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ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

August 3 2010 at 3:52 AM
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Fuzuli  (Login Fuzuli)
The Conquerors (Turkey)

Some selected examples:

[linked image]
Saber in a jeweled scabbard, L.97 cm, the Ottoman Empire, 17th century

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Yatagan of Suleyman I, 1526, length 66cm, Topkapi Museum.


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Detail from the blade, yatagan of Suleyman I, Topkapi Museum.


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Sword of Mehmed II, the Conqueror, 140cm long, 15th century, Topkapi Museum.


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Sword of Suleyman I, 16th century, length 93cm, Military Museum, Istanbul.


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Detail, sword of Suleyman I, 16th century, length 93cm, Military Museum, Istanbul


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Handle detail, yatagan of Suleyman I, 1526, Topkapi Museum.


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Ottoman Turkey, 17th century


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The blade is chiseled in relief with Koranic verses, with the surrounding areas inlaid with gold



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[linked image]

 
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Fuzuli
(Login Fuzuli)
The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 3 2010, 3:56 AM 

Some more:

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It is made in 1526 or 1527 by the court jeweler Ahmed Tekelü for the Ottoman Sultan Süleyman the Magnificent


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This decorated saber is said to have been made in 1876 for the investiture of the Ottoman sultan Murad V

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Ottoman parade sabre with karabela hilt, seventeenth century

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The Topkapi Dagger. It was made to be presented to Nadir Shah.

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Enameled and diamond studded daggers.

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Ottoman, mid 16th century, Istanbul. Jade handle inlaid with gold and set with gems.


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Yataghan and Scabbard


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Dagger and Sheath

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Dagger

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Sword with the name and blazon of Sultan Baybars

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[linked image]

 
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CT
(Login charlieTurk)
Group General

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 3 2010, 4:31 AM 

Those are some great pics thanks mate. Got any of other weapons/armour?

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Grurk
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Administrator

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 3 2010, 4:38 AM 

From The Metropolitan Museum of Art

1
2

Photobucket

 
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 3 2010, 4:45 AM 

[linked image]

[linked image]

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[linked image]

 
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Grurk
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 3 2010, 6:10 AM 

if you guys could add armour to this thread? this is just marvelous. look at the freaking detail.

The most interesting part is the individualization.I have also seen a few turkish muskets hosting a few verses and decorative trims.
(for sure, not comparable to this forged level of awesomeness)

 
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 3 2010, 6:19 AM 

[linked image]
Turkish guns, 1750-1800. Musée de l'Armée, Paris.

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Yataghans from the 17th-19th century

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Bows and arrows and maces

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Ottoman volley gun with 9 barrels, early 16th century.

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Ornate Ottoman cannon, length: 385cm, cal:178mm, weight: 2910kg, stone projectile, founded 8 October 1581 in Algiers, seized by France during the invasion of Algiers in 1830. Musée de l'Armée, Paris.

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Tower flintlocks from the 17th-18th centuries

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Ottoman armour and helmets (kept in Topkap Palace)

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Swords and sheathes

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[linked image]

 
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 3 2010, 6:39 AM 

[linked image]
Yatagan, ca. 1525 - 30
Made by the Workshop of Ahmed Tekelü
Turkey (Istanbul)
Steel, walrus ivory, gold, silver, rubies, turquoise, pearl

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Helmet, mid-16th century; Ottoman period
Turkish
Steel, damascened with gold

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Ottoman Sipahy in Scale Armour 1530

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XXII th century Ottoman armour.

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16th century Turkish Ottoman Horse Armour Chanfron

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OTTOMAN DECORATED GUNPOWDER HOLDER,16TH-17TH CENTURY

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16th century Turkish Ottoman Armour

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[linked image]

 
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 4 2010, 5:46 AM 

[linked image]
Chamfron and cheek-pieces, Ottoman Turkey or Egypt, 18th century

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An armor for horse's head. (16th century), Topkapi Sarayi Museum, Istanbul.

