Emblem, not ega!

 

Gunny G's Marines Mini-Sites
This site consists of a collection of
selected stories, information, quotes, notes,
posts, and memories, etc. Articles added here as available...
.

This is an extension of...
Gunny G's GLOBE and ANCHOR Sites & Forums
~~~~~~~
By
R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952-72
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED!
~~~~~~~~~
Post your inquiries, if any, at...
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Monday, 7 November 200512:29 PM
 
USMC Fight For Survival

http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/survival.html
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/survival.html



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Monday, 24 October 200512:37 PM
A Real Slap In The Face

Clint's Double Take
Eastwood directs two films on the battle of Iwo Jima: one from the U.S. side, the other from the Japanese
By RICHARD SCHICKEL Time Magazine

Sometime this month in Chicago, Clint Eastwood will complete principal photography on his latest movie, Flags of Our Fathers. It's the 26th feature film he has directed since he made Play Misty for Me in 1971. And just as he has done before (The Bridges of Madison County, Mystic River), he is basing it on a best-selling book. But this movie is different from all the others that he or anyone else has directed, for Flags is only half the story he wants to tell.

The book, by James Bradley and Ron Powers, recounts the ultimately tragic tale of six young U.S. Marines who happened to raise a huge American flag atop Mount Suribachi in the midst of the great battle for Iwo Jima during World War II, of how an Associated Press photographer squeezed off what he thought was a routine shot of them doing so that became an iconic image, of what happened to some of those kids (only three survived the next few days of battle) when they were hustled home to be heedlessly exploited by the U.S. government to raise civilian morale and, incidentally, sell billions of dollars' worth of war bonds. That story, rich in darkly ambiguous nuance, would have been more than enough to preoccupy Eastwood's attention for a couple of years.

But when Eastwood tried to buy the rights, he discovered that Steven Spielberg already had them, and so he moved on instead to Million Dollar Baby. Then, backstage at the 2004 Academy Awards (at which his Mystic River was a multiple nominee), Eastwood encountered Spielberg, and before the evening was out, they agreed to a Flags co-production, with Eastwood directing. Shortly thereafter, the project began to elicit an uncommon, almost obsessive, interest from its director. He has not often attempted fact-based movies, and he had never undertaken one that contained such huge combat scenes. He began to read more widely and deeply on the subject. And he began talking to both American and Japanese veterans of Iwo Jima, which remains the bloodiest engagement in Marine Corps history and the one for which the most Congressional Medals of Honor were awarded (27). As for the Japanese, only about 200 out of 22,000 defending soldiers survived. At some point in his research, Eastwood realized that he had to find a way to tell both sides of the story--"not in the Tora! Tora! Tora! way, where you cut back and forth between the two sides," he says, "but as separate films."

So, beginning next February, Eastwood will start shooting the companion movie, tentatively called Lamps Before the Wind, scheduled for simultaneous release with Flags next fall. Typically, Eastwood (who is an old friend of this writer's) is not able to articulate fully his rationale for this ambitious enterprise: "I don't know--sometimes you get a feeling about something. You have a premonition that you can get something decent out of it," he says. "You just have to trust your gut." He asked Paul Haggis, who wrote Flags, if he would like to write the Japanese version as well. The writer of Million Dollar Baby and director of Crash, Haggis was overbooked but thought an aspiring young Japanese-American screenwriter, Iris Yama****a, who had helped him research Flags, might be able to do it. She met with Eastwood, and once again his gut spoke; he gave her the job and liked her first draft so much that he bought it. It was she who insisted on giving him a few rewrites she thought her script still needed.

Taken together, the two screenplays show that the battle of Iwo Jima--and by implication, the whole war in the Pacific--was not just a clash of arms but a clash of cultures. The Japanese officer class, imbued with the quasi-religious fervor of their Bushido code, believed that surrender was dishonor, that they were all obliged to die in defense of their small island. That, of course, was not true of the attacking Americans. As Eastwood puts it, "They knew they were going into harm's way, but you can't tell an American he's absolutely fated to die. He will work hard to get the job done, but he'll also work hard to stay alive." And to protect his comrades-in-arms. As Haggis' script puts it, the Americans "may have fought for their country, but they died for their friends, for the man in front, for the man beside 'em."

Yama****a's script is much more relentlessly cruel. In essence, the Japanese officers compelled the bravery (and suicide) of their troops at gunpoint. Only the Japanese commander, Lieut. General Tadamichi Kuribayashi (a mysterious historical figure who fascinates Eastwood), and a fictional conscript, Saigo, whose fate Yama****a intertwines with his commanding officer's, demonstrate anything like humanity as a Westerner might understand it. The lieutenant general, educated in part in the U.S., is respectful of its national spirit (and industrial might) and believes that a live soldier, capable of carrying on the fight, is infinitely more valuable than a dead one enjoying an honorable afterlife. Thanks to his preservationist tactics, a battle that was supposed to last five days consumed almost 40, though honor demanded his suicide in the end. Saigo, who, as Eastwood says, "wants what most human beings want" (a peaceful life with friends and family), meets an unexpected fate.

The Japanese film derives much of its strength from its claustrophobic confinement to a horrendous time and place. Haggis' work gains its power from its confident range. The screenplay starts with the Americans on the beaches and the protagonists raising the flag. It follows them on their vulgar war-bond tour (they were obliged to re-enact the flag raising on a papier-mâché Suribachi at Soldier Field in Chicago) and then traces their postwar descent into dream-tossed anonymity. You could argue that the Japanese were the lucky ones: their government and religion foreordained their fate, and they had no choice but to endure it. Chance played more capriciously with the Americans, who liked to think they were in charge of their destinies. Yet Flag's protagonists end up knowing that they were blessed by nothing more than a photo op--and knowing that the true, unacknowledged heroes were the men left behind to fight and die on Iwo Jima's black sands. The film follows three survivors: Ira Hayes (played by Adam Beach), Rene Gagnon (Jesse Bradford) and John Bradley (Ryan Phillippe), the co-author's father. To put it mildly, their lives do not continue on a heroic trajectory. At one point Bradley, forever assailed by nightmares that he never discusses, wishes that "there hadn't been a flag on the end of that pole."

The inscrutability of fate has always been a major Eastwoodian subtext. But now, as he approaches his 76th birthday, he has begun to take it personally. "There are so many people who are as good or better than me who aren't working," he says of his career, "while I still am. I can't explain that, but luck has to play a part." Here's hoping his luck holds.


7,000 Marines died at Iwo Jima in February and March 1945, the bloodiest event in U.S. Marine Corps history. By making a film from their killers' perspective, Dirty Harry dishonors them, WWII veterans, America, and himself. As aging actor past his prime, I guess he never heard the phrase "death before dishonor."
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

I agree, it's only half the story, maybe less...
"But this movie is different from all the others that he or anyone else has directed, for Flags is only half the story.."

I should think Eastwood's "gut" feeling should tell him that it would be all well and good to also tell the story from the Japanese point of view, but I am confounded that such sensitivity would not include first telling the truth about Old Glory on Suribachi!

