<< Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to Index  

LiL’s Adventures in Tibet – Part 1 – Sightseeing and Scenery

August 3 2010 at 2:12 AM

LiL  (Login LiL888)

 
Tibet, the Roof of the World, remained unknown to the world until the beginning of the 20th century. The massive, snowy land has exerted an awesome draw on travelers and adventurers ever since. Its majestic scenery, mysterious and exotic religious culture, and wonderful people, rewards every tourist with an indelible life long memory

Lhasa, the capital city of Tibet, is considered to be a charming city with distinctive flavor.

[linked image]

Surely every traveler must visit the Potala Palace during their trip to Tibet. This palace is sacred in Tibetan people's hearts. Before entering the palace you must show your identification card or passport

[linked image]

Located on the Red Hill of Lhasa, it is the symbol of the city, known to the world for its grand constructions, elegant buildings, exquisite artworks and pious religious atmosphere.

[linked image]

Tight security in the palace, and everywhere in Lhasa city for that matter. Tibetan people appear to be peaceful and religious on the surface. One wonders why there is a need for such tight security.

[linked image]

Another must-see attraction is the Jokhang Temple. It is surrounded by Barkhor Street in the center of Lhasa. Being the spiritual center of Tibet, the temple is richly decorated with Tibetan features. It is where tourists can go to get a real taste of Tibetan culture. To visit Jokhang Temple, you have to pass through Barkhor Street where you will find many Tibetan people go to chant, sing and pray.

[linked image]

Pilgrims walking clockwise around the temple

[linked image]

Smell of incense permeates your clothing

[linked image]

Prayer wheels a plenty

[linked image]



Sera Monastery is situated in the north of Lhasa City. The highlight of the Monastery is lamas debating on Buddhist Doctrine. The debating is held from 15:30 to 16:30 every weekday. Unfortunately I visited Sera Monastery during the weekend so I did not have the chance to see the Monks Debating sad.gif

[linked image]

Incense sold outside the temple

[linked image]

Little boy turning prayer wheel - he is walking clockwise, of course

[linked image]

Kinda costs a fortune to taka photographs inside the temple

[linked image]

We also visited Tashilhunpo Monastery which is one of the Six Big Monasteries of Gelugpa (or Yellow Hat Sect) in Tibet.

[linked image]

Tashilhunpo is the seat of the Panchen Lama since the Fourth Panchen Lama took charge in the monastery, and there are now nearly 800 lamas.

[linked image]


I read online that Tibet is best appreciated if one travels outside Lhasa city. And these are photos of some of the views that we enjoyed

View from the plane

[linked image]

Just outside Lhasa city

[linked image]

River

[linked image]

Reflection

[linked image]

Stone offering and prayer flags across river

[linked image]

The Chinese Government built electric transmission lines in the middle of no-where. Easily 600 km to the west of Lhasa. I wonder how much the infrastructure cost them ? And notice the moon was still up although this photo was taken around 10 a.m.

[linked image]

Greenery..

[linked image]

Some parts of the landscape look dry

[linked image]

Lone motorbike

[linked image]

Dzong Fortress : In 1904, British troops invaded Gyangtse but encountered fierce opposition from the strong and brave Gyangtse people. They defended the City from a fortress on Dzong Hill, using primitive guns and cannons, swords, and even bows and arrows to fight against their invaders. In June, the invading troops bombed Dzong Fortress and exploded its supply depot. The Gyangtse troops persisted under this dire situation. After running out of ammunition, they resorted to throwing stones to fight against their powerful enemy. Even after they ran out of stones, the remaining soldiers refused to surrender and instead jumped off the cliff to show their patriotism.

[linked image]

Kharola Glacier 5560 metres

[linked image]

Yamdrok Lake - is one of the three largest sacred lakes in Tibet. It is over 72 km long. The lake is surrounded by many snow-capped mountains and is fed by numerous small streams

[linked image]

I took almost 3000 photos altogether but I do not want to bore you with my pics, so I made collages of a few of my favourite ones :

[linked image]


[linked image]


[linked image]


[linked image]




[linked image]


More collages...

