The Bixography Discussion Group

A vehicle for Bixophiles and other interested individuals to ask questions, make comments and exchange information about Bix Beiderbecke and related subjects. Any views expressed in the Bixography Forum represent solely the opinions of those expressing them and are not necessarily endorsed or opposed by Albert Haim unless he has signed the message.

I started archiving some of the threads that have been inactive for some time. The archived threads can be found at http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/archivesforum.htm

Albert Haim

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WBIX # 211

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Ordinarily, I upload a new program on the  last Friday of the month. I am a  week earlier for this program because I will be  on  vacation  May 25-June 1. I will check my mail and the Bixography Forum once a day, probably in the morning.
My dear wife and I will be celebrating our 58th wedding anniversary. We met in 1949 as first-year college  students and we have been "going steady" ever since.

 

Radio Program # 211. (loaded on 05/23/2013) Comparisons: Recordings of the Same Tune by Annette Hanshaw and by Dance Bands. 58 min 01 sec

Real Audio http://bixography.com/WBIX211.ram        http://bixography.com/WBIX211.rm    14.2 M  
mp3 files  
Streaming mp3 file  
http://bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX211.m3u
    
Download file    
       bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX211.mp3   48.7 MB

Black Bottom. Annette Hanshaw. Sep 12, 1926.
Black Bottom. Joe Candullo. Jun 28, 1926.
Do Do Do.
Annette Hanshaw. Nov 26, 1926.
Do Do Do. Jack Hylton. Sep 3, 1927.
I'm Gonna Meet My Sweetie Now. Annette Hanshaw.
Jan 28, 1927.
I'm Gonna Meet My Sweetie Now.Charleston Chasers.Feb 14, 1927.
Rosy Cheeks. Annette Hanshaw.
Apr 29, 1927.
Rosy Cheeks. Ben Selvin. Apr 25, 1927.
Miss Annabelle Lee. Annette Hanshaw.
. Aug, 1927.
Miss Annabelle Lee. Ted Weems. Jul 28, 1927.
Just Another Day Wasted Away. 
Annette Hanshaw. Oct, 1927.
Just Another Day Wasted Away. OKeh Melodians (Sam Lanin). Jun 14, 1927.
That's Just My Way of Forgetting You. Annette Hanshaw. Sep 13, 1928.

That's Just My Way of Forgetting You. Jean Goldkette. Jul 12, 1928.

WBIX # 212 will be uploaded on June 28, 2013.

 

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on May 24, 2013 9:36 AM

Posted on May 23, 2013, 9:04 AM

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Vacation

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We leave in half an hour. Back next Saturday.

Have a good week.

Albert



Posted on May 25, 2013, 6:40 AM

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Vacation Is Over

by

We had a great time and celebrated our anniversary in style.

Back to the salt mines. Giving the final touches to an article and starting another, preparing the power-point presentation for the seminar that I will deliver at the Bix Festival, working in the yard, doing some plumbing, etc etc, there is no end ...

Albert



Posted on Jun 1, 2013, 4:54 PM

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Thank you for a wonderful program!

by

Thank you for an especially good episode of WBIX. Not only was it glitch-free but it contained some truly marvelous music. I've just discovered Annette Hanshaw in the last couple of years, but the more i hear of her the more I like her. As I posted about her to another Web site, "You think Mildred Bailey was the first great white woman jazz singer? Think again!" Though she's not as good here with only Irving Brodsky's piano behind her as she is on some of her later records with full bands including such greats as Benny Goodman and the Dorsey Brothers, she still swings hard and has an infectious quality to her voice I find irresistible.

Indeed, this show is an unwitting testimony to Annette Hanshaw's greatness in that it gives us a chance to compare her to some of the God-awful singers that afflicted so many otherwise great dance-band records in the 1920's. Where did they get these people? Especially the men! The more I hear these booming baritones and tenors who sound like they're being strangled, the more obvious it is why Bing Crosby was such a breath of fresh air: a man who not only had a beautiful voice but was genuinely musical and had a real flair for jazz.

The one singer on the dance-band records who holds her own against Annette is surprise Kate Smith on the Charleston Chasers' version of "I'm Gonna Meet My Sweetie Now." I grew up not knowing Kate Smith had ever sung ANYTHING other than "God Bless America," and it's been a revelation to hear some of her early-1930's recordings of great oldies like "Seems Like Old Times" and "Somebody Loves Me." On the 1999 Columbia CD "From Gershwin's Time" -- a commemoration of the centennial of George Gershwin's birth through issuing some of the first records ever made of his great song (including at least one Bix item, the abridged Whiteman recording of the "Concerto in F") -- Kate Smith was heard singing "I Gor Rhythm." This was the song that made Ethel Merman a star, but Smith was just as loud as Merman and her musicianship -- especially her intonation -- was far superior.

Once again, thank you for a great program, and I hope you and your wife are enjoying your vacation. Counting the years the two of you were dating before you got married, you and your wife have been together for four more years than I've been alive! Congratulations!

Posted on May 27, 2013, 8:29 PM

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Thanks for all the kind words.

by

We are enjoying ourselves. The weather could be better, but you can't have everything.

Albert

Posted on May 29, 2013, 4:58 AM

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What students were fed in 1937 about jazz. Happily, ....

by

.... they did not pay attention.

Brad kindly sent a scan of the page about jazz from this widely used high school textbook.

 [linked image]

Brad writes, "On my trip to New Orleans last week, I found a copy of the 1938 edition of James Francis Cooke's "Standard History of Music," a popular elementary school textbook in use from 1910.  It covers everyone from the ancient Greeks to Charles Ives.  You may find the unit on "Jazz" amusing."

Indeed, amusing and interesting. An old phart who was unable to appreciate the significance of jazz as America's  contribution to world's music.

Albert



Posted on May 21, 2013, 6:24 AM

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The Right Icons in the Wrong Paragraph

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Old phart indeed. Though published in '38, this troglodyte paragraph reads like it was written in 1924, and except for noting Gershwin's year of death, was never revised (Even an old educator, writing in 1938, would at least have had to mention Benny Goodman and "Swing").

This is exactly the prevailing attitude about "jazz" in the early '20s among stodgy music critics that inspired Whiteman to do the Aeolian Hall concert, and Gershwin to write "Rhapsody in Blue." In '24, Irving Berlin was still the undisputed champion popular songwriter, as yet not seriously challenged by Cole Porter, Rodgers & Hart, or even the Gershwins, who were just arriving at the top rung of success. At this time, of course, no white folks had heard of Armstrong, Oliver, Morton and that bunch, - or Bix - except a few crazy kids around Chicago.

Ironic that Whiteman, Gershwin and Berlin were and are truly giants of American music - just not in the field of jazz, per se.

-Brad K

Posted on May 21, 2013, 7:41 PM

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A 1924 Page Giving Advice About Happiness. No Jazz at Meal Times.

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Kindly sent by Ken B. He writes,

"In London in 1924 my mother bought a little book the title of which was The Happy Ones.

On every page it gave advice on how the reader should make others happy and be happy oneself.
Subjects include
Excercise
Food and wine
Anger
Travel
Regret and remorse
etc.
This page on "Music and Dancing".
 
[linked image]
 
Another old phart!
 
Albert
 


Posted on May 22, 2013, 1:07 PM

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"The Happy Ones"

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Why, upon reading this page, does my mind drift to "The Stepford Wives" and "Invasion of the Body Snatchers?"

BK

Posted on May 22, 2013, 2:38 PM

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In one word ....

by

.... brainwashing. In two words behavior modification. One of the most toxic and pervasive of all human activities. It's everywhere: via books, TV, blogs, movies, music, etc. and, last, but not least, school.

My rant before I go on vacation.

Albert



Posted on May 24, 2013, 11:30 AM

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On Teaching Rubbish

by Andy Vaaler

Reminds of a poem by Billy Collins:

The History Teacher

Trying to protect his students' innocence
he told them the Ice Age was really just
the Chilly Age, a period of a million years
when everyone had to wear sweaters.

And the Stone Age became the Gravel Age,
named after the long driveways of the time.

The Spanish Inquisition was nothing more
than an outbreak of questions such as
"How far is it from here to Madrid?"
"What do you call the matador's hat?"

The War of the Roses took place in a garden,
and the Enola Gay dropped one tiny atom on Japan.

The children would leave his classroom
for the playground to torment the weak
and the smart,
mussing up their hair and breaking their glasses,

while he gathered up his notes and walked home
past flower beds and white picket fences,
wondering if they would believe that soldiers
in the Boer War told long, rambling stories
designed to make the enemy nod off.

This poem is from his book Questions About Angels and is available on-line: http://www.billy-collins.com/2005/06/the_history_tea.html

Posted on May 24, 2013, 4:00 PM

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Hoagy: Back in the Book Nook.

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[linked image]

Courtesy IU Digital Collection.

June 1939.

Albert



Posted on May 20, 2013, 4:17 PM

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Henry Busse and Prom Queen.

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[linked image]

Courtesy IU Digital Collection

Prom Queen Jeanette Prinz with bandleader Henry Busse, Spring 1938.

Albert

 



Posted on May 20, 2013, 4:13 PM

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Husk O'Hare ad 1928

by Formiggini

Husk O'Hare had been discussed somes earlier here:
Connections Between Bix and Husk O'Hare?http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1312055269/Connections+Between+Bix+and+Husk+O%27Hare-
Wolverines, Original Wolverines, Dick Voynow, Husk O'Harehttp://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1285449965/Wolverines%2C+Original+Wolverines%2C+Dick+Voynow%2C+Husk+O%27Hare+and+Fred+Hamm-

Here is a ad from February 1928 (Talking Machine World) for his latest Brunswick recordings.

[linked image]

Best

Posted on May 20, 2013, 9:42 AM

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Thank you, Mr. Formiggini!

by

The recordingss mentioned in the ad are:

Husk O'Hare's Wolverines: Jim Awad, c/ Turk Savage, c. v/ Peter Havlicheck, tb/ Gus Lingo, Art Cox, cl, ss, as/ Harlod Send, cl/ ts/ Tom Giblin, p/ Dick Kettering, bj/ Mal Woolin, bb/ Al Silverman, d. Chicago, Jan 10, 1928.
E-6870 Milenberg Joys - v TS Voc 15646
E-6872 My Daddy Rocks Me (With One Steady Roll) - v TS Voc 15646

Milenberg Joys  http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x8nw42_husk-o-hare-his-footwarmers-milenbe_music

My Daddy Rocks Me  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MTTAKv0h5nI

Photos of the Capitol Theatre, Chicago:

[linked image]

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on May 20, 2013, 1:45 PM

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Husk O'Hare at the 1924 Junior Prom at Indiana University

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[linked image]

Courtesy IU Digital Collection. Arbutus.

May 1924.

Albert 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on May 20, 2013 4:26 PM

Posted on May 20, 2013, 4:26 PM

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Some Information About Husk O'Hare.

by

 
b. c.1890, Chicago, Illinois, USA, d. 19 April 1970, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Formed in Chicago, Illinois in the mid-20s, Husk OHares Orchestra included sidemen Jimmy McPartland, Bud Freeman, Jimmy Lannigan, Frank Teschemacher, Floyd OBrien, Dave North, Arnold Sweatman, Harry OConnor, Franklyn Marsh and, at one time, Bix Beiderbecke. Unlike other dance bands of the period, OHare rarely played engagements at hotels or ballrooms, preferring instead to exist as a studio band, recording for Gennett and Decca Records, and performing extensively on radio. His first band was a small combo entitled the Blue Friars. He renamed them OHares Red Dragons then Husk OHares Wolverines. Occasional dates were played in Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Baltimore and Atlantic City, where OHares radio profile ensured strong box office trade. The orchestra remained a staple of radio schedules throughout the late 20s and 30s, before their leader retired in the early 40s to run a manufacturing business in Chicago.
 
Husk was a nickname. His first name was Anderson.
 
Bix in Husk's band? I doubt it.
 
Albert


Posted on May 20, 2013, 4:51 PM

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Husk O'Hare - Perfume Czar

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A rather unsavory piece in Billboard, Jan 23, 1954.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on May 20, 2013, 5:30 PM

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Husk O'Hare - Genial Gentlemen of the Air

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From the Reading (PA) Eagle, Aug 1, 1931.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on May 20, 2013, 5:43 PM

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Re: Less-Known "Wolverines"

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Little seems to have been written about two musicians that were also associated with Chicago Style recordings--Maurice Bercov and Dick Feige. To me, Bercov is a clarinetist more like Benny Goodman (and Danny Polo and Volly de Faut) than Frank Teschemacher (or Don Murray, for that matter)

According to David Sager's notes for the album The Complete Wolverines 1921-1928, Bercov plays on four sides recorded in October of 1927, led by Dick Voynow--"Royal Garden Blues," "Shim-Me-Sha-Wabble," "A Good Man Is Hard to Find," and "The New Twister" with Jimmy McPartland on cornet.