I know that all Marines are well informed, having taken it upon themselves to delve into and beyond the usual party line history topics, and are well aware that Rosenthal's photo and the corresponding information on the so-called Iwo Flag Raising, is only, in actuality, the raising of a "replacement flag" some time later on the same day that the actual flag raising occurred. Yet, the actual flag raising event is given short shrift, briefly mentioned only, reduced to a mere footnote, or maybe not mentioned at all in writings regarding this historic event.
DickG
~~~~~~~~~~~~
Previous post/links this topic...
http://www.grunt.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=65325&SearchTerms=slap,in,the,face
http://www.grunt.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=65325&SearchTerms=slap,in,the,face




~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Tuesday, 4 October 20052:38 PM
The Myth Of The One Only Award MOH!

http://www.angelfire.com/ca4/gunnyg/mohmyth.html
http://www.angelfire.com/ca4/gunnyg/mohmyth.html



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Sunday, 25 September 20051:35 PM
New: Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Marines @Google...

http://groups.google.com/group/GunnyG?lnk=oa
http://groups.google.com/group/GunnyG?lnk=oa



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Friday, 16 September 200512:39 PM
The day I Stole The CMC's Glasses case

http://www.sullyusmc.com/Sully/May%201,%201965.htm
http://www.sullyusmc.com/Sully/May%201,%201965.htm



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Tuesday, 16 August 200511:17 AM
A Deadly Walk In The Swamp, by Gene Ervin

http://www.angelfire.com/ca4/gunnyg/swamp.html
http://www.angelfire.com/ca4/gunnyg/swamp.html



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Thursday, 11 August 20057:55 AM
A War For Us Fought By Them

http://www.furl.net/item.jsp?id=4144188
http://www.furl.net/item.jsp?id=4144188



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Wednesday, 10 August 20058:34 PM
The Marine's Marine....

http://www.angelfire.com/ca4/gunnyg/puller.html
http://www.angelfire.com/ca4/gunnyg/puller.html



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Tuesday, 2 August 20053:30 PM
Jack Webb's The D.I. Vs. FMJ!

http://www.angelfire.com/ca4/gunnyg/jackwebb.html
http://www.angelfire.com/ca4/gunnyg/jackwebb.html



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Sunday, 31 July 20058:11 AM
WannaBe Marine Raist

http://www.furl.net/item.jsp?id=4005890
http://www.furl.net/item.jsp?id=4005890



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Monday, 18 July 20059:51 AM
PULLER!

http://www20.brinkster.com/gunnyg/words.html
http://www20.brinkster.com/gunnyg/words.html



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Sunday, 17 July 200511:55 AM
The Swagger Stick: Origins, History, Evolution, etc.

http://www20.brinkster.com/gunnyg/swaggerstick.html
http://www20.brinkster.com/gunnyg/swaggerstick.html



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Wednesday, 4 May 20053:14 PM
Curious Coincidence?

To: XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

I just found some info on the Internet that I
hadn't known about, and it immediately reminded
me of something in the Carlson biography that has
always interested me. Likely, you already know
about this, but I thought I would run this by you
and ask if you feel if the quote from Blankfort's
book is directly related to the FDR material
below.

Thank you for your kind attention.

Best,
Dick Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)

~~~~~~~~~~~
Ref
The Big Yankee, The Life of Carlson of the
Raiders, page 319...

"But nothing was said about sending him back to
the Pacific. In short, he had lost the final
round for the Raider idea.

Holcomb saw him again and suggested that perhaps
General William J. Donovan of the Office of
Strategic Services might have a task for Carlson.
He conferred with Donovan, with Dr. Stanley
Hornbeck and John Davies of the State Department,
then General Stilwell's adviser in China, and a
job was offered to him, the deatils of which are
still, and may well be for a very long time
to come, top secret.

Carlson, however, saw that the mission had
certain political aspects which were repugnant to
him, and he begged to be relieved. 'I'd rather go
back to the Pacific,' he told a friend, 'and get
a good clean bullet right in the heart.'"
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Ref
http://www.fff.org/freedom/0895b.asp

"President Roosevelt's freezing of Japanese
assets in the United States and his embargo
against the selling of oil to Japan in July 1941,
as well as his unwillingness to negotiate any
compromise with Tokyo, set the stage for the
attack on Pearl Harbor. Once in the war,
Roosevelt abandoned Chiang Kai-Shek and the
Chinese resistance against Japan. As Frederick W.
Marks has explained in his study of FDR's foreign
policy, Wind Over Sand (1988):

In fact, Roosevelt broke virtually every
important promise made to Chiang between the time
of Pearl Harbor and his death in April, 1945. He
shipped less than 10 percent of the aid pledged.
He went back on his commitment to assist Chiang's
Burma campaign with an amphibious invasion. At
various times, supplies earmarked for Chungking
were diverted without consultation. Scores of
bombers and transports, once the entire U.S.
Tenth Air Force in India, was rerouted to bypass
China after the United States had given its word.
Roosevelt pledged a loan of a billion dollars
which was never delivered. And more than once, he
promised increased tonnage to be flown from India
over the Himalayan Hump. In almost every
instance, such tonnage failed to eventuate.

Finally, after becoming sufficiently tired of
Chiang Kai-Shek's complaints about American
failure to support his government, FDR ordered
that a plan be prepared for the assassination of
the Chinese generalissimo. In December 1943,
FDR's military representative in China, General
Joseph Stilwell who passionately disliked
Chiang, often referring to him in public as "the
Peanut" told a subordinate, Col. Frank Dorn,
that FDR was "fed up with Chiang and his
tantrums, and said so. In fact, he told me in
that Olympian manner of his, 'if you can't get
along with Chiang, and can't replace him, get rid
of him once and for all. You know what I mean,
put in someone you can manage.'" Col. Dorn
prepared a plan for an airplane mishap, in which
there would be engine problems and, in the
process of bailing out of the plane, Chiang and
his wife would be given faulty parachutes. The
plan was not executed only because FDR decided
not to issue final authorization.

Franklin Roosevelt's final betrayal of his
Chinese ally occurred in his negotiations with
Stalin over the conditions under which the Soviet
Union would enter the war against Japan. In
November 1943, on their way to their conference
with Stalin at Teheran, FDR and Churchill met in
Cairo, Egypt, with Chiang Kai-Shek. At the end of
the meeting, they issued the Cairo Declaration,
which said that America, Britain, and China "are
fighting this war to restrain and punish the
aggression of Japan. They covet no gain for
themselves and have no thought of territorial
expansion. . . . [A]ll territories Japan has
stolen from the Chinese, such as Manchuria,
Formosa and the Pescadores, will be restored to
the Republic of China.""
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
_________________
R.W. "Dick" GAINES
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952-72



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Friday, 22 April 20053:48 PM
Marine Vignettes - Tales Of The Corps....by GunnyG

http://www.angelfire.com/ca4/gunnyg/vignetteslisting.html
http://www.angelfire.com/ca4/gunnyg/vignetteslisting.html



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Tuesday, 12 April 20058:36 AM
Some Thoughts On Marines Forums, Messageboards, etc.

Why am I here? Because I enjoy the interaction w/other Marines here. Does that mean I absolutely respect all hands here? Far from it--there are many here I think very highly of, and others, from time to time--a very few--I would classify down there somewhere between p!sspoor and benjo-ditch.

I first got on the Net sometime in 1997. At that time there were several Marines boards around, but not as many as there are now, I believe. The Few.Com was the big one, and I think Sgt Grit's may have been around then too, or came along soon after. And there were some no longer online. Before I had GyG's... online, I had a non-Marine site called Dick G's WebSite, and when I posted on BBs I used the username, DickG.

The big problem w/the few was that, I think, it was too big. There were too many different individuals, and diverse groups of one kind or another there, and because of this, in my opinion, squabbles almost continuously ensued. Then the original owner left, and it went downhill quickly never to right itself.

Anyway, boards were continually abandoned, merged w/others, new boards sprang up, some siezed by opportunists, etc., etc.--whatever. Interesting that many of the original members are now confined to their own little group ICU/boards; lessee, there's the country bumpkins who discuss only the weather, gas prices, granny's mule; the goody-goody group of self-professed intellectuals; and several others who prefer to remain unknown. People are the funniest animals I know.

Seems to me, Sgt Grit has found at least a partial solution by fragmenting into several forums where all--or most all--can choose to frequent forum(s) according to their likes/dislikes, etc.--one may choose all, some, or one or more forum, or even none--and can just view posts and safely stay out of the line of fire, if they prefer. In fact, this is just what many/most of the old-timers do--and that's a shame. Actually, I have attempted to "recruit" numerous real old-timers to my sites, this one included, and it's always the same story--they don't like the constant bickering and in-fighting that goes on on these Marines forums; and, they don't like the way the situation is handled when it gets out of hand. (how do they know this?--obviously they are 'lurking') Shouldn't be too difficult for any of us to grok this.

In my experience, there are a helluva lot more viewers of many categories frequenting Marines boards than posters. Those hit-counters don't lie.

Myself, there are some people I cannot stand/share a board with. So long as they (I think 'they' know who they are) stay on their own turf, all is fine. But there are some--I call them "freedom riders" (they push their way in because they can) who insist on their presence/being acknowledged where they don't belong. No way, Jose! I am perfectly willing to surrender my guest status here if the need should arise, but I will not submit to conform to PC.

There are good points and not-so-good points to a GyG's Place here. Unlike my own Network54 boards where I have my finger on the delete button at all times, I do not have that luxury here--that's both good and not-so-good. So, too, because I routinely delete posts I just don't like at my N54 boards--that's good and bad--not good for business/hits--but who's counting?

I often notice posts where some mention that this is a Marines site...etc. In fact, I've made that point myslf at times. But we have to recognize it is also a commercial site with the thought in mind of attracting non-Marines as well as us Marines of all kinds and ages. Can't have your cake and eat it too.