[linked image]


[linked image]


[linked image]


[linked image]

Stay tuned for Part 2 of LiLs Adventures in Tibet.

( Please note that some of the text has been lifted off other articles on the Internet but the photos are all original. The opinions expressed here are based on my personal experience )




 
 Respond to this message   
AuthorReply

JerryW
(Login 9000000153)
AP Discussion Group

Great photos Liling

August 4 2010, 8:53 PM 

You really captured Tibet. The photos are stunning, you have really mastered photography.

Thanks for taking us along.

JerryW

 
 Respond to this message   

LiL
(Login LiL888)

Re: Great photos Liling

August 4 2010, 11:03 PM 

Hiii Jerry..

Thanks for your comment. You are the first to post a reply happy.gif I will try my best to post Parts 2,3 and 4 by this week


 
 Respond to this message   

Phil
(Login pp5120)
AP Discussion Group

simply AMAZING...

August 5 2010, 9:55 AM 

wow...I always forget how open the land is out there..almost pristine...
great photos..would love to see an online link if you like to share...

one place that I hope to get to someday before it gets too common...

any issues with altitude?
looks like you just drove...
looking forward to part 2

 
 Respond to this message   

LiL
(Login LiL888)

Re: simply AMAZING...

August 5 2010, 7:37 PM 

Hiiiii Phil

Online link ? Not sure what u mean by this but I upload my pics to photobucket. My username is ongliling_2009 if u want to view my pica but if memory serves me right I only upload pics which I post on this forum

I did have problems with altitude. I flew into Lhasa from Chengdu ( this city is the best place to access Tibet because it has numerous flights a day ) and was ok the first 3 hours.. Then I started feeling tired and lackluster, had slight headache.. Went to bed around 10 pm and threw up around midnite. Felt much better after puking but basically had to take it slow the entire trip. Some of my friends did not sleep week and not much appetite ( maybe coz I am not a big fan of yak meat and yak butter tea hahahahhaa )

yes we did a lot of driving.. I would say it takes around 15 hours to get from Lhasa to Mount Everest and u do it over 2 days



 
 Respond to this message   

LiL
(Login LiL888)

Re: simply AMAZING...

August 5 2010, 7:39 PM 

Hiiiii Phil

Online link ? Not sure what u mean by this but I upload my pics to photobucket. My username is ongliling_2009 if u want to view my pica but if memory serves me right I only upload pics which I post on this forum

I did have problems with altitude. I flew into Lhasa from Chengdu ( this city is the best place to access Tibet because it has numerous flights a day ) and was ok the first 3 hours.. Then I started feeling tired and lackluster, had slight headache.. Went to bed around 10 pm and threw up around midnite. Felt much better after puking but basically had to take it slow the entire trip. Some of my friends did not sleep week and not much appetite ( maybe coz I am not a big fan of yak meat and yak butter tea hahahahhaa )

yes we did a lot of driving.. I would say it takes around 15 hours to get from Lhasa to Mount Everest and u do it over 2 days



 
 Respond to this message   
Geo
(no login)

Beautiful shot

August 5 2010, 12:02 PM 

Would love to be there.
Thanks for the great pictures!
Geo

 
 Respond to this message   

LiL
(Login LiL888)

Re: Beautiful shot

August 5 2010, 7:41 PM 

Thanks for viewing and I should be posting Part 3 and 4 soon

 
 Respond to this message   

Helen
(Login elanoftroy)
AP Discussion Group

WoW!

August 10 2010, 7:43 PM 

Lil,

 

This is an amazing trip; is it a recent?  I realize photography is a hobby / developing skill but the places you visit and the broad scope of folk lore, people and country makes it amazing that you can capture so much in so little time.  You must be a whirl wind type of person to keep up that sort of pace. 

