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Lancaster Display: The Earliest American Handcuffs

July 13 2017 at 7:22 AM

Joseph Lauher  (Premier Login lauher)
Owner

Morning Everyone.

It is going to be hot weekend, but I am really looking forward to the Lancaster show.

I am bringing a display entitled "The Earliest American Handcuffs".

Included are ten handcuffs and two nippers from 1870 or earlier.
There are 8 patented items, three well know handcuffs never patented, and one based upon a combination of two patents.

Who can name these 12 items in advance?

Looking forward to seeing you all.

Joe

 
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Holstcollection
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supermac1

July 13 2017, 3:43 PM 


Hello Joe,

I think I have nine cuffs of ten but I can't figure out the tenth. No guess on nippers as they are out of my knowledge.

Adams, 1862
Elijah Rickard, not patented
Delestatius, 1861
Rankins, 1866
Phelps, 1860's
Palmer, 1860's
Wisner, 1869
Lilly, not patented
Kimball, 1860



Lars

 
 

Holstcollection
(Login holstcollection)

Re: Lancaster Display: The Earliest American Handcuffs

July 13 2017, 3:52 PM 



Sorry, the Palmer is patented 1876 and should be excluded from my list.

 
 
Joseph Fox
(no login)

Lancaster Display

July 13 2017, 4:12 PM 

Lars: Good list that you came up with...

Mmm...what about the Guiteau? (unpatented)

 
 

Joseph Lauher
(Premier Login lauher)
Owner

Re: Lancaster Display: The Earliest American Handcuffs

July 13 2017, 9:49 PM 

A little too early for the Guiteau.

What is the third non-patented cuff? It is perhaps the most popular cuff of the 1860s.


 
 
Chris Gower
(no login)

Cuffs

July 14 2017, 2:11 AM 

I would add:
Providence Tool Handcuffs - not patented
Towers Bottom Keyhole 1st model 1866
Baldwin Nipper

Wish I could have been at the show.

Chris

 
 

Joseph Lauher
(Premier Login lauher)
Owner

Re: Lancaster Display: The Earliest American Handcuffs

July 14 2017, 4:46 AM 

Chris figured out the two additional handcuffs. The Tower does not have a patent of its own until the 1870s, but uses the Adams and Phelps patents for the bottom key model. Providence Tool was the main cuff of the civil war.

The two Nippers include the most common one and a rare, but pretty one. Not the Baldwin that was a little later.
Joe

 
 
Chris Gower
(no login)

Guiteau

July 14 2017, 12:40 PM 

If Joe had not said about the Guiteau I would have gone for them. Do you have more info on them where you say they are latter than the 1870's? I am very interested as I do have a nice working pair in my collection.
Chris

 
 
Gordon
(no login)

12 items

July 14 2017, 7:01 PM 

It is obvious that the pretty nipper is the Lutz,Royce,Trenor,Chadwick.
The first nipper is the Phillips

 
 

Joseph Lauher
(Premier Login lauher)
Owner

Re: Lancaster Display: The Earliest American Handcuffs

July 14 2017, 9:49 PM 

Chris
I do not have any evidence for the Guiteau handcuff date. I just always thought of it as being a refinement of the Rankin and thus likely a few years later, but who knows?
Joe

 
 
Ian McColl
(no login)

Re: Lancaster Display: The Earliest American Handcuffs

July 15 2017, 2:26 AM 

I have always considered the Guiteau to be pre Rankin as it is difficult to use, didn't snap locked and heavy to carry. Rankin was the advancement.

 
 

Joseph Lauher
(Premier Login lauher)
Owner

Re: Lancaster Display: The Earliest American Handcuffs

July 15 2017, 6:51 AM 

Ian
That is an interesting thought. You certainly might be correct, I have no evidence either way.
I guess we need more research.

Joe

 
 
Ian McColl
(no login)

Re: Lancaster Display: The Earliest American Handcuffs

July 15 2017, 7:34 AM 

My hypothesis has been this from back in the 1980's when i began collecting, The Guiteau was the first idea invented made by Rankin. For the reasons I have stated, the cuff wasn’t a success and maybe the reason there are so few cuff today. to my delight, recently was one cuff found with the name Rankin on it which confirmed my thought that the Guiteau was a Rankin. Rankin saw and Delestatius patent and having bought (?) it, used the idea in the cuff shape we know as Rankin with lock at the end similar to the Guiteau but with snap lock function and mechanism which is more reliable. ( in further confirmation of my theory, the thread for the Rankin I suspected would be the same thread for the Guiteau cuff and I made my reproduction with that thread. My key was purchased by a collector who had an original Guiteau and worked straight away without any modification.

 
 
 
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