Sgt Grit's, unlike most other sites, is up front about this point--it is at the root a business, here to provide Marine stuff to Marines and other interested folks. Great! I like that. I buy stuff too. What I don't like is the many other so-called "Marines" sites (actually money-making scams under the guise of "for Marines," but only using a hook for Marines) run by Merchant marines--yes, I have placed those Ms as I intended. There are many out there--one in particular I have referred to as a "carnival for suckers" --you may recall my mentioning that once or twice.

So, I am hopeful that the..."freedom riders" stay the hell outta my way, and I'll continue to mind my own business and enjoy myself here as long as the ride lasts.



Semper Fidelis
Dick
RESTORE THE REPUBLIC!



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
http://network54.com/Forum/135069
Gunny G's Globe and Anchor Weblog
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Tuesday, 12 April 20058:20 AM
What We Know About Our Favorite Authors....

Roundup: Comments About Historians

James Bradley: The Man Who Celebrated Iwo Jima Flag-Raisers Writes Like Howard Zinn

Michael P. Tremoglie, a free-lance journalist, writing in frontpagemag.com (Jan. 13, 2004):

Flyboys by James Bradley is supposedly about eight pilots who were captured and killed by the Japanese during WWII while trying to destroy the Japanese radio stations on the island of Chichi Jima. However, the book is actually an indictment of American culture, history, and foreign policy along the lines of Howard Zinn. Rife with the usual politically correct canards about American history, Flyboys mentions the "ethnic cleansing" of the Native Americans, the extermination of Filipino civilians from 1899-1902 and the annexation of Hawaii by "bayonet. In addition, it claims that our policies towards Japan were actually responsible for Pearl Harbor. Bradley's book is not so much an account of events that took place during World War II as it is a forum for the author's views on the historical and cultural circumstances that caused them.

For example, Bradley recounts the atrocities of American troops in the Philippines but only tells part of the truth. He lists a cartoon about General Jacob Smithwho ordered Filipino civilians executedforgetting to mention that Smith was court-martialed as a result. Tellingly, Bradley primarily uses only one book about the Philippine War for his source: Benevolent Assimilation: The American Conquest of the Philippines by Stuart Creighton Miller. This book condemned U.S. policies in the Philippines as despotic imperialism and suggested that the U.S. was a ruthless, imperialistic nation, no different from the Japanese who destroyed Nanking.

As a reference about the history of American involvement in the Philippines, Bradley could have used The Philippine War by Brian McAllister Linn. Publisher's Weekly wrote of Linn's book:

"Without justifying the annexation itself, Linn demonstrates that the Filipino nationalists enjoyed at best limited popular support and did as much as the U.S. commanders in the islands to provoke a shooting war as an alternative to negotiationAs Linn shows, however, military success was only half of the war. Civic action was the other elementThe Americans built hospitals, opened schools and restored order. When necessary, they sustained that order with punitive measuresIf the U.S. annexation of the Philippines was an exercise in imperialism, Linn makes a convincing case that by 1902, the U.S. government of the island was nevertheless legitimate both de jure and de facto. For an increasing majority of Filipinos, the Americans had become preferable to the insurgents."

But then this is the antipodes of Bradley's thesis. The truth is that while we inherited an empire after the SpanishAmerican War, it was a controversial inheritance to say the least. Indeed, Williams Jennings Bryan used anti-imperialism as a plank in his platform during the 1900 election. We were reluctant imperialists, who made every effort to dissolve the empire we inherited that is, if you call paying $20 million of taxpayers' money to Spain for territory we captured from them an inheritance.

About the Native Americans, Bradley writes that we engaged in "ethnic cleansing." Has Bradley ever read the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, the Supreme Court case of Worcester v. Georgia, or the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934 whereby we established pensions, native control of lands, and funding of education, medical care, etc. for Native Americans? This is what Bradley calls ethnic cleansing?

Bradley also repeats the oxymoronic, liberal prevarication that we stole the Western United States from Mexico after the Mexican-American War. This claim is specious for two reasons.

First, the United States paid Mexico $15,000,000 cash and assumed some $3,250,000 more in claims of American citizens on the Mexican government. When one considers that Great Britain, France, or Russia might have taken California at any moment; and that the American troops were in possession of the Mexican capital, the terms offered Mexico were very generous. Indeed, then-President James Polk was urged by many to annex the whole country of Mexico to the United States. [1]

The second reason this claim is specious is the same reason that it is oxymoronic. If we stole California, New Mexico and Texas from the Mexicans, did not the Mexicans steal this land from the Native Americans? It certainly was not their land. They annexed it after declaring independence from Spain. However, Spain stole it from the Native Americans. So how could Mexico claim it was their land to annex?

As for Hawaii, The United States did not foment a revolution there. In fact, according to one source, " in 1893; there were simply subjects of the kingdom who objected strongly to the willful ways of their queen she announced she was going to install a new constitution, take away the voting rights of certain taxpayers and appoint all the members of one of the two houses of government. They said no way and removed her from office in a virtually bloodless coup. The U.S. played a minimal role, pointing no guns, firing no bullets. And even that role was denounced very quickly by President Cleveland, making clear the U.S. itself was not interested in taking over the kingdom" [2] Yes, there was a Bayonet Constitution in 1887. However, the U.S. was not involved, and that government was replaced by a royal Hawaiian government and a new constitution.

When writing about World War II, Bradley is equally hypercritical of America, citing the usual liberal history. About the embargo of the Japanese, Bradley states that it was America's faultignoring completely the atrocity of Nan King and the invasion of China. He says that America committed imperialist acts; therefore, we should not have condemned Japan. Bradley also cites the usual canard of racism. But he contradicts himself on that count, because he then says we helped China.

Bradley loves to mention atrocities or barbarities by our military against the Japanese. He uses the standard liberal canard that this was unique to the Pacific theater because of American racism. In Bradley's view, the European theater did not have the atrocities committed by Americans because Germans were more like us. Bradley mentions on page 138 how American soldiers killed Japanese more enthusiastically then they killed Germans and Italians. He cites on the same page how one Marine was instructed at Peleliu that no prisoners were to be taken.

Apparently, he did not research such action in Europe, where there was the Biscari massacre of Italian soldiers and the Canicatti slaughter of Italian civilians. [3] There have been books written how 700 SS POW's were killed by American troops and at Dachau 300 German soldiers were summarily executed.

Bradley also claims Americans applauded Japanese internment (p. 137). He cites testimony of general who said that Italians and Germans could be trusted, but a Jap is a Jap. This was from the book Lewis and Steele Hell in the Pacific , which was written in 1992, when it was not commonly known that Germans and Italians were also interned. This point renders Bradley once again subject to his own liberal revisionist history. Germans and Italians were interned during WWII, and Germans and Austro-Hungarians during WWI. Therefore, Bradley's premise that there was a special or unique hatred of Japanese as evidenced by internment or not taking prisoners is bogus.

But in Bradley's world, the Doolittle Raid was a war crime. He claims schools and hospitals were bombed and innocent civilians were killed. He cites the elementary schools destroyed and the students killed. Pearl Harbor was a military installation, Bradley says, Tokyo was not.

As Japan's capital, there were military installations in Tokyonot to mention military industries. As far as innocent civilians are concerned, there were many killed at Pearl Harbor. Among the innocent civilians were Nancy Masako Arakaki, age 8 and Robert Yo****o Hirasaki, age 3. They were by no means the only such casualties.

Our military did not conduct anymore ruthless, barbarous or deadly a war against Japan than it did against Germany. German cities, like Dresden, were bombed and incinerated. In fact, more civilians were killed in Dresden (135, 000) [4] than in Hiroshima and Nagasaki combined. In addition, 2,000 Italian civilians were killed in the first air raid of Rome in July 1943.

All this was done for a purposeto end the war.

Flyboys is the second book by James Bradley, whose first book, Flags of Our Fathers , about the Marines who planted the flag at Iwo Jima, was a bestseller. Bradley is the son of one of the flag-planters.

Originally from Wisconsin, Bradley holds a degree in East Asian History from the University of Wisconsin. During his college days, he lived in Japan with an 18-year-old Japanese woman. Bradley is also president of an eponymous nonprofit peace foundation, "which fosters understanding between America and Asia. The foundation sends American students to Japan and China to study."

One can understand Bradley's sympathy towards Japanese culture because of his experiences. And this is not to say that our country is not without sin. However, Bradley's version of history is tendentious and fallacious. The fact that the United States Navy awarded Bradley its civilian medal because of his book, and that Flyboys was endorsed by W.E.B. Griffin, who is not a Blame America First liberal, is rather odd.

