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LiL’s Adventures in Tibet – Part 1 – Sightseeing and Scenery

August 3 2010 at 2:12 AM

LiL  (Login LiL888)

Tibet, the Roof of the World, remained unknown to the world until the beginning of the 20th century. The massive, snowy land has exerted an awesome draw on travelers and adventurers ever since. Its majestic scenery, mysterious and exotic religious culture, and wonderful people, rewards every tourist with an indelible life long memory

Lhasa, the capital city of Tibet, is considered to be a charming city with distinctive flavor.

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Surely every traveler must visit the Potala Palace during their trip to Tibet. This palace is sacred in Tibetan people's hearts. Before entering the palace you must show your identification card or passport

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Located on the Red Hill of Lhasa, it is the symbol of the city, known to the world for its grand constructions, elegant buildings, exquisite artworks and pious religious atmosphere.

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Tight security in the palace, and everywhere in Lhasa city for that matter. Tibetan people appear to be peaceful and religious on the surface. One wonders why there is a need for such tight security.

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Another must-see attraction is the Jokhang Temple. It is surrounded by Barkhor Street in the center of Lhasa. Being the spiritual center of Tibet, the temple is richly decorated with Tibetan features. It is where tourists can go to get a real taste of Tibetan culture. To visit Jokhang Temple, you have to pass through Barkhor Street where you will find many Tibetan people go to chant, sing and pray.

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Pilgrims walking clockwise around the temple

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Smell of incense permeates your clothing

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Prayer wheels a plenty

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Sera Monastery is situated in the north of Lhasa City. The highlight of the Monastery is lamas debating on Buddhist Doctrine. The debating is held from 15:30 to 16:30 every weekday. Unfortunately I visited Sera Monastery during the weekend so I did not have the chance to see the Monks Debating sad.gif

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Incense sold outside the temple

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Little boy turning prayer wheel - he is walking clockwise, of course

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Kinda costs a fortune to taka photographs inside the temple

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We also visited Tashilhunpo Monastery which is one of the Six Big Monasteries of Gelugpa (or Yellow Hat Sect) in Tibet.

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Tashilhunpo is the seat of the Panchen Lama since the Fourth Panchen Lama took charge in the monastery, and there are now nearly 800 lamas.

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I read online that Tibet is best appreciated if one travels outside Lhasa city. And these are photos of some of the views that we enjoyed

View from the plane

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Just outside Lhasa city

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River

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Reflection

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Stone offering and prayer flags across river

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The Chinese Government built electric transmission lines in the middle of no-where. Easily 600 km to the west of Lhasa. I wonder how much the infrastructure cost them ? And notice the moon was still up although this photo was taken around 10 a.m.

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Greenery..

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Some parts of the landscape look dry

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Lone motorbike

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Dzong Fortress : In 1904, British troops invaded Gyangtse but encountered fierce opposition from the strong and brave Gyangtse people. They defended the City from a fortress on Dzong Hill, using primitive guns and cannons, swords, and even bows and arrows to fight against their invaders. In June, the invading troops bombed Dzong Fortress and exploded its supply depot. The Gyangtse troops persisted under this dire situation. After running out of ammunition, they resorted to throwing stones to fight against their powerful enemy. Even after they ran out of stones, the remaining soldiers refused to surrender and instead jumped off the cliff to show their patriotism.

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Kharola Glacier 5560 metres

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Yamdrok Lake - is one of the three largest sacred lakes in Tibet. It is over 72 km long. The lake is surrounded by many snow-capped mountains and is fed by numerous small streams

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I took almost 3000 photos altogether but I do not want to bore you with my pics, so I made collages of a few of my favourite ones :

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More collages...

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Stay tuned for Part 2 of LiLs Adventures in Tibet.

( Please note that some of the text has been lifted off other articles on the Internet but the photos are all original. The opinions expressed here are based on my personal experience )




 
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