The Bixography Discussion Group

A vehicle for Bixophiles and other interested individuals to ask questions, make comments and exchange information about Bix Beiderbecke and related subjects. Any views expressed in the Bixography Forum represent solely the opinions of those expressing them and are not necessarily endorsed or opposed by Albert Haim unless he has signed the message.

I started archiving some of the threads that have been inactive for some time. The archived threads can be found at http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/archivesforum.htm

Albert Haim

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The famous photograph of Bix with an inscription.

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This is the most famous photo of Bix, nice and clean.

[linked image]

There are several prints of this photo in the internet. Here is the one in Vince's announcement for tonight's concert in honor of Bix and Louis.

[linked image]

The photo with a dedication is also found in http://fineartamerica.com/products/leon-bix-beiderbecke-granger-poster.html with the dedication a bit clearer. I copied the dedication and increased its size, but did not change anything else.

[linked image]

Is it my imagination or could the dedication be, in fact,  signed B. Beiderbecke? One of my friends is very good at cleaning and restoring images. I asked him what can he do, if anything, with this image. He will respond on Monday. In the meantime, is there anyone who has a clearer print of the photo with the dedication? And if so, is it legible?

Albert



Posted on Mar 9, 2013, 6:43 AM

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The dedication in the photo.

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My friend could not do much with the image. He identified the first and last lines as "To George" and L. B. Beiderbecke.
 
It turns out that a  clear image of the photo with the dedication is included in a soon to be published article by Chris Barry. Here is the transcription:
 
To George -
my only wish
is that I may play
with you as long in
the future as I have
in the past.
L. B. Beiderbecke
 
"George" is George Johnson, one of Bix's fellow musicans in the Wolverine Orchestra.
 
Isn't that a nice dedication? Bix did not graduate from high school, but his writing (except for the spelling) is of excellent quality and has a poetic turn to it. Remember the dedications in the sheet music covers to Hoagy,Leo McConville and Fan?
 
Albert




    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 11, 2013 4:05 PM

Posted on Mar 11, 2013, 7:46 AM

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P.S.

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Thanks to Chris for a preprint of his article about George Johnson and for giving me permission to cite it in my previous posting.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 11, 2013 4:06 PM

Posted on Mar 11, 2013, 9:08 AM

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From Danish Bixophile Flemming Thorbye

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Dear Bix-friend

During the last year, Ive broadcasted three one-hour programs about Bix on the local radio station (very few listenersL).

But now a big radio-jazz-station in Copenhagen has invited me to broadcast the stuff on their canal this Friday (March 8th).

The program is titled Bix Galore and will run from 9 PM to midnight local time US East Coast time 3 PM to 6 PM.                                                          

One of the reasons that Ive got this big chance is without doubt , that I use a lot of the Okeh-recordings, newly restored by

Emrah Erken from Switzerland.  The staff on the station are quite impressed of the excellent quality. Second, I try to

entertain the listeners with many of the anecdotes from Bixs life. I also inform  about my visits to the Bix-festivals in

Davenport and Racine. I really hope that the program will add some new Danish Bix-fans. 

The program will not be streamed you can only listen while its broadcasted on net-radio.

So if youd like to hear a little bit of a freshly washed and fragrant Bix - and maybe have fun listening to the strange Danish language

go to: www.radiojazz.dk  - Friday afternoonand chose Netradio in the top menu.

Best regards from

Flemming

 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 7, 2013 8:45 AM

Posted on Mar 7, 2013, 8:44 AM

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Dan Levinson Celebrates Bix Beiderbecke's 110th Birthday with Mike Davis on Cornet

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bix_beiderbecke.jpg?num=54

 

MONDAY, MARCH 11

8:00 p.m.

 

THE BIG BIX BEIDERBECKE BIRTHDAY BASH!

 

featuring

Mike Davis, cornet

Dan Levinson, clarinet/C-melody saxophone

Mark Shane, piano

Mike Weatherly, bass

Kevin Dorn, drums

 

The Bickford Theatre at the Morris Museum

6 Normandy Heights Rd.

Morristown, NJ

Tickets: (973) 971-3706

Info: www.morrismuseum.org/static/bickford/jazz.html

or Bruce Gast (908) 755-5037 tekhouse@aol.com

 

from Bruce Gast's email blast:

 

Monday, March 11 (Bickford) Dan Levinson is assembling a dedicated group of musicians for the annual Big Bix Beiderbecke Birthday Bash this year. The prized cornet slot will be occupied by the hot new trumpet sensation Mike Davis, who wowed the crowd at JazzFest this year (with Emily Ashers outdoor intermission band). Hes been the talk of NYC this year (playing trumpet since age 6!) so NJ fans ought to get to know him. Filling out the band are Dan Levinson (clarinet and period-correct C-melody sax), Mark Shane (piano), Mike Weatherly (bass) and Kevin Dorn (drums). This is always a popular feature, and is special this year, being the 110th birthday celebration.



Posted on Mar 7, 2013, 1:43 PM

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Celebrate Gloucester's Gabriel (Sylvester Ahola)

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Posted by Enrico in facebook.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Mar 7, 2013, 3:12 PM

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Clementine (From New Orleans).

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On Sep 15, 1927, the members of the Jean Goldkette orchestra, Bix included,  gathered at Liederkranz Hall for a recording session with the Victor Record Co.


Fromhttp://www.liederkranzny.org/history.html


On January 9, 1847, a group of 25 men of German heritage founded a male singing society, dedicated in particular to the promotion of vocal and instrumental music. The society's name was Deutscher Liederkranz der Stadt New York.
William Steinway, who served as President of the Liederkranz Club intermittently from 1867 until 1896, was one of the greatest presidents of our club. It was under his leadership that a building fund for a clubhouse was raised in the amount of $150,000 within 2 days. The cornerstone was laid on October 1st, 1881 at 111-119 East 58th Street, east of Park Avenue. The total cost of the building including land represented an investment of $325,000. It should be mentioned that the buildings acoustics were such that it was used at one time by RCA Victor for recording sessions. In 1919 the name of the organization was officially changed to The Liederkranz of the City of New York. Its official language was likewise changed from German to English.


[linked image]


[linked image]


The Sep 15, 1927 sesssion was to be the last for the Jean Goldkette Orchestra with Bix. Two numbers were recorded, Blue River and Clementine. There were three takes of Clementine. Take 1 was destroyed. Take 3 was held conditional and never issued. Take 2 was mastered and released on Vic 20994.


[linked image]


Clementine is a composition by Harry Warren (music) and Henry Creamer (lyrics). Harry Warren was born Salvatore Antonio Guaragna in Brooklyn, NY. From Wikipedia,


Harry Warren (December 24, 1893 September 22, 1981) was an American composer and lyricist. Warren was the first major American songwriter to write primarily for film. He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Song eleven times and won three Oscars for composing "Lullaby of Broadway", "You'll Never Know" and "On the Atchison, Topeka and the Santa Fe". He wrote the music for the first blockbuster film musical, 42nd Street, choreographed by Busby Berkeley, with whom he would collaborate on many musical films. Over a career spanning four decades, Warren wrote over 800 songs. Other well-known Warren hits included "I Only Have Eyes for You", "You Must Have Been a Beautiful Baby", "Jeepers Creepers", "The Gold Diggers' Song (We're in the Money)", "That's Amore", "The More I See You", "At Last" and "Chattanooga Choo Choo" (the last of which was the first gold record in history). Warren was one of America's most prolific film composers,and his songs have been featured in over 300 films.


According to Lord's discography, there were seven recordings of Clementine in the 1920s. Here is the list in chronological order.


Jay C. Flippen, Aug 4, 1927. http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/flippen/clementine.ra (Adrian is here)
The Goofus Five, Aug 10, 1927. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpMvWyKIR-I  (Adrian is here)
Varsity Eight, Aug 10, 1927. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0kDk51V6t8  (Adrian is Here)
Don Voorhees, Sep 10, 1927. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYz_GlMeQng  (a mellow Irving)
Jean Goldkette, Sep 15, 1927.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggfyZIsWK10  (Bix, Bix!) The intro is not found anywhere else.
California Ramblers, Sep 27, 1927. http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/caramblers/Clementine.ra (with Adrian)
Original Indiana Five, Sep 28, 1927 .http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/oi5/clementine.ra


There is one recording in the 1930s. It is by Alphonso Trent on Mar 24, 1933. A completely different sensibility, this is early swing from the 1930s.


https://www.box.com/s/a7te07112283evpdyeve


There is a transcription of a 1939 version by the Casa Loma Orchestra on a Circle LP. I don't have it nor could I find the recording in the internet. No recordings in the 1940s. There are several recordings of a number ttitled Clementine by Duke Ellington in the 1940s, but is is a different tune.) The Nov 16, 1946 recording by Sonny Durham listed as Clementine is really Oh My Darling Clementine. Then lots of recordings beginning in the 1950s and continuing until the present.


Let's not forget the copy of Goldkette's recording by Oliver Naylor.


bixbeiderbecke.com/ClementineOliverNaylor.mp3


And interesting information in


http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1316814926


and many other postings in the forum.


Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 7, 2013 9:10 AM
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 7, 2013 9:04 AM

Posted on Mar 7, 2013, 8:27 AM

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I missed Kate Smith's recording of ....

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.... Jul 28, 1927.

http://archive.org/details/KateSmithCollection1926-1934

I also missed  Gene Weimer and His Pepper's recording of Dec 28, 1927, Champion 15422. A pseudonym for Kibler's Kollegians.

Albert



Posted on Mar 7, 2013, 10:48 AM

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Phil & Bix

by Gerri Bowers

To one and all headed to Rachine, have a grand time. I wish I was going. I will be thinking of each of you. Maybe next year. Bix Lives.