Could it be that my perspective is skewed? Possibly, my experiences with public schools and colleges have made me aware of the liberal bias among educatorsespecially historians. As a result, I may sometimes perceive bias where there is none.

My wife, however, is apolitical. During those rare occasions that she does comment on a subject of a political nature, her Mount Holyoke/University of Pennsylvania education is apparent by the liberalism of her opinions. However, she read several pages of this book, and even she was appalled by its unwarranted and specious criticism of America.

When Bradley finally writes about the events on Chichi Jima and the pilots, the book is a good one. Unfortunately, his partisan perspective of history detracts from the book itself. Consequently it is neither enlightening nor entertaining, and does not accomplish what Bradley said he wanted to: tell why the execution of the Chichi Jima pilots occurred and why no mention was ever made to the men's families.


http://hnn.us/blogs/entries/3062.html>

ENDNOTES :

[1]
http://www.sfmuseum.org/hist6/muzzey.html>>;

[2]
http://www.angelfire.com/hi2/hawaiiansovereignty/annexation.html>>; ret fm w/s 1-4-03

[3]
http://www.ausa.org/www/armymag.nsf/(reviews)/200212?OpenDocument>>; ret f/m w/s 1-4-03

[4]
http://www.winstonchurchill.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=832>>; ret fm w/s 1-4-03

Posted by Editor on Thursday, January 15, 2004 at 8:35 PM

* Response by Christopher Riggs (January 29, 2004 at 6:49 PM)
o Re: Response by Joe Doex (June 13, 2004 at 1:29 AM)
+ Re: Response by Christopher Riggs (August 1, 2004 at 11:01 PM)

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~~~~~~~~~
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~~~~~~~~~~
FOR THE THINKING MARINE!
~~~~~~~~~~



~~~~~~~~~~


R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

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Comments: 1Reply with comment  

Tuesday, 15 March 20055:16 PM
Patriotic Fervor and The Truth About Iwo Jima Flag

http://www.sftt.org/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=3097
http://www.sftt.org/phpbb2/viewtopic.php?t=3097

The above History website is an outstanding reference site with lots of information regarding That Flag On Iwo Jima, etc.



~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~
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http://gunnyg.blogspot.com
~SITES/FORUMS FOR THE THINKING MARINE!~

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Sunday, 18 July 20049:49 PM
An Open letter To Clint Eastwood....By Gunny G!

Wednesday, July 14, 2004

AN OPEN LETTER TO CLINT EASTWOOD....by Dick Gaines
An Open Letter To Clint Eastwood
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com/2004_07_14_gunnyg_archive.html

I see by recent news articles that you are to be involved in a new film regarding the raising of our flag on Iwo Jima on February 23, 1945. I have wondered if this is going to be yet another of the usual party line accounts, or if this one will finally be an in-depth full story and truth of that event in our history.

Since it is you involved this time, I expect the latter could be the case, and I think it's worth a shot to attempt to bring the following information to your attention in hopes that the story of Marine Ray Jacobs, and others, might finally be brought to the attention of the American public in a way that is worthy of both the event and the men themselves.

Jacobs is one of the known remaining survivors, along with Chuck Lindberg, of Lt. Schrier's 40-man combat patrol up Suribachi that day to raise our colors over the Japanese homeland. I am referring here to the earlier first (so-called) flag raising--not the later raising of a replacement flag that was photographed by Joe Rosenthal (and was also shot by Sgt Bill Genaust on motion-picture film as well)--and which quickly, and incorrectly, became famous as the Iwo Jima flag raising well-known to all. The actual flag raising was photographed earlier that same day by Marine S/Sgt Lou Lowery, and is not nearly so well-known.

Jacobs' own recent Eyewitness Account and photos describing the flag raising, as well as other information, may be viewed here...
Eyewitness Account...

Ray Jacobs may be reached at the following E-Mail address...

ray1jacobs@msn.com

Hoping this finds its way to your eyes. Thank you for your kind attention.