You can listen to "Royal Garden Blues," with a short Bercov solo, here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5xD9NAyDxvA

Bercov has also been credited with the some of the last recordings assigned to the "Wolverine" name, "Limehouse Blues" and "Dear Old Southland," but Sager feels strongly that Teschemacher himself plays clarinet and alto sax on these two.

Sager also suggests that Dick Feige may be one of the trumpets on "Limehouse Blues" and "Dear Old Southland." Feige also recorded with Elmer Schoebel's Friars Society Orchestra on "Copenhagen" and "Prince of Wails," with Teschemacher on board.

Hear the alto sax and clarinet solos Sager assigns to Tesch and Feige's lead style on "Dear Old Southland" here: http://www.redhotjazz.com/owolverines.html

That's about all I've read and heard of these two mystery Chicagoans. Does anyone have more information to share?

Posted on May 22, 2013, 4:40 PM

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Irving Peskin

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http://jazzriffing.blogspot.com/2013/05/the-early-life-of-irving-peskin.html

I have not read the article in detail. It seems to be well done. Peskin was extensively discussed in the forum. See for example

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1298400116/Isadore+Nathaniel+Parker+-+Irving+Peskin+-+Irving+Niel+Parker

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on May 18, 2013 4:00 PM

Posted on May 18, 2013, 12:26 PM

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A Remarkable Bixian Solo by Irving Peskin.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFPblt8aF2U

Albert



Posted on May 19, 2013, 9:41 AM

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Announcement

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Network 54 was hacked and was off line for severl hours. I believe all issues have been resolved. Continue posting as usual.

Thanks.

Albert Haim

Forum Founder and Owner



Posted on May 18, 2013, 12:16 PM

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Miff Mole's 1929 "That's a Plenty"--Klein or McConville solo?

by

On April 19, 1929, Miff Mole's (Little) Molers recorded three takes of "That's A Plenty", only one of which was issued at the time. http://www.redhotjazz.com/mmm.html Brian Rust gives the personnel on this session as Leo McConville, Manny Klein-t/Miff Mole-tb/Jimmy Dorsey-cl, as/Arthur Schutt-p/Eddie Lang-g/Stan King-d.

Stephen M. Stroff writes in *Red Head: A Chronological Survey of "Red" Nichols and His Five Pennies*, p. 113:

"In a way, this Nichols-less remake of *That's A-Plenty* is even more interesting than the original. After the ensemble opening we hear Schutt piano with good Stan King drums, then ensemble on the chorus. JD is heard next on clarinet with guitar and drums, then a wonderfully inventive passage for the two trumpets, muted. Mole is in superb staccato form; Klein solos with a sax-trombone cushion; then we transpose up a half-tone for a soft bit, followed by an alternating loud-soft-loud ending."

OTOH, Max Harrison writes about some Molers recordings in A Jazz Retrospect (p. 160): "Other fine sequences include Russell's clarinet solo in *Feeling no pain,* Leo McConville's sweeping trumpet contributions to *That's a plenty,*, and the telling use of Livingston's clarinet against the brass on You took advantage of me." Leaving aside the eternal question "Pee Wee or Fud?" on "Feelin' No Pain," what I'd like to discuss here is Harrison's evident belief that it is McConville rather than Klein who solos on "That's A Plenty." I really have not heard enough solos by either Klein or McConville to be sure, and anyway Klein was famous for his ability to play in anyone's style...Any opinions here? (The same question can be asked about the trumpet solo on the other recording made at that session, "I've Got a Feeling I'm Falling." http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/mole/ive_got_a_feeling_im_falling.ra )

Incidentally, in http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kisV-Q0Uv9U it is claimed that Nichols is present, which has to be wrong--Nichols wasn't in any of the Molers' sessions after the summer of 1928.

Posted on May 15, 2013, 4:56 PM

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My guess for what it's worth.

by

Manny Klein in That's A Plenty.

I've Got a Feeling I'm Falling is a great tune and an excellent performance by Miff and the Molers. Here I guess McConville, showing the Bix influence.

More about I've Got a Feeling I'm Falling in http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1292118996/

Although discographies list recordings of Red and Miff until Feb 1929, according to Red Nichols expert Stephen Hester, the last recording session of Red and Miff together took place on September 14, 1928 in the Brunswick studios in New York City when they waxed several sides as the Wabash Dance Orchestra.

Albert



Posted on May 16, 2013, 5:34 AM

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Juxtaposition

by

The two solos in sequence: first "That's A Plenty," second "I've Got A Feeling I'm Falling."

http://soundcloud.com/albert-haim/thatsqplentyivegotafeellingmol

What do you think? Same guy? Two different ones?

Albert



Posted on May 17, 2013, 6:31 AM

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I'm Wondering Who

by

I'm more familiar with the 1930s-1940s style of Mannie Klein, and "That's A Plenty" doesn't swing enough to sound like that Mannie. This solo has more technique than tone and feeling. So... probably McConville? Of course, Mannie Klein would have been very young at this time and he might have been trying out various styles.

Posted on May 17, 2013, 7:20 PM

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Both by the same guy - LEO !

by John Leifert

Albert, I believe both solos (the fast one on "That's.." and the slower on "..Falling") are by the same trumpeter: Leo McConville. The more you hear his work, the more distinctive he becomes, and he's really one of the top brass studio men in NY in the late 20s / early 30s!

John L

Posted on May 24, 2013, 3:33 PM

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Bix on SS Capitol in 1921?

by Nick Dellow


The following has just been published in the "Discographical Ramblings" page of VJM Magazine, compiled by Ate Van Delden:-

Billboard, 21 October 1921: Band on S.S. Capitol: Burk Lains (Leins?) Novelty Orchestra with Pole Bark (tpt, xylo), Stick Leine (p, ldr), Rex Leine (sax), Rusty Bieberbache (cnt), Fred Rusick (bj), Tim Tanfear (vln), Tracey Meunna (real name: Mumma) (alt), Wayne Richards (cello).

(This notice in Billboard was submitted by collector and discographer Richard Johnson.)

Presumably "Rusty Bieberbache" is Bix himself, as Ate suggests. But why "Rusty"? And if this is Bix, then it surely provides compelling evidence that he did play on the S.S. Capitol.

Tracey Mumma subsequently played in a band named the Original Capitol Orchestra, which visited London in 1923 and played at the Grafton Galleries as well as recording for Zonophone. The personnel of this band also included Vic Sells (or Sell), trumpet, I.V. (Bud) Shepherd and saxophonist Byron Webb, all of whom had also played in the 1921 Doc Wrixon Band on the SS Capitol, which was another band on the steamer that apparently included Bix.






    
This message has been edited by ahaim on May 14, 2013 12:50 PM

Posted on May 14, 2013, 8:47 AM

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Re: Bix on SS Capitol in 1921?

by

Band on S.S. Capitol 1921: Burk Lains (Leins?) Novelty Orchestra with Pole Bark (tpt, xylo), Stick Leine (p, ldr), Rex Leine (sax), Rusty Bieberbache (cnt), Fred Rusick (bj), Tim Tanfear (vln), Tracey Meunna (real name: Mumma) (alt), Wayne Richards (cello).

The 1923 Original Capitol Orchestra recorded for Zonophone:  

Artist Instrument
Tracy Mumma Clarinet, Alto Saxophone
Les Russick Banjo
Vic Sells Cornet
Bud Shepard Piano, Leader
Leon van Stratten Violin
Billy Trittle Trombone
George Byron Webb Alto Saxophone
unknown Tenor Saxophone

 Two members are in both bands: Mumma and Russick.

Now about the date: the Billboard issue of  Oct 21, 1921. Bix left Davenport in early Sep 1921. So this Rusty Bieberbache is not Bix. A possile identification of this Rusty Bieberbache.

In http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/itemsofspecialinterest.htm#NEWGLANCE, the late Rich Johnson and the late Jean Pierre Lion provide information about the "Friends Who Called" at Bix's funeral. Here are two of them:

Ernie Bieberback = Ernest A. Bieberbach. He died in 1969 in Davenport, age 66, and was a Mississippi riverboat trombonist. He and his brother Bill played with such riverboat bands as Minnie Fitzgerald and her Tropical Jazz Band, and the Burke-Leins Novelty Orchestra on the excursion steamer Capitol.

Bill Bieberbach was a trumpet player. From Rich Johnson in
http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1112820456

"Bill Bieberbach was Ernie's brother and played trumpet in several riverboat bands with his brother. They also played with Bix."

Maybe Bill went by the nickname of Rusty? 

The identical last name, the reference to the Burke-Leins Novelty Orchestra and the mention of the steamer Capitol in Johnson and Lion's piece suggests that the "Bieberbache" in the Billboard piece is, in fact, not Bix but Bill Bieberbach. 

Albert

Nick: is there a way to send a correction to the VJM Discographical Ramblers column?



Posted on May 14, 2013, 3:04 PM

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From the SSDI

by

Given Name: William
Middle Name:
Surname: Bieberbach
Name Suffix:
Birth Date: 22 July 1897
Social Security Number: 480-07-3753
State: Iowa
Last Place of Residence: Davenport, Scott, Iowa
Previous Residence Postal Code: 52802
Event Date: July 1965
Age: 68

 

This is the man who was a trumpet player in his youth.

Albert



Posted on May 14, 2013, 3:27 PM

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A relative?

by

Two young musicians, both from Davenport, one named "Beiderbecke" and one named "Bieberbach." Given how many 19th century immigrant names got mangled by the record-keepers at Ellis Island and other ports of entry, it seems somewhat possible that Bix Beiderbecke and William Bieberbach had common ancestors in Germany and were at least distantly related.

Posted on May 15, 2013, 3:48 PM

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Who Speaks German?

by

But the last names in German would mean different things. I know enough German to know Beiderbecke translated is "close to the the brook" or "near the creek", -- "Beck" in English or "Becke" in German means stream or brook; der is "the", bei "nearby" or "of"; desginating where ancesotrs might have lived in original medieval or later times in the old country, and as far as Beiderbecke and Bieberbach, they are pronounced differently: ei is I as in bye-der-beck and ie is ee as in bee-ber-bock. I don't know what Bieberbach means in German as a family name; who here speaks Deutsch fluently?

Laura

Posted on May 16, 2013, 6:22 PM

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Just Guessing

by

I don't speak German, but I know that "bach" has a similar meaning to "becke," meaning stream, brook. It is possible that "bie der" is a transliteration for "bei der" ("I before E?" is a common problem in English spelling), and if that is what happened, Rusty and Bix had last names with the same meaning. Perhaps some German language expert can decode bie der bach better than I can.

Posted on May 17, 2013, 5:29 AM

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Bieberbach means "beaver brook"...

by

At least according to *German-American Names* by George Fenwick Jones:

http://books.google.com/books?id=t1hJTv3BxxgC&pg=PA93

I would have thought that would be Biberbach, but Bieberbach may simply be a spelling variant.

Posted on May 17, 2013, 6:04 PM

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Re: Who Speaks German?

by David Logue

I just plugged "bie ber bach" into the google translator and "bending over creek" is what comes up.

Posted on May 17, 2013, 6:14 AM

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Beiderbecke

by

Perhaps I display my ignorance here, of the relevant regions of western Europe. In any event.... Writings about the Beiderbecke heritage seem to usually include the descriptor 'German.' Is the Beiderbecke name not Dutch? Cultural overlap in Dutch & German?

Posted on May 18, 2013, 10:26 PM

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It's German

by Laura Demilio

From all resources I've seen, it's a German name.

Laura

Posted on May 20, 2013, 7:19 AM

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From Evans and Evans.

by

Charles Beiderbecke (1836-1901), Bix's grandfather, was born in Westphalia, Prussia. Heinrich Christoph Beiderbecke (1799-1851), Bix's great-grandfather, was a school principal in German schools. It is said that he fought in the battle of Waterloo.

Albert



Posted on May 20, 2013, 9:07 AM

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Re: Who Speaks German?

by Formiggini

Ok, give a german a try those bavarian is much better than his english...

Many of german family name are by origin:
1. Description of the place the family live/lived - originally came from.
or
2. Occupation descriptions

But, often you have to know real old german - a lot of german family names going back to the time of the late medieval.
Both names (Bieberbach and Beiderbecke) are descriptions of the place the family live/lived.

Absolutely right, "Bieber - bach" = "beaver - brook"
So the family lived in a village near a brook which had a lot of beavers happy.gif
"Bach" is a word more used in southern and middle germany.

Beiderbecke ist composed of three german words: "Bei - der - becke" = "At/Near - the - brook".
So the family lived originally in a town/village near or by a brook.

"Becke" is also a german word for brook as "Bach", but in contrast to the word "Bach" that is used more in southern germany, "Becke" is more used in nothern germany and the Netherlands of today, which had been in medieval (in parts) part of the so called "Hanse" - a union of german city states and princedoms.