Posted on Mar 5, 2013, 4:08 PM

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Same from me

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Like Gerri, I'll think of you lucky guys this weekend.
Have fun and tell Phil that I'm serious about coming next year,
to celabrate the 25th 'Tribute to Bix'.

Bix lives!

Flemming

Posted on Mar 7, 2013, 11:58 PM

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Ted Marshall and his Orchestra on Champion

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I recently purchased Champion 15001, more so for the Vagabonds (California Ramblers) side, but it was backed by a wonderfully peppy version of Headin' for Home, recorded on July 8, 1925, attributed to "Ted Marshall and His Orchestra." A few of the soloists sounded familiar--I want to say Red Nichols is present, but I can't say with any certainty who they might be, or if the group name is a nom-du-disque for some other group that I should know, hence the familiar sound.

Any help as to whom "Ted Marshall and His Orchestra" might be would be appreciated.

Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 8:53 AM

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According to Rust's Dance Band Discography, ....

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.... Ted Marshall and His Boys is a pseudonym for the Travis-Carlton Orchestra. Headin' for Home was recorded on Jul 8, 1925. Rust gives ?Chelsea Quealey and another t, tb, cl-as, as, ts, p, bj, bb, d-x.

The Gennett counterpart of the record you just bought is the first in a list of "Gennett Record Winners" published in Presto, Nov 14, 1925.

[linked image]

Albert



Forum Owner

Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 10:24 AM

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Re: According to Rust's Dance Band Discography, ....

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Thank you so much, Albert! I forgot to look at the Gennett counterparts.

I'm not at all familiar with the organization, and could see why Quealey was listed as trumpeter, although I still hear some Nichols-sounding phrasing. I wish that I had the means to upload a sound file, but I only have my Victrola for listening to acoustic era 78's.



Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 10:52 AM

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An up-tempo version of Bix's "Davenport Blues."

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Jimmy Lytell (clarinet), Frank Signorelli (piano) and Lou Calabrese (tenor banjo). Recorded 02/1928.

http://clefpalette.files.wordpress.com/2013/03/21-davenport-blues.m4a

Courtesy of  Andrw Jon Sammut in facebook.

Albert



Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 7:08 AM

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I like this slower version

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We've discussed this before, but I like this slower, more bluesy version. I repost it for the new people who might not have been on the forum when it was talked about before.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpIZde7lVoY&feature=channel

This is just one of several that forum member Mook Ryan has done.

Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 1:03 PM

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My favorite "Davenport Blues"

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There's a different take of "Davenport Blues" by Alex Welsh and Fred Hunt from November 28, 1971 available on archive.org.

My favorite versions of "Davenport Blues" are Bix's original and the two by Jack Teagarden: one in 1934 with Adrian Rollini, Benny Goodman and Mannie Klein for Decca; and on in 1954 under his own name on the short-lived Period label (though it's been reissued quite often on various imprints). The one Bunny Berigan did in 1937 as part of a cycle of the Bix compositions ("In a Mist," "Candlelights," "Flashes," "In the Dark") is also worth having, as is the 1960 modern-dress version by Gil Evans.

Posted on Mar 8, 2013, 8:15 AM

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The Flapper Wife is a book written by Beatrice Burton in 1925.

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[linked image]

You can see it is subtitled "The Story of A Jazz Bride." It is a jazz age romance novel about a young woman who wants to marry a millionaire but settles for a lawyer and refuses to fit into the housewife mold. The book was adapted in a 1926 film titled "His Jazz Bride."

[linked image]

The film plot is summarized in the TCM website as follows.

Brief Synopsis

Dick Gregory, a young lawyer, is hard pressed to pay the bills of his wife, Gloria, and equally hard pressed to keep up with the frantic pace of her life. Edward Martindel, an attorney who represents a corporation against which Dick is litigating, attempts to bribe Dick with a substantial sum of money; Dick refuses, and Gloria develops a grievance against him on this account. After a particularly bitter argument, Gloria leaves Dick and joins some friends for a moonlight cruise. Alec Seymour, a friend of the Gregorys', tells Dick that the boat on which Gloria is sailing has not met safety standards, and Dick goes after her, saving her life when the boat sinks. Gloria repents of her wild and wicked ways, and she and Dick settle into calm domesticity.

Here are the vital statistics for Beatrice. From Wikipedia.

Beatrice Burton
Born

May 13, 1894
Cleveland Ohio, U.S.A.

Died April 13, 1983(1983-04-13) (aged 88)
Naples, Florida, USA
Other names Beatrice Burton Morgan
Occupation Author, Playwright

 

Beatrice married Victor Hugo Morgan in 1916 in Ohio. In the 1920s, they moved to Florida where Mr. Morgan was editor of a local newspaper.

Beatrice's books were quite successful, several of them were serialized in newspapers. In her books, Beatrice made references to popular culture and used 1920s slang. You can hear a sample of the book in

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0oIU3f0A4FA

Flapper Wife was also a  1925 song, music by Carl Rupp, lyrics by Beatrice Burton. (Gloria was the name of the main character in the book).

[linked image]

One of the first recordings of the song was by the Golden Gate Orchestra (name used by the California Ramblers on Edison)on April 22, 1925, Edison 51551.

[linked image]

Listen to the recording on youtube. Terrific, in to my taste.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuVOb0QDmZk

The Yonkers Statesman of April 28, 1925, carried an article about the California Ramblers introducing the song in their appearance in the Strand Theater, Yonkers, NY.

[linked image]
[linked image]
[linked image]

Interesting article. Gives the roster of musicians in the band., unfortunatley with several of the names misspelled!

There were lots of recordings of the tune in the 1920s. here are a few in youtube:

International Noverly Orchestra (Nat Shilkret)  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UI2ruIwnkUE

The Red Hotters (Harry Raderman) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tmGD058Ep-o  I like this version a lot.

Missouri Jazz Band (Ben Selvin) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EBZdL43NGg

Among others, Lou Gold and Harry Reser also recorded this tune.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 2, 2013 12:35 PM

Posted on Mar 2, 2013, 12:31 PM

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Enrico points out that the recording of "The Flapper Wife" ....

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.... in the youtube video is one-minute short. Indeed, the section before the vocal is missing. The complete recording is available in the Thomas Edison's Attic: Playlist from February 21, 2006. Go to

http://wfmu.org/playlists/shows/18144">http://wfmu.org/playlists/shows/18144

"The Flapper Wife" comes in at about 59 minutes.

Albert



Posted on Mar 2, 2013, 3:50 PM

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Thanks to Enrico and one of his friends, here is ...

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.... an mp3 of The Flapper Wife, the complete recording, not a chopped up version. More conveninet than searching in the Feb 26, 2006 Thomas Edison Attic program.

bixography.com/TheFlapperWifeCalRamblers.mp3

Enjoy!

Albert

 



Posted on Mar 3, 2013, 2:59 PM

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I collect Beatrice Burton Books!

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Thanks so much for posting this fascinating info, pictures, etc. on Beatric Burton's "The Flapper Wife." I have that book and also have the sequel to that novel -- it's called "Footloose." Just now I'm too lazy to run downstairs to the 1920's novels I keep in a large four-shelf "laboratory" bookcase with pullout glass coverings, but I'd say I have at least 8 or 9 of the Beatrice Burton books. And the 78 of the song, too.

I'm thrilled about this posting -- collecting Jazz Age popular fiction in their original bindings happens to be one of my favorite hobbies. Admittedly many of the valumes are lacking their jackets and are often more than a little worse for wear, but it's the reading which gives me so much pleasure (as well as finding them at flea markets or hunting them down from on-line sellers.)

Laura

Posted on Mar 3, 2013, 7:21 PM

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A much better scan of the cover of the sheet music kindly posted ....

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.... by Enrico in a facebook page.

[linked image]

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 10, 2013 3:15 PM

Posted on Mar 10, 2013, 3:14 PM

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Donald O'Connor as Hoagy Carmichael?

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From the Binghamton Press, April 1, 1948.

[linked image]

Nothing ever came out of this. sad.gif

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 2, 2013 10:20 AM

Posted on Mar 2, 2013, 10:19 AM

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Only in Hollywood …

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Only in Hollywood could the same actor have been considered "right" to play both Hoagy Carmichael and Buster Keaton!

Posted on Mar 2, 2013, 6:49 PM

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Another implausible casting.

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Sent by Ken B. who writes,

"Re Donald O'Connor as Hoagy.
I came across this photo on Wikipedia.

[linked image]

Another implausible casting: Kirk Douglas as Rick Martin in "Young Man with a Horn".
On the Third Avenue El Station staircase.
Did Bix ever use those stairs? Who knows."
 
Thanks, Ken.
 
Albert


Posted on Mar 3, 2013, 11:47 AM

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John Garfield?

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Actually Warner Bros. bought the screen rights to "Young Man with a Horn" in 1945 intending it as a vehicle for John Garfield, who didn't look like Bix either but would probably have been better in the role. Instead Garfield made "Humoresque" with Joan Crawford, and though "Humoresque" is about the world of classical music its plot is close enough to "Young Man with a Horn" that if Garfield had played "Rick Martin" audiences would probably have thought, "Ah, 'Humoresque' - the jazz version!"

Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 6:12 AM

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Who played Bix in the Gene Krupa Story?

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Not that the actor had any LINES, mind you -- he was just introduced to Gene at a party (at a time frame in the movie when Bix had already been dead for a year) and all he did was smile and shake hands, and then go sit with his girlfriend while someone in the apartment's living room was performing in a very 1950's kind of way. Everyone looked like the 1950's in that film.