Semper Fidelis
Dick Gaines

Ref
Source: GyG's OSMT Forum

Note:
Viewers, please post/forward all hands.
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com/2004_07_14_gunnyg_archive.html







~~~~~~~~~~



R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GnySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952 (Plt #437)--'72

GyG's Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums
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Monday, 10 May 20048:23 PM
INDEX OTHER GUNNY G FORUMS/MESSAGEBOARDS1

http://www.network54.com/Index/11170
http://www.network54.com/Index/11170

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Wednesday, 17 March 20048:26 AM
WW II Veteran Closer To Clearing Name

San Jose (CA) Mercury-News
March 17, 2004
WWII Veteran Closer to Clearing Name

ROBERT IMRIE
Associated Press
WAUSAU, Wis. - A World War II veteran who has fought to clear his name since a book cast doubt over his role at Iwo Jima appears to have been in the battle after all, a former Marine officer said.
Retired Marine Col. David Severance, who was instrumental in the 36-day struggle to capture the Japanese island, said photo evidence is convincing that Jerry Ziehme was among the soldiers there.
"It is the only thing he has as far as I am concerned," Severance said Tuesday from his California home.
The book, "Flags of Our Fathers," documents the lives of the six Marines who raised the flag atop Iwo Jima's highest peak on Feb. 23, 1945. The Pulitzer Prize-winning picture was captured by Joe Rosenthal, an Associated Press photographer.
But it's not the famous flag-raising picture that upset Ziehme, a retired Navy medic. It's another photo Rosenthal took moments later of 17 cheering, gun-waving troops posed beneath the flag atop Mount Suribachi after four days of fighting.
That picture is published in the book and is labeled the "gung-ho shot." It identifies 16 of the men, none of them as Ziehme, and lists another as unknown. Ziehme (pronounced ZEE-me) has said he's in the photo but was misidentified as another soldier.
In a recent letter to Ziehme, Severance wrote that one of the Marines who raised the flag in the famous picture, Corpsman John "Doc" Bradley of Antigo, Wis., told the Hospital Corps Quarterly in July 1945 that a corpsman named James R. Zima worked with him on Mount Suribachi as a replacement.
Severance said that account has been a major basis for disputing Ziehme's claims that he was the replacement corpsman.
"I must concede that Corpsman John Bradley most likely confused the name 'Zima' with 'Ziehme' because of the similarity of pronunciation, and that Corpsman Gerald Ziehme was the one working with him on Suribachi," Severance wrote.
Severance said other details added to the misunderstanding, including published comments attributed to Ziehme that contain major factual errors about battle details and a lack of a paper trail to Ziehme.
Matthew Martin, an attorney for Random House in New York - which published the book by James Bradley and Ron Powers in 2000 - told one of Ziehme's attorneys last summer there were contradictory claims regarding the identities of soldiers in the gung-ho picture.
Because of that, future printings of the book will only identify the four Marines in the photo who were among the primary subjects of the book.
Ziehme, who has said he goes to veterans meetings and gets cold stares because of the book, called the change unfair to the rest of the men. "Those other guys are deserving because they went through a lot."




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Monday, 15 March 200410:32 PM
EYEWITNESS ACCOUNT: FIRST FLAG IWO JIMA!

From: "RAYMOND JACOBS" <ray1jacobs@msn.com> Add to Address Book
To: "Farrell Capt Thomas C" <FarrellTC@mfp.usmc.mil>, "Greglatino" <gclatino@rcn.com>, "jay5644" <jay5644@comcast.net>, "Judith Ann Ziehme" <ziehmeja@chibardun.net>, "Lutman, Mike" <MLutman@KCPD.org>, "R.W. Gaines" <gyg1345@yahoo.com>, "Rayfor" <Doc666usmc@aol.com>
Subject: Fw: WWII Stories -- Web Site
Date: Mon, 15 Mar 2004 19:10:52 -0800


Thought you would like to see this...
----- Original Message -----
From: Joseph L. Richard
To: RAYMOND JACOBS
Sent: Monday, March 15, 2004 3:52 PM
Subject: WWII Stories -- Web Site

Hello Mr. Jacobs,

My day off is today, and I managed to get a number of small projects
cleared off of my desk so that I can devote some time to reading and
building a page of your essay that you sent to me last week.

I find the material fascinating! to say the least.

I cannot understand as to how the historians did not give you proper
credit for your actions during the 1st Flag Raising on Iwo Jima.

Hopefully, through you efforts and others working on your behalf, you
will receive the credit due you, Sir...especially with the upcoming 60th
Anniversary of the flag raising atop Mt. Suribachi in February of next
year.

If interested, you can watch as I work on your page!

I am currently in the process of scanning the images from your essay
into my computer system. I run an older (Apple) Mac system and I work
alone on my web pages...which explains why it sometimes takes so long
for a project to be completed. My full time job keeps me hopping and I
work on my days off as well as during much of my spare time.

If you check out the following link you will see the page I am setting
up for you IN PROGRESS.

http://carol_fus.tripod.com/marines_hero_ray_jacobs.html

All of the text is pretty much in place.

The images are being scanned in and are being uploaded as I work on the
project. This portion of the project will take a bit of time and may not
be completed for a couple of days or so. It takes a bit of effort and
time to scan images, size, set the proper image size for the web page
and upload the images to my server.

Additionally, the images are LARGE and will take a fairly long time to
load up especially if the viewer is using a dial-up server. I use a
cable internet server and this cuts my upload/download time measureably.

Anyway, as you look at the page, don't get alarmed if you do not see all
of the images in place as of yet. As I work with each image, I send them
to my server and they will then appear in proper locations throughout
the text of the essay.

Hope you enjoy.

Best Regards,

Joe Richard
web master

World War II Stories -- In Their Own Words
http://carol_fus.tripod.com

Patrick -- Portrait Artist
http://patrick_rich.tripod.com/

Thomas' 28th Louisiana Infantry Regiment
http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Quarters/5361

18th Louisiana Infantry Regiment
http://members.tripod.com/j_richard

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Friday, 12 March 20041:54 PM
Myths Of Makin Island by Kenneth L. McCullough

http://gunnyg.blogspot.com/2004_03_10_gunnyg_archive.html
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com/2004_03_10_gunnyg_archive.html

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Saturday, 7 February 20049:27 AM
"A NEW CORPS WITHOUT GUNNERY SERGEANTS!"

http://gunnyg.blogspot.com/2004_02_06_gunnyg_archive.html
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com/2004_02_06_gunnyg_archive.html

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Tuesday, 13 January 200412:58 PM
That Old Slouch Hat!

http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/slouchhat.html
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/slouchhat.html

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Sunday, 11 January 20047:53 AM
Medal Or Reprimand

"I was told by 'Chesty' Puller years ago, there is only a hairline's difference between a Navy Cross and a general court-martial."

Gregory "Pappy" Boyington

http://www.homeofheroes.com/wings/part2/03_walker.html
http://www.homeofheroes.com/wings/part2/03_walker.html

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Monday, 5 January 20047:51 AM
"China Marines"

CHINA MARINES
"Ten thousand gobs lay down their swabs to fight one sick marine" "Ten thousand more stood up and swore, Twas the damndest fight the'd ever seen"
-Tell It To The Marines, Lon Chaney, 1927

Comments: -Reply with comment  

Saturday, 3 January 20049:22 AM
War Crimes Coverup? 1950, Seoul, Korea...

Note:
The following is an e-mail to me from Mr. Longabardi in response to my request for information regarding his article(s) on this subject,
-RWG

Re: USMC War Crimes...


Mr Gaines,

Thanks for your interest.

The story is about a 'war crime' incident in Seoul in late Sept of 1950.

... the entire original story published on Nov 3rd 2003 in US News and World Report can be viewed
in the forum section of Marine Corps Times.

http://www.militarycity.com/forums/viewtopic.php?t=1090

I just wrote a guest column for "DefenseWatch" about the story also.

The direct link to my Defensewatch article:

http://www.sftt.org/cgi-bin/csNews/csNews.cgi?database=DefenseWatch.db&command=viewone&op=t&id=297&rnd=154.4831890450034

Also the Charleston Gazette (West Virginia) did a very good follow-up story and and editorial calling for a Congressional investigation of the case.

The first article is below for your reference.

I will try and pass along any/all new info .. please do get the word out about this story.

-Eric


------------------------------------------------------------------------
Copyright 2003 Charleston Newspapers
Charleston Gazette (West Virginia)

October 30, 2003, Thursday
Correction Appended
SECTION: News; Pg. P1A
LENGTH: 1369 words
HEADLINE: After 53 years, Korea vet's story told to nation, U.S. News recounts alleged Marine atrocity
BYLINE: Chris Wetterich
BODY:
chriswetterich@wvgazette.com

WINFIELD - Korean War veteran Carl Lamb has been trying to tell his story for more than 50 years.
The story of how Lamb found a swimming pool full of dead North Korean prisoners of war in a Seoul hotel - men he believes were murdered by U.S. soldiers in the first year of the war - is being told nationally for the first time in the current issue of the magazine U.S. News & World Report.
The 5,000-word dispatch, spearheaded by award-winning investigative reporter Eric Longabardi, details how Lamb discovered the POWs and tried to get justice from the Marine Corps for their deaths, and how Lamb and U.S. News were thwarted by military investigators while trying to make the story public.
To this day, the military has not made the investigation public, talked about the results or even announced its existence.
The U.S. News article tells how Lamb grew up poor in Arkansas, joined the Marine Corps at 16, became a sergeant, left the Corps shortly after the war and spent most of his life wandering across the country, doing odd jobs along the way while he tried to publish a book about the incident. Finally, Lamb ended up splitting his time between a West Virginia mobile home and a Pennsylvania house where his wife lives.
Lamb discovered the pile of naked, bullet-riddled bodies in a Seoul hotel's basement pool during a bloody 1950 street battle for the South Korean capital city. He did not witness the killings, but they have haunted him for more than half a century.
The memory is so awful, Lamb paid to publish a book about it in 1999 titled "The Last Parade!" which is available by mail order from any bookstore.
"I wrote the book to try to cleanse my memories of the Korean War," he said Wednesday outside his spartan mobile home on a hill overlooking the Kanawha River.
Lamb is at least 6 feet tall, a burly man with a head full of gray hair and a full gray beard. He sports a bright-orange sweatshirt and a pair of jeans, their newness accentuated by the tag still stuck to the left pant leg.
The trailer is a mess. Clothes are scattered everywhere. A chair and couch that surround a coffee table are covered with debris. A tan blazer, brown striped tie and blue shirt hang near the front door.
Propped up against the wall is a dented car door Lamb said he intends to fix and re-fasten onto one of the Lincoln Town cars that sit outside. A holstered pistol sits on the coffee table in the living room.
Longabardi, who first met Lamb two years ago, quips that it is Lamb's "bachelor's pad." The house where his wife lives in Pennsylvania is kept up and respectable, Lamb said.
To look at the place, Lamb is obviously eccentric. Reporters get pitched stories every day from people who have an agenda and seem overly vehement about getting it told. But Longabardi said he trusted Lamb because the vet admitted he didn't know everything about what happened that September 1950 day in Korea.