Hope I may helped and a lexicologist of german wouldn´t kill me for my crude explanation wink.gif

Best




Posted on May 21, 2013, 10:54 AM

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Good explanation.

by

Thank you.

Albert



Posted on May 21, 2013, 11:24 AM

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new or rare bix child pic?

by DavenportChad

looks like they dressed him up as a girl. face seems to match though...

http://www.umvphotoarchive.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/scdpl&CISOPTR=1126&CISOBOX=1&REC=1

Posted on May 13, 2013, 8:49 PM

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This photo, original in the Davenport Public Library, ....

by

.... was brought up by Gerri for discussion several years ago. See

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1164746884

It was also discussed in a facebook page a while ago. Probably not Bix; perhaps, Bix's sister, Mary Louise.

Thanks for bringing the photo to our attention.

Albert



Posted on May 14, 2013, 5:22 AM

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A Bixian solo from Earl Thompson--"California Swing"

by

Undoubtedly the best jazz band on the West Coast circa 1930 was Paul Howard's Quality Serenaders. They can be heard at http://www.redhotjazz.com/paulhoward.html and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5_KNWAW-aBU Their soloists included two fine trumpet players--George Orendorff and Earl Thompson, the young trombonist Lawrence Brown, and an even younger drummer (and vocalist) named Lionel Hampton...

As Gunther Schuller notes in *The Swing Era,* "Orendorff was an expert in the 'freak' trumpet style and an admirer of Bubber Miley, and Earl Thompson (later doing fine work in Andy Kirk's band) on the other hand was a disciple of Bix Beiderbecke."
http://books.google.com/books?id=6EZ2TDuGEOkC&pg=RA4-PA51

Both Schuller and Albert McCarthy (*Big Band Jazz*, p. 172) single out "California Swing" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZqaS8NrddQ as one of Howard's outstanding recordings. As McCarthy writes, "Earl Thompson wrote California Swing, and as the Bix Beiderbecke-like trumpet solo on this is untypical of Orendorff, it can reasonably be presumed that it is played by the composer." McCarthy also notes that on "Gettin' Ready Blues" the guitarist Charlie Rousseau has a solo pointing to the influence of Eddie Lang. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-hHNjzO3hY

("Charlie's Idea" http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/howard/charliesidea.ra is really "Tiger Rag" with a solo by Orendorff obviously following Armstong's famous one in "Hotter than That." Here and on the other Howard recordings, Lawrence Brown shows that at 22, he had already developed the style that would become so familiar to everyone from his years with Ellington...)

Posted on May 11, 2013, 12:43 PM

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Very Interesting!

by

You remind me that I neglected to name Paul Howard's Quality Serenaders in my recent post about a California band. Indeed, the QS were a great band.

Albert



Posted on May 11, 2013, 2:24 PM

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A great Earl Thompson solo from a decade later

by

"Zonky" played by Six Men and a Girl (a unit drawn from Andy Kirk's band), 1940:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8u6N0kvibL8

Of course this is a superb record all the way around, with Mary Lou Williams on piano and the great Dick Wilson on tenor sax. (What losses the jazz tenor sax suffered in late 1941--Chu Berry and Dick Wilson dying within one month of each other...)

Anyway, the neglect of Earl Thompson has been strange. Gunther Schuller writes in The Swing Era (p. 359) about

"Earl Thompson's first-rate playing on *Zonky*--his entrance one of those great moments of suppressed excitement that certain trumpet players could coax from their instruments with the aid of jazz mutes. This solo, along with several others and the occasional arrangements which Earl Thompson contributed to the Kirk library, reveals a major talent, equal to anything players like Roy Eldridge, Dizzy Gillespie, or Charlie Shavers could produce at this time. Thompson's solo is technically fluent, well-constructed, authoritative, and a worthy partner for Wilson's (already mentioned) solo." In a footnote, Schuller adds:

"It represents a frequent problem for the jazz historian that certain players (and orchestras) who happen not to have recorded prolifically (or at all), or who died prematurely, or who had peripatetic careers not easily traceable through recordings, are difficult to appraise. Such players are often not listed in any encyclopedias and even the most mimimal biographical information is often lacking. Such is the case of Earl Thompson. All that I have been able to glean from discographies is that Thompson played with the great Speed Webb in 1926 and recorded with Paul Howard's Los Angeles- based band in 1929 (see below, Part 4). On the basis of his work with Kirk alone, he should not languish in such historical oblivion."

I have been able to find a little bit more about Thompson from other sources, but not much. According to Linda Dahl's biography of Mary Lou Williams, *Morning Glory*, "Earl Thompson, a.k.a. Merle Boatley, was a good trumpet player who had replaced Mouse Randolph [in Kirk's band] in '33 or '34, and he added several arrangements." http://books.google.com/books?id=BWs_2NLIUFUC&pg=PT162 According to Kirk, in an interview with *Jazz Review,* "One of the guys who was with me right from the start and never received credit for all he did was Merle Boatley. He called himself Earl Thompson, but we didn't learn his real name until the war broke out. He was a terrific musician and many of the things Mary Lou got credit for were actually done by him, but he was taken for granted." http://jazzstudiesonline.org/files/jso/resources/pdf/JazzReviewVolTwoNoTwoFeb59.pdf Joe Darensbourg, in his *Telling It Like It Is*, p. 68, wrote about working on a band on the West Coast steamer the H. F. Alexander during Prohibition days, noting " Earl Thompson, the fine trumpet player that was later with Andy Kirk, was with us, too." Frank Driggs in *Kansas City Jazz*, p. 139, notes that when Kirk was tempted to give up music in 1935 and go back to working for the Post Office in Denver, "Luckily, the ever faithful Ben Thigpen and Earl Thompson convinced Kirk to stay the course." http://books.google.com/books?id=8ZbAyDygTLAC&pg=PA139

And that is all the biographical information I have been able to find about Earl Thompson/Merle Boately. I have no idea when or where he was born or died. The three volume New Grove Dictionary of Jazz (2nd edition 2002) has no article on him (under either name); the only reference I could find for him was a mention in the article on Arrangement as one of the arrangers for Andy Kirk. I wonder if anyone has any more information about him.

Posted on May 12, 2013, 9:06 AM

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It seems clear to me, from listening to "Zonky, that ....

by

.... any influence Bix may have had on Earl Thompson, it was gone by 1940.

I did a bit of looking. Here is what I found:

New York Age, Jul 27 1940: Earl Thompson, trumpet-tooter who left Andy Kirk's "Clouds of Joy" to free lance as an arranger, is now dividing his time between music and politics. He's campaigning for one of the major parties.

Albert



Posted on May 12, 2013, 11:28 AM

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A lot of musicians shed their early influences...

by

Few people would guess that Roy Eldridge, as he later acknowledged, started off trying to play like Red Nichols.

Posted on May 12, 2013, 4:06 PM

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Roy, Bix, Red, Jabbo, Coleman and Benny (Carter)

by

From http://www.jazz-music-history.com/Roy-Eldridge.html

In late 1930, he arrived in New York for the first time and he was soon playing with the best bands in Harlem. He played with Cecil Scott, Charlie Johnson, Teddy Hill, and Elmer Snowden. Snowden gave him the nickname" Little Jazz". While playing with Teddy Hill, Little Jazz also backed Billie Holiday on some early recordings.He did not cut his jazz teeth in Chicago with the musicians from New Orleans. His early influences were Red Nichols, Jabbo Smith, Bix Beiderbeckeand more importantly Coleman Hawkins and Benny Carter. Coleman Hawkins brought a fluid legato up-tempo style to the saxophone. While Louis Armstrong was playing a trumpet with lots of arpeggios and vertical melodies, Roy Eldridge playing in a more linear fluid style in the manner of a saxophone. Eldridge stated: "The sax players would run changes, would run through all the passing chords and things" He also said "I play nice saxophone on the trumpet" Little jazz also had a remarkable range and he played high whistling notes with regularity. In both his rapid fluid scale-like runs and his use of the upper range of the trumpet, he was an innovator. He had a very brassy tone and frequently "cracked" his notes - giving him a dirty sound.

Roy saying "I play nice saxophone on the trumpet" is fasscinating to me because I have often stated that Bix plays his cornet like a clarinet. This was put more elegantly by Richard Hadlock in "Jazz Masters of the Twenties." See my latest posting on this subject.

 http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1266529536/Bix+and+his+clarinet+style-+Richard+Hadlock+Speaks

Albert



Posted on May 13, 2013, 4:53 AM

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Two quotes .

by

One quote - From TJ's jazz-music-history.com website:  Bix played solos improvised on the melody more like a reed player.

The other quote - From TJ's jazz-music-history.com website:  Armstrong played wildly inventive solos based on chord structures and full of arpeggios. He swung the beat dramatically and used many different tones for emotional, musical effect. Bix played solos improvised on the melody more like a reed player. His structure was more linear and less based on chords. His beautiful tone did not vary much and he swung, but he swung very close to the ground beat.

The comment - Bix had a keen sense of both harmony and melody. Brad explained this in

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1349636980/Harmony+Schmarmony

More about Bix and harmony:

From Chicago Jazz: A Cultural History, 1904-1930 by William Howland Kenney.

"Pianist/leader Roy Bargy was widely admired by jazz musicians and had been Bix Beiderbecke's tutor in harmony."

Sudhalter and Evans:

"Bargy, star of the Benson orchestra of Chicago, was later to help an older, more ambitious Bix with difficult chord sequences and voices when both were members of the Paul Whiteman orchestra."

Albert



Posted on May 13, 2013, 6:30 AM

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Two more quotes

by

From Richard Hadlock's article "The State of Dixieland," originally published in Jazz Review magazine and then in the book Jazz Panorama:

"In the twenties [Pee Wee] Russell was working out jazz ideas that were regarded by many observers at the time as too 'far out,' ideas that probably came from Bix Beiderbecke, who was practicing in 1927 what a few early 'bop' musicians (Charlie Parker in particular) felt they were discovering some 12 years later. Parker himself claimed to have stumbled onto the idea, in 1939, of 'using higher intervals of a chord as a melody line and backing them up with appropriately related changes.' Which is exactly what Bix Beiderbecke (and, to a lesser extent, Frank Trumbauer) was up to, although most of his cohorts weren't always aware of it and invariably failed to furnish the 'appropriately related changes.' (This helps us to understand why Bix might have drawn as much inspiration from the harmonically sophisticated scores of Bill Challis et al. as he did from loose 'Dixieland' surroundings."

Hadlock then inserts a bit of music notation showing Bix's solo from the 1929 Whiteman recording of "China Boy" and comparing it to the original melody. Then he writes:

"This was part of the magic of Bix that continued to excite so many jazz musicians, especially [Eddie] Condon and company, long after his death. His ability to build well-proportioned melodies in the upper harmonic strata of any given tune has seldom been equaled. Before Charlie Parker, Pee Wee Russell was one of a very few jazzmen who comprehended Bix and possessed the necessary musical equipment to explore similar paths. ... Beiderbecke and Russell are held in esteem because they combined these harmonic devices with personal, persuasive jazz voices in ordered choruses, laced with warm humor, that stand on their own as good music. Except for Lester Young, no one seemed to accomplish as much along these lines until Parker ripened in the forties."

Posted on May 15, 2013, 3:43 PM

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Thanks for taking the time to copy all that.

by

Very important material. As an aside, I will mention that Richard Hadlock is a member of the "Worshippers of Bix"  society. So am I. I am member # 19, probably the last person to be admitted to the WOB. See

http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/itemsofspecialinterest.htm#bixlives

Albert

PS I will scan my membership card and post it in the next few days.

 



Posted on May 16, 2013, 12:20 PM

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I Like This Thread

by

Not just because you quoted me from all the way back in last October, but because of the ring of truth chiming through each entry now. A musician or composer who can think melodically, feel harmony AND make it swing is a rare Bird (pun intended) indeed. With Bix and Charlie Parker, add to those qualities a predilection for EXTENDED harmony, and we're talking Pullet Molars here.

It doesn't shock me that Bix and Bird both died young. Having those abilities is a hot potato for anyone to handle.

Brad K



Posted on May 20, 2013, 3:15 PM

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Re: Reedlike

by

An example of Bix's "reedlike" playing, is, of course, the amazing "Clarinet Marmalade." Bix is said to have learned all the instruments' parts from the ODJB records he had as a teenage. I don't know if the family had the ODJB's version of this tune or not, but Bix sounds like he plays more notes than did Jimmy Dorsey on the Bix & Tram recording. If you imagine that you are hearing a clarinet instead of a cornet, you get some idea of how "reedlike" his lead could be.

Posted on May 16, 2013, 11:50 AM

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Jig-Saw Puzzle Blues--unissued take 1?

by

In a recent auction, an item that is purportedly an un-issued test pressing of take 1 of Jig Saw Puzzle Blues, from the February 28, 1933, Venuti-Lang session was offered.

This is one of my favorite records, but I was not aware of the existence of any other take in existence, and I don't believe that the Mosaic Venuti-Lang box set contains anything other than Take 2.