 

Its crazy that you need to show a identification / passport to enter that building and that youre even allowed to take photos or videos in the temple.  I guess with having so much security, it may draw more people to want to go in to see whats being guarded encouraging income from curious picture seekers.

 

The peoples costume is colorful but I really find it interesting that so much material is used on the outside of the buildings like outside curtains. I would think that the colors would fade quickly

 

Your group of photos of the mountains, lakes and clouds were breath taking.  I really like the one following the caption Reflections.  It has the look of an erupting volcano with smoke coming from the cone.   Speaking of cones did you buy any incense?  How do you burn the powdered kind?  Ive never seen incense like that before. 

  

3000 photos???  And how many days was this visit?  Another weekend?  Its all amazing you captured the essence of the people, their temperaments and their country very well.  From reading your story I became curious about where the Lhasa Apso dog breed originated.  According to Wikipedia, It was bred as an interior sentinel in the Buddhist monasteries who alerted the monks to any intruders who entered.  The breeds name is taken for the city and a Tibetan word combined to mean long-haired Tibetan dog.  Ahh all so interesting - Drinking my evening tea as I read your letter.

 

Fondly,

 

Helen

 

BTW   Is that you in the baby blue sweat shirt with the black and white polka dot hat and black gloves?   How cool!


 
 Respond to this message   

LiL
(Login LiL888)

Re: WoW!

August 10 2010, 9:19 PM 

Hiiiiiii Helen Howzit going ? Please see the reply to your comments below :


Lil,

This is an amazing trip; is it a recent? I realize photography is a hobby / developing skill but the places you visit and the broad scope of folk lore, people and country makes it amazing that you can capture so much in so little time. You must be a whirl wind type of person to keep up that sort of pace.

( *** I visited Tibet beginning of last month. Summer is the best time to visit Tibet due to the harsh climate.

I have been back a month now and it took me so long to post my photoessay coz I have been so busy with my new baby hedgehog, Needles. Isnt he adorable ?

[linked image]

[linked image]

[linked image]

[linked image]

[linked image]

[linked image]



Well, I guess I am kinda a whirlwind type of person. I get bored easily which is why I need to travel so often.. hahahaha. *** )


Its crazy that you need to show a identification / passport to enter that building and that youre even allowed to take photos or videos in the temple. I guess with having so much security, it may draw more people to want to go in to see whats being guarded encouraging income from curious picture seekers.


( *** Well, I think the reason why you need to show identification is because of the China government is not in good terms with the Dalai Lama and Potala Palace is his former winter residence. I was surprised they charged so much to take photos inside the chapels at Sera and Tashilhunpo Monastery. Most people did not want to fork out that much $$$ so I doubt they derived any income from us tourists. I was told that Kumbum monastery in Gyantse charges only RMB10( around USD$3 ) per chapel and that money many people paid. *** )


The peoples costume is colorful but I really find it interesting that so much material is used on the outside of the buildings like outside curtains. I would think that the colors would fade quickly

( *** Hmmm.. very observant of u happy.gif *** )

Your group of photos of the mountains, lakes and clouds were breath taking. I really like the one following the caption Reflections. It has the look of an erupting volcano with smoke coming from the cone. Speaking of cones did you buy any incense? How do you burn the powdered kind? Ive never seen incense like that before.

( *** I did not buy any incense but I assume they use charcoal to burn them. ***)

3000 photos??? And how many days was this visit? Another weekend? Its all amazing you captured the essence of the people, their temperaments and their country very well. From reading your story I became curious about where the Lhasa Apso dog breed originated. According to Wikipedia, It was bred as an interior sentinel in the Buddhist monasteries who alerted the monks to any intruders who entered. The breeds name is taken for the city and a Tibetan word combined to mean long-haired Tibetan dog. Ahh all so interesting - Drinking my evening tea as I read your letter.