Ugh. Anachoranisms.

Laura

Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 9:28 AM

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I don't know and I have been unable to find out.

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Red Nichols played himself, Bobby Troup played Tommy Dorsey, Shelly Manne played Dave Tough, and, in one of the worst possible choices, Sal Mineo played Gene Krupa.

[linked image]

I remember clearly the scene where there is a gathering of musicans and Bix is introduced to Gene.

Here is the trailer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNhKkHMiKDE You get to see a glimpse of Red Nichols.

Albert



Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 10:45 AM

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One of my postings in the year 2000!!!!

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Of all the bad biographical films made about jazz musicians, the Gene Krupa Story is possibly the worst of them all. There are two mentions of Bix. At one point, when Gene Krupa is becoming famous, there is a montage of a quick series of snapshots of newspapers headlines. One of the headlines reads "Bix Biederbecke (not my spelling!) with Gene Krupa". Later in the film, when Gene Krupa has made it, he has this ostentatious apartment where he is throwing a party. The bell rings, the door to the apartment is opened and three guys come in. They are introduced to the actor who plays Gene Krupa as Bunny Berigan, Frankie Trumbauer and Bix Beiderbecke.

Albert

PS Bobby Troupe played Arthur Schutt in the film "The Five Pennies."



Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 11:22 AM

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Fill of 1950's fashion

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Ha, yeah, I watched that trailer. Yeeeeecccccch -- they didn't even TRY to show a cloche hat, dropped waist dress, or t-strap shoes on any of the women -- there they were in their 1950's dresses and admittedly hideous 1950's hairstyles -- the men were no better, all 50's pompadoured hair and man in the gray flannel suits outfits. Sigh. I'm sure the movie -- I had to give up watching it on TCM after the "Bix" introduction at the party -- had only a vintage car or two to allude to the 1920's and 30's; the music itself had that nauseating quasi-Dixieland blare on those early LIVING STEREO promotional LP's of circa 1960, which featured jerky-looking guys in straw hats and loud striped jackets posed leeringly on the Technicolor album covers. You know what I mean. "Hot Jazz From Yesteryear!" and it's something awful like the RCA house band faking Dixie in a roaring rattle of strumming banjos and howling trumpets. It was the kind of stuff which made me clamp my hands over my ears as a kid and still does today.

Bleh. Why was ANY movie made in the 1950's? They all, every jack one of them, got everything wrong, wrong, wrong. I don't even think they knew their OWN contemporary culture in those days, let alone another era's. The only art I can stomach from that abominable decade were the superlative opera recordings -- LP's were new, the best artists were at the Met and La Scala; companies had plenty of money to promote their artists.

Yeah, I know you jazz buffs are [offended by my hollering] aware of some kind of great work during the 1950's, but since my bile charges to my throat when I even think about that decade outside of the opera box, it's a pitible blank to me. I do love that "jazz octet" tribute album to Bix from 1960, but that's because those guys seemed to sense how it was with Bix, and more than alluded to his spirit in the rendition of his work.

Anybody who wants to can take all the pot-shots they want at "my" decade, the 1970's, I'm sure just as reprehensibly laughable and contemptible to many of you as the 1950's "culture" -- unfathomable as much of it is -- seems to me. I'm sure the 1970's was a big plastic garish joke to many, the decade I came of age, but -- at least -- movies put out about the Jazz Age era 35-40 years ago got the costumes and music pretty accurately -- at least they tried. Masybe 1974's The Great Gatsby was dorky, but it didn't hurt to stretch the imagination. In 1954 a viewing audience would have had to close their eyes.

Wahoo, haven't had such a good rant in months. :D :D :D

Laura



Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 12:16 PM

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Re: Fill of 1950s Fashion

by

WHOA! Did you tell 'em or what? Good rant, Laura!

I never saw the Krupa movie. I guess by that time I semi-subconsciously thought Gene Krupa was doing a caricature of himself on the occasional television spots he did, and I wasn't too impressed by those. Since then, of course, I've heard his work in the 1920s and 1930s and have a clearer idea of his true talents.

I did see The Glenn Miller Story and The Benny Goodman Story, I was an unsophisticated kid then, and despite some anachronisms (but with an occasional tip of the hat to the period), they got me interested in non-1950s music, and I'm eternally grateful for that, as I don't know where else I would have come across 1930s swing music and be led back from there to the 1920s.

I agree with you about the 1950s "bio" movies in general and those tourist attraction "Dixieland" bands in the striped blazers playing bad jazz. It was a strange decade when the whole country was full of itself, and I guess the movie makers figured the 1920s would be improved for the moviegoer by pretending they were the 1950s. It was a strangely disjunctive decision, since there was a mini-craze around the early part of the decade for the 1920s, with people doing the Charlston and dancing to hot music at "Roaring Twenties" costume parties. 1920s music became available on 45s and LPs and that was a good thing for me. Sometimes even a bad movie can lead someone to good music.

Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 4:21 PM

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The 1950's version

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Hi, Glenda! Yeah, I just had to let it all out -- it bugs me to pieces how movies made back then got nothing right historically -- no matter what century or what era they were portraying (the godawful version of "Ivanhoe" or "Knights of the Round Table" for starters--)

You're right that it was because this country was full of itself -- because, I liked some European "historical" movies from the 1950's -- I'm thinking in particular of the adaption of Emile Zola's Pot Boulle [spelling?] -- they were accurate in 1880's clothing, the houses and carriages, and it was very amusing without being dated or 1950-ish at all. Postwar France and Italy were coming out with watcheable, accurate, well-produced films portraying different eras and their cultures.

Now, somebody is going to want to slit my throat -- which one was it that Jimmy Stewart was in, Glenn Miller story? I sure didn't go for that one and I'll spare the reasons why because there's lots of Jimmy fans out there, but, uh, equally irritating to me was the lead actress June Allyson with the sloppy lisp: "Shay, Glenn," or "Sho, will I be sheeing you tonight?" -- I'm not quoting verbatim, and it's not supposed to be politically correct to criticize speech imnpediments, but if someone's going to be an actor/actress something like that should not be -- pardon the pun - so pronounced. She shounded drunk all the time, and I had to shut THAT movie off of TCM after the firsht half hour becaushe -- oh, never mind.

I read a really hilarious comment, I think on IMDB, that The Gene Krupa Story, using the teen idol of the times, Sal Mineo, as the lead, could be compared to making the Frank Sinatra Story in 1972 with a TV teen idol of those times, David Cassidy, as the lead playing Sinatra from age 17 to 47. Then one can sense how ridiculous the premise is--very young people can't play entertainer legends believably any more than post-middle-aged people can portray youthful ingenues and leading heroes. [Sort of like the old saw about some 60+ Broadway actress in Romeo and Juliet, for example, playing a girl just turning age 14.)

But somehow I had less of a problem with Mineo's performance than I had with coiffures and clothing straight out of I Love Lucy. It's like those old circa 1960 TV episodes of "The Untouchables" which I saw, not in syndication years ago, but on one of the nostalgia cable channels. 'Nuff said, I wasn't about to kick the TV screen in. But it is interesting, as you pointed out, that during the 1950's there WAS somewhat of a rivival of the "Roaring 20's" craze; I have some popular culture/quasi history books published from those times -- with hilariously inaccurate illustrations between the photographs -- and it was another case of, "Don't they get it?" Sort of like Happy Days being such a popular television program all during the mid-to-late 1970's. It's the 1970's version of 1950's middle America, the actors just barely scraping by in acceptable clothing and hairstyles with the right cars, but after a couple of seasons of the sit-com, the slang and cultural values became more and more grounded to circa 1975 than 1955.

email me, let's chat --

Laura

Posted on Mar 5, 2013, 6:07 AM

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A good one from the 50's

by Andy Vaaler

Singin' in the Rain (1952) is a helluva good movie -- cliches, color, and all. There's so much charm and humor that the anachronisms just float by like clouds. Who cares. The music is glorious, the costumes fabulous.

So can you name three (3) movies that "get it right" when it comes to old jazz? I feel your pain, but it's tough to please somebody who is both passionate and knowledgable about the details. Might as well expect Dr Kildare to actually remove a gallbladder.



Posted on Mar 5, 2013, 4:19 PM

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Singin' in the Rain: My all-time favorite musical.

by

Plot, music, dancing all phenomenal. I agree, it is so good that the anachronisms are forgiven. My wife presented me, for my upcoming birthday, with a copy of the 60th anniversary edition. I will watch the blueray version later this month. (The set includes both a dvd and a blueray).

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Mar 5, 2013, 4:40 PM

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Thnaks to Ken B for the cover ....

by

.... of the sheet music for "Singin' in the Rain" from the 1929 M-G-M Musical "Hollywood Review of 1929".

[linked image]

The "Singin' in the Rain " (long) sequence from the 1929 film. Get a load of the sax obbligato behind Cliff Edwards' singing.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xe60AkZd0WQ

Albert



Posted on Mar 6, 2013, 10:42 AM

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WOW!

by Laura Demilio

I love it! Both the long black and white and the color -- I'd seen bits and pieces of the 1929 versions on TCM, but there whole shebang -- great!

Laura

Posted on Mar 6, 2013, 6:58 PM

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3 movies

by

Well, that's a challenging question! I'll do my best -

I do like certain movies who seem to closely capture the culture of the 1920's-early '30's era (clothes, cars, background music) but as for specific movies actually about jazz itself -- well, even though the clothes and music are both great in the 1990 Bix and the guys did well with believable acting (it was the plot which was a shambles: untrue facts, depicting Bix's family as a mess, the clubs stuffed with middle-aged people instead of the youth, and not one girl with an authentic 1920's bob!)