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Frontal for a horse's head, gilded copper with engraving, stamp of the Imperial Armoury. 61 X 24 cm. Ottoman period, 16th century. Armoury, Topkapi Sarayi Museum, Istanbul.

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Armor, from an Ottoman soldier

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An Ottoman armor and helmet. (15th century)

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Ottoman mail and plates armor, seventeenth century

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[linked image]

 
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 4 2010, 5:51 AM 

Ottoman Rifles:

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19th century Ottoman rifle with Sultan II.Abdulhamid tugra, length 108cm, bore 13mm, muzzle loaded

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18th century Ottoman rifle, length 160cm, bore 16mm, muzzle loaded

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18th century Ottoman rifle, length 143cm, bore 15mm, muzzle loaded

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Early 19th century Ottoman rifle, length 141cm, bore 18mm, muzzle loaded

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17th century Ottoman rifle, length 154cm, bore 13mm, muzzle loaded

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Circa 1806 Ottoman rifle, length 217cm, bore 18mm, muzzle loaded

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18th century Ottoman rifle, length 232cm, bore 22mm, muzzle loaded

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17th century Ottoman rifle, length 158cm, bore 16mm, muzzle loaded

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16th century Ottoman rifle, lenght 148cm, bore 22mm, muzzle loaded


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CT
(Login charlieTurk)
Group General

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 4 2010, 5:56 AM 

Thats some beautiful work on the horses armour, thanks again mate

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Grurk
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 4 2010, 8:29 AM 

wow amazing pics.. love the koranic sword and the black chain armor, wow

.

 
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 4 2010, 9:15 AM 

Here are some more:

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17th century Turkish vambrace or bazu-band from the Karlsruher Turkenbeute collection

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16th century Ottoman krug or korazin

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Another type of mail-and-plate armour

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Yataghan sword 1884

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Iron Dizçek, for knee protection, 15th century

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Ceremony shield, made of willow tree, 16th century

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Ottoman shield 17th century

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Mail armour belonged to Rumeli beylerbeyi Behram Pasha (dec. 1532)

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Sirvansah, belonged to Sultan Halid I (dec. 1464)




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[linked image]

 
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 4 2010, 9:26 AM 

16th century steel armour:

[linked image] [linked image]
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15th century helmets:

[linked image] [linked image] [linked image]

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Conic style helmet, 17th century

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Helmet of Orhan Gazi



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[linked image]

 
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 4 2010, 9:35 AM 

Turkish ceremonial Tombak gold helmets and shield:

[linked image]
[linked image] [linked image]



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[linked image]

 
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Arsenal
(Login arsenal100)
The Redcoats (UK)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 4 2010, 12:26 PM 




i went to royal armouries in leeds 2 years ago and so lots of weapons armour that was used by turks and other army in the in the ottoman days


if you live in england or visiting from outside and are in nothern england then visit this place

royal armouries website
http://www.royalarmouries.org/visit-us/leeds/leeds-galleries/oriental
















 
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(Login cr33pt3d)
The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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August 4 2010, 2:08 PM 

really nice pics , thanx bro !

[linked image]

 
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 4:46 AM 

ANTIQUE OTTOMAN MACES

A mace with a ball shaped heavy head (topuz) was a sign of military authority as well as a weapon used by Turks from the earliest times.


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Three different style of Ottoman maces, Topkapi Saray Museum, Istanbul


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Ceremonial or Parade Mace


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Ceremonial Ottoman mace of jade and rubies. By permission of Topkapi Saray Museum, Istanbul


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Ottoman mace of the seventeenth centruy




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[linked image]

Atam izindeyiz!

 
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 5:13 AM 

Random weapons:

[linked image]

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[linked image]

[linked image]

[linked image]

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[linked image]

Atam izindeyiz!