( *** This trip took 9 days ex Kuala Lumpur. A lot of time was spent getting to Lhasa ( I had to fly to Chengdu first and spend the night there ) so most of the photos I posted were taken over a 5 day period. The Lhasa Apso dog is soooo cute. I did not see any but I saw a few Tibetan Mastiffs. Would love to own one but I think the weather in Malaysia is not suitable. *** )

Fondly,

Helen

BTW Is that you in the baby blue sweat shirt with the black and white polka dot hat and black gloves? How cool!

( *** The lady in the polka dot hat is working at Potala Palace and she is in charge of checking our passports happy.gif You can see two photos of me in Part 3 I am posing with the baby ox in Gyantse and I made friends with a cute Yak at Yamdrok Lake. Funny story how I got round to buying the Tibetan outfit. It was a hot day in Tibet and I wore my tshirt and shorts for my day of sightseeing. The driver stopped along the roadside in Gyantse where we could take photos of Kumbum monastery. I started taking photos of passerbys and this farmer lady gave me a dirty look and started stroking cheek with her index finger and looked down at my legs. Other than shorts, I did not have any clean clothing which is decent by Tibetan standards, so as soon as we got into town, I ran into the first clothing store I saw. This is the first time I have been shamed into buying a dress !!!!! *** )

 
 Respond to this message   

Helen
(Login elanoftroy)
AP Discussion Group

I’m laughing

August 11 2010, 11:28 AM 


Lil,

You were shamed into buying a dress, lol!  Thats funny, but I think I may have done the same thing since I do not care for disapproval from elders like that either.  You know what they say, When in Rome, do as the Romans. 

I just love your baby hedgehog, hes sooo cute.  Ive never heard of someone having a hedgehog as an animal.  His name, Needles, fits him perfectly.  Is it common for folks to have them as pets or is this a new craze?  Im curious about the art; is that an exhibit of your photography?  What about the lady painting the hedgehog? 

Lil, you amaze me,

Helen


 
 Respond to this message   

LiL
(Login LiL888)

Re: I’m laughing

August 11 2010, 9:17 PM 

Hiii Helen

actually I am the only person I know who has a hedgehog.. I was at the petshop a few months back and that is where I saw my first hedgehog. Could not get the image of his cuteness out of my mind and I ordered a baby hedgie that night itself. Needles is albino and quite a rascal. I have ordered a girlfriend for him and she should be arriving soon. I have brought him out to a few events, dinners, houseparties and he is always the centre of attraction coz not many Malaysians have seen or heard of hedgehogs before, often confusing him for a porcupine. He is a good companion coz he does not make noise and does not smell ( kinda helps that I shower him daily and apply baby oil and cologne on his quills after that ).

As for the artwork, check out www.photofunia.com. Some of the photos use face recognition technology and unfortunately the programme cannot recognize hedgehog's face sad.gif

 
 Respond to this message   

MTF
(Login MelvynTeillolFoo)
AP Moderators

Journey to the West

August 11 2010, 10:24 AM 

LiL,

Thanks for the photo-tour.

 

I'm still reading Volume 1 of 3 volumes of 'The Journey to the West' by Wu Cheng'en about the Tang Dynasty priest Sanzang going to India forthe Sutras with his disciples, including the infamous Monkey King 'Sun Wu-Kong'. Eventually, they will get to Tibet and I can imagine the scenery now that I've seen your photos.

Apparently, the broad rivers feature prominently in the stories  -  there be monsters and demons in swirling waters!  happy.gif

 

Regards,

MTF


 
 Respond to this message   

LiL
(Login LiL888)

Re: Journey to the West

August 11 2010, 9:22 PM 

Hiii MTF... I think I read the cartoon version of this story many years ago. Did not see any monsters or demons when I was there

if I visit Tibet again I would like to goto Lake LhamoLatso ( Oracle Lake ). If you r lucky ( or in Buddhist speak have the right karma ),, the lake will tell u your future.

 
 Respond to this message   
 
  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to Index  
 Copyright © 1999-2017 Network54. All rights reserved.   Terms of Use   Privacy Statement  
ThePuristS.com Home Page