There are certain elements of 1984's The Cotton Club which did capture a lot of the ambience and strived to sypathetically represent African-Americans, although they should have been depicted much more importantly in the musicians' scene itself. Gregory Hines was playing a dancer, but what of all the important black jazz artists his character surely would have worked with? Cab Calloway and Duke Ellington as characters were portrayed only very briefly. Also, the movie reached too high in making the Richard Gere character both a Bix-emulating cornet player frequenting all the Harlem clubs, AND involved with gangsters, AND a sudden movie star in the early "talkies" of 1929-1930. Plus it was not a specific jazz biography and represented no true characters save for a glimpse of the Harlem greats; otherwise the plot is fiction; the music not what we wish for.

I have a shabby little VHS of a 1976 TV program shown on public television -- I believe part of the American Masterpieces' series -- F. Scott Fitzgerald's story "Bernice Bobs Her Hair" about the machinations of catty, snotty teenage girls one-upping one another in their pursuit of boys and popularity, but it is a little gem, very faithful to the story, perfect clothes of the very early 1920's, and the kids dancing to an acoustic record which is an accurate representation of the soft jazzy post-ragtime fotxtrot music of around 1921 (no, I can't identify the record, but it IS a 78 record and not something fake on the soundtrack, from what I can discern).

1990's movies made about gangsters of those years -- Hoodlum, Once Upon A Time in America -- put the real jazz on the soundtrack of actual recordings in the background whent he characters are at nightclubs and parties, and they get the clothing, hair, cars, buildings, and ambience pretty right -- I have to check in on more specific titles and better illustrate.

But, sorry guys, even though I agree Singing in the Rain is a darling movie and often very funny, the garish Technicolor is too much for me, and geez, historically it is not accurate, although we've already established that. However, it did, I agree, do a beautiful job introducting 1950's audience to an interest and affection for the late 1920's.

Laura

Posted on Mar 6, 2013, 5:53 AM

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Verissimilitude! If You Can Fake That, You Got It Made

by

Aaah, quitcher bellyaching!!

The historical period best served by the movies is the CURRENT year, and whatever is going on in that year. HISTORIC history is rarely done well on-screen.

The best and most historically resonant movies of the 1950s are about the then-current culture: Rebel Without a Cause, Jail House Rock, The Sweet Smell of Success, and many others I could name.

Sometimes a movie will make a total hash of the "period" being depicted, while also being a wonderful documentary of the present. The 1958 St. Louis Blues, starring Nat King Cole, makes a historical travesty of the life of W. C. Handy, but has priceless contemporary performances by jazz stars of 1958 (Cole, Ella Fitzgerald, Cab Calloway, Mahalia Jackson, etc).

My favorite movie about Vaudeville and the 1920s in general is The Dance of Life, (Paramount, 1929), starring Nancy Carroll and Hal Skelly. It is the grittiest, most realistic-looking, unglamorous look at show business ever made, depicting all the hazards of travel, relationships, backstage and onstage shenanigans, and all. Of course, every costume, hairdo, face, attitude, filmic style and nano-second of music (and there is plenty) is unerringly period-perfect. In an immortal moment, slapstick comedian Hal Skelly lies down on stage in the middle of his act to deliver "True Blue Lou," to the most heartbreakingly tender accompaniment by the Paramount Orchestra. For an early talkie, and of a Broadway stage hit to boot, it's quite cinematic and un-stagey.

So there's your answer: The best films about the 1920s were done IN the 1920s!


-Brad K

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED: Past Imperfect - History According to the Movies Mark C. Carnes, editor, Henry Holt, pub. 1995. Penetrating essays by a glittering dais of historians, comparing "real" history with the Hollywood filmizations thereof, from Dinosaurs (Jurassic Park), to Moses (The Ten Commandments) to Malcolm X.




Posted on Mar 6, 2013, 4:33 PM

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I have always maintained that ....

by

.... movies are time machines. They provide an accurate insight into the past. One of the reasons I love bluerays is because they provide such amazing detail about all the items seen in the various scenes: appliances, radios, switches, lamps, furniture, room decorations, etc.

Albert



Posted on Mar 6, 2013, 5:01 PM

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And then we have the fantastic musicals of ....

by

... Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers that have nothing to do with reality. But who cares.!!The music and the dancing are out of this world, and the silly plots and acting are so endearing (at least to me) that I watch them every time they are on TCM.  I am anxiously awaiting their release on blueray.

Try this one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxPgplMujzQ  Isn't it pure magic?

Albert



Posted on Mar 8, 2013, 10:55 AM

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Good Call

by

Indeed: MAGIC is the necessary item in any film, whatever "reality" supposedly is being addressed. Singin' in the Rain, featured in this discussion, is loaded with magic, and because of that we can happily suspend and retire disbelief for the whole two hours. The best to be hoped for from any work of art is that it SEND us. Other considerations are secondary.


-Brad K

Posted on Mar 8, 2013, 4:37 PM

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Agree!

by Laura Demilio

I wish I had a copy of The Dance of Life. Or can it be viewed on YouTube?

I LOVE movies MADE in the 1920's, that goes without saying. Even the awful ones are atmospheric, although I lose patience with the loooooong boring drawing room dramas, and the comedies leave me cold. But, oh boy, "showbiz" movies about backstage life, all made in 1929 --

Glorifying the American Girl
The Great Gabbo
Applause
On With the Show
The Broadway Melody

I've got these and others, all 1929-ers, on dvd or vhs (yep, some of "those others" taped from TCM because no one has seen fit to make them commercially available, but I'm determined in close in on getting the best copies I can)

And holy gee, the college stories are a scream -- I love "So This Is College", 1929. Later college flicks are just as fun and full of you-are-there: 1932's The Age of Consent, all full of serious discussions about "free love"; the supposedly high-minded boy wanting to keep his pre-fiance girlfriend "pure" until their marriage, so he goes off and does the nasty with the slutty waitress and gets ARRESTED because she's under 21 -- her dad wants to force them to get married, otherwise he'll go to jail. Oh, and "Confessions of a Co-Ed" from 1931 -- BING has a part in the show, performing with the Rhytmn Boys, and Phillips Holmes, dancing by, casually says, "Hi Bing." "Hi Phil," Bing replies with a wave, scarecely missing a beat while in his song. Great stuff.

Oh yeah, who cares about black-and-white (or the crude 3-tone Technicolor in some musical numbers)? Pop in the tape or the disc and be transported back 84 years ago. . . . almost like sitting in the room with 'em.

Laura



Posted on Mar 6, 2013, 7:12 PM

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"Dance of Life" and Great (and not-so-great) Jazz Movies

by

BTW, "The Dance of Life" is available as a free download on archive.org. The print quality is scratchy but acceptable. Alas, the only extant sources are prints prepared for 1950's TV showings so the numbers originally filmed in two-strip Technicolor now exist only in black-and-white. Also, while the film is quite good as it stands it would have been even better if Paramount had signed Barbara Stanwyck to repeat the female lead, which she'd played on stage (where the show was called "Burlesque") under her original name, Ruby Stephens. Instead they tested Stanwyck but went with Nancy Carroll because she'd already made films and therefore had a movie "name."

My favorite jazz biopic of all time: "Bird." Superbly atmospheric direction by Clint Eastwood, great performances by Forest Whitaker as Charlie Parker and Diane Venora as his partner Chan Richardson, and amazing sound recording which enabled the filmmakers to use Parker's actual recordings and dub in new accompaniments, overcome a few inaccuracies in the script and make this a worthy tribute to a jazz genius.

My least favorite jazz biopic of all time: "Lady Sings the Blues." Billie Holiday's heart-rending autobiography got run through the Hollywood meat grinder as a vehicle for Diana Ross, who not only doesn't sound a bit like Billie but looks so different you could put a picture of Billie Holiday and one of Diana Ross together and offer it as proof positive that Black people DON'T all look alike. Overdirection by Sidney J. Furie and a script that not only ignores the truth of Billie's life but substitutes rank Hollywood clichés make this one virtually unwatchable.

Greatest missed opportunity for a jazz biopic: "New Orleans," the 1947 film which began as a project Orson Welles wanted to make at RKO: a Louis Armstrong biopic with Armstrong playing himself. Only it went through several morphings and ended up, as my partner pointed out to me, as an uncredited knockoff of "San Francisco," with two boring white leads (a gambler and casino owner and an aspiring operatic soprano who falls in love with him and with jazz music at his place) and the 1917 closure of Storyville serving the same story function as the 1906 earthquake and fire did in "San Francisco." Still, "New Orleans" is watchable for Armstrong and Billie Holiday (the real one!) in full cry and for occasionally atmospheric direction by Arthur Lubin (particularly the long opening tracking sequence to Armstrong's "West End Blues" and the departure of the "ladies of the evening" from Storyville).

Posted on Mar 8, 2013, 8:09 AM

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I Can't Spell

by Laura Demilio

This is inexcusable for an English major, but I type as fast as I blather -- anachronism is what I meant to write!

Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 11:55 AM

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bunny

by

I saw that movie and i notice my grandfather bunny berigan was played by someone in the Gene Krupa Story.There a part where someone goes to the door and bunny is there and he is told to come in.I know Bunny went to lot of parties where they jam and the music was better then anything recorded.

Posted on Mar 12, 2013, 12:20 PM

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Radio Journals 1920s - 1950s online

by David Sager

Old copies of Radio Digest, Radio Mirror and several other journals in The Library of Congress Recorded Sound Collection, have recently been digitized and put online at http://archive.org/.

Once in the site, do a search for "Packard Campus" and then choose the top option "The Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation."