 
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WAFFer
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Satyameva Jayate (India)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 5:53 AM 

amazing pics . thnx for sharing happy.gif

********************************************
Ever seen an English puppy with tail b/w legs happy.gif

the name is Broad wink.gif

 
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WAFFer
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 10:15 AM 

[linked image][linked image]
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16th-17th century Shields
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17 th century Shield made of elephant leather
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17th century Shield made of willow tree
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maces


[linked image]

 
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WAFFer
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 10:34 AM 

[linked image][linked image]
Ottoman Chichak 1560

[linked image]
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Sultan Suleyman the magnificents helmet
[linked image]

 
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WAFFer
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 11:58 AM 

Awesome thread ,thats the turkish ottomans, no wonder that we f***** up all europe with our spirit combined with this equipment.

and whats that? a 2 Metre long, 18mm Bore Rifle? Holy shi* is that a Ottoman Mcmillan or what?
They make the impression of being very precise with those long barrels. anyone confirm?

 
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 1:22 PM 

@ Mysia

These pics are awsome. thx. happy.gif

_______________________________________________

[linked image]

Atam izindeyiz!

 
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WAFFer
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 4:12 PM 

thanks fuzili
here some more Helmets
[linked image]
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Ak Koyunlu helmet
[linked image]



[linked image]

 
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WAFFer
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 5:23 PM 

The Kapikulu cavalry also known as the Six Divisions (Alti Bölük), was a corps of mounted elite soldiers in the Ottoman army. There were not really six but four division s. Two of the six were sub-divisions. The divisions were:
* Sipahis (From Persian, translated roughly as ''armymen'')
* Silahdars (From Persian, translated roughly as ''weaponbearers'')
*Ulufeciler (translated as ''stipendiaries''), organised in two sub-divisions:
Ulufeciler of the Left
Ulufeciler of the Right

* Garipler(translated roughly as ''strangers''), organised in two sub-divisions:
Garipler of the Left
Garipler of the Right

The elite cavalry was the mounted counterpart to the Janissaries and played an important part in the Ottoman army. The Six Divisions were probably founded during the reign of Sultan Mehmed II (1451-1481), but the Sipahis had existed since 1326.
The most important of these divisions was the Sipahis.

The Sipahis' status resembled that of the knights of medieval Europe but less armored. Sort of a light to medium cavalry. Turks never had heavy cavalry. The sipahi influenced a lot the walachian knights.

The Sipahi was the holder of a fief of land (tîmâr; hence the alternative name Tîmârli Sipahi) granted directly by the Ottoman sultan and was entitled to all of the income from that land, in return for military service.


The Sipahis were originally founded during the reign of Murat.I. Although the Sipahis were originally recruited, like the Janissaries using the devshirme system, by the time of Sultan Mehmet II. their ranks were only chosen from among the ethnic Turks who owned land within imperial borders. The Sipahi eventually became the largest of the six divisions of the Ottoman cavalry, and were the mounted counterpart to the Janissaries, who fought on foot.

Until the mid-18th century provincial sipahi cavalery formed the majority
of most Ottoman armies. They numbered around 40,000 men in the 15th and 16th centuries, over half of whom came from the European provinces (Rumeli).
A timar was the smallest unit of land owned by a Sipahi, providing a yearly revenue of no more than 10,000 akçe ( which was between two and four times what a teacher earned. A ziamet was a larger unit of land, yielding up to 100,000 akçe, and was owned by Sipahis of officer rank. A hass was the largest unit of land, giving revenues of more than 100,000 akçe, and was only held by the highest-ranking members of the military. A "timar Sipahi" was obliged to provide the army with up to five soldiers, a "ziamet Sipahi" with up to twenty, and a "hass Sipahi" with far more than twenty.

Though often compared to the medieval european fiefs, the timars were not the property of a sipahi they were held in trust and gave the sipahi only limited rights over the local inhabitants. An ordinary sipahi lived in a village, worked his own land, had to pay the peasants for most of their services and received no salary. In Anatolia the Ottomans normally incorporated existing sipahis and their timars. At first the process was similar in Rumelia. Many Balkan Pronoia fiefs were converted into timars, their existing owners keeping the land but losing their domination over the peasants. Some became Muslim but other Christian for generations. Even after conversion many such sipahis retained their old family names.

