**********
SHARE THIS/LINK TO THIS PAGE/ADD, ETC.
CLICK BELOW!
**********
Share
**********
 


  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>~Return to Index~  

Why Are Marines Called Jarheads?

August 21 2003 at 6:49 PM
No score for this post

gunnyg  (Login Dick Gaines)
Owner
from IP address 24.99.13.138

 
The Wordwizard Clubhouse
jarhead

marines are called this . why?

http://www.wordwizard.com/clubhouse/founddiscuss.asp?Num=2903
http://www.wordwizard.com/clubhouse/founddiscuss.asp?Num=2903

Submitted by ( - )

JUGHEAD originally meant mule. ‘Jughead’ dates back to the late 19th century when it meant fool and by the 1910’s it had come to be a general term of abuse and also referred to a mule whose large chunky head denoted stubbornness and stupidity.

JARHEAD started out as meaning mule probably ultimately from the pronunciation of ‘jawhead.’ In 1899 the mule became the mascot of the Army football team (to counteract the Navy goat) which could have had something to do with the military relationship. Of course a military icon wouldn’t have been picked for its stupidity so it is said that it was chosen as the mascot because ‘it reflects the long-standing usefulness of the animal in military operations -- hauling weapons, ammunition, and supplies. Strong, hearty, and persevering, the mule is truly an appropriate symbol for the Corps of Cadets.’ There are those who think that the term ‘leatherneck comes from the idea of the neck of the mule, but that term actually derives from the leather-lined collar which was formerly part of the uniform (1910-15).

Jarhead and jughead eventually merged to become slang synonyms for marine. Jughead was originally used to refer to members of a machine-gun company in WWI (‘the JUGHEAD gunners had it off the tripod and were tapping heads with it’). Before WWII JARHEADS was already in widespread use. A 1933 article stated ‘the [Marine] sergeants …moved into the second class cabins, and it took three days and a squad of JARHEADS to get them and their baggage moved to the troop class.

Dictionaries and military history websites seem to give varying explanations for the origin of JARHEAD. In addition to the above ideas, here are a few more:

A U.S. Marine. Perhaps from the shape of the hat the Marines once wore. (American Heritage Dictionary of English)

A slang term used by sailors as early as World War II to refer to members of the Marine Corps, drawing the term from the resemblance of the Marine dress blues uniform, with its high collar, to a Mason jar which at the time was made from blue glass. (military history website)

GRUNT, or Marine. Reportedly, due to the "high and tight" haircut favored by many marines; it looks as if someone put a bowl on the victim’s head and cut or shaved off all the hair that protruded.

Note: Definitions, dates, and quotes were assembled from Random House Unabridged Dictionary, Cassell’s Dictionary of Slang, Random House Historical Dictionary of American Slang, various ('repectable-looking) websites.

___________________________________________________________________________________

Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, Colorado – U.S.A.)

4/2/02

Response from Ken Greenwald (Fort Collins, CO - U.S.A.)

What no input from our resident USMC Jughead? Shay-m, Shay-m on you! G

Response from Leif Thorvaldson (Eatonville - U.S.A.)

a pejorative term, probably invented by the Navy, and therefore of no value or interest.

Response from Shay Simmons (Colfax - U.S.A.)

And the word "Marine," when used to refer to a member of the Armed Forces, is always capitalized.

Response from Shay Simmons (Colfax - U.S.A.)

boobs

Response from ( - )

"There are those who think that the term ‘leatherneck comes from the idea of the neck of the mule, but that term actually derives from the leather-lined collar which was formerly part of the uniform (1910-15)."

Not True the term was originated during the revolutionary war where Marines wore a leather band around thier necks to protect them from Swords hence the phrase stuck "Leathernecks"

SSgt Steve Sekula USMC Okinawa Japan

Response from ( - )

Invitation to all members!
Use the box below to join in the discussion by submitting your response:

Last Update: August 21, 2003
Copyright © 1995-2003 WordWizard Ltd
EMail: info@wordwizard.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952-72

Gunny G's Old Salt Marines Tavern
Sites & Forums!

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   
AuthorReply

gunnyg
(Login Dick Gaines)
Owner
24.99.13.138

GyG...

No score for this post
August 21 2003, 7:00 PM 

During my first cruise--1952--I was told by more than one Old Salt that the term Jarhead had come come the Old Corps when they still used mules. These Old Salts, in particular, were pre-WW II Marines.
I had known from watching old cowboy movies that the term Jughead was common for mules. The salts said that the term Jarhead was also used, and eventually, hardheaded/stubborn Marines came to be referred to as jarheads.

I have pointed this out to other Marines, for many years, on my own forums and webpages, and also on other messageboards--but this is the first time that I have seen the same explanation come back at me from another source. It's possible that somebody had gotten this stuff from one of my own postings, and passed it on, since no specific reference is give, but who knows!

Interesting.

Dick

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952-72

Gunny G's Old Salt Marines Tavern
Sites & Forums!

 
Scoring disabled. You must be logged in to score posts.Respond to this message   
 
  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>~Return to Index~  
Find more forums on U.S. Marine CorpsCreate your own forum at Network54
 Copyright © 1999-2017 Network54. All rights reserved.   Terms of Use   Privacy Statement  
**********
SHARE THIS/LINK TO THIS PAGE/ADD, ETC.
CLICK BELOW!
**********
Share
**********

All Rights Reserved
Gunny G's Marines Sites & Forums
By
R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952-72

eXTReMe Tracker >