"When you're dealing with a source for a story, you have to go on instinct," said Longabardi, interviewed by phone Wednesday from his home in Los Angeles. "Usually, guys will make grandiose claims. He stuck straight to his story that he's been telling for 53 years. He knew he couldn't prove it. He knew he had to find somebody who could. All he saw was an aftermath of dead bodies."
One document convinced Longabardi that Lamb was credible: A mental health report Lamb kept that was made before his discharge from the Corps in November 1951. The report declares Lamb suffered from "battle fatigue" but notes his anger about the massacre. That proved that Lamb wasn't just a loner making up a story to get attention, Longabardi said.
Indeed, Lamb retells his story calmly and meticulously. He ticks off dates and times. He remembers vividly the reaction his captain had to his outrage over the bodies.
"He called me a son-of-a-bitch. He thought it was an inadequacy on my part that I was upset at the murders," Lamb said.
Longabardi has been a television producer and investigative journalist for 13 years, working for the past five years as an independent producer. He finds the stories, digs them up and is hired to produce and report them. In this case, television news was not interested so he brought the story to the editors at U.S. News & World Report.
The journalist started a two-year struggle to round up information about the incidents. Longabardi knew he'd need documents, military reports and firsthand accounts from other marines who had been in Seoul on that day.
The interviews and documents corroborated Lamb's story about being upset about the incident and go further to include quotations from a marine who also remembers hearing gunshots in the hotel after seeing POWs being dragged into it.
Longabardi began the investigation in August 2001 working with CBS News' Pentagon correspondent, David Martin. They had planned to do the story in only a few weeks. When it became evident that they could not gather the necessary materials quickly because of Pentagon foot-dragging, CBS dropped the story. Longabardi continued to work on it through the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks and the war in Iraq.
CBS, Martin and Longabardi first got a whiff of the story when Lamb contacted them in August 2001.
Lamb had sent a letter to Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld detailing the massacre in 2001. He got a letter back from the Marine Corps inspector general asking for all material documents and proof Lamb had that the incident occurred.
Lamb sent them documents but the preliminary investigation didn't start until CBS started sniffing around the story, Longabardi said. Once the Pentagon found out that CBS had dropped the story, the investigation seemed to slow and Marine Corps investigators didn't interview Lamb until months later when he sent them another letter.
Longabardi and Lamb are convinced the Pentagon wanted to make sure the story never saw the light of day.
"They were successful in stonewalling us," Longabardi said. "They did some definitive active things to thwart my investigation."
Longabardi points to several actions by the Marines that they say show an attempt to bury the story:
s Longabardi could not get the "smoking gun," an after action report containing statements from Marine officers and enlisted men that refers to the killing of enemy prisoners, until the Pentagon had concluded its investigation in April 2002. Employees at the Marine archives in Washington told him the Corps had ordered the information withheld.
"The killing of prisoners is something that should be watched," the report said. "We had some of that going on."
s Investigators from the Marine Inspector General's office interviewed Lamb once. The first time they interviewed him, Lamb taped it. When they requested a second interview, Lamb again told them he would record it. They refused to do the interview. Longabardi was still actively tracking the investigation through Lamb.
s The U.S. News article also details how military investigators interviewed only a handful of the remaining marines believed to have been in Seoul near the hotel that day. Lamb told investigators that he believes men from Easy Company of the 2nd Battalion, 1st Marine Regiment were responsible. The investigators talked to two men from that unit.
"How the hell do you do an investigation if you only talk to two people?" Lamb said.
The Marines were to open a full-blown investigation if they found enough evidence. In February 2003, the Marine Corps closed its preliminary investigation and declined to ask for a full-blown investigation from homicide investigators in the Navy.
They told U.S. News that the investigation was thorough and that there wasn't enough evidence of a war crime to warrant further proceedings. Longabardi said the U.S. News article shows there is plenty.
Lamb said he will keep telling the story and making his case.
"I warned them that if they attempted to whitewash this, I would fight to make sure this story was told until hell froze over," Lamb said. "I want them to see them admit that a war crime occurred."
To contact Chris Wetterich, use e-mail or call 348-3023.
CORRECTION-DATE: October 31, 2003, Friday
CORRECTION:
In Wednesday's story about Korean War veteran Carl Lamb's efforts to get his allegations about war crimes heard, the Gazette incorrectly stated that the Marine Corps investigation of the incident ended in February 2003. The investigation actually ended in February 2002.
LOAD-DATE: October 30, 2003
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Posted on Dec 21, 2003, 8:37 AM
from IP address 69.34.39.166

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Saturday, 3 January 20048:47 AM
Harass The Brass...

Note:
I was surprised to see the following listed on today's e-mail from the Marine Corps/DOD Daily Media Report...
http://www.infoshop.org/inews/stories.php?story=03/12/30/5918602
The entire article (Collapse of The Armed Forces) by Col R.D. Heinl USMC (Ret.), deceased, is available on GyG's Blog...
http://gunnyg.blogspot.com/2003_10_28_gunnyg_archive.html
DickG
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
People of the Year -- 2003

by Tibor Szamuely
Monday Dec. 29, 2003 at 2:58 PM
tiborszamuely@yahoo.com

Harass the Brass

A friend who was in the U.S. military during the 1990-91 Persian Gulf War told me that before President G.H.W. Bush visited the troops in Saudi Arabia, enlisted men and women who would be in Bushs immediate vicinity had their rifle and pistol ammunition taken away from them. This was supposedly done to avoid accidents. But it was also clear to people on the scene that Bush and his corporate handlers were somewhat afraid of the enlisted people who Bush would soon be killing in his unsuccessful re-election campaign.

The suppressed history of the last big U.S. war before Operation Desert Storm shows that the Commander-in-Chief had good reason to fear and distrust his troops. Our rulers want us to forget what happened during the Vietnam war -- especially what happened inside the U.S. armed forces during the war. Our rulers remember it all too well. They want us to forget what defeated their war effort, and the importance of resistance to the war by enlisted men and women.

Until 1968 the desertion rate for U.S. troops in Vietnam was lower than in previous wars. But by 1969 the desertion rate had increased fourfold. This wasnt limited to Southeast Asia; desertion rates among G.I.s were on the increase world-wide. For soldiers in the combat zone, insubordination became an important part of avoiding horrible injury or death. As early as mid-1969, an entire company of the 196th Light Infantry Brigade sat down on the battlefield. Later that year, a rifle company from the famed 1st Air Cavalry Division flatly refused - on CBS TV - to advance down a dangerous trail. In the following 12 months the 1st Air Cav notched up 35 combat refusals. From mild forms of political protest and disobedience of war orders, the resistance among the ground troops grew into a massive and widespread quasi-mutiny by 1970 and 1971. Soldiers went on search and avoid missions, intentionally skirting clashes with the Vietnamese, and often holding three-day-long pot parties instead of fighting. By 1970, the U.S. Army had 65,643 deserters, roughly the equivalent of four infantry divisions.

In an article published in the Armed Forces Journal (June 7, 1971), Marine Colonel Robert D. Heinl Jr., a veteran combat commander with over 27 years experience in the Marines, and the author of Soldiers Of The Sea, a definitive history of the Marine Corps, wrote: By every conceivable indicator, our army that remains in Vietnam is in a state approaching collapse, with individual units avoiding or having refused combat, murdering their officers and noncommissioned officers...Sedition, coupled with disaffection from within the ranks, and externally fomented with an audacity and intensity previously inconceivable, infest the Armed Services...

Heinl cited a New York Times article which quoted an enlisted man saying, The American garrisons on the larger bases are virtually disarmed. The lifers have taken our weapons away...there have also been quite a few frag incidents in the battalion.

Frag incidents or fragging was soldier slang in Vietnam for the killing of strict, unpopular and aggressive officers and NCOs. The word apparently originated from enlisted men using fragmentation grenades to off commanders. Heinl wrote, Bounties, raised by common subscription in amounts running anywhere from $50 to $1,000, have been widely reported put on the heads of leaders who the privates and SP4s want to rub out. Shortly after the costly assault on Hamburger Hill in mid-1969, the GI underground newspaper in Vietnam, GI Says, publicly offered a $10,000 bounty on Lieutenant Colonel Weldon Hunnicutt, the officer who ordered and led the attack. The Pentagon has now disclosed that fraggings in 1970 (209 killings) have more than doubled those of the previous year (96 killings). Word of the deaths of officers will bring cheers at troop movies or in bivouacs of certain units.

Congressional hearings on fraggings held in 1973 estimated that roughly 3% of officer and non-com deaths in Vietnam between 1961 and 1972 were a result of fraggings. But these figures were only for killings committed with grenades, and didnt include officer deaths from automatic weapons fire, handguns and knifings. The Armys Judge Advocate Generals Corps estimated that only 10% of fragging attempts resulted in anyone going to trial.

In the Americal Division, plagued by poor morale, fraggings during 1971 were estimated to be running around one a week. War equipment was frequently sabotaged and destroyed. By 1972 roughly 300 anti-war and anti-military newspapers, with names like Harass the Brass, All Hands Abandon Ship and Star Spangled Bummer had been put out by enlisted people. In Vietnam, wrote the Ft. Lewis-McCord Free Press, The Lifers, the Brass, are the true enemy... Riots and anti-war demonstrations took place on bases in Asia, Europe and in the United States. By the early 1970s the government had to begin pulling out of the ground war and switching to an air war, in part because many of the ground troops who were supposed to do the fighting were hamstringing the worlds mightiest military force by their sabotage and resistance.

With the shifting over to an air war strategy, the Navy became an important center of resistance to the war. In response to the racism that prevailed inside the Navy, black and white sailors occasionally rebelled together. The most significant of these rebellions took place on board the USS Constellation off Southern California, in November 1972. In response to a threat of less-than-honorable discharges against several black sailors, a group of over 100 black and white sailors staged a day-and-a-half long sit-in. Fearful of losing control of his ship at sea to full-scale mutiny, the ships commander brought the Constellation back to San Diego.

One hundred thirty-two sailors were allowed to go ashore. They refused orders to reboard the ship several days later, staging a defiant dockside strike on the morning of November 9. In spite of the seriousness of the rebellion, not one of the sailors involved was arrested.