Among the best known Christian sipahis were members of the slavic aristoracy like Constantine Dejanovic, lord of Kjustendil in easter macedonia, who fought for the Sultan at Kosova (1389); and Kraljevic Marko, a leading nobleman who later became the great folk-hero of Serbian legend. Both died fighting for the Ottomans in 1395. In the mid-15th century the Vidin area of north western Bulgaria sent Mehmet II seven Christian sipahis with voynik infantry (A Slav warrior in Ottoman service) followers. A few Christian are still recorded even at the end of the 15th century.

The quality of a sipahis weaponry reflected the size of his fief. A Sipahi was only expected to have armour if his timar was above a certain value. Neverthless, even in the late 16th century Europeans, while considering their infantry superior to that of the Ottomans, conceded that the Turkish sipahi was the better cavalrymen. All European tactical developments wich arose out of war with the Ottoman reflected the sipahi threat not that of the Jannisaries.

On mobilisation, one of every ten sipahis remained at home to maintain the law and order. The rest formed into alay regiments under theit çeribaþi("head of troops", an officer in the provinces commanding a detachment of timar-holding sipahis), subaþi and alay bey (colonel) officers. These led them to the local sancak bey`s(The governor of sancak) two hors tail standard. These led them to the local. The men of each sancak (The chief administrative unit of the Ottoman Empire) then assembeld around a provincial governor or beylerbeyi befor riding to the sultan`s camp. On the battelfield either the sipahis of honour on the right flank, depending on wheter the war was in Europe or Asia.

After 1533 a new typ of timar was established along the Hungarian frontier. Instead of living on their fiefs, these sipahis stayed in strategic towns like Budapest, Timisoara, Belgrad and Estergon where they supported the garrnison. In general, however, the 16th century was a period of decline in sipahis fortunes. The majority of fiefs were now held by other Ottoman cavalaryman. some were even sold to non military men for cash. Stagnation and retreat reduced the number of timars but not those who needed them. Meanwhile men who did hold fiefs often paid second rate soldiers to serve in their place.

The sipahi also found himself unable to cope with the increasingly disciplined European infantry armed with ever more effective muskets. The Ottoman government tried to arm their horseman with pistol, but only after 1600 did many sipahis accept it.

The duties of the Sipahis included riding with the sultan on parades and as a mounted bodyguard. In times of peace, they were also responsible for the collection of taxes. The Sipahis, however, should not be confused with the Timariots, who were irregular cavalry organised along feudal lines and known as "sipahi"s colloquially. In fact, the two formations had very little in common

Rivalry with the Janissary Corps

Since they were a cavalry regiment it was well known within the Ottoman military circles that they considered themselves a superior stock of soldiers than Janissaries, who were a mixture of both Turkic and devþirme non-Turks, whereas the Sipahis were almost exclusively chosen amongst ethnic Turkic landowners(after 15th century). That minor quarrels erupted between the two units is made evident with a Turkmen adage, still used today within Turkey, "Atlý er baþkaldýrmaz", which, referring to the unruly Janissaries, translates into, "Horsemen don't mutiny".

Towards the middle of the 16th century, the Janissaries had started to be the most important part of the army, though the Sipahis remained an important factor in the empire's economy and politics, and a crucial aspect of disciplined leadership within the army. As late as the 17th century, the Sipahis were, together with their rivals the Janissaries, the de facto rulers in the early years of sultan Murad IV's reign. In 1826, the Sipahis played an important part in the disbandment of the Janissary corps. The Sultan received critical assistance from the loyalist Sipahi cavalry in order to forcefully dismiss the infuriated janissaries.

