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Yes, once more in the Mideast, itís time to play the Kurd card

June 16 2012 at 6:36 PM
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  (Login cretegeorge)
Group General

Kurds could be key to saving Syria

[linked image]

The largest Syrian opposition group has picked a Kurd as its new leader which might help the rebels gain critical mass.

Meanwhile, Syrian despot Bashar al-Assad is trying to use the Kurds against Turkey. That might prompt Ankara to send troops across the border, further escalating the war though for now Ankara is instead allying itself with other Kurds in the region.

Good move. So should we.

Yes, divisions and competition among Kurdish leaders (whose homeland is split among Syria, Iraq, Turkey and Iran) makes relying on them an iffy proposition. But for generations this non-Arab ethnic group has been an American ally (when we didnt desert them) and a marked rise in Kurdish power is one legacy of our wars with Saddam Hussein. Renewing and tightening this alliance could help us navigate the treacherous Mideast transitions.
Last week the Syrian National Council named Abdulbaset Sieda, a Syrian Kurd exiled in Sweden, as its new leader. The clear hope is that the mild-mannered scholar will unite the oppositions many ethnic, religious and political factions, which now push in all directions.

And also win more support in the West. Sieda isnt a Kurdish activist. As Kani Xulam of the American-Kurdish Information Network, tells me, he became a consensus leader of the opposition because of his democratic credentials, rather than because hes a Kurd.

Yet the move might move the Kurds off the sidelines in the 14-month-old uprising, which pits mostly Sunni Arabs (the majority in Syria) against a regime dominated by members of the obscure Alawite sect.

Syrian Kurds are shocked by Assads murderous ways, but suspicious of the Sunni majority and of Turkeys intentions.

Turkeys Kurdish Workers Party (PKK) for decades waged a violent struggle against the Turkish government (which refused to even acknowledge that Kurds in Turkey were Kurds); many deem the PKK a terrorist group.

And PPK leader Abdullah Ocalan fled to Damascus in 1978, where Assads father sheltered him for 20 years. Hafez al-Assad also favored Syrias Kurds during that time a status that ended when Turkish military and political pressure forced him to expel Ocalan in 1998.

But since the uprisings began, Turkish Prime Minister Tayyep Recep Erdogan has become a vocal supporter of Assads overthrow and hosted opposition leaders.

In response, Bashar Assad has allowed the PKK to reopen its bases in Syria. Ankara fears that the next step will be intensified attacks against its citizens and troops.

To date, Erdogans counter has been to cultivate to Iraqi Kurdish leader Masoud Barzani (who visited Ankara in April), in hopes hell blunt anti-Turkish sentiments among Syrias Kurds or even dismantle PKK camps in Iraqs Kurdistan.

Prospering and democratic (by regional standards, anyway), Kurdish Iraq has emerged as leader of all the regions Kurds, says Ofra Bengio of Tel Aviv Universitys Dayan Center for Mideast Studies.

Thats why everyone in the region (including Israel) is now seeking Kurdish ties. But Iraqs Kurds owe much of their good fortune to America, which protected them from Saddam.

The Kurds would be useful allies not only in the current fight against Assad, but the larger struggle with his Iranian sponsors and jihadists across the Mideast.

A promise of limited autonomy, like that enjoyed by Iraqs Kurdistan, could bring Syrias Kurds into the opposition, moderating it and pushing the next Syrian government toward the West.

Yes, once more in the Mideast, its time to play the Kurd card.
http://www.nypost.com/p/news/opinion/opedcolumnists/kurds_could_be_key_to_saving_syria_n9LURUgXuo6pBmSDUpkXBP


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Turkish planing of indigenous projects [linked image]

[linked image]

April/21/2012
Turkey is not like China. Turkey is, just like Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal.
www.hurriyetdailynews.com

 
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(Login cretegeorge)
Group General

Re: Yes, once more in the Mideast, itís time to play the Kurd card

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June 16 2012, 6:42 PM 

"Thats why everyone in the region (including Israel) is now seeking Kurdish ties."


