services? Nobody knows for sure. Yeah, most everybody has an opinion, but what is the straight scoop? Some of the more popular "opinions" on this include that OohRah comes from either (take your pick) a Turkish or a Russian battle cry, and was somehow adopted by U.S. Marines. For many years, I, myself, leaned in the direction that it may have originated with the 1956 film, The DI, starring Jack Webb as T/Sgt Jim Moore, who, in that movie, commands his recruit platoon, "Let me hear you ROAR, tigers!"

In any case, opinions on this abound--some ridiculous, some even humorous, but like I already said, nobody seems to know for sure. OohRah is now well-entrenched in Marine Corps tradition, and although I have found that it is generally disliked and its use disapproved of by many old time Marines, one thing is for sure--it is here to stay! Personally, I think that provided we could determine valid and meaningful historical origin, much of this disapproval by old timers would soon be forgotten. And it seems like OohRah's origin is not so far distant in our past that there should still be some old salts around even now who can clue us in on the straight scoop.

Somewhere I read.... "The Sea Story is the traditional, preferred means by which wisdom is passed on from one generation of Marines to the next."
-Author Unknown

That makes sense to me, and I have thought that if we're ever going to get an answer on this it will be from Marines who were there and know. For at least a couple years now I have been using the resources of my e-mail and websites to seek information from Marines on this question, but the results have been disappointing. Up to now, that is.

On 12 May 2002, I received the following information from Marine Bob Rader (Sgt Wolf); the info had first been posted to the Sgt Grit's Bulletin Board and then e-mailed to me. *****************
From Whence It Came?

Received this among some other stuff from an old college classmate and former Force Troops Recon Marine, Dr. Frank Osanka:

The Recon Marines (and maybe all Marines), have their "OORAH" and the Army its "HOOAH"! But what is the origin of these exclamations by troops (can't call them words-- they are better described as sounds)? When used they are unmistakenly expressions of verve, spirit, morale, espirit, eliteness and sometimes derision! They are responses, greetngs, etc.

You won't find anything in Navy BuPers files. Marine Corps directives or Army regulations prescribing that they be used. Yet, they permeate the ranks and their origins ought to be recorded for they are as much military lexicon as "SNAFU," "GI", "Kilroy was here", "P38", etc. And, woe betide the commander who thinks he can put an end to their use! They are exclusive property of those who use them and rightfully so--for what it means to them transcends anything a leader can do to give them unity and a sense of belonging!

Whey did they start? Who started them? Why are they so popular with the troops? I can't answer the question..."OORAH"is answered below, courtesy of Gary "Buddha" Marte, (former Marine).

OK, HERE IT IS! THE DEFINITION AND HISTORY OF 'OORAH'

Right after Korea in 1953 the 1st Amphibious Reconnaissance Company, FMFPAC can be credited with the birth of "OORAH" in the Corps.

Specifically, where it came from was when Recon Marines were aboard the Submarine USS PERCH, ASSP-313. The Perch was an old WWII diesel boat retrofitted to carry UDT and Amphib Recon Marines. If you remember the old war movies, whenever the boat was to dive, you heard on the PA system, "DIVE,DIVE", and you heard the horn sound "AARUGHA", like an old Model "A" horn.

Sometime in 1953 or 1954, 1st Amphib Recon Marines, while on a conditioning run on land singing chants, someone imitated the "Dive" horn sound "AARUGHA", and it naturally became a Recon Warrior chant or mantra while on runs. It is sort of like the martial arts yell and adds a positive inference to the action. And this became part of Recon lexicon.

Former SgtMaj of the Marine Corps, John Massaro, was the company gunny of 1st Force in the late 50s and when he tansferred to MCRDSD as an instructor at DI school he took "AARUGHA" with him and passed it on to the DI students and they , in turn, passed it on to recruits.

Just as "Gung Ho" became symbolic of the WWII Raiders, so did "AARUGHA" become part of the new "running Marine Corps."

Over time, "AARUGHA" EVENTUALLY CHANGED TO "OORAH". The official Marine Corps Training Reference Manual on the history of Marine Recon is titled "AARUGHA", giving credence on the orgination of the 'POSITIVE RESPONSE' accenting anything that is meant to be good and uniquely Marine Corps.