Two years later, however, they shared a similar fate when Sultan Mahmud II revoked their privileges and dismissed them in favour of a more modern military structure. Unlike the Janissaries before them they retired honorably, peacefully, and without bloodshed into new Ottoman cavalry divisions who followed modern military tradition doctrines.



The other cavalary devisions were heavily equipped compared to the Sipahi cavalary.
Ulufeciler (Salaried Men) and divided into right and left were established by Kara Timur Pasa (14th century), The Beylerbey of Rumeli , during the reign of Murad I (1360-1389)
The third an fourth named Garipler (strangers/Foreigners), also divided into left and right, having first been recruited from veteran and volunteers and later from Muslim mercenaries entering Ottoman service from other parts of the Middle East,mostly Arabs, Persians, and Kurds; members of the Janissary corps who particularly distinguished themselves; and also occasionally, able member of the other Kapikulu corps.



The final Two regiments, named Silahtars(weaponbearers) and Sipahi Oglan (Sipahi children) were organized later, probably under Mehmed I(1413-1421), and were the elite of the entire force. In general, the men of the first four groups were known collectivly as the four regiments (Bölükat-i Erba´a)and operated on both sides of the sultan in battle, while the Silahtars an Sipahi children operated only on the right close to sultan. All had higher salaries and more prestige than the Jannisary corps, so that positions in them were highly valeud and sought. Members came from Ic oglan (Inner Palace servants) graduates not considered quite capable enough for palace service.

During campaigns, the Sipahi children and Silahtars were responsible for guarding the person of the sultan. The latter also had the job of clearing out and opening roads and bridges befor the main army leading and guarding the sultans horses, and carrying his horsetails.
Since these corps were mounted forces, they were stationed mostly in the outskirts of istanbul and the other major cities, with each of these groups being commanded by a Kethüda yeri (local lieutenant) apointed by and responsible to the aga of his own corps. They were salaried. Form the same reasons as the provincial cavalrymen. Numbering about 6000 men late in the sixteenth century, they rose to 20,844 in the late 17th century and 22,169 early in the 18th.

Ps sorry for my english





















[linked image]

 
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WAFFer
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 5:38 PM 

The Kapikulu cavalry
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This a late 15th century - Early 16th century Ottoman Bekhterets-style armour.


[linked image]

 
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WAFFer
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 8:01 PM 

Lances
[linked image]
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Jevlin/Cirit(also called in old times "gönder" happy.gif)
[linked image]
saddle
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stirrup
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17th century armour
[linked image]
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The Sultans Armour
[linked image]

[linked image]

 
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WAFFer
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 9:06 PM 

[linked image]
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Peik (right)
Solak (left)



Peik (Messenger)
Originally, messengers or postal runners, the Peiks later became an important part in a pompous ceremony at official processions. They always took up their place at the Sultan's right hand side. They were fast athletic runners and could travel great distances without rest. It took them, for example, two days to get from Edirne to Istanbul on foot. They carried a hanjar (Hancer) - dagger in their girdles, a halberd in their right hands and a handkerchief full of sugar in their left.One of their tasks was to inform the Sultan when the pilgrims had returned from Mecca. The post was abolished in 1828.

Axes
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Helberds
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[linked image]

 
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WAFFer
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 9:55 PM 

[linked image]
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Solak Bashi (the Captain)
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Solak

They were the soldiers who belonged to the 60th and 63rd Battalions of the Janissary corps. They joined the janissary corps in the period of Yildirim Bayezid (1389 - 1402). They were assigned with the law code of Fatih to provide close protection to the sultans in the imperial ceremonies. As they were using their left hands instead of right hands they were called as left - handed (in turkish solak). They walked on the right side of the sultan's horse and used their left hands when using arrow and bow in order to avoid any disrespectfulness.

