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The Left's new role...the moderate Muslims finally waking?

September 10 2004 at 5:14 AM
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Something to think about, the next time you see somebody defending the Islamist terrorists' latest atrocity, as some sort of rational, justified response to past injustices against them.

Even the Islamic moderates, that long-rumored, seemingly-mythical body that has kept its silence for so long, is beginning to wonder what the Islamofascists have done with their faith. A Muslim journalist wrestles with the truth of the matter, below. Quote: It is a certain fact that not all Muslims are terrorists, but it is equally certain, and exceptionally painful, that almost all terrorists are Muslims.

I would paraphrase, in the following manner: It is a certain fact that not all Lefty-Pacifists are terrorist-supporters, but it is equally certain, and exceptionally painful, that almost all terrorist-supporters are Lefty-Pacifists.

Wretchard spells out the Great Rift, which has been magnified by the events of 9/11 and the subsequent War On Terror. You think "Weston" of C.S. Lewis' great Perelandra wouldn't rather have Hussein still in power in Iraq, than the fledgling democracy in the process of being installed by the US and our loyal allies?

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http://belmontclub.blogspot.com/

None So Blind

There's a nightmare that recurs to some people where you fall into a dark pond where a ravenous beast is lurking; but friends are at hand. You call out for help and they turn, but with blank faces, and walk away. Roger Simon describes that feeling.

When I first "came out" on this blog as an apostate from the liberal church, I heard a number of old friends and acquaintances whispering, sometimes in front of me and sometimes behind my back, "Poor Roger, he's scared. He got mugged by 9/11." Well, no. I don't scare that easily. I have my share of problems, but unbridled fear isn't one of them. I was angry.

But now I am scared. 9/11 didn't scare me. The Atocha railroad station didn't scare me. The horrors of the Russian schoolhouse didn't even scare me. It was the reaction by many in Europe and in our media to what happened in that school that has me terrified. Sure the Russians have historically brutalized and mistreated the Chechens, but this barbarism was far beyond a reaction to that. It goes to the core of our common humanity. It was a gauntlet thrown down at Western civilization and yet some still choose to look the other way. But if the sight of children being stripped and shot in the back after having had their gymnasium pre-wired with explosives doesn't wake them up, I don't know what will.


The first task in a nightmare is to discover which parts are wholly imaginary and which have real counterparts. In this scenario Roger Simon is real but the "liberal church" from which he expects outrage has now become entirely fictive. Or rather it has faded into non-existence in a positive sense and come into its own in the negative. The only literary character that ever frightened me was Edward Rolles Weston in C.S. Lewis' science-fiction classic Perelandra. Nothing before or since has ever been so horrible as the description of the brilliant Weston being taken over by the evil whose existence he denied. In the story, Weston decides to corrupt an Edenic planet purely as demonstration of intellectual power; an ultimate exercise in vanity. But on the way Weston discovers he cannot hold evil at arm's length, that it is become him. The protagonist of Perelandra, Professor Ransom, describes his confrontation with a Weston who has now turned into the Un-Man. Effects are magnified on that alien planet and evil has eaten him out.

'But this is very foolish,' said the Un-Man. 'Do you not know who I am?'

'I know what you are,' said Ransom. 'Which of them doesn't matter.'

'And you think, little one,' it answered, that you can fight with me? You think He will help you, perhaps? Many thought that. I've known Him longer than you, little one. They all think He's going to help them -- till they come to their senses screaming recantations too late in the middle of the fire, moldering in concentration camps, writhing under saws, jibbering in mad-houses, or nailed on to crosses. Could He help Himself?' -- and the creature suddenly threw back its head and cried in a voice so loud that it seemed the golden sky-roof must break, 'Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani.'

And the moment it had done so, Ransom felt certain that the sounds it had made were perfect Aramaic of the first century. The Un-Man was not quoting; it was remembering. These were the very words spoken from the Cross, treasured through all those years in the burning memory of the outcast creature which had heard them, and now brought forward in hideous parody; the horror made him momentarily sick.