I was not successful in winning the item, but am curious as to whether or not anyone had any familiarity with an unissued take of this excellent recording.

Posted on May 10, 2013, 6:12 AM

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Five Musicians, Eleven Instruments.

by

I am afraid I do not know about a test pressing of take 1 of Jigsaw Puzzle Blues.

There were five musicians in the Feb 28, 1933 recording session by Joe Venuti and Eddie Lang's Blue Five/Joe Venuti and His Blue Five:

Jimmy Dorsey - cl, as, cor
Adrian Rollini - bass sax, goofus, vib, hfp
Joe Venuti - vln, b
Phil Wall - p
Eddie Lang - g

The recordings (fantastic music):

Raggin' the Scale   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6jDdE5tVR0 

Hey Young Fellow  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhTW0fhes3M

Jigsaw Puzzle Blues  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbmbeIQJaiE

Pink Elephants  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0ZfV6UyAE0Y

Some images:

https://www.vmauctions.com/files/members/0/288/products/large/1363201805_Scan0104.jpg

https://www.vmauctions.com/files/members/0/288/products/large/1363201805_Scan0103.jpg

https://www.vmauctions.com/files/members/0/288/products/large/1363201144_Scan0107.jpg 

https://www.vmauctions.com/files/members/0/288/products/large/1363201144_Scan0108.jpg

Note that no composer credit is given for Jigsaw Puzzle Blues. IAcording to the 78 online disco, it is a collaboration by all five blue boys.. I believe that Hey! Young Fellow and Pink Elephants were not issued on American Columbia. I wonder why not.

Albert



Posted on May 11, 2013, 6:22 AM

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"Raggin' the Scale" by Edward Claypoole.

by

Edward Claypoole was the composer. Here is a piano/drums version  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TF_EKCXVsV0

Could this be the Victor test recorded on Mar 16, 1927 by the composer? The guy who posted this writes "Uploaded on Jan 30, 2008There is only one copy of this recording of Ragging The Scale and this is it." I hear drums! But the EDVR describes Clayopoole's recording as a piano solo. What is going on?

Matrix [Trial 1927-03-16-01]. Ragging the scale / Edward B. Claypoole

Primary Title Source
Ragging the scale Victor ledgers

Title Source
Ragging the scale (Primary title) Victor ledgers

Personnel
Notes
Edward B. Claypoole (instrumentalist: piano)

Primary Performer Notes
Edward B. Claypoole (instrumentalist: piano)

Description: Piano solo
Category: Instrumental

Take Date and Place
Take
Status Label Name/Number
Format
Note
Show Issued Only
3/16/1927 (New York, New York) [1]

 

Albert



Posted on May 11, 2013, 6:39 AM

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1910s recordings of "Raggin' the Scale."

by

Aug 2, 1915 http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4032

[linked image]

June 1, 1916 http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4504

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on May 11, 2013, 6:43 AM

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The 1930 recording by Joe Venuti's Blue Four.

by

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PHZoKHXjwyw

From the youtube: Guitar Eddie Lang; Leader - Joe Venuti; Piano - Frank Signorelli; Saxophone [Bariton] - Adrian Rollini. Two errors: the pianist is Itzy Riskin and the great Rollini plays bass sax.

Albert 



Posted on May 11, 2013, 6:50 AM

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The 1923 recording by Vincent Lopez

by

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xgarg8VaJkw

I love this tune, specially the harmonic progression (is this the correct technical phrase?) at 1:20.

Albert



Posted on May 11, 2013, 6:55 AM

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The 1937 recording by Jimmie Lunceford.

by

incoming.jazz-on-line.com/a/mp3b/Dec62261-A.mp3

To my taste, this version lost all the charm that the earlier versions had. Maybe it's me.

Albert



Posted on May 11, 2013, 7:08 AM

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The Sheet Music: 1915.

by

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on May 11, 2013, 7:16 AM

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Correction

by

Thanks to Nick for pointing this out. The link I gave is to the 1930 version. Here is the link to the 1933 version.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9L8p3DAG8k

Albert





Posted on May 11, 2013, 7:32 AM

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I got to the point where I am repeating myself!!

by

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1360610301/Raggin%27-Ragging++the+Scale

Albert



Posted on May 11, 2013, 7:42 AM

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Joe "Fingers" Carr !

by John Leifert

Albert, the reason why you hear drums is because this is probably a late 1950s / early 1960s hi-fi recording by Joe "Fingers" Carr, aka Lou Busch (and not the 1927 Edward Claypoole Victor test you described here) !! Somebody even responded as such in the messages below the posting. And obviously, it's not the "only recording" of Raggin' the Scale as the poster claimed (really, some people!!)

It's almost like the "only known Buddy Bolden recording" - in STEREO!

John L



Posted on May 24, 2013, 3:38 PM

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Re: Five Musicians, Eleven Instruments.

by

There's a point in Jig Saw Puzzle Blues where Jimmy Dorsey finishes a cornet solo and changes over to clarinet in two seconds. That has always amazed me. Although I'm sure it's not a world's record, and that there might be a few instances by other jazzmen of switching between reed and brass instruments in a short amount of time, I can't imagine the versatility required for such a feat, especially when brass instruments weren't Jimmy's forte, Few know that he played the cornet/trumpet.

I know that Jimmy Dorsey is not as highly regarded a clarinetist as Goodman or Shaw, and that he might not have been "the world's greatest saxophonist," as he was later billed, but surely such a little presto-chango of the kind that he accomplished in this recording is worth more than a slight bump in regard to his musical abilities versus the aforementioned reedmen, who receive much more credit for their big band work than Jimmy does for the all the trailblazing jazz that he did in the 1920's with Nichols, the California Ramblers, Goldkette, Whiteman, Venuti and Lang, and many others.

Posted on May 11, 2013, 7:52 AM

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I don't know why, but I got a kick out of this quote.

by

Looking for something else, I came across the article "Let the Men Do the Work" by G. F. Scotson-Clark in the Jul 1927 edition of The Rotarian.

"I am not going to give the recipe for broiling lobsters for, delicious though they be, I do not approve of this method of cooking them. Oysters and clams are different: they are very low in the  scale of evolution and I feel certain that they have no more feeling than have the composers of jazz music on Tin Pan Alley. A lobster is a gentleman and should be plunged into fiercely boiling water which has been well salted, and left for not over ten minutes - or until he is quite red."

Mr. Scotson-Clark seems a bit weird to me. Different methods of cooking for habitants of the sea depending on their ranking in the evolutionary scale? And why the gratuitous jab at "composers of jazz music"?

Albert



Posted on May 10, 2013, 5:51 AM

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Don't understand the quote either.

by

But I guess since lobsters are higher up on the evolutionary scale, they have more nerve endings, so it's less painful for them to meet sudden death in rapidly boiling water than to kill them for broiling. This is done, as I watched my grandfather do many times, by sticking a sharp knife in their back and slicing them in half while they're still alive.

Don't know if that horrendous experience is why I am now a vegan, but if you have to kill your own food and watch it suffer and die, you ponder it a bit more.

Three cheers for vegetarians.

Posted on May 10, 2013, 9:47 AM

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Bix mentioned in a book on Henry Mancini

by

This quote is from *Henry Mancini: Reinventing Film Music* by John Caps, published by University of Illinois Press in 2012: "...the boy taught Henry to play what is called a 6-9 chord, common in the big band charts of Bix Beiderbecke at that time" (meaning the time Mancini was a teenager, in the late thirties or early forties).

Posted on May 9, 2013, 3:10 PM

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Thanks, RJ!

by

Bix is quoted again in p. 177. In a discusssion of the film "Victor Victoria," we find the following sentence: "The bridge of this piece (called 'Cat and Mouse') features alto clarinet and piano fill in the 1930s style of Bix Beiderbecke's band."

Albert



Posted on May 9, 2013, 4:58 PM

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One Degree of Separation

by

I met Henry Mancini at a posh party in Beverly Hills in the mid '70s, where I was hired to play piano. He liked my playing and we talked. He said he got his start in arranging in the late '30s, by transcribing Artie Shaw records. So there's your "connection" - Bix, Shaw, Mancini.

Brad K

Posted on May 11, 2013, 9:46 PM

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One of the lesser known West Coast Bands.

by

I am sure that you are familiar with Gus Arnheim, Abe Lyman, Anson Weeks. I don't know if you are familiar with Eddie Harkness, violinist and band leader.

[linked image]

In 1925-26, Eddie Harkness played in the Marine Room of the Olympia Hotel, Seattle, WA.

[linked image]
Art Deco Rendition of the Prestigious Olympia Hotel, Seattle.

Harkness made a dozen or so recordings for Victor in 1927-1929 under the name of Eddie Harkness and His Hotel Mark Hopkins Orchestra, the luxurious hotel in San Francisco.

Here is a recording of I'm Wondering Who (recorded by Bix and Tram on Sep 30, 1927), March 22, 1928, Oakland, CA. The vocalist is Van Fleming who made a few recordings with the post-Bix Goldkette orchestra.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-ECvDoUqJA

According to the EDVR, the authors of the tune are Jo Trent (l), Albert von Tilzer (m),  Peter De Rose (m) and Edward Grant (l). But the record label of the Bix and Tram recording lists only Trent, von Tilzer (born Elias Gumbinsky) and De Rose.

[linked image]

Take a look at the ad for the recording by Bix and Tram but issued as by Benny Meroff.".

[linked image]

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on May 9, 2013 10:47 AM

Posted on May 9, 2013, 10:44 AM

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Another beautiful recording by Eddie Harkness's band.

by

The lovely tune "Trees."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7q_3R-srWeI

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on May 9, 2013, 10:54 AM

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Re: Another beautiful recording by Eddie Harkness's band.

by

I love this recording! I believe that I was introduced to it by a Forum posting made last year. happy.gif

Posted on May 10, 2013, 6:07 AM

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Happy Birthday, Red.

by

Birth:  May 8, 1905 Ogden Utah, USA
Death:  Jun. 28, 1965 Las Vegas Nevada, USA

Red needs no introduction in this forum. One of the giants of jazz in the 1920s, he was active until he died.

Ida, one of my favorite Red recordings.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylMKzgK_es4

Listen to Red Nichols' voice and his 1940s rendition of Ida.

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x88bva_red-nichols-radio-broadcast-ida_music

The sheet music cover.

[linked image]

RIP Red!

Albert

PS According to "Find A Grave," the University of Oregon (Eugene), houses his personal papers; his private collection is in the Archives of Recorded Sound, University of Kansas, (Lawrence). And of course Stan Hester has the world's largest collection of Red Nichols material.

From http://nwda.orbiscascade.org/ark:/80444/xv66931

The collection contains music manuscripts (including original scores), published sheet music, cassette tape, phonograph and reel-to-reel recordings, biographical and personal files, correspondence, published books, scrapbooks, and photographs.

Scores within the two series', Musical Manuscripts and College Songs and Medleys are organized alphabetically by title and include annotations as to Nichol's own index numbers, arranger's name, size of group (small is meant here to mean ten or fewer parts), unusual instrumentation (such as strings or vocals), famous performers, dates, and information as to whether the collection contains score or parts or both.

The indices to music manuscripts section explains the letter/number annotations devised by Nichols.

The series on the film "Five Pennies" includes correspondence, preliminary and final scripts, and publicity.

The World Tour series contains correspondence, schedules, programs, publicity, and clippings. There are also country/state files that contain souvenirs and mementos from the places Nichols traveled.

The files for the TV show "This is your life" contains scripts, correspondence and photographs.

The manuscripts series consists of television and radio scripts, performance schedules, a jazz thesaurus, notes, and lyrics.

The personal material consists of biographical information, correspondence (included a letter from Bing Crosby), programs and press releases, clippings and articles about Nichols, album covers, jazz books, and awards.

The published sheet music and parts series is also annotated by Nichols numbering system, is alphabetically organized by title, and consists of piano/vocal music only unless otherwise noted.

An oversize series contains large hand-copied music manuscripts arranged in alphabetical order by title.

There are over two hundred recordings on cassette tape, reel-to-reel, and phonograph albums (albums are organized alphabetically by title).

Also available are ten volumes/books about music subjects and jazz artists, including one about The Five Pennies.

There are three scrapbooks that contain clippings about Nichols.

Most photographs have been removed from the collection and stored separately for preservation purposes under the call number PH212.

A listing of music arrangers exists in the paper finding aid.



Posted on May 8, 2013, 6:04 AM

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The funny thing is that my favorite Red Nichols record...

by

Doesn't have Red soloing at all! It's the 1929 "Rose of Washington Square" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8JPQQGkYk0A

It is not, as some have sugested, that Red thought he couldn't match Teagarden, Russell, Freeman, and Sullivan as a hot improvisor. No, one thing Red did not suffer from was a lack of ego. And he proved in plenty of records that he could hold his own as an improvisor with the best jazz musicians of his time: two good examples are "China Boy" http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_kPaMXwj24 and "I Want To Be Happy." http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zVgDF9y3WMQ (In the latter, Red takes a very "hot," stabbing, quite *un*-Bixian solo.) But in "Rose of Washington Square" he wanted to highlight his colleagues' solo abilities, and they responded magnificently.