It is part of Marine Corps language, like "Pogey Bait", "SOS", etc.

Semper Fi & Gung Ho,

Sgt. Wolf"
**************************

Since May I have been attempting to contact Major Marte for his verification of this story. On 12 August 2002, I received the following e-mail from the major.

Gunny...
When I was in ist Amphib Recon Company (54-57) when we went on our conditioning runs we would chant and one of the sayings was "AARUGHA" which was imitating the sound of the klaxon horn on board the submarine whenever the announcement was made "DIVE, DIVE". This was started by SgtMaj Dave Kendricks (Then a Gunny in 1952 in Amphib Recon) Today, it is part of the Marine Corps language as is Semper Fi, Gung Ho, etc. Loosely translated it means acknowledgement to a question and anything positive. Hope this helps!

Semper Fi
Gary "Buddha" Marte
Major, USMC, Ret
(1952-1982)

In my opinion, we have most likely finally hit paydirt here! It has long been thought, as expressed by many responses to my queries, that OohRah was grounded in Marine Recon. The fact that Maj Marte is an old-time Recon Marine, and was there in the early 50s, lends credence to an altogether plausible explanation as to the beginning and evolution of OohRah. I expect to publish this information on Gunny G's websites; hopefully, other Marines with knowledge of this will also come forward to comment on this

My most sincere thanks to Major Marte, Dr. Osanka, Bob Rader and others mentioned above..
Semper Fidelis
R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952-72
Gunny G's Marines Sites & Forums

OohRah!

Ever wonder where some of the most common items of our Marine Corps history came from? Things like the term "Jarhead," etc.? Most of these things are pretty well known by all Marines. But, then, there are also numerous cases where our accepted history is just plain inaccurate. For instance, Major Devereaux's last message from the besieged Wake Island in early World War Two--"Send Us More Japs"--or that the red stripe on the blue uniform trousers of officers and NCOs (sometimes referred to as bloodstripes) commemorates the Marine blood spilled at the battle of Chapultapec in 1847. These two items are not true, and there are many more things like this that I have addressed elsewhere on my websites.

And then there are some cases where the origin of certain traditions are altogether unknown. Take for example, the case of the well known OohRah! What is its origin? What is its meaning? When and where did it start? Is it related to similar cries now in use by other military services? Nobody knows for sure. Yeah, most everybody has an opinion, but what is the straight scoop? Some of the more popular "opinions" on this include that OohRah comes from either (take your pick) a Turkish or a Russian battle cry, and was somehow adopted by U.S. Marines. For many years, I, myself, leaned in the direction that it may have originated with the 1956 film, The DI, starring Jack Webb as T/Sgt Jim Moore, who, in that movie, commands his recruit platoon, "Let me hear you ROAR, tigers!"

In any case, opinions on this abound--some ridiculous, some even humorous, but like I already said, nobody seems to know for sure. OohRah is now well-entrenched in Marine Corps tradition, and although I have found that it is generally disliked and its use disapproved of by many old time Marines, one thing is for sure--it is here to stay! Personally, I think that provided we could determine valid and meaningful historical origin, much of this disapproval by old timers would soon be forgotten. And it seems like OohRah's origin is not so far distant in our past that there should still be some old salts around even now who can clue us in on the straight scoop.

Somewhere I read.... "The Sea Story is the traditional, preferred means by which wisdom is passed on from one generation of Marines to the next."
-Author Unknown

That makes sense to me, and I have thought that if we're ever going to get an answer on this it will be from Marines who were there and know. For at least a couple years now I have been using the resources of my e-mail and websites to seek information from Marines on this question, but the results have been disappointing. Up to now, that is.

On 12 May 2002, I received the following information from Marine Bob Rader (Sgt Wolf); the info had first been posted to the Sgt Grit's Bulletin Board and then e-mailed to me. *****************
From Whence It Came?