Sabotage was an extremely useful tactic. On May 26, 1970, the USS Anderson was preparing to steam from San Diego to Vietnam. But someone had dropped nuts, bolts and chains down the main gear shaft. A major breakdown occurred, resulting in thousands of dollars worth of damage and a delay of several weeks. Several sailors were charged, but because of a lack of evidence the case was dismissed. With the escalation of naval involvement in the war the level of sabotage grew. In July of 1972, within the space of three weeks, two of the Navys aircraft carriers were put out of commission by sabotage. On July 10, a massive fire swept through the admirals quarters and radar center of the USS Forestall, causing over $7 million in damage. This delayed the ships deployment for over two months. In late July, the USS Ranger was docked at Alameda, California. Just days before the ships scheduled departure for Vietnam, a paint-scraper and two 12-inch bolts were inserted into the number-four-engine reduction gears causing nearly $1 million in damage and forcing a three-and-a-half month delay in operations for extensive repairs. The sailor charged in the case was acquitted. In other cases, sailors tossed equipment over the sides of ships while at sea.

The House Armed Services Committee summed up the crisis of rebellion in the Navy: The U.S. Navy is now confronted with pressures...which, if not controlled, will surely destroy its enviable tradition of discipline. Recent instances of sabotage, riot, willful disobedience of orders, and contempt for authority...are clear-cut symptoms of a dangerous deterioration of discipline.

The rebellion in the ranks didnt emerge simply in response to battlefield conditions. A civilian anti-war movement in the U.S. had emerged on the coat-tails of the civil rights movement, at a time when the pacifism-at-any-price tactics of civil rights leaders had reached their effective limit, and were being questioned by a younger, combative generation. Working class blacks and Latinos served in combat units out of all proportion to their numbers in American society, and major urban riots in Watts, Detroit and Newark had an explosive effect on the consciousness of these men. After the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr. major riots erupted in 181 U.S. cities; at that point the rulers of the United States were facing the gravest national crisis since the Civil War. And the radical movement of the late 1960s wasnt limited to the United States. Large-scale rebellion was breaking out all over the world, in Latin American and Europe and Africa, and even against the Maoists in China; its high point was the wildcat general strike that shut down France in May, 1968, the last time a major industrialized democracy came close to social revolution.

The crisis that racked American society during the Vietnam war was a grave development in the life of what had been a very stable and conservative society, but it wasnt profound enough to create an irreparable rupture between the rulers and the ruled. In the early 1970s, the U.S. was still coasting on the relative prosperity of the post-World War Two economic boom. Social conditions faced by working people in the U.S. werent anywhere near as overwhelming and unbearable as they are now. U.S. involvement in a protracted ground war in Iraq today or Columbia tomorrow could have a much more rapid explosive impact on American society.

A number of years ago, in a deceitful article in Mother Jones magazine, corporate liberal historian Todd Gitlin claimed that the peaceful and legal aspects of the 1960s U.S. anti-war movement had been the most successful opposition to a war in history. Gitlin was dead wrong; as a bourgeois historian, Gitlin is paid to render service unto capital by getting it wrong, and get it wrong he does, again and again. The most effective anti-war movement in history was at the end of World War One, when proletarian revolutions broke out in Russia, Germany and throughout Central Europe in 1917 and 1918. A crucial factor in the revolutionary movement of that time was the collapse of the armies and navies of Russian and Germany in full-scale armed mutiny. After several years of war and millions of casualties the soldiers and sailors of opposing nations began to fraternize with each other, turned their guns against their commanding officers and went home to fight against the ruling classes that had sent them off to war. The war ended with a global cycle of mutinies mirroring the social unrest spreading across the capitalist world; some of the most powerful regimes on Earth were quickly toppled and destroyed.

Soldiers and sailors played a leading role in the revolutionary movement. The naval bases Kronstadt in Russia and Kiel and Wilhelmshaven in Germany became important centers of revolutionary self-organization and action, and the passing of vast numbers of armed soldiers and sailors to the side of the Soviets allowed the working class to briefly take power in Russia. The French invasion of Revolutionary Russia in 1919 and 1920 was crippled by the mutiny of the French fleet in the Black Sea, centered around the battleships France and the Jean Bart. Mutinies broke out among sailors in the British Navy and in the armies of the British empire in Asia, and even among American troops sent to aid the counter-revolutionary White Army in the Russian Civil War.

Revolutionary unrest doesnt happen every day, but when it does break out, it can overcome the most powerful states with a surprising and improbable speed, and the collapse of the repressive forces of the state is a key moment in the beginning of a new way of life. Its an ugly fact that war and revolution were intimately linked in the most far-going social movements of the 20th century. With the U.S. governments self-appointed role as the cop for global capitalist law and order, its likely that the crisis that will cause an irreparable break between the rulers and the ruled in the United States will be the result of an unsuccessful war. That day may soon be upon us. At that point, widespread fraternization between anti-capitalist radicals and enlisted people will be crucial in expanding an anti-war movement into a larger opposition to the system of wage labor and commodity production that generates wars, exploitation, poverty, inequality and ecological devastation. An examination of what happened to the U.S. military during the Vietnam War can help us see the central role the military question is going to play in a revolutionary mass movement in the 21st century. It isnt a question of how a chaotic and rebellious civilian populace can out-gun the well-organized, disciplined armies of the capitalist state in pitched battle, but of how a mass movement can cripple the effective fighting capacity of the military from within, and bring about the collapse and dispersal of the states armed forces. What set of circumstances can compel the inchoate discontentment endemic in any wartime army or navy to advance to the level of conscious, organized resistance? How fast and how deeply can a subversive consciousness spread among enlisted people? How can rebels in uniform take effective, large-scale action against the military machine? This effort will involve the sabotage and destruction of sophisticated military technologies, an irreversible breakdown in the chain-of-command, and a terminal demoralization of the officer corps. The quasi-mutiny that helped defeat the U.S. in Vietnam offers a significant precedent for the kind of subversive action working people will have to foment against 21st century global capitalism and its high-tech military machine.

As rampaging market forces trash living conditions for the majority of the worlds people, working class troops will do the fighting in counter-insurgency actions against other working class people. War games several years ago by the Marines in a defunct housing project in Oakland, dubbed Operation Urban Warrior, highlight the fact that Americas rulers want their military to be prepared to suppress the domestic fallout from their actions, and be ready to do it soon. But as previous waves of global unrest have shown, the forces that give rise to mass rebellion in one area of the globe will simultaneously give rise to rebellion in other parts of the world. The armed forces are vulnerable to social forces at work in the larger society that spawns them. Revolt in civilian society bleeds through the fabric of the military into the ranks of enlisted people. The relationship between officers and enlisted people mirrors the relationship between bosses and employees, and similar dynamics of class conflict emerge in the military and civilian versions of the workplace. The military is never a hermetically sealed organization.

Our rulers know all this. Our rulers know that they are vulnerable to mass resistance, and they know that their wealth and power can be collapsed from within by the working class women and men whom they depend on. We need to know it, too.

Much of the information for this article has been taken from the book Soldiers in Revolt: The American Military Today, by David Cortright, published by Anchor/Doubleday in 1975.

Readers should please send copies of this article to any enlisted people they know.

NOTE: 1. A few far-sighted individuals among the U.S. political elite apparently fear that protracted U.S. involvement in a ground war could trigger large-scale domestic unrest.

According to Newsweek magazine, at a meeting in the White House during President Clinton's intervention in the Balkans, a heated exchange took place between Madeleine Albright, then ambassador to the United Nations, and then-National Security Adviser Colin Powell.

Newsweek gives the following confusing and semi-coherent account:

"...Powell steadfastly resisted American involvement. He initially opposed even air drops of food, fearing that these would fail and that U.S. Army ground troops would inevitably be sucked in. His civilian bosses, who suspected him of padding the numbers when asked how many U.S. troops would be required, grew impatient.

At one meeting, Madeleine Albright, then ambassador to the United Nations, famously confronted Powell. "What's the point of having this superb military that you're always talkingabout if we can't use it?" she demanded. In his memoirs, Powell recalled that he told Albright that GI's were "not toy soldiers to be moved around on some sort of global game board."

An official who witnessed the exchange told NEWSWEEK that Powell also said something quite revealing that has not been reported.

"You would see this wonderful society destroyed," the general angrily told Albright.

It was clear, said this official, that Powell was referring to his beloved Army."

("Colin Powell: Behind the Myth," by Evan Thomas and John Berry, Newsweek, March 5th, 2001)

Colin Powell was a junior officer in the fragging-plagued Americal Division during the Vietnam War. On numerous occasions, Powell has said that the US defeat in Vietnam was the main influence on the way he sees the world. Pow ell clearly understands that the armed forces are a function of the larger civilian society that spawns them.

Was Colin Powell speaking about the US Army -- or about US society itself with his comment about seeing "this wonderful society destroyed?" You be the judge!

INTERNATIONALISM IN PRACTICE:

An American soldier in a hospital explained how he was wounded: He said, I was told that the way to tell a hostile Vietnamese from a friendly Vietnamese was to shout To hell with Ho Chi Minh! If he shoots, hes unfriendly. So I saw this dude and yelled To hell with Ho Chi Minh! and he yelled back, To hell with President Johnson! We were shaking hands when a truck hit us. (from 1,001 Ways to Beat the Draft, by Tuli Kupferburg).
http://www.infoshop.org/inews/stories.php?story=03/12/30/5918602
http://www.infoshop.org/inews/stories.php?story=03/12/30/5918602




Related at Infoshop: http://www.infoshop.org/military.html>;
Link: http://www.infoshop.org/military/phpBB2/index.php>;
Source: http://www.indybay.org/news/2003/12/1666772.php>;
~~~~~~~~~
I have a friend who's an ex-ranger and I've talked with him a lot about military things. One story he told me was about how his platoon had specific plans for killing the CO if they ever came under fire. He never actually saw combat so they never had the chance but the plan was to pop the guy as soon as they got shot at. On another topic, he also told me that the US bombed iraq every wednesday during the sanctions.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
R.W. "Dick" Gaines
GySgt USMC (Ret.)
1952-72
Gunny G's GLOBE and ANCHOR Sites & Forums
http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html
GyG's Old Salt Marines Tavern~Interactive~
http://www.network54.com/Forum/135069