Posted on May 14, 2013, 9:47 PM

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Untitled

by hal smith

Does anyone know the address of the pavillon royal in Valley Stream LI . Does the building still exist?

Posted on May 8, 2013, 1:53 AM

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From http://www.hnom.org/history1950d.htm

by

The Pavillon Royal was located a few blocks west of Central Avenue on the south side of Merrick Road, between Montague Street and South Terrace Place. It was a well-known restaurant that featured famous entertainers like Paul Whiteman, Rudy Vallee and Guy Lombardo.

I think it is gone.

Albert



Posted on May 8, 2013, 5:31 AM

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"Poor Papa"

by

Professor Hot Stuff sent an mp3 of Fred Rich's Poor Papa. Here is the mp3 file from the archive site:

archive.org/download/FredRich-01-12/FredRichOrch-PoorPapa1926.mp3

Rust in his Jazz Disco gives the collective personnel. 

Fred Rich And His Orchestra : collective pers. : Hymie Farberman, Mike Mosiello, Leo McConville (tp) Miff Mole (tb) Jimmy Dorsey (cl,as) Goof Moyer (cl,as,mel) Rudolph Adler (cl,ts) Jimmy Johnston (bassax) Fred Rich (p,dir) Phil Oliwitz (vln,bj) Jack Hansen (tu) Ray Bauduc (d) New York Feb 2, 1926

141588-3

Who takes the solo? I guess Leo McConville sounding an awful lot like Red Nichols. Opinions? Nice recording, worth listening.

Albert

Do you hear a bass sax? I don't. I don't hear Jimmy Dorsey either. Does anyone?

Some of this was discussed previously. See

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1264199192/





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on May 6, 2013 9:49 AM

Posted on May 6, 2013, 8:58 AM

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No interest in the posting? :(

by

No comments? Agree? Disagree?

Albert



Posted on May 8, 2013, 12:08 PM

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Duh!

by

This one is hard! The only immediately recognizable player to me is Miff Mole, and that's not in question. I'm not familiar enough with McConville or Mosiello to make a guess; All I could say is that the soloist is not Farberman, and that's not in doubt either. The recording sounds likes it's being played underwater, making hard to distinguish among the reeds, except to say that if there was a bass saxist present, he was mighty quiet! "Tis a puzzlement!"

Posted on May 9, 2013, 5:44 AM

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Bad sound quality!

by John Leifert

Actually, Albert, I didn't respond to this (much as I wanted to) because the remastering is so horrible that the chances of mistaken identities on the soloist would be greater, since the original tonalities have been altered beyond recognition! I hope there is a better quality sound file of this track somewhere, because I would love to hear it properly.

John L

Posted on May 14, 2013, 5:35 PM

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Happy Birthday, Bing!

by

One of my favorite Bix and Bing recordings. Get a load of the dialogues between vocalists and instrumentalists.

That's My Weakness Now.   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WAfVQpzQB3g

One of my favorite Bing and Eddie recordings.

Where the Blue of the Night.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6U6Vrc8RqsI

Bing, thanks for bringing so much good music into my life!

Albert



Posted on May 3, 2013, 4:18 PM

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"Im Through With Love."

by

Another great recording by Bing. June 12, 1931 in Los Angeles.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y62ApRsQ51g

Composed by Gus Kahn (lyrics) and Fud Livingston and Matty Malneck (music).

[linked image]

I can't figure out why Paul Whiteman is on the cover: he never recorded it and I doubt that his band played it. No Eddie Lang: he was back in New York,

Great lyrics and beautiful music. Terrific interpretation by Bing. There have been many recordings of this tune by various artists, but, in my opinion, no one approaches Bing's.

Bing sang this song on Sep 2, 1931 in a 15-minute radio broadcast from New York City over the CBS radio network. Get a load of the musicians who accompanied him in the broadcast: (From Ray Mitchell's Lang discography.

Sylvester Ahola, Tommy Gott (t); Tommy Dorsey, Lloyd Turner (tb); Tony Parenti, Elmer Feldkamp (cl, as), 2 unknown ts, Joe Venuti, (vn), Eddie Lang (g), Hank Stern (bb), Chauncey Morehouse (d). The other two songs in the broadcast were "Too Late" and " Just One More Chance."

Seven minutes of this program available in youtube. Terrific stuff by the great Joe Venuti. Bing in top shape, in spite of the fact that the broadcast had been postponed because of an "attack of laringytis."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ti6Swf7OhV8

I could have listen to the program live, I was about six months old; but this was not broadcast across the ocean to France, where I was already giving my mother a hard time. happy.gif

Albert







    
This message has been edited by ahaim on May 4, 2013 12:48 PM

Posted on May 4, 2013, 12:45 PM

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The Announcement of Bing's Broadcast in the New York Times.

by

Aug 30, 1931.

[linked image]

A photo of Bing in the New York Times as early as 1931 is quite an achievement on his part, me thinks.

Albert



Posted on May 4, 2013, 1:30 PM

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Sylvester Ahola not confirmed.

by

I took a look at Dick Hill's "Sylvester Ahola - the Gloucester Gabriel." No mention of Hooley being present in the Crosby broadcast of Sep 2, 1931. The only mention about Hooley playing with Bing is  in Feb 1932, a Cremo broadcast from the Brooklyn Paramount Theatre.

Another problem. The Aug 31, 1931 edition of the Daily Star, Long Island City carries the following item:

[linked image]

No mention of Victor Young in the discographical information I gave in the previous posting.The identity of the musicians that accompanied Bing in his Sep 2, 1931 broadcast needs to be re-examined.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on May 4, 2013 4:55 PM

Posted on May 4, 2013, 4:54 PM

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A slightly different roster of musicians.

by

From Robert Stockdale, "That's It," revised discography of the Dorsey Brothers. Fred Rich was the regular director of the CBS orchestra, but Bing Crosby insisted on having Victor Young.

[linked image]

It looks to me, from aural evidence and all the information I have been posting on this, that Victor Young was indeed the leader of the band and that Joe, Eddie and Tommy were present. The assignment of trumpet players is interesting and confusing: Sylvester Ahola, Bunny Berigan, Tommy Gott? I think Hooley is out (from Dick Hill). Bunny? Rob, help! What does Bozy White say, if anything?

Albert



Posted on May 5, 2013, 5:56 AM

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From ....

by

.... http://www.jazzdiscography.com/Artists/Crosby/crosby2aBroadcast1.html

Date: 2 September 1931
Location: New York, NY
Label: Radio
BING CROSBY

a. PC68310-1 Radio    Just One More Chance - 4:45  (Arthur Johnston, Sam Coslow)

Bing Crosby (voc), The C B S Studio Orchestra (orc), Freddie Rich (dir), Joe Venuti (vln)

b. PC68311-1 Radio    I'm Through With Love - 3:41  (Gus Kahn, Fud Livingstone, Matty Malneck)

Bing Crosby (voc), The C B S Studio Orchestra (orc), Freddie Rich (dir), Eddie Lang (gtr), Joe Venuti (vln)

Both titles on:      JONZO (UK) CD: JZCD-09 THE CHRONOLOGICAL BING CROSBY VOLUME 09   (2000)
     COLLECTORS' CHOICE (US) CD: CCM2109 BING CROSBY - SO RARE - Treasures from the Crosby Archive Disc 1   (2010)
     FROGBIEN LP 12": FB6309 BING CROSBY 1931 HIS VERY FIRST BROADCAST AND Mr SOFT SOAP   

The first solo broadcast from CBS Station WABC. The recording was made in Hollywood from a live transmission from New York.

More about the broadcast. This from http://www.bingmagazine.co.uk/bingmagazine/solo.htm

Details of these programmes are sketchy and the following represents the only details of their content that has, so far, come to light.  Acknowledgements are made to the research conducted by the late Larry F. Kiner.

PRESENTING 15 MINUTES WITH BING CROSBY

    BING CROSBYS COLUMBIA DEBUT MONDAY NIGHT
    "Bing" opens with a "bang" over a nationwide network of the Columbia Broadcasting System, Monday night, 7 o'clock!
    I'm talking about the youthful and "it-ful" baritone who was christened Harry, full name, Harry Crosby. And KHJ promises to do ever better than Crosby's most enthusiastic admirers had hoped-the local member of CBS announces it will present the vocalizing Lochinvar, who came out of the West, six nights per week-Sundays off.
    Incidentally to the Crosby voice will be an orchestra under the direction of Victor Young, and the program will run fifteen minutes.
    No sponsor! It will be a sustaining CBS feature, and incidentally, "Bing" appears to have hunt up a new mark for such an unsponsored program. Unofficial but rather authoritative reports state that cash each week will find $1,500 rolling into the Crosby exchequer.
    Record-playing stations have, unwittingly, given Crosby a perfect "build-up" for his network debut. They have played and replayed every record the young man ever made, have devoted whole thirty-minute periods to nothing but his recordings.
    Now, this section of the nation at least, is ripe to hear the real article, singing other and newer songs as well. He will, of course, have to sing "Many Happy Returns of the Day," "At Your Command," and "One More Chance" occasionally, just to escape a lynching.
    Columbia has long sought a feature that could compete with NBC's "Amos n' Andy." Crosby may fill the bill for the Pacific Coast audience; some folks seem to think he will, at any rate. More than one "Amos n' Andy" fan will admit that the black-face team has lost its grip, but the habit remains. Another breach-of-promise suit would seal the verdict, however.

(Ray De O'Fan, Los Angeles Examiner, 27th August, 1931)

Bing Crosby, well-known Southern California singer, will start broadcasting over the Columbia network and KHJ Monday night, August 31, at 7pm according to announcement received today. Bing will be on the air every night with the exception of Sunday.

(Eugene Inge, Los Angeles Evening Herald, 27th August, 1931)

Bing Crosby, once heard locally over several stations, takes his vocal efforts to New York and lands on big time...Columbia network to KHJ week days at 7pm commencing Monday.
(Ralph L. Power, Los Angeles Record, 29th August, 1931)


Bing Crosby, well-known Southern California baritone, who recently signed an exclusive contract with the Columbia Broadcasting System, will be heard for the first time at 7:30 over KHJ. Crosby will be on the air every night at the same hour with the exception of Sunday.
(Eugene Inge, Los Angeles Evening Herald, 31st. August, 1931)

7pm, KHJ-Bing Crosby makes his debut over Columbia, supported by Victor Young's Orchestra. He sings "Just One More Chance," "I Found a Million Dollar Baby" and "I'm Through With Love," CBS (15 minutes).

(Ray De O'Fan, Los Angeles Examiner, 31st. August, 1931)
 
Bing Crosby, famous blues singer, will soon be heard over the National network sponsored by a well-known cigarette.

(Eileen Percy Los Angeles Evening Express, 31st. August, 1931)

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM (CBS): 7:00-7:15 pm, New York, NY.

Announced by Harry Von Zell.

Orchestra conducted by Victor Young.

Personnel: (From) Mannie Klein, Charlie Margulis, Bobby Effros (trumpets), Tommy Dorsey (trumpet/trombone), Will Bradley, Jerry Colonna (trombones), Jimmy Dorsey, Lyall Bowen (alto saxophone/clarinet); Artie Shaw (clarinet), Joe Venuti, Harry Hoffman (violins), Arthur Schutt (piano), Eddie Lang (guitar), Joe Tarto (bass/tuba). Larry Gomar (drums).

No. 1 2nd September 1931 (Wed)  (a) 

*Just One More Chance                                                                (b)

*Im Through With Love                                                                (c)

*I Found A Million Dollar Baby (In A Five & Ten Cent Store)       (d)

Notes:

(a)                This program was the first in the series of sustaining shows.  Originally scheduled to premiere on 31st August, it was delayed until this date due to Bing's laryngitic problem.

The Victor Recording Book indicates recordings and matrices as listed below with the notation after [PCVE-68312-1] of Entire Fifteen Minute Broadcast. It is unknown if any pressings were ever made from this matrix.

At the time of publication none were known to exist.  It is believed that only three copies of the 78rpm matrices were pressed.  The Victor recordings were air-checked, in their Hollywood studios, from the KHJ (Los Angeles) broadcast.

The accompanying musicians varied from broadcast to broadcast.  Interviews with Klein, Venuti and Bradley indicate that those listed were on most of the broadcasts conducted by Victor Young.