Received this among some other stuff from an old college classmate and former Force Troops Recon Marine, Dr. Frank Osanka:

The Recon Marines (and maybe all Marines), have their "OORAH" and the Army its "HOOAH"! But what is the origin of these exclamations by troops (can't call them words-- they are better described as sounds)? When used they are unmistakenly expressions of verve, spirit, morale, espirit, eliteness and sometimes derision! They are responses, greetngs, etc.

You won't find anything in Navy BuPers files. Marine Corps directives or Army regulations prescribing that they be used. Yet, they permeate the ranks and their origins ought to be recorded for they are as much military lexicon as "SNAFU," "GI", "Kilroy was here", "P38", etc. And, woe betide the commander who thinks he can put an end to their use! They are exclusive property of those who use them and rightfully so--for what it means to them transcends anything a leader can do to give them unity and a sense of belonging!

Whey did they start? Who started them? Why are they so popular with the troops? I can't answer the question..."OORAH"is answered below, courtesy of Gary "Buddha" Marte, (former Marine).

OK, HERE IT IS! THE DEFINITION AND HISTORY OF 'OORAH'

Right after Korea in 1953 the 1st Amphibious Reconnaissance Company, FMFPAC can be credited with the birth of "OORAH" in the Corps.

Specifically, where it came from was when Recon Marines were aboard the Submarine USS PERCH, ASSP-313. The Perch was an old WWII diesel boat retrofitted to carry UDT and Amphib Recon Marines. If you remember the old war movies, whenever the boat was to dive, you heard on the PA system, "DIVE,DIVE", and you heard the horn sound "AARUGHA", like an old Model "A" horn.

Sometime in 1953 or 1954, 1st Amphib Recon Marines, while on a conditioning run on land singing chants, someone imitated the "Dive" horn sound "AARUGHA", and it naturally became a Recon Warrior chant or mantra while on runs. It is sort of like the martial arts yell and adds a positive inference to the action. And this became part of Recon lexicon.

Former SgtMaj of the Marine Corps, John Massaro, was the company gunny of 1st Force in the late 50s and when he tansferred to MCRDSD as an instructor at DI school he took "AARUGHA" with him and passed it on to the DI students and they , in turn, passed it on to recruits.

Just as "Gung Ho" became symbolic of the WWII Raiders, so did "AARUGHA" become part of the new "running Marine Corps."

Over time, "AARUGHA" EVENTUALLY CHANGED TO "OORAH". The official Marine Corps Training Reference Manual on the history of Marine Recon is titled "AARUGHA", giving credence on the orgination of the 'POSITIVE RESPONSE' accenting anything that is meant to be good and uniquely Marine Corps.

It is part of Marine Corps language, like "Pogey Bait", "SOS", etc.

Semper Fi & Gung Ho,

Sgt. Wolf"
**************************

Since May I have been attempting to contact Major Marte for his verification of this story. On 12 August 2002, I received the following e-mail from the major.

Gunny...
When I was in ist Amphib Recon Company (54-57) when we went on our conditioning runs we would chant and one of the sayings was "AARUGHA" which was imitating the sound of the klaxon horn on board the submarine whenever the announcement was made "DIVE, DIVE". This was started by SgtMaj Dave Kendricks (Then a Gunny in 1952 in Amphib Recon) Today, it is part of the Marine Corps language as is Semper Fi, Gung Ho, etc. Loosely translated it means acknowledgement to a question and anything positive. Hope this helps!

Semper Fi
Gary "Buddha" Marte
Major, USMC, Ret
(1952-1982)

In my opinion, we have most likely finally hit paydirt here! It has long been thought, as expressed by many responses to my queries, that OohRah was grounded in Marine Recon. The fact that Maj Marte is an old-time Recon Marine, and was there in the early 50s, lends credence to an altogether plausible explanation as to the beginning and evolution of OohRah. I expect to publish this information on Gunny G's websites; hopefully, other Marines with knowledge of this will also come forward to comment on this

My most sincere thanks to Major Marte, Dr. Osanka, Bob Rader and others mentioned above..
Semper Fidelis
R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952-72
Gunny G's Marines Sites & Forums

 
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GyG's WW I Marines Battle Cry - E-E-E-YAH-YIP!

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November 5 2002, 5:20 PM 


 
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