The Left, having declared itself above the pettiness of all moral belief now finds its emptiness filled by the ugliest and darkest blood-cult on the planet. It was a proud Tower, but its windows are now dark and its rooms filled with old and withered things. Laugh at it. There is nothing left to fear.

posted by wretchard
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Abdel Rahman al-Rashed: A Wake-up Call for Muslims

An Arab journalist challenges Islamic terror


12:01 AM CDT on Thursday, September 9, 2004


By ABDEL RAHMAN al-RASHED


It is a certain fact that not all Muslims are terrorists, but it is equally certain, and exceptionally painful, that almost all terrorists are Muslims.

The hostage-takers of children in Beslan, North Ossetia, were Muslims. The other hostage-takers and subsequent murderers of the Nepalese chefs and workers in Iraq were also Muslims. Those involved in rape and murder in Darfur, Sudan, are Muslims, with other Muslims chosen to be their victims.

Those responsible for the attacks on residential towers in Riyadh and Khobar were Muslims. The two women who crashed two airliners last week were also Muslims.

Osama bin Laden is a Muslim. The majority of those who manned the suicide bombings against buses, vehicles, schools, houses and buildings, all over the world, were Muslim.

What a pathetic record. What an abominable "achievement." Does all this tell us anything about ourselves, our societies and our culture?

These images, when put together or taken separately, are shameful and degrading. But let us start with putting an end to a history of denial. Let us acknowledge their reality, instead of denying them and seeking to justify them with sound and fury signifying nothing.

For it would be easy to cure ourselves if we realize the seriousness of our sickness. Self-cure starts with self-realization and confession. We should then run after our terrorist sons, in the full knowledge that they are the sour grapes of a deformed culture.

Let us listen to Yusuf al-Qaradawi, the sheikh the Qatar-based radical Egyptian cleric and hear him recite his fatwa about the religious permissibility of killing civilian Americans in Iraq. Let us contemplate the incident of this religious sheikh allowing, nay even calling for, the murder of civilians.

This ailing sheikh, in his last days, with two daughters studying in "infidel" Britain, soliciting children to kill innocent civilians.

How could this sheikh face the mother of the youthful Nick Berg, who was slaughtered in Iraq because he wanted to build communication towers in that ravished country? How can we believe him when he tells us that Islam is the religion of mercy and peace while he is turning it into a religion of blood and slaughter?

In a different era, we used to consider the extremists, with nationalist or leftist leanings, a menace and a source of corruption because of their adoption of violence as a means of discourse and their involvement in murder as an easy shortcut to their objectives.

At that time, the mosque used to be a haven, and the voice of religion used to be that of peace and reconciliation. Religious sermons were warm behests for a moral order and an ethical life.

Then came the neo-Muslims. An innocent and benevolent religion, whose verses prohibit the felling of trees in the absence of urgent necessity, that calls murder the most heinous of crimes, that says explicitly that if you kill one person you have killed humanity as a whole, has been turned into a global message of hate and a universal war cry.

We can't call those who take schoolchildren as hostages our own.

We cannot tolerate in our midst those who abduct journalists, murder civilians, explode buses; we cannot accept them as related to us, whatever the sufferings they claim to justify their criminal deeds. These are the people who have smeared Islam and stained its image.

We cannot clear our names unless we own up to the shameful fact that terrorism has become an Islamic enterprise; an almost exclusive monopoly, implemented by Muslim men and women.

We cannot redeem our extremist youths, who commit all these heinous crimes, without confronting the sheikhs who thought it ennobling to reinvent themselves as revolutionary ideologues, sending other people's sons and daughters to certain death, while sending their own children to European and American schools and colleges.


Abdel Rahman al-Rashed is general manager of Al-Arabiya news channel. This article first appeared in the London-based pan-Arabic newspaper Al-Sharq Al-Awsat.


 
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