PACIFIC INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY FORUM

 Return to Pacific IT Board  

Value of Non-Citizens In Maintaining Economic Dominance of IT Powerhouse Nations

June 6 2007 at 7:18 PM
FYI 


Response to Are there PNG IT skilled people overseas??

The economic powerhouses in the world can only maintain their dominance by attracting non-citizens with expertise and talent in IT and associated electronic fields.

There are several reasons for this:

(1) Attracting the best possible non-citizens means that their talents are gained by the successful attracting country, while lost to the countries they might have otherwise gone or returned to. Because it is a double effect (gain for one country, loss for another), the results of hiring non-citizens is magnified far more than when a citizen is hired by countries in Europe, North America, or Asia. America's IT industry is a perfect example. Non-citizens have been crucial in allowing the USA to maintain its first class status in the world. Because many of those non-citizens have come from Asia economic tigers, their capture by the USA has simultaneously hurt their countries of origin, much to America's benefit.

(2) Non-citizens in the IT industry contribute to economic health of Europe, USA, etc. For example: The USA has a large trade deficit which is troubling. However, the one area where the USA is still competitive despite its high labour costs is in the service industry. IT non-citizen experts are contributing hugely to software development and other services. Because these are the American products that people overseas most want to buy (America's heavy industry is no longer economically competitive with its products), the contribution of non-citizens greatly helps the USA and other nations to earn the foreign revenue necessary in offsetting balance of payments deficit.

(3) It was customary that non-citizens that schooled in Europe, USA, Japan, etc., to go back to their countries of origin. In some way or another their education has been subsidised, and that investment becomes lost when these people go back. The country where they are educated will benefit far more if those non-citizens can remain in the country where they were schooled and contribute to that country's economic growth. Whether or not the non-citizen would be a valuable asset in their country of origin is immaterial from this perspective. The greater goal is simply to recoup the investment in their education. That is best achieved by providing employment to the highest quality non-citizens, encouraging them not only to abandon plans to return to their country of origin, but also provide economic and other incentives that encourage them to become citizens of the countries where they have schooled so that their residence becomes permanent.

(4) It has been demonstrated time and time again that new ideas and ways of thinking are enhanced by non-citizens employed in the USA, Japan, Europe, etc. Again it is immaterial whether that creativity would be put to better use in the developing countries from where these non-citizens often come. The issue is the ability for the USA, Europe, Japan, etc to maintain their IT lead, which is critical in the shifting economies of the 21st Century. Staying in first place requires fresh ideas; fresh ideas in turn, require fresh blood, and this fresh blood is most likely to come from expertise that originally came from outside the IT leader nations, particularly from India and Asia. Only the cream of the crop of non-citizens should be retained by these IT dominant nations as a matter of strategy, because that will enhance the contribution that non-citizens make to maintaining IT leadership in the Europe, Japan, and the USA.

It cannot be overstated that IT and associated endeavours are now the lynch pin in national economies of the nations often termed as "developed." The successful recruitment of non-citizens is fundamental to these nations remaining as the economic and intellectual power houses of the world, as well as remaining the main owners of intellectual property that can be harnessed to further boost the economic interests of the IT dominant nations.


 
 Respond to this message   
Responses



INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ISSUES IN THE PACIFIC ISLANDS AND OCEANIA: PAPUA NEW GUINEA (PNG), FIJI, VANUATU, SOLOMON ISLANDS, TONGA, SAMOA, KIRIBATI, NAURU, NEW CALEDONIA, TAHITI, COOK ISLANDS, AND OTHER COUNTRIES IN THE PACIFIC.