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While the sultan toured, solak soldiers had to walk in front of and near the Sultan in a manner that their arrows and bows were drawn. in the war, 12 highest ranked solak sordiers held the halter of the sultan's horse and the remaining 400 solak soldiers established a circle around the sultan. During war, another task of the solak soldiers was to keep everybody away from the sultan, even his private servants such as sword bearers and footmen.
The solak soldiers carried their weapons when they went out of the palace together with the sultan. However, in 1492, after an assassination attempt to the Sultan Bayezid II, they began to carry weapon also within the palace.

Bows
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WAFFer
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Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 12 2010, 10:51 PM 

Diffrent suit of Ottoman Armours
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WAFFer
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Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 13 2010, 2:39 AM 

Chichak Helmet
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16th century
The chichak (or çiçak) appeared in the late 14th century and fell out of use in the first half of the 17th century.
Ceremonial Chichak Helmets
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mid-16th century, iron, gold, rubies, turquoises


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The "turban helmet" seems to have appeared in the mid-14th century and to have fallen out of use circa 1500. It was most popular among the Aq-Qoyunlu Turkmen of Iraq and Iran, but was also used by the Ottomans.


Warmask
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15th century steel and gold war mask from Eastern Turkey

The korazin typ Armour was a 16th-century sipahi armour whose name strongly suggest European origin. This korazin was, however,distinctively ottoman protection consisting of large steel plates connected by mail to form an exceptionally supple armour.

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16th century
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The korazin seems to have appeared in the late 15th century and remained popular until the mid-17th century.

Cevshen(from the Persian "dj awshan") Typ Armour represents chain armor jacket with that intertwined on the breast and the back by the collection of horizontal plates.

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Aq-qoyunlu cevshen armour 15th century

The cevshen also known as zirhli gömlek seems to have appeared circa 1400 AD, possibly in Iran. It very quickly spread to Russia, the Ottoman Empire and the Middle-east. In the Ottoman Empire and Iran it disappeared in the 2nd half of the 16th century, whereas in Russia it continued to be used until the mid-17th century.

The kazaka
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This is a late 15th century Ottoman kazaka It looks like a jacket, but under the silk outer layer is a layer of padding, and under that there is a mail shirt.

chain mail
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Vambraces (called kolçak in Turkish)

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16th century

Bazuband vambraces (called kolluk in Turkish)
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Bazuband vambraces appeared in the late 14th century and remained popular until the mid-18th century in Iran, India and the Ottoman Empire

Cuisses (called dizçek in Turkish)

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the cuisse was worn around the thigh, and the greave was strapped to the lateral side of the lower leg.




Greaves
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Mail-and-plate leg defences appeared in the late 14th century and remained in used until the 1st half of the 17th century.


Mail-and-plateboot 16 th century
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Shield
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16th century, willow rods, iron, gold, silk thread, rubies, turquoises

Mace
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ceremonial mace (the Ottoman Empire, 17th century, iron, gold, rubies, turquoises, emeralds).



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WAFFer
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Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 13 2010, 4:42 PM 

awesome pics,thx for sharing bro!!!

 
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Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 13 2010, 7:31 PM 

thx fliphead

The yatagan or yatahan (from Turkish yataðan [1]) is a type of Turkish sword (which became known in other countries as the 'Turkish sword') used from the mid-16th to late 19th centuries.
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18th -19thcentury