[linked image]


Turkish planing of indigenous projects [linked image]

[linked image]

April/21/2012
Turkey is not like China. Turkey is, just like Italy, Greece, Spain and Portugal.
www.hurriyetdailynews.com

 
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Nikephoros
(Login Nikephoros)
Eagle Squadron (US)

Re: Yes, once more in the Mideast, itís time to play the Kurd card

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June 16 2012, 6:52 PM 

It is nice to know that contrary to their vital interests, the subhuman Narco-terrorist Turkish state is helping Kurds ascend regionally. Thankfully the wannabe "regional power" has to pursue the interests of Arab Gulf States who desperately want to see the Iranian backed Syrian regime topple, since those Arabs bankroll their economy:


http://www.michaelrubin.org/7639/turkey-ally-enemy

...

Between 2002 and 2003, the Turkish Central Bank's summary balance of "payments for net error and omission"which is to say, money that appeared in the nation's financial system for which government reporting cannot accountincreased from approximately $200 million to more than $4 billion. By 2006, Turkish economists estimated the Green Money infusion into the Turkish economy to be between $6 billion and $12 billion, and given the ability of the government to hide some of these revenues by assigning them to tourism, that is probably a wild underestimation. Some Turkish intelligence officials privately suggest that the nation of Qatar is today the source of most subsidies for the AKP and its projects.

Thus, if Iran's Islamic revolution was spontaneous, Turkey's was anything but: it was bought and paid for by wealthy Islamists.

AKP officials are well-placed to manage the Green Money influx. Throughout much of the 1980s, Erdogan's sidekick, Gul, worked as a specialist at Saudi Arabia's Islamic Development Bank. Before the 2002 victory, he criticized existing state scrutiny of Islamist enterprises. Senior AKP advisers made their fortunes in Islamic banking and investment. Korkut Ozal, for example, is the leading Turkish shareholder in al--Baraka Turk, Turkey's leading Islamic bank, as well as in Faisal Finans, which also has its roots in Saudi Arabia.

Erdogan has systematically placed Islamist bankers in key economic positions. He appointed Kemal Unakitan, a former board member at both al--Baraka and Eski Finans, as finance minister and moved at least seven other al-Baraka officialsone of whom had served as an imam in an illegal commando campto key positions within Turkey's banking regulatory agency.

Erdogan also reoriented Turkey's official foreign trade. In 2002, bilateral trade between Turkey and the United Arab Emirates hovered at just over half a billion dollars. By 2005, it had grown to almost $2 billion. That same year, Kursad Tuzmen, the state minister for foreign trade, announced that United Arab Emirates ruler Sheik Khalifa bin Zayid al-Nuhayyan would invest $100 billion in Turkish companies. Not to be outdone, Saudi Arabia's finance minister announced earlier this year that Saudi Arabia would invest $400 billion in Turkey over the next four years. In contrast, in 2001, Turkish-Saudi trade amounted to just over $1 billion. When Turkish-Iranian trade surpassed $10 billion in 2009, Erdogan announced a goal to increase it to $30 billion. Whether or not Turkey and its Persian Gulf allies are exaggerating their figures, the trajectory of trade is clear.

...


No Arab money, no "AKP economic miracle".

Sig:
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[linked image]
Why is vaseline in my sig? Because Turks don't want to read what I post. Hopefully the lube makes it easier for those criminal scum who are such great cry-babies to swallow.

 
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WAFFer
(Login Maxiking)
Panzer Brigade (Germany)

Re: Yes, once more in the Mideast, itís time to play the Kurd card

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June 16 2012, 7:08 PM 

You (Greeks) are really thinking that Kurds are dogs. If you say "come here", the should come, if you say "go away", they shout go, a.s.o...


 
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BordoEnes
(Login BordoEnes)

Re: Yes, once more in the Mideast, itís time to play the Kurd card

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June 16 2012, 7:21 PM 

Kurds used as tools, Dont think they would like that happy.gif

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''Nothing is true, Everything is permitted'' Hasan ibn Sabbah

 
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Nikephoros
(Login Nikephoros)
Eagle Squadron (US)

Re: Yes, once more in the Mideast, itís time to play the Kurd card

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June 16 2012, 7:29 PM 

Well you TurkoArabic kopeks don't even seem to know you are tools of the Gulf Arabs and that Ankara supports the Syrian rebels because it is interest of those Arabs who bankroll your economy.