Click on "Browse by Subject/Keywords" and there you'll see two groups of radio periodicals and a group of radio directories. These are all word searchable!

There are a bunch more that have not yet been digitized. Hopefully they will be by next year.

Have fun!!

DS


Posted on Mar 1, 2013, 11:38 AM

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Thanks.

by

Lots of good stuff!

Albert



Posted on Mar 1, 2013, 1:42 PM

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The Edward Beach Collection at the LOC.

by

Collection Summary

Title Edward Beach collection, 1940-1975
Span Dates 1940-1975
Bulk Dates (bulk 1950-1975)
Call No. ML31.B45
Creator Beach, Ed
Extent circa 150 items ; 9 boxes ; 5 linear feet
Language Collection material in English
Location Music Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C.
Summary The collection consists exclusively of photographs and other iconography of musicians. Primarily, the images are of jazz musicians; also represented are a few notable figures from other musical and artistic disciplines. The bulk of the material dated from the 1950s through the mid-1970s; one photograph is dated 1940. Of particular interest are images of: Louis Armstrong; William "Count" Basie; Sidney Bechet; Leon Bismarck [sic] "Bix" Beiderbecke; Bennett Lester "Benny" Carter; John Coltrane; Miles Davis; Roy "Little Jazz" Eldridge; Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington; Bill Evans; John Birks "Dizzy" Gillespie; Benny Goodman; Coleman Hawkins; John Cornelius "Rab" Hodges; Billie Holiday; Henry "Hank" Jones; Charles Mingus; Thelonious Monk; Bessie Smith; Art Tatum; Jack Teagarden; Lester Young. There are images of composers: Benjamin Britten; Aaron Copland; Frederick Delius; Paul Hindemith; Leo Janáèek; Bohuslav Martinu; Darius Milhaud; Carl Orff; Serge Prokofiev; Maurice Ravel; Dmitri Shostakovich; Karol Szymanowski; Ralph Vaughan Williams. Also included is a large poster of Vaslav Nijinsky.
Finding Aid Permalink Cite or bookmark this finding aid as: http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.music/eadmus.mu007001
LCCN Permalink LC Online Catalog record for this collection: http://lccn.loc.gov/2006577400

 

Dave, did you ever take a look at this collection? Any "new" or "unknown" photo(s) of Bix by any chance? When you have some time and it is conveneient, please take a look. You never know until you try.

Albert



Posted on Mar 4, 2013, 11:31 AM

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"A Historic Jazz Label Gets a New Life" is the title of a piece ....

by

.... in the March 1, 2013 issue of the New York Times.

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/09/a-historic-jazz-label-gets-a-new-life/

You will see that the OKeh label will be revived. Here is the first sentence of the article.

The major-label landscape hasnt been hospitable to jazz in recent years, but theres a bit of good news on the horizon: OKeh Records, the label that released historic early recordings by Louis Armstrong, King Oliver and Duke Ellington, is being revived under the corporate umbrella of Sony Masterworks.

What? No mention of Bix and Tram? Shame on sie!

Wikipedia has an informative article about the OKeh label.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Okeh_Records

The article includes an image of Bix's "In A Mist." It is "borrowed" from http://bixbeiderbecke.com with no attribution. The owner of the record is Joe Giordano. He sent me a photo which I scanned and posted.

The image in Wikipedia.  (If you look at the properties of the image you will see "okehredjoe" before ".jpg" !

[linked image]

The image in the Bixography website. Note "okehredjoe" before ".jpg" in the properties.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Mar 1, 2013, 5:12 AM

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Interesting news...

by David Logue

...considering how the "record" industry practically no longer exists, unfortunately.

Gone are the days of those colorful, cool label graphics. But you CAN get this very cool t-shirt on ebay with the old "Okeh" logo:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/OKEH-T-SHIRT-/261176890589?pt=UK_Men_s_T_Shirts&var=&hash=item3ccf5b14dd


Posted on Mar 1, 2013, 5:59 AM

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An informative article about the sound of OKeh records.

by

http://the78rpmrecordspins.wordpress.com/2013/02/28/what-made-that-great-okeh-sound-by-steven-lasker/

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 1, 2013 8:56 AM

Posted on Mar 1, 2013, 8:54 AM

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This article was previously published in the vjm website.

by

http://www.vjm.biz/new_page_4.htm

Thanks to Han Ederman for pointing this out.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 3, 2013 8:37 AM

Posted on Mar 3, 2013, 8:37 AM

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That Is One Sad-Looking Label!

by

Surely a lovelier-to-look-at "In a Mist" label could grace the Wikipedia OKeh page than this tattered, battered, faded and stained re-issue copy. Somewhere west of Peoria, a mint-condition original 1927 large-black-label edition is waiting for its closeup.

-Brad K

Posted on Mar 2, 2013, 12:06 AM

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They could have "borrowed" many other images from the Bixography Website.

by

Signed by Bill Challis.

[linked image]

A blue label from the 1930s.

[linked image]

A reisssue from the 1940s with the original sleeve.

[linked image]

A reissue on Vocalion.

[linked image]

Or go to the internet and find a decent image.

Albert



Posted on Mar 2, 2013, 4:25 AM

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Vince Giordano's Nighthawks at Opening of the Suffolk Theatre

by

[linked image]

Grand Opening Gala
Saturday 3/02
Grand Opening Gala
$125.00
SHOWS 6:00pm
Get Tickets

A Back to the 30s Cocktail Party featuring Vince Giordano & his Nighthawks Orchestra, Grammy awardwinning, Vince Giordano won his award for HBOs Boardwalk Empire. The evening will feature dancing, delectable food, signature cocktails, costumed characters, video entertainment and many more surprises. 6pm till midnight (includes After Party festivities)
Everyone receives two complimentary cocktails.

Take a look at the article by Michelle Trauring in

http://www.27east.com/news/article.cfm/East-End/453987/Suffolk-Theater-A-Breath-Of-Fresh-Air-In-Riverhead/start/2

See also the page about the theatre in the Cinema Treasures website.

http://cinematreasures.org/theaters/904

Albert

I spent a day in the Suffolk County offices in Riverhead a few months ago researching Alice's home in West Islip.



Posted on Feb 28, 2013, 5:51 AM

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Some Photos of the Grand Opening. Courtesy of the Suffolk Times and Katharine Schroeder

by

News-Review/Katharine Schoeder · Times Review · Suffolk Theater
 
 
News-Review/Katharine Schroeder · Times Review · Suffolk Theater
 
 
 
News-Review/Katharine Schroeder · Times Review · Suffolk Theater
 
Albert




    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 3, 2013 4:36 PM

Posted on Mar 3, 2013, 4:34 PM

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More Photos. Courtesy of Diane Tucci

by

photo_1.jpg

DSC_0475.jpg

 

DSC_0749.jpg

 

DSC_0691.jpg

Albert



Posted on Mar 3, 2013, 4:47 PM

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Notes for Randy Sandke's Concert.

by

RANDY SANDKE HOMAGE TO LOUIS ARMSTRONG +BIX BEIDERBECKE

[linked image] [linked image]

Saturday, March 9, 2013, 8:00 PM
Flushing Town Hall
$15/$10 Members and Students with ID

Born just two years apart, Louis Armstrong (New Orleans, 1901) and Leon Bismark Bix Beiderbecke (Davenport, Iowa) became two of the most influential musicians in the early history of Jazz. Tonight, Armstrong/Beiderbecke scholar, trumpeter, composer Randy Sandke performs an homage to these greats who called Queens their home, and are listed on FTHs Queens Jazz Trail Map©. Join us for a post-show Q&A and Birthday Cake in honor of Bix, who was born March 10, 1903.

Randy kindly sent a copy of the notes he wrote for the concert. Thanks, Randy.

Albert

Bix Beiderbecke and Louis Armstrong: Back Home Again in Queens

 

When my old friend, Clyde Bullard (producer of FlushingTown Halls Jazz Live! series since 1998), suggested a concert in honor of both Bix Beiderbecke and Louis Armstrong, I jumped at the chance. The idea seemed a natural fit for the program and venue since both Armstrong and Beiderbecke lived (and died) in Queens. Local recognition has come to Armstrong mainly through the efforts of Michael Cogswell and his superb team at the LouisArmstrongHouseMuseum in Corona, as well as the accompanying Archive at QueensCollege. Bix Beiderbeckes final residence in Sunnyside is now designated with a bronze plaque, thanks to the work of drummer and graphic designer Paul Maringelli, who holds an annual concert and vigil there on the anniversary of the cornetists death. Plans are underway for a permanent BixBeiderbeckeMuseum and Archive in his hometown of Davenport, Iowa.

 

Beiderbecke and Armstrong were perhaps the first great soloists in jazz. Their styles, personalities, and, of course, life trajectories couldnt have been more disparate: Bix started out in a solidly middle-class family but died poor and pretty much forgotten; Louis began life in grinding poverty but rose to become rich (by the standards of his time) and arguably the most famous and beloved person in the world. Louis, two years Bixs senior, would outlive his counterpart by almost four decades. But in the 1920s these two set the standard for a vital new music, and their work forms both the bedrock and pinnacle of what has come to be known as classic jazz.

 

Louis and Bix first met as teenagers while working on the riverboats in the year 1920. After the first trip to Saint Louis, wrote Armstrong in his autobiography, we went up river to Davenport, Iowa, where all the Streckfus boats put up for the winter. It was there that I met the almighty Bix Beiderbecke, the great cornet genius. He made the greatest reputation possible for himself, and we all respected him as though he had been a god. Whenever we saw him our faces shone with joy and happiness, but long periods would pass when we did not see him at all.