(b)               Issued on RCA Victor LSA3094 Bing Crosby Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams and Frogbien

FB6309 - Bing

            12" 33 Victor Test PCVE-68312-1; 12" 78  Victor Test PCVE 68310-1

The Chronological Bing Crosby vol. 9 Jonzo Records JZCD-9

So Rare: Treasures From The Crosby Archive Collectors Choice Music CD WWCCM21092

(c)                Issued on RCA Victor LSA3094 Bing Crosby Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams and Frogbien

FB6309 - Bing

12" 33 Victor Test PCVE-68312-1; 12" 78  Victor Test PCVE 68310-1

The Chronological Bing Crosby vol. 9 Jonzo Records JZCD-9

So Rare: Treasures From The Crosby Archive Collectors Choice Music CD WWCCM21092

(d)       12" 33 Victor Test PCVE-68312-1

It looks like Victor Young was the conductor. Do you recognize any of the musicans in the broadcast? I am pretty sure Venuti is responsible for the embellishments behind Bing's vocal. Probably Eddie Lang. The others?

Albert



Posted on May 4, 2013, 6:03 PM

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Der Bingle

by Mike O

My favorite early Bing number is "It Must Be True."

Posted on May 6, 2013, 6:13 AM

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"It Must Be True"

by

The Gus Arnheim recording:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4K25GdWwGAE

From the "Dream House" short:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87SJM9237S0

Albert



Posted on May 6, 2013, 8:28 AM

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Bing

by Mike O

Thanks, Albert! Bing once said that this song was written as an obbligato to "One Hour With You," a number that later became Eddie Cantor's radio theme song.

Posted on May 7, 2013, 6:08 AM

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oh how embarassing

by

I forgot Bing's Birthday! I drove by his birthplace in Tacoma on Sunday!

Posted on May 8, 2013, 8:01 PM

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Gerri Needs Volunteers for the Bix Fest.

by

The Bix Festival in Davenport is approaching: Aug 1-4, 2013 in what I call the magic town. Less than three months left. Make your plans to attend.

The success of the Festival depends on the good will of volunteers. If you are in the Quad City area, please volunteer.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on May 2, 2013, 3:06 PM

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Guy and Tram

by

Listen at 1:19 to Guy Lombardo's Mar 21, 1928 recording of Coquette.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0L8ksRS-8kI

Then, listen to the introduction of Trumbauer's Oct 26, 1927 recording of Sugar.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Du7czYtbTBk

Hear the similarity? Coincidence?

Albert



Posted on May 1, 2013, 12:11 PM

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The Dennington Builders Bix Signature.

by

More than a decade ago, I copied this from an ebay auction.

[linked image]

There was some speculation about the Dennington Builders. Work done in the Beiderbecke's home in Davenport? Bix signing for a delivery when he was working for his father's business?

In a recent post in her facebook page, Kitty gives a link to the Normandie building webpage.

http://nyre.cul.columbia.edu/projects/view/25795

You will remember that 43-30 46th Street in Sunnyside is Bix's last address. Note also that the "owner/agent" is Dennington Builders of 43-01 45th Street, Long Island City, about 1.1 mile from Bix's last residence.

Kitty writes, "my guess, based on the slip and the brochure and Occam's Razor, is that the slip of paper was from the lease/rental agreement for apartment 1-G." Sounds like a reasonable suggestion to me.

Albert 



Posted on May 1, 2013, 6:24 AM

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New Orleans Rhythm Kings on "Record of the Week"

by David Sager

One of my favorites!

http://www.loc.gov/rr/record/recordoftheweek.html

Posted on Apr 30, 2013, 2:18 PM

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She's Crying For Me.

by

.... is a composition by Santo Pecora. The NORK recorded this tune twice, both times in New Orleans.


- Jan 23, 1925, OK 0327, She's Crying For Me Blues.
Paul Mares, c; Santo Pecora, tb; Leon Roppolo, cl; Charlie Cordella, ts; Glyn "Lea" "Red" Long, p; Bill Eastwood, bj; Chink Martin, bb; Leo Adde, d.


- Mar 26, 1925, Vic19645, She's Crying For Me.
Same as above except that Roppolo is absent and Cordella plays only clarinet. This date marks the last recording session of the NORK in the 1920s.
Four takes. 2 and 3 were destroyed. 4 was mastered and issued on Vic 19645. Take 1 was held and eventually released in the Retrieval CD 79031.


Here is take 1 according to the redhotjazz site.  (Could this be the OK recording?)
http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/nork/ShesCryingforMe.ra
 
And take 4 (the record of the week). 
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/10255


Parts of the clarinet solo at about 2 min in take 1 remind me of The Japanese Sandman.

Note that the record label gives only Santo Pecora as composer.


[linked image]


However, Wingy Manone's recording (OK 41569) gives Picora (sic), Mares and Rappoli (sic).


[linked image]


So who is/are the composer/s? I did not find an image of the sheet music.


I found this statement in http://jazzagemusic.blogspot.com/2013_03_15_archive.html


Some writers have noted that Leon's brother, Nick Roppolo, went into the recording studio and threatened Charlie Cordilla with bodily harm if he copied his brother's solo on "She's Crying For Me".


Fact or fiction?


Albert



Posted on Apr 30, 2013, 5:03 PM

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Some discographical questions about Roppolo and Cordilla

by David Tenner

I've always been puzzled by the Red Hot Jazz page for the NORK: http://www.redhotjazz.com/nork.html

It gives the first and fourth takes of "She's Crying for Me" (one as "She's Crying for Me Blues"). Both are listed as from January 26, 1925 and both obviously (to me) feature Roppolo playing clarinet solos--in fact, they sound identical. (Cordilla's sound on both takes from March, including the "record of the week," is quite different, and sounds closer to Larry Shields.) Yet they are listed as being Bluebird B-10956-A (take one) and Victor 19645-A (take four). This puzzles me, because I had always thought that all the NORK January recordings were on Okeh, and that only in the Roppolo-less March session did the NORK switch to Victor. Is "January 26, 1925" a confusion of "January 23, 1925" with "March 26, 1925"?

To make matters more confusing, Samuel Charters in A Trumpet Around the Corner writes: "His [Roppolo's] last solos were done at a session that produced two sides with that band [the Halfway House Orchestra] on January 22, 1925. He played an extended duet on alto saxophone with tenor player Charlie Cordilla on one arrangement, and a characteristic low-register clarinet solo on the other was probably by Roppolo. [He is referring to "Barataria," but see http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LoGUErBAdQ for an argument that the clarinet solo in "Barataria" cannot have been by Roppolo.] When Pecora and Mares came into the studio three days later [i.e., February 25, 1925, not February 23 or 26...] to record as the New Orleans Rhythm Kings, they intended to use Roppolo, but Cordilla had to fill in when Roppolo wouldn't play. Roppolo was commited to an asylum a few months later..." http://books.google.com/books?id=ACpt6t_1WjkC&pg=PA200

I certainly respect Charters' knowledge of New Orleans jazz, but am confused because what he is saying is contrary to what I have read in Sudhalter and elsewhere--that Roppolo played in the January NORK sessions, and that it was only in March that Mares and Pecora, though wanting to use him, had to substitute Cordilla. I have always felt the clarinetist in the January sessions (both of the NORK and the Halfway House Orchestra) had to be Roppolo, because Cordilla sounds so different in the March recordings. (I doubt that the alleged warning from Roppolo's brother can explain that. OTOH, maybe Cordilla is simply more Shields-like when he plays in the upper register, and Roppolo-like in lower register. Later Halfway House recordings in 1925 sound that way to me. http://www.redhotjazz.com/halfway.html ) Can anyone possibly clarify this--including the question of who does the clarinet solo in Barataria? Maybe I am too emotionally committed to wanting all the January clarinet solos, both in the NORK and the Halfway House recordings, to be by Roppolo, since not just "She's Crying for Me" but "Barataria" and "Golden Leaf Strut" in particular have always seemed to me to be among his best. (It's like my wanting it to be Bix rather than Secrest on "Waiting at the End of the Road"...)

Posted on May 1, 2013, 3:29 PM

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Barataria was discussed in detail in ....

by

....  http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1287481622/

So  we agree that what redhotjazz lists as take 1 of the Victor session is in fact the OKeh recording. Yes, the redhotjazz page has errors.

Albert



Posted on May 1, 2013, 6:50 PM

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I'm willing to accept....

by

That the clarinet solo in "Barataria" may be by Cordilla. (After all, it is undisputed that he as well as Roppolo was there.) But Charters' claim http://books.google.com/books?id=ACpt6t_1WjkC&pg=PA200 that Roppolo was not used in the NORK session a few days later is (at least to me) startling--it would mean that some of Roppolo's most famous solos, including "Golden Leaf Strut" "I Never Knew What a Girl Could Do" and the first version of "She's Crying for Me", where the clarinet solo is so different from the March recordings with Cordilla--were not Roppolo's at all but Cordilla's. I find this hard to believe. And what Charters writes about the Jnauary NORK sesssion--that Mares and Pecora intended to use Roppolo but he wouldn't play, so they used Cordilla instead--is exactly what Sudhalter and others write about the March session.

Charters certinaly knows a lot about New Orleans jazz. And if it is true that Cordilla takes the clarinet solo in "Barataria" (which, incidentally, Charters does not think--he says it was "probably" Roppolo) perhaps it is plausible he took other solos commonly attributed to Roppolo. But it is such an unusual claim that I think it deserves more attention.


Posted on May 2, 2013, 11:14 AM

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Speaking of Samuel Charters, here is some of what he writes ....

by

[linked image]

.... about Bix in "A Trumpet Around the Corner: The Story of New Orleans Jazz."

[linked image]

All the recordings mentioned by Charters are available in the redhotjazzarchive.

Johnny Hyman  http://www.redhotjazz.com/bayou.html

Tony Parenti  http://www.redhotjazz.com/tpno.html

New Orleans Owls  http://www.redhotjazz.com/owls.html

It is significant that already in the Spring of 1927, Bix's influence had extended as far as New Orleans. Relevant to this point is the excellent article about "Bix and New Orleans" by Bruce Boyd Braeburn.

http://www.crj-online.org/v4/CRJ-BixNewOrleans.php

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on May 2, 2013 1:05 PM

Posted on May 2, 2013, 1:04 PM

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I forgot to mention.

by

I find it weird that Hyman uses a harmonica player in his two 1927 recordings: Alvin Gaughreaux. This from the EDVR.  That is a very (again) weird spelling for a French name. So I did a bit of googling and find that the correct spelling is probably Gautreaux.

Any other 1920s jazz or dance band records with a musician playing harmonica?

Albert



Posted on May 2, 2013, 1:21 PM

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A Video of Johnny Wiggs in 1973

by

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNJya6jrn1I

The tune reminds me of Louisiana Serenade.

Albert



Posted on May 3, 2013, 4:34 AM

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A sunday afternoon version

by

Here is a sunday afternoon version of that title-sorry no Bix connection.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBZPGdkh9Nc

Posted on May 4, 2013, 2:49 AM

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Nice and mellow

by

Thanks for the link.

Albert



Posted on May 4, 2013, 5:58 AM

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I meant "Louisiana Fairy Tale."

by

Here is Fats Waller's rendition of this great tune composed by John Frederick Coots and Mitchell Parish.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yuD0QptJW0

Terrific rendition by Fats.

Albert

 



Posted on May 4, 2013, 8:27 AM

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The Roppolo specialist ....

by

.... Sue Fischer probably has some information about the problem you posed. She is writing a biography of Leon Roppolo. If she did not read your posting, and does not comment in the next day or so, I will ask her offline.

Albert



Posted on May 2, 2013, 1:25 PM

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Sue's Comments.

by

I asked Sue about the Jan 1925 recording session by the NORK. Here is her response.

Charters is mistaken.  Roppolo was not used on the March session for Victor, but there is no question that he was on the January sessions for both NORK and the Halfway House.  I think he was confusing the two sessions; in March, Roppolo had rehearsed with the band, but got into a fight with Pecora and walked out the night before the recording session.  Mares had Cordilla substitute.  But the differences in their playing are obvious.
 
Albert




    
This message has been edited by ahaim on May 5, 2013 3:23 PM

Posted on May 5, 2013, 11:06 AM

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Monk Hazel, the March NORK session, and "pea-whistle notes"

by David Tenner

Richard Sudhalter writes (in *Lost Chords*, pp. 257-8): "Acording to 'Monk' Hazel (interview of July 16, 1959), Roppolo was on this [March NORK] session as well. 'Every time Rap would get a chorus, he'd get up there and hit one of those pea-whistle notes and...he'd blow the needle off the wax. Old man [Eddie] King kept telling him to quit playing those high notes, [but] to tell Rap to quit doing anything--well, you might just as well talk to the King of England.' In the end, King dismissed Roppolo, said Hazel, and Cordilla did the date."

As Sue King noted here several years ago http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1156121336
(she asked the source of this story and you replied by citing the passage in Sudhalter I just quoted) there is something odd about this. Why would Victor have a harder time recording Roppolo's "pea whistle" notes than Okeh did a couple of months earlier? Indeed,Sudhalter observes that the March version of "She's Crying for Me," though inferior to the January version, is much better recorded.