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Thursday, 1 January 200410:16 AM
The Victoria Cross

MARINE BARRACKS

GOLIAD, TEXAS



Wednesday, December 31, 2003



For: All Hands & The Ship's Cook.



Subj: The Victoria Cross



"Gunny G.," sent me a message a few days back that to satisfy my need for further information required much help from my friends in Australia. The Gunny's "Globe and Anchor Sites and Forums without a doubt contain more information on the past, present, and the future Marine Corps than any other site on the net. For those of you interested, you may click on the http immediately below to get background information for the reason for this addition to my site.



http://www.network54.com/Forum/message?forumid=135069&messageid=1022266313

http://www.network54.com/Forum/message?forumid=135069&messageid=1022266313



For those of you still interested in the above

story of about 1 1/2 years ago, I suggest you

send a postal card, as I have done, to...



Marine Corps Historical Center

1254 Charles Morris St. SE

Bldg#58 WNY (HDH-2)

Washington, D.C. 20374



I recently received an interesting response from

an inquiry to the above--not what I had hoped

for, nor does it explain a few things left

unanswered, but information none the less.



Semper Fidelis,

DickG



=====

R.W. "Dick" Gaines, GySgt USMC (Ret.) 1952-72

The Globe and Anchor! --Sites & Forums http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/sites.html

Old Salt Marines Tavern ~Interactive~

http://network54.com/Forum/135069





Gunny G Online! --One of The Best Darn Marines Information Lists On The WWW! http://www.angelfire.com/ca/dickg/online.html



Whatever, Gunny G.'s message made me curious enough to email my good friend, Ron Chapman, of Sydney, in the land of Oz. Ron's a highly decorated Oz vet of the Korean War. This caused him to consult his guru on all such military questions, "Vince," and Vince supplied us with the information that I have attached to our site. As usual, go to http://sullyusmc.com, click "Menu," "Military History & Traditions," and under "British Military History and Awards," "Victoria Cross." I believe that most of you will find the information Vince and Ron forwarded is interesting indeed.



One personal note. I saw with interest that Hospital Apprentice A. Fitzgibbon, Indian Medical Establishment, was awarded his Victoria Cross for actions while involved in the taking of the Taku Forts, China, on 21 August, 1860. Those same forts were also stormed and captured by an international force, that included U. S. Marines during events concerning the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. Then forty-five years later, on 1 October, 1945, some 60,000 Marines landed below the guns of those same Taku Forts. This time, thank the Lord, there were no assault, because the Japanese held them and aided the Marines during our landing. My battalion, 1/5/1stMarDiv, worse luck, were assigned the mission of continuing to garrison those forts. I got to know more about those forts than I really needed to know. What makes these forts strategic is they lie at the egress of the Pei Ho River into the Gulf of Po Hai (Yellow Sea). Oh, yes. Should mention that Hospital Apprentice Fitzgibbon was the youngest ever winner of the Victoria Cross. He was fifteen and three months when he performed his heroic deed. Not bad for a young lad.



The Happiest of New Years to all of you, and we hope this holiday season for you has truly been blessed. To make sure you're around for the next holiday, remember,



"Keep off the !@#$% Skyline," "Don't bunch us like a group of %$#@! sheep," "Make your interval ten >>>>>>>>>> paces," and as we Chosin Marines always say in parting, "Keep Warm." Semper Fidelis, Sully

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Thursday, 1 January 200410:13 AM
OOHRAH, and other things that go bump in the night!

OOHRAH, and other things that go bump in the night...
by Dick Gaines (Login Dick Gaines)
Forum Owner

Is Dave Kendrick still alive and kicking? Dave was one of my corporals when I was a PltLdr in HqBn. In the summer of '49 1stMarDiv ReconCo, was based out of Camp Del Mar. The CO was a 1stLt named John Alexander, and the XO 1stLt Ralph Crossman. 2dLt Dana Cashion had one platoon, and I the other. The PltSgts were GySgt Slagle and GySgt Ernest L. DeFazio, with the latter being my PltSgt. The "Experimental Submarine Company" was designated, for reasons I've never understood, as A Company, 7th Marines. At that time regiments had but three rifle companies under the "I" series of T/Os. A/7/1stMarDiv was commanded by Captain Kenny Houghton, with 1stLt Jim Williams as XO. That company, like ourselves, were based out of Del Mar, but spent a great deal of time aboard the Perch. I know that A Company was aboard Perch when she was rammed by a destroyer in "C" lane off the strand at Del Coronado in the summer of '48, but how much further back than that they had an association with Perch I don't know. MGen Kenny Houghton is still alive, and I'd guess he could tell you. Anyway, I became acquainted with Captain Houghton, and when he redeployed to Perch at North Island in San Diego, he asked that my platoon be attached to him. I'd not bet the farm on it, but it seems to me that Dave Kendrick was in my platoon at that time. We were prepping for Operation "MIKI" in Hawaii in October, and then a MICOWEX 50A on the north coast of the Alaskan Peninsula in January/February of 1950. During the latter exercise Cmdr Oly Payne (Sp?) suffered a mental collapse, and was succeeded by his XO, LtCmdr Bob Quinn. The latter would command Perch during her glory days raiding North Korea targets in July 1950.

When we returned from Alaska in March 1950, during which time we encountered and depth charged at least one submarine in the outer Kodiak (Recon Company was embarked on USS Wantuck, APD 125), Captain Houghton succeeded to command of the DivReconCo. Crossman remained as XO, and Cashion and I as platoon commanders. When Korea broke out on 16Jun50 Houghton took out my old platoon with an officer new to the company, 2dLt Don Sharon. I went to D/2/5 as a PltCmdr with additional duties as BnReconOfficer. 2dLt Dana Cashion, with part of his platoon, and a UDT unit, embarked in Perch and made the raids on the west coast of North Korea. Following the disbandment of the raiding group, Dana joined G/3/5 as a PltCmdr and survived the war.

I've read that Dave Kendrick, then a GySgt, was in Force Recon in 1954 and brought the OORAH with him. Of course, I'd have expected that since the OORAH was already a sort of battle cry when my recon platoon joined A Company in June, 1949. Exactly who originated it I haven't a clue, but for sure for sure OORAH was alive and well the first time we worked off Perch. If Dave is still on the right side of the soil, I know that he'll confirm everything I've written previously.

The last time I saw Dave was at Phu Bai in June 1966. He was 1stSgt or SgtMajor of some outfit, and I was the Phu Bai Defense Commander in addition to my duties as CO of 1/4/3dMarDiv. Should Dave still be around and a member of your outfit, tell him Sully said Semper Fi.

I figure this will give you guys something to chew on regarding when OORAH originated. Semper Fidelis, Sully website: http://sullyusmc.com, email addy sully@sullyusmc.com or saber6@the-i.net.

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