 

Their next encounter would be in Chicago in the summer of 1923. Hoagy Carmichael wrote of how he and Bix went to hear Louis with King Olivers Band at the LincolnGardens: Bix was on his feet, his eyes poppingEvery note Louis hit was perfection.

It would be another three years before Bix and Louis would see each other again. As Jimmy McPartland, Bixs friend and protégé related, Pee Wee Russell, Bix, and Frankie Trumbauer were working down at Hudson Lake, about eighty miles south in Indiana. Every Monday, their night off, they would come up here to hear us. When we got finished, we would all go off together to catch Louis or Jimmy Nooneanother of our favorites. Sometimes we sat in with Louis at the Sunset, or with Noone at the Apex.

 

Bix spent two weeks in Chicago with Paul Whitemans band in November of 1927 and another three weeks in July of 1928. Bix and Louis renewed their friendship during these periods, as Armstrong fondly recalled: I had been diggin him in small combos and stuff. Now my mans gonna blow some of these big time arrangements, I thought, and sure enough he did. All of a sudden Bix stood up and took a solo and Im tellin you, those pretty notes went all through me.

 

When he finished work that night at the theater, he came directly to the place where I worked. He stayed there until the customers left. Thats when we locked all the doors. My band stayed, Bix and his friends remained, and youre talking about a jam session that was priceless. Hmmm! Ive never heard such good music since. There are likewise many instances in which Beiderbecke expressed similar admiration and affection for Armstrong.

 

It should be noted that Bix and Louis were trailblazers not only in music but in human relations as well. Beiderbecke knew nearly all the leading African American musicians of his time: he sat in with both Duke Ellington and Fletcher Hendersons bands, and jammed with Fats Waller, Armstrong and countless others. He also attended parties at Hendersons apartment in Harlem (where W.E.B. DuBois also resided), as well as those hosted by Lionel Hamptons uncle Richard in Chicago. At these informal gatherings, Beiderbecke made music all night with the likes of Jelly Roll Morton, King Oliver and Bessie Smith. Bix Beiderbecke once did a solo at our house that gave me goose bumps, Hampton recalled.

 

Of course, Armstrong broke so many racial barriers all over the world that his role as goodwill ambassador became almost as legendary as his music. His warmth, wit, humor, and astounding musical abilities had the power to conquer even the most hardened and cynical hearts. And fortunately for us, that power is immortalized on film and recordings.

 

Beiderbecke and Armstrong were born of different circumstances, and their music communicates different sensibilities: Armstrong has been called the dramatist and Beiderbecke the poet; Louis the exuberant optimist and Bix the pensive and searching introvert. Together they showed that jazz could incorporate significantly different approaches without compromising its soul and vitality.  Like all great artists, their message is at once deeply profound yet totally accessible. So it was, and so it shall always be!

 

Randy Sandke


 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Mar 13, 2013 5:52 AM
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 28, 2013 5:30 AM

Posted on Feb 28, 2013, 5:30 AM

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Re: Sandke's Concert

by

Thank you for making this information available. Forum readers who are too far away to hear this performance will still rejoice to have the roles of Beiderbecke and Armstrong set forward so cogently in their proper relationship and place in history.

Although their styles are often contrasted and sometimes set in an opposition that they themselves never felt, they were coming from the same place in the soul and moving toward the same expansion in the human spirit that was expressed in their work. Each one without the other leaves an uncompleted task: between them they opened their hearts and managed to say it all. And from his own words, it is clearly evident that Armstrong, being the one blessed with the wisdom born of a long lifetime, understood that so well.

Posted on Feb 28, 2013, 7:48 AM

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the world is ending soon!!!!!!! the end is coming!!

by hal smith

Worlds Records is going out of business.

Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 10:51 PM

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Agree!

by John

A sign of the end times? I don't know how I'll even know about most of the new releases, this is going to really hurt all those relatively small labels World's dealt in.

Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 12:14 PM

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It's Da Hipocalypse, I Tell Ya...

by

"... this is going to really hurt all those relatively small labels World's dealt in..."

Like mine, for instance! Worlds is, or was, the exclusive distributor of Superbatone Records, which has four new releases in preparation.

See youse in the funny papers...

Brad Kay

Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 7:26 PM

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Re: Agree!

by hal smith

I though the same thing myself about the "THE NEW RELEASES" anyone out there know where to go?

Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 11:30 PM

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NOT The End After All...

by

Ren Brown and I talked today. He said his "Denouement" is more of a re-organization than a full shut-down. He's taking the business on-line instead of issuing catalogs. World's still will carry esoterica from labels like mine and operate on a direct internet order basis. The responses of "Don't do it, Mr. Brown!" after his announcement were so many and heartfelt that he is re-assessing the big picture.

So stay tuned, everyone, and PLEASE support his efforts.

We've got the whole "Worlds" in our hands!

- Brad K

Posted on Mar 1, 2013, 11:50 PM

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jimmy dorsey's daughter

by hal smith

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrjPhTnmSX0

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 11:44 PM

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Re: jimmy dorsey's daughter

by David Sager

I wonder if any more interviews w Mrs Hilton exist? She is well-spoken and charming. I never got to meet her. I did know Tommy's eldest son, Thomas III, who was the sweetest guy you'd ever want to meet. Looked a lot like his old man, to boot.

DS

Posted on Feb 28, 2013, 12:22 PM

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Futuristic Rhythm

by John

Here's a different slant on Goose Pimples, not sure if the Bix version was sampled. A bit outré but I got a kick out of it so I thought other forumites might also:

Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 12:36 PM

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Hello John, and welcome!

by

I believe you forgot to give the link. sad.gif

Albert



Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 1:53 PM

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The missing link

by John

https://soundcloud.com/#cosmo-sheldrake/goose-pimples

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 6:57 AM

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Re: Goose Pimples

by

Wonder what the two versions would sound like if you synked them together?

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 4:31 PM

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Thumbs Up

by Andy Vaaler

That was fun, funky, and playful. Thanks for sharing. Send more.


Posted on Feb 25, 2013, 2:50 PM

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This is the first time i comment here

by

Hi:

I'm an Spanish 18 year old who is interested in jazz & interested to learn some things about Bix or any musician who worked with him or influenced him, but more of course, to know more.
I've got a serious doubt:
I've found on Rust's American Dance Band Discography on page 604, exactly the Lou Gold chapter that Eddie Edwards recorded with Lou Gold. I had to say it, but I wonder if that Eddie Edwards is the same man who recorded with the ODJB & his only mid-20s recordings where those of Gowan's Rhapsody Makers for Gennett?

Signed:
Javier Soria Laso

Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 10:58 AM

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Bienvenido al Forum de la Bixografia!

by

Muchas gracias por su comentario.

I believe that the Eddie Edwards in Rust's listing under Lou Gold is one and the same as the ODJB trombonist. But I will be happy to be corrected if this information is wrong. Eddie Edwards also recorded with Johnny Sylvester and Brad Gowans in the second half of the 1920s.

In the mid-1940s he has his own band, Eddie Edwards And His Original Dixieland Jazz Band. It included, among others, Tony Sbarbaro, Brad Gowans, Eddie Condon and Wild Bill Davison.

Un saludo cordial,

Albert

 

 



Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 1:42 PM

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RE: Your Welcome

by

Thanks for helping, Mr. Haim.
I believe that Miff Mole played on various Lou Gold recordings from July to early December from 1926.
By the way, how did you know my language?



Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 1:54 PM

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I spent many years in ....

by

.... Uruguay. With World War II coming, my father decided to leave France; he took the family to Uruguay in the 1930s. I lived there until 1954.

Miff Mole with Lou Gold? I don't think so.

Albert



Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 3:19 PM

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A check from Sam Lanin to Smith Ballew

by

Uploaded by Steve Hester in one of the facebook pages.

[linked image]

I did not find a recording of Sam Lanin or the Ipana Troubadours with Smith Ballew for Oct 18, 1928 in Rust's Dance band discography.

Perhaps an old debt from an earlier recording session? I thought musicians got paid right on the spot when they completed a recording session.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 22, 2013 8:02 AM

Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 8:02 AM

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An interview of Smith Ballew.

by

Fascinating stuff.

http://archive.org/details/SmithBallewRadioBroadcast

Albert



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 8:11 AM

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Was It A Dream? Goldkette?

by

Recorded Jul 16, 1928 by The Dorsey Brothers' Concert Orchestra. OK41083.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alDfPumvPeY

Smith Ballew tells the interviewer that the name on the record was "Dorsey Brothers" but that actually Jean Goldkette directed the band. I wonder. Rust tells us that the director was Eugene Ormandy.

Albert



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 10:15 AM

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Come to think of it, ....

by

..... $10 ain't not much for a recording session.

Albert

 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 22, 2013 8:24 AM

Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 8:23 AM

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Ah ha ! Yes indeed

by Malcolm Walton

Precisely Albert : I also thought that musicians got paid on the spot after the session. So what about the cheque made out to Bix, signed by Sam Lanin on 20th Oct 1927 ? I still wonder about the second Trumpet/Cornet on Sugar. Now that we have found two takes, the solos are different too !!

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 9:44 AM

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Hello Malcolm. Indeed, we discussed the possibility of an alternate take of "Sugar."

by

But it was the Red Nicols' recording. See

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1311075962

Albert



Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 1:33 PM

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A different record date

by Malcolm Walton

The "Sugar" that I am referring to was recorded on 20th Oct 1927 by Sam Lanin and his Orch. There is a Bixian short solo passage towards the end of the record that is most definitely not Red Nichols.Neither is it the lead trumpet player on the record. It is fairly "laid back" and behind the beat, just as Bix might have phrased it on a day when he was not under any pressure to produce a "work of art", e.g. when booked as a session sideman at scale. Recently an alternative take has emerged on which the solo is different, but by the same player. There are moments during the record where one can detect the occasional note, played by the second trumpet,articulated (tongued) just as Bix often did.This recording has been mentioned before on this forum some years ago, but I have only just got a copy of the second take.In the latest edition of the American Dance Band Discography the player is stated to be Jimmy McPartland. I can say,with some assurance,that it is not he. We know for certain that Sam Lanin issued a cheque for $25 to Bix on 20th Oct 1927, and I was merely acknowleging Albert's statement that musicians usually got paid on the day of the session !

Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 12:55 AM

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Sorry, Malcolm.

by

I did not remember your posting of 2004 with a discussion of Lanin's Sugar.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1082649732

An alternate take would be  a great thing to hear. One take -I don't know which- is available on youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLwEUMgNAms

Also Malcolm had kindly sent his transfer when he discussed the recording. This sound file has the solo repeated at the end.

http://bixography.com/sugarlanin.html

And take a look at this. http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/sam-lanin-orch-sugar-imperial-1860-148663106

Malcolm, can you make an mp3 file of the new take you just acquired and send it to me as an attachment to an email message? I think there would be great interest among forumites to listen  to it. Thanks.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 27, 2013 9:27 AM
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 27, 2013 5:50 AM

Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 5:49 AM

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Re: Sorry, Malcolm

by

The YouTube version and Malcolm's 2004 version certainly do have a different ending solo, a quite Bixian one. It's too bad "EMGColonel" devoted screen time to his dancing couple instead of letting us have a good look at that record label to see what take it might be!

Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 8:20 AM

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Davenport school museum has bix relics (video)

by DavenportChad


Link to appropriate video here. Watch to end for additional mention of bix picks

http://www.kwqc.com/category/231919/video-landing-page?clipId=8350955&autostart=true

Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 6:43 AM

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Thanks for that link and welcome ....

by

.... to the Bixography Forum.

 I hope to be able to visit the Museum in August when I'll be in Davenport for the Bix Festival.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 7:21 AM

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Couldn't open it

by

It just had the TV station logo, and something about requesting the story Was anyone able to get the video up, and can they send to me? Thanks!

Laura

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 8:11 AM

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Are you using Windows Vista?

by

If so, you've been Gates'ed, just like me. I couldn't access it either, using Vista. Use Internet explorer or something else to access the link. I'm afraid I'm not good enough with the computer to send you a copy of the video, but mine works now that I'm not using Vista.

Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 3:44 AM

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Thanks, Alberta!

by

I'll give it a try! Would really like to see this -- :D


Laura

Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 5:28 AM

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Re: Using Vista

by

You're right, Alberta. I have a friend who was unfortunate enough to buy a new computer with Vista. Seeing all the things that it wouldn't do or would only do through lots of work-arounds, I hung on to my XP until Windows 7 came out! I'm glad you mentioned that because other people may be having the same problem without knowing why.

Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 7:49 AM

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I misspoke

by

It's VISTA PLUS MOZILLA that doesn't work. VISTA PLUS INTERNET EXPLORER does, in fact, work. That's how I accessed the video.

Sorry I didn't get it right. Old age!

Good luck!


Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 4:32 PM

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"Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now." Irving Kaufman?

by

Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now is a very nice composition by Walter Donaldson.

[linked image]

Professor Hot Stuff sent me an mp3 of a recording of this tune by an unknown band. Listen

bixbeiderbecke.com/BecauseMyBabyDontMeanMaybeNowUnknownBand.mp3

The vocalist sounds to me like Irving Kaufman. However, a comprehensive Kaufman discography by Patrick Humbert

http://patrickhumbert.com/irvingkaufmandiscography/IK.html

shows only one recording of the tune by Irving Kaufman. It is by Lou Gold  (as the Harmonians) on Har 667-H, Jun 11, 1928. As you can hear, a different recording. (Incidentally, the two recordings have a trumpet player who listened carefully to Bix; get a load of the trumpet obbligato behind Kaufman in the Lou Gold version).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeT8ggdjdJ8

So, the question is: can anyone identify the band and the vocalist in the mp3 sent by Professor Hot Stuff? Thanks, guys.

Albert



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 5:43 AM

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This is a 1928 MARATHON track by Sam Lanin's Orch!

by John Leifert

Hi Albert - I have this side on a CDR! There was a session led by Sam Lanin in mid-1928 for the MARATHON label (an extremely rare and short-lived label which was produced by the Emerson Record Company, in their very last days of existence, in 1928). The vocalist is indeed Irving Kaufman, and I hear Leo McConville on trumpet and (to my ears, definitely) Jimmy Dorsey on alto sax near the end of the side. It is pitched just slightly fast.

This was issued as "Southern Melody Serenaders" on Marathon 223 (mx 31317-2), recorded ca. June 1928. It's session-mate is "Oh You Have No Idea", on Marathon 221 (mx 31315-2), ca. Jun 1928, on which Irving Kaufman also sings. Jimmy Dorsey is also present and soloing on that (and if it's not in JD's discography: I wouldn't be in the least surprised!)

I've been in touch several times with Patrick Humbert, who is really tackling the Mt. Everest of all artist discographies with the stupefyingly prolific Irving Kaufman (I'm convinced he had a cot or bedroom in every recording studio in the mid to late 20s, just bouncing from one studio to another!) Patrick admits that what he has up there is a decent percentage of Irving's sides, but is WAY FAR AWAY from being complete (with somebody like Kaufman, the odds of being "complete" are slim indeed, as somebody finds yet another side on which he takes the vocal refrain on Madison, Grey Gull, Marathon, Jewel, or the like..) He relishes any addition any collector may have to his website, which Albert kindly provided. I even found an animated cartoon from 1933 on which Kaufman sings! - and Patrick immediately confirmed that it was Irving. What DIDN'T Kaufman do ??

John L

Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 11:22 AM

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Excellent!

by

A bit of additional information about this rare label in

http://78records.wordpress.com/tag/marathon-78-rpm-records/

Includes sound files for both sides of Marathon 227.

Here is a label of a Marathon (# 225) record by Irving's brother Jack Kaufman.

[linked image]

Albert

 

 



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 12:30 PM

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Another version of "Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now" by Sam Lanin.

by

June 26, 1928. Cameo 8277 or Pathe 36827, I don't know which. Scrappy Lambert on vocal?

bixbeiderbecke.com/BecauseMyBabyDontMeanMaybeNowSamLanin.mp3

Kindly sent by Professor Hot Stuff from Jim Baldwin's show of 2010.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 1:49 PM

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"Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now"

by vince giordano

I agree with John the first track is Irving Kaufman,,,who is taking a few liberties with melody here and there..he didn't do that too many times.
I hear Jimmy Dorsey's sax there , too.
The pitch on that record is a half step fast...so it does make the vocal and performance a little wild.

The 2nd "Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now" is Scrappy Lambert...and there the pitch is almost a half step flat !

It's neat to hear "new" performances !



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 6:08 PM

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Re: Whiteman's "Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now"

by

While the various examples of the tune are of great interest to jazz buffs, they also illustrate just how far advanced of the others the Paul Whiteman Orchestra was.
With Bix playing at his peak at the time, along with the advanced orchestrations of Bill Challis and others, how fortunate we are that recording techniques in the mid late 1920's were able to capture on wax all that wonderful music for us to enjoy today.

Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 2:06 PM

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Re: "Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now"

by Professor Hot Stuff

Thanks for the corrections, Vince, and my apologies for not sending those tracks in the right key. Is the arrangement on the Sam Lanin versions of the tune more or less the stock arrangement, and if so, do we know who's arrangement that was? Your band is great, Vince. Keep up the great work.

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 7:24 AM

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"Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now"..the stock

by vince giordano

Many thanks for your nice words...The stock is by Frank Skinner and it's in key of "F"


Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 3:43 PM

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WBIX # 208.

by

Radio Program # 208. (loaded on 02/22/2013) The Last Ten Whiteman Recordings Before Bix Joined. 68 min 51 sec

Real Audio 
Streaming audio file.   
Download file.
  16.8 M  

mp3 files  
Streaming mp3 file    
http://bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX208.m3u
     
Download file            
bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX208.mp3    49.6 MB

All recordings by Paul Whiteman's Orchestra.

The Calinda. Aug 19, 1927. Vocal by Bing Crosby, Jack Fulton, Charles Gaylord and Austin Young.
Just A Memory.
Aug 19, 1927.
It Won't Be Long Now.
Aug 20, 1927. Vocal by the Rhythm Boys.
Ooh! Maybe It's You.
Aug 22, 1927.  Vocal by Jack Filton, Charles Gaylord and Austin Young.
Shaking the Blues Away.
Aug 22, 1927.
Mississippi Suite. Parts 1 and 2. Sep 7, 1927.
Beautiful Ohio. Sep 21, 1927. Vocal by Jack Fulton.
Missouri Waltz.
Sep 21, 1927. Vocal by Bing Crosby, Al Rinker, Jack Fulton Charles Gaylord and Austin Young.
A Shady Tree.
Sep 22, 1927. Vocal by Mildred Hunt.
Dancing Tambourine. Sep 22, 1927.
Wang-Wang Blues.
Sep 22, 1927.

WBIX # 209 will be uploaded on Mar 29, 2013.

Enjoy!

Albert



Posted on Feb 21, 2013, 2:15 PM

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I hate to do this to you again!

by

But I have to report a glitch in WBIX #208: the announcement preceding "Beautiful Ohio" and "Missouri Waltz" is actually the one from WBIX #207 that introduced "Hoosier Sweetheart" and "Sunny Disposish" from George Carhart's New Yorkers. Oops! Otherwise, this was a great show and it was especially welcome to hear the original Whiteman recording of one of Ferde Grofé's most beautiful light-classical works, "Mississippi Suite."