Posted on May 5, 2013, 5:57 PM

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Re: Monk Hazel, the March NORK session, and "pea-whistle notes"

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If it is true that Eddie King was the recording director, it's believable he could have responded to Roppolo in the same way that he reacted to Bix on his first Goldkette session.

Posted on May 6, 2013, 4:01 PM

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No mention of Eddie King in the EDVR Website. or the ....

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.... LOC Jukebox Website. However, Eddie King, at least in 1924, was going around the country where there were no Victor studios and bringing in portable equipment. The first recording session of Bix with Goldkette (November 1924) took place in the Detroit Athletic Club with Edward T. King as "Director." Wikipedia tells us "King went to cities such as Chicago, Oakland, and New Orleans when Victor began recording in these cities." For example, Ed King was the "director" for Armand Piron's recording session of Jan 8, 1924 in New Orleans.

Albert



Posted on May 6, 2013, 5:07 PM

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I'm not an expert on the NORK, but ...

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Listening to the March 1925 Victor record of "She's Crying for Me" that started this thread, I thought I heard two different clarinetists with two distinct styles. The clarinetist heard in the background behind the first trumpet solo seems far more imaginative than the one who takes the clarinet solo later in the record and plays behind the trumpeter when he returns. So maybe Roppolo was in the studio and played behind the first trumpet solo, then dropped out of the record and Cordilla took over?

Posted on May 6, 2013, 5:44 PM

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Over ten years ago, I had a posting about Golden Leaf Strut ....

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.... but not a word about the identity of the clarinetist!

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1043607474

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on May 2, 2013 2:59 PM

Posted on May 2, 2013, 2:59 PM

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Cordilla or Roppolo?

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Based on no claims to personal expertise, I am willing to concede that "I Never Knew What A Gal Could Do" and "Golden Leaf Strut" could be Charlie Cordilla, but not the version of "She's Crying for Me" I'm familiar with. If that's not Roppolo, then I just don't know what he sounded like at all.

With all that in mind, I've just been listening to "Panama" and am beginning to wonder if that's Roppolo on alto sax (it sounds a lot like the alto on "Pussy Cat Rag" and "Barataria") and Charlie on clarinet. What do the specialists say?

Posted on May 5, 2013, 1:47 PM

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Pettis

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On "Panama" it's Jack Pettis playing saxophone. You see him with his instrument (probably C-melody sax) in several photos of the band from this earlier period. I think that it's inevitable that Roppolo got some inspiration from him since he was one of the jazz pioneers on sax.
And while you are listening to those records, see if you cannot hear quite a difference between the low register clarinet playing in "I never knew..." (Roppolo) and in "Barataria" (Cordilla). I do!

Posted on May 5, 2013, 2:22 PM

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Re: "Panama" and Pettis and Roppolo and Cordilla

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Thank you, Paul. I had thought that Pettis played tenor sax, and what I was hearing was not a tenor sax. C-melody sax makes perfect sense.

I agree with your conclusion on the two clarinet solos.

I guess that on the clarinetist on that final session in New Orleans we go with Monk Hazel... or not. If someone has the Charters text, it would help to know if he footnoted his information and if so, to whom he credited it. We have three slightly different explanations for Roppolo not playing on the last session: 1) He was there and ready to record, but had a dispute about high notes with Eddie King and left. 2) He had a fight with Santo Pecora and refused to play, or 3) he wouldn't or couldn't play for unspecified reasons. (The rest of Charters' sentence seems to suggest that his mental status was the problem.) These three explanations are not necessarily mutually exclusive, so there is some detective work still to be done. But these sources seem to agree that Cordilla stepped in at that point.

Posted on May 6, 2013, 4:47 PM

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The label of the OKeh record.

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[linked image]

Composer Santa (sic) Pecora.

Albert



Posted on May 2, 2013, 4:38 AM

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Two notable differences in the OKeh and Victor record labels.

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- The name of the tune: She's Crying for Me Blues, OK and She's Crying for Me  Vic.

- The name of the band: Original New Orleans Rhythm Kings, OK and New Orleans Rhythm Kings, Vic.

Albert



Posted on May 2, 2013, 2:16 PM

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Yet another composer credit on this song

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I just found a 1950's "Traditional Jazz" compilation on RCA Italiana that contains the Victor version of "She's Crying for Me" and credits the composition to "Mares" and no one else.

Posted on May 12, 2013, 9:52 AM

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The mystery deepens …

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The mystery of "She's Crying for Me" just keeps getting deeper and deeper! I've just been playing a NORK compilation that has both the Okeh version and two takes of the Victor, and on take two of the Victor the clarinet obbligato under the second half of Paul Mares' first solo, the one I thought might be Leon Roppolo, isn't heard at all. This just bolsters my theory that Roppolo played that part on take one, then dropped out and let Charles Cordilla play the rest of the clarinet part on take one, and either left the studio or didn't play at all on take two.

Posted on May 12, 2013, 3:54 PM

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Takes 1 and 4.

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I will assume that this is take 4 (issued on Victor 19645). From the LOC Jukebox site.

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/10255

and that this is take 1 (issued on BB 10596). From jazz-on-line.com

http://jazz-on-line.com/pageinterrogation.php

If this is correct, we can study the two mp3 files in detail.

Please, let me know if these are correct assignments so we can proceed.

Albert



Posted on May 13, 2013, 4:43 PM

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Sorry for the false alarm!

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That's what comes of not listening closely enough! The two takes of "She's Crying for Me" on Victor are actually identical in terms of the arrangement. The disc opens with an ensemble passage for trumpet, clarinet and trombone, following which Mares takes a half-chorus solo and the other horns join in for another ensemble passage. Then Mares takes a full-chorus solo with no clarinet obbligato on either take, following which there's a piano break and a clarinet solo. I still think the clarinet work in that ensemble half-chorus following Mares' first half-chorus solo sounds more imaginative than the rest of the clarinet playing on the record, but I was wrong about their being any discernible difference in the arrangements on the two takes. (The Okeh version doesn't have that split-chorus, half Mares and half ensemble; instead the main clarinet solo goes for two choruses.) Sorry for sending fellow list contributors on this odd wild-goose chase.

Posted on May 15, 2013, 3:17 PM

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If http://incoming.jazz-on-line.com/a/mp3c/BLU32125-1.mp3 ....

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.... is take 1, then there are important differences between this take and take 4. Just a couple:

Take 4: one clarinet solo 1:17-1:49
Take 1: two clarinet solos; one at 1:03-1:35 and another at 1:59-2:19 playing a melody that is not included in take 4 and reminds me of Japanese Sandman.

Albert



Posted on May 16, 2013, 11:32 AM

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Four non-NORK versions of "She's Crying (or Cryin') for Me"

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(1) Albert Wynn's Creole Jazz Band with Punch Miller on trumpet, Chicago 1928:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaMnFg9MFkw

(2) Dewey Jackson's Peacock Orchestra, St. Louis, 1926:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sOQxq2466Z0

It's unfortunate that Dewey Jackson, who was one of the leading exponents of the St. Louis trumpet style, didn't record more; just four sides from 1926 and a few more in 1950. On the 1926 recordings, Gunther Schuller writes (in *The Swing Era,* p. 785):

"Jackson's playing was more ornate than [Charlie] Creath's, and indeed often threatened to become all ornamentation, beginning with an almost disturbingly intense and fast twittery vibrato. But it had that innate singing quality that is a hallmark (by way of New Orleans) of the St. Louis trumpet school and that has, now in retrospect, its own peculiar period charm, so different from Louis Armstrong's broader and more all-embracing conception. Jackson's Peacock Orchestra was perhaps best in its collective ensemble-playing. Here the players hit their full stride, with a grand pendulant swing--the quintessential 1920s New Orleans orchestral style and feeling--and a wonderfully dense and complex polyphonic sonic tapestry (as in *She's Crying for Me* or *Capitol Blues.*)." http://books.google.com/books?id=Zc4Lh9KC2MIC&pg=PA785 ("Capitol Blues" can be heard at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sUD35lN0guI )

(3) Wingy Manone and His Orchestra, New York 1934:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PNgFYo0_2cg

Santo Pecora from the NORK sessions is back on trombone, Sidney Arodin is on clarinet.

(4) Art Hodes' Chicagoans, 1944, http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/m3u/TS490615.m3u

Max Kaminsky (tp), Ray Conniff (tb), Rod Cless (cl), Art Hodes (p), Jack Bland (g), Bob Haggart (sb), Danny Alvin (dm).

Posted on May 13, 2013, 10:57 AM

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Scans of Record Labels

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On Feb 23, 1931, The ARC Brunswick Studio Band (with Bunny Berigan) recorded "Ev'ry Thing That's Good Is For You." The recording was issued in four different labels.
Melotone M-12124 (US)
Panachord 25054 (England)
Mayfair G-2014 (England)
P-12124 (Australia)
Credit was given to one of the following
Owen Fallon and His Californians
Maurie Sherman and His College Inn Orchestra
Southern State Rambers
I believe that there were two labels for the Melotone issue. One credited to Owen Fallon and one to Maurie Sherman.
I am looking for scans of the record labels and would be very grateful if any of you who has one or more of the records mentioned above could post them here.
Thanks a lot.

Albert



Posted on Apr 29, 2013, 12:23 PM

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One down, four to go.

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A kind soul sent a scan of the Melotone credited to Maurie Sherman. Thanks, kind soul!

Albert

 



Posted on Apr 29, 2013, 5:49 PM

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One more, three to go.

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Another kind soul sent a scan of the May-Fair label. Thanks very much! Looking for the British and Australian record labels.

Albert



Posted on Apr 30, 2013, 1:37 PM

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The number 24 hit of 1947...

by David Tenner

Was Frankie Laine's version of "Singing the Blues":

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATKpP3bDKls

I had never heard it until today.

Posted on Apr 29, 2013, 1:40 AM

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New to me.

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According to Sudhalter and Evans, "Like Louis Armstrong's "West End Blues," recorded more than a year later, these two Bix-Tram titles ("Clarinet Marmalde" and "Singin' the Blues") are one of the landmarks in the history of jazz on record."

Frankie Laine recorded "West End Blues" on  Aug 18, 1946 (with Babe Russin, ts; Clare Fischer,p; Perry Botkin,g; Artie Bernstein, b;  Lou Singer, d.)

[linked image]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LTAC6jcoI3s

For the first version of "West End Blues" with lyrics, Aug 23, 1928 (two months after Louis' seminal recording), see Ethel Waters accompanied on piano by one of the authors of the tune, Clarence Williams.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jU_OaIQpnxA

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Apr 29, 2013 4:57 AM
This message has been edited by ahaim on Apr 29, 2013 4:56 AM

Posted on Apr 29, 2013, 4:53 AM

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From Ken B, here is the record label of ....

by

.... the Parlophone Record of "West End Blues" by the Hot Five. Thanks very much, Ken!

[linked image]

One of the two (the other is Bix and Tram and Eddie's "Singin' the Blues") most important jazz records in the 1920s.

Listen to Louis' versions of 1928

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zPgh7nxTQT4

Albert



Posted on Apr 29, 2013, 10:37 AM

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Great record, but where was Mannie Klein?

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I hadn't heard Frankie Laine's version of "Singin' the Blues" before either. Laine's "West End Blues" is quite a well-known record: it was included on his first album, "Frankie Laine Sings," a three-disc, six-song 78 rpm package on Mercury. Indeed, ALL the songs on "Frankie Laine Sings" were ones Louis Armstrong had recorded in the late 1920's or early 1930's (the rest of the album was "Wrap Your Troubles in Dreams," "Black and Blue," "On the Sunny Side of the Street," "Blue Turning Grey Over You" and "I Can't Believe That You're in Love with Me"). But I hadn't known until now he recorded "Singin' the Blues" as well!

I only wish that Laine had had Mannie Klein, who played a beautiful solo on his "By the River Sainte Marie" (the flip side of Laine's star-making record, "That's My Desire"), play Bix's chorus as a solo in between the two vocal choruses. That would have made a great record even greater!

Posted on May 1, 2013, 5:54 PM

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Bix Licks and "Skylark"

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I am going thru the (really) large book of the "Complete Lyrics of Johnny Mercer." What a remarkable career output!

In the book it is noted (page 119) that Hoagy's "Skylark" was first conceived as an instrumental piece titled: "Bix Licks."
It was for a musical that was never produced. Later Mercer added lyrics and the song was published. It is certainly a dreamy and evocative tune.

I wonder how much the melody/chord changes of Skylark capture the compositional process of Bix? Or does the song's mood simply capture something of his personality?

Posted on Apr 26, 2013, 8:00 PM

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More about Bix Licks/Lix

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Before the film based on the novel "Young Man With A Horn" by Dorothy Baker was made, Hoagy had a project of a Broadway show based on the book. In 1939 Hoagy wrote "Bix Lix" as the tune associated with Rick Martin, the main character in the novel. The Broadway project never materialized. However, in 1941 the song "Bix Lix" with an added lyric by Johnny Mercer became "Skylark."