Your myths about a powerful, "independent Turkiye" are always laughable. Everywhere around you, your neighbors with Kurdish minorities who have strong geographical contingency to their population are being destabilized, and what do you do, you help to destabilize one of these states! It is totally against your interests and it makes no sense, unless you know who funds the AKP economic bubble.

Sig:
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[linked image]
Why is vaseline in my sig? Because Turks don't want to read what I post. Hopefully the lube makes it easier for those criminal scum who are such great cry-babies to swallow.


    
This message has been edited by Nikephoros on Jun 16, 2012 7:31 PM


 
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Nutuk
(Login nutuk)
The Conquerors (Turkey)

Re: Yes, once more in the Mideast, itís time to play the Kurd card

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June 16 2012, 10:23 PM 

And how is Greece going to use the Kurds? You are fackin poorer than Kurds!

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Turkiye Turklerindir (Mustafa Kemal Ataturk)
[linked image]

 
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Nikephoros
(Login Nikephoros)
Eagle Squadron (US)

Re: Yes, once more in the Mideast, itís time to play the Kurd card

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June 16 2012, 10:27 PM 

We don't have to use them, Islamic ultra-nationalist scum polluting the Netherlands. Personally I would love to see Greek leaders with an actual foreign policy plan and the will to implement it against our enemies like Torkgay, but sadly the metapoltefsi structure doesn't allow for common sense or pursuing interests.

You are creating instability in Syria and promoting their rise against your state interests. USA and Israel will need a powerful linchpin against Iran eventually and may start to destabilize also Iran using Kurds and you will be in big trouble if that ever happens. But don't worry "independent Turkiye" will do whatever Arab sheiks want, lol.
[linked image]

Sig:
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[linked image]
Why is vaseline in my sig? Because Turks don't want to read what I post. Hopefully the lube makes it easier for those criminal scum who are such great cry-babies to swallow.


    
This message has been edited by Nikephoros on Jun 16, 2012 10:29 PM


 
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Varangian
(Login varangian)

Re: Yes, once more in the Mideast, itís time to play the Kurd card

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June 16 2012, 11:56 PM 

Kurds used as tools, Dont think they would like that

So it's OK for Turkey to use the Kurds.. but not anyone else...lol




 
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WAFFer
(Login kurdman)
WAFFer

Re: Yes, once more in the Mideast, itís time to play the Kurd card

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June 17 2012, 2:08 AM 

Some people here are truly deluded. All of the middle eastern countries had to radically change their foreign policies in regards to the Kurds due to the success of the KRG and their increasing political power in the region. Turkey and all other Sunni states have come to recognise Kurds and their rightful place, and are giving more and more concessions to us. You need to understand the difference between 'using' and mutual interests. This isn't the 1970s and Kurds are not desperate. We will not settle for anything which is why the immense pressure from every direction has not influenced the Kurdish position in Syria, and until Kurdish demands are met the uprising will fail, which is why Turkey is trying to appease Kurds in Anatolia, because when they give the green light their puppets in the SNC to agree to Kurdish demands, they won't get too much hustle from Anatolian Kurds.

This 'using' Kurds conspiracy has to end. Look at the facts, if you plot the Kurdish success so far against what Kurds gave in return you will see that the success is significantly higher. I'll give you an example, Turkey has not only lashed out against Baghdad, but has also agreed to build a pipeline, and what do they get from the KRG in return? very little! regardless of immense Turkish pressure, and an invasion the PKK is still in Kandil and the KRG WILL not use military force against them, something they have said openly in Turkey.

Greeks, I don't believe that Kurds will assist in a Turkish-Greek war, instead I would expect them to watch from the sidelines as they are doing in Syria, and build up, there is no point in us getting involved, we have a border with the Turks and whether we (or the Turks) like it, we will continue to be neighbors. I don't see a Turkish-Greek war happening any time soon though.

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