The yatagan was extensively used in Turkey and in areas under Turkish influence, such as the Balkans.
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It consisted of a single-edged blade with a marked forward curve and a hilt formed of two grip plaques attached through the tang, the end of the hilt being shaped like large ears. The gap between the grips is covered by a metal strap, which is often decorated. The blade varies from 60 to 80 cm in length and is curved forward (like the Iberian falcata, or Greek kopis), sometimes reclining backwards again towards the very end. This blade form is often referred to as being 'recurved.' While the back of the blade is made of softer steel, the sharp edge is made of hard, tempered steel for durability.
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The hilt has no guard, 'bolsters' of metal connect the grips to the shoulder of the blade. The grip plaques are typically made from bone, ivory, horn or silver, and spread out in two 'wings' or 'ears' to either side at the pommel (a feature which prevents the sword slipping out of the hand when used to cut). Regional variations in the hilts have been noted: Balkan yatagans tend to have larger ears and are often of bone or ivory, whilst Anatolian yatagans characteristically have smaller ears which are more often made of horn. Sophisticated artwork on both the hilt and the blade can be seen on many yatagans displayed today, indicating considerable symbolic value. Having no guard, the yatagan fitted closely into the top of the scabbard; this was customarily worn thrust into a waist sash, retained by hook.
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The majority of yatagans date from the period 1750-1860, and from the number of plain, wooden-hilted weapons they were honest fighting weapons as well as ornate parade weapons. The more ornate examples were often worn as a status symbol by civilians, as well as military men, much in the way smallswords were worn in 18th century Western Europe. Occasionally blades were cut down from broadswords or cavalry swords, but in general the forward-curving single-edged blade was used. Verses in gold or silver are often laid along the blade. Silver hilts mounted with filigree and coral, for example, are associated with Bosnia; many of these are dated around 1800. The most flamboyant scabbards are of wood, encased entirely with silver.
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18th century silver yatagan
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18th-19thcentury yatagan

By contrast, in the later half of the 1800s, the prevalence of sword bayonets on military rifles gave rise to an entire style of mass-produced military bayonets known as "Yataghan style".
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Yataghan style bayonet

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yatagan with a damascusblade


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Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 13 2010, 9:21 PM 

Yatagant part 2
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Janissary Aga

The yatagans used by janissaries and other infantry soldiers were smaller and lighter than ordinary swords so as not to hinder them when carried at the waist on the march. It is named after the town of Yataðan in southwest Turkey (now in Denizli province) which was conquered by a Seljuk commander and blacksmith named Osman Bey, whose cognomen was Yataðan Baba. Yataðan Baba later settled there, and gave his name not only to the town, but to the swords which were produced there. Later, however, yatagans were also made in all the major cities of the Ottoman Empire, particularly Istanbul, Bursa and Filibe.
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yatagan with massive pieces of brass
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16 th century
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18th-19th century

Balkan Style
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Albanian Basibozuk
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1739 Ottoman Soldier Yatagan
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1821 Greek Bandit Yatagan
Greek style
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I.Daskaloyannis the leader of the Cretan revolt against the Turks in 1770
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the yataghan of Daskaloyannis


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Fuzuli
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Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 13 2010, 10:26 PM 

Awsome pics bro! Thnx!

Here's a good soundtrack to listen to while scrolling wink.gif



Yatagan

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Atam izindeyiz!

 
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WAFFer
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Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 14 2010, 1:08 AM 

Yatagan part 3

Black Sea Yataghan (or Laz Bicagi) is my favourite Blade.
this blades where used by muslim&christian Laz,Pontian and Georgians.
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"The industrial heritage of costume design in Turkey" by Prof. Onder Kucukerman.page 60
"clothing of muslim villagers and townspeople", in Trabzon 1870
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pontian resistance member in trabzon (but i am not sure) Can someone translate this please?
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pontian couple
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Istanbul military museum
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Athen military museum


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Georgian

@fuzuli thx for the music happy.gif

more from baris happy.gif
HEY KOCA TOPÇU
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PHyg7XucI0w
ESTERGON KALESÝ
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12Ndhc41XzE&feature=related
SELAHADDN EYYUB (ENSTURMENTAL)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oetklpobWYY&feature=related
this one is superb!!!!
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Fuzuli
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The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 14 2010, 1:38 AM 

^ Thx mate, I Love his music, may he RIP. Didn't know that the last piece had that title!



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Atam izindeyiz!

 
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Re: ANTIQUE OTTOMAN SWORDS AND KNIVES

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November 14 2010, 7:14 AM 

hmmm thats where they got the name from yatagan even for the T84 tank

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfU9_rS64kc&feature=related
Above lord of war link

 
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