There was a TCM program on Johnny Mercer (Clint Eastwood was the executive producer). The famous photo of Bix was shown on the screen while Johnny Mercer talked about Skylark, "Hoagy had this tune and I couldn't think of what to write because it has this front line which is so pure and kind of classic and bucolic, and in the middle there is straight Bix Beiderbecke."

The previous from old postings. We know more now, I hope. The bridge (and other parts) in Skykark is the "Geechie phrase." Listen to Harry James's version.

http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/m3u/1942_088.m3u

The similarity between fragments of Davenport Blues and Skylark (and Royal Garden Blues) was pointed out by Barbara (before we knew about the Geechie phrase) in

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1301271215/

The complete sheet music of Skylark is available in

http://www.dlib.indiana.edu/collections/hoagy/

Albert

 



Posted on Apr 27, 2013, 5:23 AM

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"Skylark" and "Deep Harlem"

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I never reflected on these two tunes before in comparison, but your recent posts about "Skylark" got me to ruminating, and it occurs to me that a latter Bix-record-session-chord-progression (from around '30, "Deep Harlem") flows in the same manner as "Skylark." Agree/Disagree? Chime in anyone.

Posted on Apr 28, 2013, 9:33 PM

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Re: "Skylark" and "Deep"Harlem"

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"Flows in the same manner" is a good way to describe it. Bix had a way with descending phrasings!

Posted on Apr 29, 2013, 4:37 AM

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WBIX # 210

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 Radio Program # 210. (loaded on 04/26/2013) Recordings by Other Artists of the Numbers Played by Jean Goldkette and His Orchestra Over the WWJ Radio Station on Dec. 4, 1924. 56 min 44 sec

Real Audio 
Streaming audio file.
  http://bixography.com/WBIX210.ram 
Download File. 13.9  M
   http://bixography.com/WBIX210.rm

mp3 files  
Streaming mp3 file   http://bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX210.m3u    
Download mp3 file  
 bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX210.mp3  40.9 MB

Romance. Joseph C. Smith. Feb 24, 1921.
After You've Gone. Marion Harris. Oct 18, 1918.
By the Waters of Minnetonka. Paul Whiteman. Jun 11, 1924.
Wala-Wala. Paul Whiteman. Jun 18, 1924. Vocal by
At the End of the Winding Lane. Jack Chapman. Nov 18, 1924.
No One Knows What' It's All About. Jack Shilkret, Oct 24, 1924.
Mandy Make Up Your Mind, Paul Whiteman. Sep 15, 1924.
Sally Lou. George Olsen. Jun 15, 1924.
Allah's Holiday. Mayfair Dance Orchestra. Feb 3, 1920.
Poplar Street Blues. Isham Jones. Nov 27, 1924.
Fox-trot Classique. Jean Goldkette. Mar 28, 1924.

WBIX # 210 will be uploaded on May 24, 2013.

Enjoy.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Apr 26, 2013 8:46 AM

Posted on Apr 26, 2013, 7:23 AM

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Jean Goldkette's "Fox-Trot Classique."

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This recording consists of two pieces composed by Edward McDowell: "From the Land of the Sky Blue Water" and "To A Wild Rose." Listen to the first few seconds of "To A Wild Rose."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zFfz5K3W4dc

Here is Hoagy Carmichael's "Walking the Dog."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRj9Ab-DLpA

Listen the piano break at 1:22.

Max Harrison in "Essential Jazz Records, Vol 1" points out that "The keyboard passage before the scat vocal in Walking the Dog is amusingly based on the main phrase of Edward McDowell's Woodland Sketches, Op. 51."

Indeed, Hoagy was "inspired" by McDowell. We know that Bix was a lover of McDowell's music. Who was first in discovering McDowell? In WBIX # 210, I pointed out that Bix played in the Dec 4, 1924 radio broadcast of Goldkette's Fox-Trot Classique  over radio station WWJ. I speculated that Bix learned about McDowell from playing in the broadcast. But perhaps, he had learned about McDowell from his mother or from Hoagy when the Wolverines spent a lot of time at Indiana University. Or was it Bix who introduced Hoagy to McDowell? 

Albert



Posted on Apr 26, 2013, 9:21 AM

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Correction

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Nick points out that "From the Land of the Sky Blue Water" was composed by Charles Wakefield Cadman from an old Native American folk song, not by Edward McDowell. Thanks, Nick.

In my posting, I also mentioned "To A Wild Rose." Eubie Blake's "Memories of You"  reminds me a bit of Edward McDowell's "To A Wild Rose." Since Ethel Waters was mentioned recently, here is her version of the tune.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L-qFgYKjQnc

And here is a link to McDowell's "To A Wild Rose."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2V3HV3RBw6s

Albert



Posted on Apr 26, 2013, 4:18 PM

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More about "To A Wild Rose."

by

From Kitty Climpson's facebook page:
 
According to the write-up of the Shoemaker-Beiderbecke Wedding (Mary Louise's, that is) in the Davenport _Democrat-Leader_, on November 9, 1924:

"Erwin Swindell at the piano, played before the ceremony and gave the Bridal Chorus from Lohen...
grin as the bridal party came down the wide stairway, "To a Wild Rose" being played during the ceremony...."

Obviously, Bix was familiar with McDowell's composition before he played it on the WWJ broadcast of Dec 4, 1924. Was "To A Wild Rose" (Fox-Trot Classique in the Goldkette recording) a standard number for the Goldkette band when Bix joined it? Possibly and maybe even likely. The band had recorded it months before Bix joined.  I wonder if Mr. Swindell played "To A Wild Rose" at Bix's sister wedding as part of his repertoire or (wishful thinking) at the suggestion of the bride's brother? 

From another posting in Kitty Climpson's facebook page.

"'Walkin' the Dog,' if not quite up to the same voltage level [as "March of the Hoodlums"], is no less satisfying....Hoagy is the show here, knocking off sixteen bars on cornet (tone and embouchure leave something to be desired, but the conception is pure Bix) and bookending some perilously manic scat vocalizing within TWO REFLECTIVE PIANO EXCERPTS FROM EDWARD MACDOWELL'S _TO A WILD ROSE_."
(emphasis mine)

-Richard Sudhalter, in _Lost Chords_ (1999), p. 444
 
I wonder why  Kitty Climpson does not post in the Bixography. She used to post under her real name. Obviously, she reads the postings in the forum and her postings about To A Wild Rose in her facebook pageare quite relevant to what I have posted here and, as a matter of fact, she provides important additional information.
 
Albert
PS Sudhalter's observation was made in 1999. Max Harrrison's observation was made in 1984



Posted on Apr 27, 2013, 12:10 PM

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Memories of a Wild Rose

by

The resemblance of "Memories of You" to "To a Wild Rose" is not accidental. Eubie Blake had a soft spot for Edward MacDowell's music; "Memories" is solidly based on "Rose," and the direct quote in the second chorus of Ethel Waters' record is a knowing tip-o'-the-hat. Eubie loved to embellish and expand on tunes that inspired him. His "Gypsy Blues" is the ragtime sequel to "Gypsy Love Song" by Victor Herbert; his "Merry Widow Rag" is a syncopated paraphrase of Lehar's "Merry Widow Waltz." There may be other such tunes in the Blake catalogue.

He didn't "rag" the Leslie Stuart classic "Tell Me Pretty Maiden," - at least in print - but that piece fired his imagination, and his melodic sense was greatly inspired by it.

-Brad Kay

Posted on Apr 29, 2013, 9:35 PM

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Nice show, and glitch-free again!

by

Nice show, and glitch-free again (though your e-mail says WBIX #210 will be uploaded May 24 when you obviously mean WBIX #211).

I especially liked the last chorus on Whiteman's "Walla Walla" (which would be the correct spelling if the song is about the town in Washington state). It's a surprisingly convincing Dixieland ensemble. Who knew the well-drilled musicians in Whiteman's band could come up with something this hot this early, without Bix, Tram, Nichols, the Dorseys and the other jazz greats who'd join him later?

And RE: "To a Wild Rose." This was such a standard song during the first quarter of the 20th century it would have been surprising if Bix hadn't known it. Most likely he heard it first in his childhood, from a family member playing the sheet music or listening to a record.

Posted on Apr 27, 2013, 6:54 PM

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Thanks. Another miracle!

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Indeed, "To A Wild Rose" was a popular tune in the early 20th century. As an illustration, get a load of the four Victor recordings in the nineteenteens.

1912  http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/2677

1914  http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/6831

1917  http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4688

1918  http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4690

There are also early recordings for Columbia and other labels. So Bix probably knew the tune before he joined Goldkette.

Albert



Posted on Apr 28, 2013, 10:03 AM

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"Record of the Week

by David Sager

A new "Record of the Week!"

http://www.loc.gov/rr/record/recordoftheweek.html



    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Apr 24, 2013 2:25 PM

Posted on Apr 24, 2013, 2:13 PM

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Mamie - Paul Van Loan's Orchestra (with Earl Oliver?)

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Hi:

I just have on Dismuke found a great recording of Jack Shilkret's "Mamie" perfomed by Paul Van Loan's Orchestra that includes a very great growling trumpet solo that sounds like Earl Oliver (the same man who played with Ben Selvin & Harry Reser). I wonder if Oliver was present on some Paul Van Loan recordings of 1925?
It was recorded on February 2 of 1925 according to Brian Rust through www.musiktiteldb.de.

Here's the link anyway:
http://dismuke.net/musicfiles/howmusic/mamie.ram

And of course, the web's link:
http://dismuke.org/how/prev3-05.html

Signed:
Javier Soria Laso

Posted on Apr 24, 2013, 4:46 AM

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I did not find evidence for Earl Oliver recordings with Paul Van Loan's Orchestra.

by

However, the sound of the trumpet player in Mamie is very similar to what I hear in other recordings of Earl Oliver. Here is an example from about the same time, Jan 20, 1925, the Green Brothers Jazz Band in Those Panama Mamas Are Ruining Me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C-CuW71iL7Q

I would say that Earl Oliver in Paul Van Loan's Mamie is a reasonable guess.

I hope other forumites give their opinions.

Albert



Posted on Apr 24, 2013, 6:10 AM

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Davenport Bix Festival - many reasons to attend!

by

The 42nd Annual Bix Beiderbecke Jazz Festival is scheduled for August 1st - 4th this year. It will be held right here in good ole Davenport, Iowa, Bix's hometown.
Former TV star Johnny Crawford will be one of the guest performers. You may remember him from the classic TV western "The Rifeman" where he admirably portrayed Mark McCain. He has some 60 TV acting credits and started his TV career as a Walt Disney "Mouseketeer". Johnny had 3 top 40 hits in the early 60's. Johnny loves the older tunes and will sing with "Josh Duffee's Graystone Monarch Band" and the "Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Youth Jazz Band" during the festival.

Here's a link that takes you to a summary of Mr. Crawford's achievements:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johnny_Crawford

Joining Josh Duffee's and the Youth Band will be:

Dave Greer's Classic Jazz Stompers
Andy Schumm & his Flatland Gang
Dan Levinson's Roof Garden Jass Band
Jon Weber
Cecile McLorin Salvant
The River City 6
The Jimmy Valentine Quintet with Dave Bennett
Five Bridge Jazz Band
The Tony Hamilton Orchestra
The Manny Lopez Quartet

There will also be seminars offered in conjunction with the Festival on Friday morning. Dancing demonstrations and teaching and a one women show by Ms. Wendy Hammen as Agatha Beiderbecke should not be missed. Those who attended the Bix Bus tour last year were treated to this performance. Many suggested this one person show should be offered every year!

So you can imagine, we are excited about this year's Festival! There will again be a concert at Bix's gravesite, and the Litergy service at the Beiderbecke Family Church.

For more details about the Festival at ticket info, go to:
http://www.bixsociety.org/

Sure hope you can make it, I'd love to meet all of you!
Best wishes,
Jim Petersen









Posted on Apr 23, 2013, 10:53 AM

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Additions to the band list!!

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Great writer that I am (not!), I left off Bob Schulz's Frisco Jazz Band and Randy Sandke's New York All-Stars from the list of bands that will be playing at the Bix Festival this August.

So sorry for my error!

Jim Petersen


Posted on Apr 24, 2013, 9:56 AM

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Thanks for the information

by

My boys and I used to watch reruns of The Rifleman in the late 1960s. Little Johnny Crawford was great, and big Chuck Connors was excellent. I knew about Johnny Crawford's interest in 1920s music from one of Rich Conaty's program "The Big Broadcast." He has a good voice and good taste in the music he chooses to sing. I am happy to know that he'll be in Davenport.

I have my plane tickets and reservation at the Beiderbekce Inn. All I have left to do is to send in my order for tickets.

I look forward to seeing you, Jim. I think I will have an important announcement to make during the Festival.

Albert



Posted on Apr 24, 2013, 1:54 PM

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