Posted on Feb 25, 2013, 11:37 AM

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Thank you for pointing out the error.

by

I will create a new intro for "Beautiful Ohio" and "Missouri Waltz" and delete the incorrect one. Give me a day or so.

Albert



Posted on Feb 25, 2013, 1:37 PM

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More than a day or two.

by

I am very busy reformatting and making additions to our article Alice and Bix. The editor is very pleased with the article. End notes should be changed to footnotes. He also wants several clarifications. I am cleaning up some of the new images. We have a few new items that we want to incorporate. If I may say so, the article is awsome: lots of documented information, large number of images, and some important findings. Be patient. The article will be in the Spring issue of the Journal of Jazz Studies.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 26, 2013 12:16 PM

Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 12:14 PM

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George Harrison and Bix

by

Enrico gives a link to this video once a year.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZLZfG5QEIM

And from http://beatlesnumber9.com/dhani.html

The western music played chez Harrison was Jerry Lee Lewis, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Bix Beiderbecke and Hoagy Carmichael. "People at school were surprised I liked that stuff, but those were hardcore dudes," says Harrison. "I only discovered electronic music as a teenager and I still love the Prodigy and Massive Attack."

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 20, 2013, 5:13 AM

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Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea

by

Maybe that's why George was always my favorite Beatle. Here's George doing Between the Devil and The Deep Blue Sea. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjiF6Rpa3kA

Posted on Feb 20, 2013, 7:43 AM

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I'll See You in My Dreams

by

When the big George Harrison memorial concert took place in London, the very last song played was the 1920's classic "I'll See You in My Dreams." The reason given was that song was the very last music George heard on his deathbed just before he expired.

Posted on Feb 21, 2013, 1:40 PM

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Re: George Harrison and Bix

by

Here's a citation from a magazine article on George Harrison and his fondness for "Barnacle Bill" that I posted back in 2010 in which Harrison talks about his fondness for Bix's period:

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1264539804/More+on+George+Harrison%2C+Hoagy%2C+%26quot%3BBarnacle+Bill%26quot%3B+and+Bix

Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 5:46 AM

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A three-part article about Whiteman in Radio Digest 1928-1929

by

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/WhitemanRadioDigest/WhitemanRadioDigest.html

Lots of information and images. A lot to read, but worthy the time.

Albert



Posted on Feb 19, 2013, 2:23 PM

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Need Help on Rare Jazz Record

by

I recently requested that Rich Conaty play a rare Jack Teagarden record on his "Big Broadcast" radio show at wfuv. I suggested that he might want to include one of the sides in any upcoming Big Broadcast CD.

On about 1930-31, Jack Teagarden made two jazz sides with a female harpist (no, not Casper Reardon in 1934). Conaty was
stumped.

Most collectors tell me there is no such record. Many years ago, a collector pulled out this 78 rpm at his home, played it for me--so I am sure this record exists...or am I just getting old? Maybe it weas a test(?)pressing.

Is anyone at the forum familiar with either of these delightful early Teagarden sides, or the harpist?

Posted on Feb 19, 2013, 8:10 AM

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I am afraid I don't know.

by

All I know is that there was a female harpist, Loretta McFarland, who recorded with Ted Lewis in 1934.

Speaking of Caspar Reardon, here is Hoagy's Washboard Blues recorded by Caspar's group on May 10, 1937; Tony Tortomas, t / Jimmy Lytell, Henry Wade, cl / Casper Reardon, harp /Mack Shopnick, sb / Herb Quigley, d, vib.

http://soundcloud.com/peter-mintun/washboard-blues-hoagy

Albert



Posted on Feb 19, 2013, 10:43 AM

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Jazzy Harp

by

Richard,

There was a guy named Lester Cruman who played jazzy harp with Paul Tremaine and his Aristocrats in '29. He gets off a peppy (though not very swinging) solo on their "Aristocratic Stomp" (Victor V-40176). Then there was Harpo Marx...

But far as I know, the true-blue trail-blazing original pioneer jazz harpist, who COULD really swing and go head-to-head with the likes of Jack Teagarden WAS Casper Reardon. He first appears around 1933*. If your memory is true, that you heard a record from 1930-'31 with Teagarden and an unknown, unsung girl jazz harpist (feminists take note), it not only would be a rare record, but the first of its kind. Otherwise - ARE YOU POSITIVE the record wasn't "Junk Man"? That so totally fits your description, except for the year and the gender of the harpist.


-Brad K

*as a jazz harpist - he also was a pianist and symphony harpist for about ten years prior. see: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0714094/bio

Posted on Feb 20, 2013, 1:38 PM

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Thanks for the info: still a mystery to me

by

Thanks Albert and Brad. My recollection is that the harpist was a female, and the collector told me
that Teagarden made the record with her out of some personal family friendship. Maybe it was Reardon,
but I don't think so, because another collector present said he first thought it was Reardon, and was pursuaded otherwise by the owner of the record.

I will continue to do some research--and maybe take a mystical memory pill--and report back.

Posted on Feb 20, 2013, 8:40 PM

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Adele Girard...

by Russell Davies

..replaced Caspar Reardon with the Three T's at the Hickory House. That was as late as 1936 -- but it does place a female harpist alongside Teagarden. They didn't record together officially, but here's a link to some preserved broadcasts...
R.D.

http://www.jazzoracle.com/catalogue/BDW_8056.asp

Posted on Feb 21, 2013, 6:42 AM

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Adele Girard Trio - "Harp Boogie"

by

Good music (if you like the boogie-woogie), but  a lousy dancer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNtkSzow0FY

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 21, 2013, 12:40 PM

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Sweet Sue, Just You.

by

Beautiful song by Victor Young (music) and Will J. Rogers (words).

[linked image]

Paul Whiteman recorded this song on Sep 18, 1928 for Columbia.

[linked image]

A great arrangement by Bill Challis with a 32-bar solo by Bix in hat.

Tom Lord online discography lists about 500 recordings of the tune, 17 in 1928, 10 in 1929, 3 in 1930, and 3 in 1932. Curiously, of the 33 recordings in 1928-1932, 3 were recorded in England, 9 in Germany, 2 in France and 1 in Argentina; the remaining in the US.

Red Nichols recorded the tune three times:

- Sep 24, 1928, Wabash Dance Orchestra, Duo D4009

- Jan 20, 1930, Louisiana Rhythm Kings, Br 4943

- Feb 18, 1932, Five Pennies, Br 6266

The recording of interest in that by the Wabash Dance Orchestra, a Red and Miff group who recorded for Duophone (owner of English Brusnwick at this time) in the Brunswick studios in New York City for exclusive distribution in England. Get a load of the roster of musicians:
Red Nichols (cnt,dir) Mannie Klein (tp) Miff Mole (tb) Arnold Brilhart (cl,as) ? Jimmy Crossan (cl,as) Fud Livingston (cl,ts,arr) Kurt Dieterle (probably wrong),  ? Murray Kellner (vln) Arthur Schutt (p) Carl Kress (g) ? Hank Stern (tu) Chauncey Morehouse (d) Phil Baker (vcl).

Thanks to Nick's generosity, here is an mp3 of the recording. Excellent arrangement, lots of first-class solos (Red, Miff and Fud) and a Bixian influence throughout, including Red's solo.

bixbeiderbecke.com/SweetSueWabashDanceOrchestra.mp3

Albert

PS See also the thread http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1254497794



Posted on Feb 16, 2013, 2:37 PM

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sweet sue

by al heenan

The version recorded by The Louisiana Rhythm Kings (1930) contains a magnificent solo by Red Nichols which comes closer to Beiderbeckes sound than any that I have heard.

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 9:52 AM

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Available on youtube.

by

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUOpPpk90eI

A harbinger of mid 1930s swing.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 17, 2013 2:44 PM

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 11:48 AM

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jack fulton vocal

by hal smith

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKQIMnHsJDE

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 2:35 PM

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The link to the mp3 file was not working. Fixed now.

by

I am surprised only one person complained! The link is working now. Here it is again for your convenience.

bixbeiderbecke.com/SweetSueWabashDanceOrchestra.mp3

Albert



Posted on Feb 18, 2013, 5:31 AM

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Sweet Sue

by

This is my own copy of "Sweet Sue" as posted on my website www.mel-thompson.artistwebsites.com. Please visit to view many vintage and original works related to Bix, jazz, popular music and the like, thanks.

Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 5:17 PM

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Not everyone has a high opinion of Challis's arrangement

by

Though Bix's solo draws almost universal praise. Here is Benny Green's evaluation in *The Reluctant Art*:

The summation of the whole Bix-Whiteman paradox is
contained in the Whiteman recording of 'Sweet Sue*. Every
indelicacy that might conceivably be crammed into a four-
minute performance is included in what the sleeve notes to
the American Columbia Memorial album describe with some
restraint as *a real period piece'. Quacking brass, lumbering
tubas, the tinkling of bells and the clashing of cymbals,
portentous slow movements and dashing fast movements,
comically bogus profundity, saccharine harmonies, teashop
violins and what sounds like a deadly parody of every singer,
male, female and neuter, who ever sat in the ranks of a dance-
band. In the midst of this farrago, the listener may discover a
single chorus by Bix Beiderbecke which momentarily dispels
the nonsense as though by magic. There is no clucking inter-
ference from the rest of the band. The rhythm section merely
accompanies Bix for thirty-two bars, and everyone else, from
Whiteman to the lowest menial on his orchestrating staff,
leaves it to him.

The result is that Bix, playing casually enough, never at
any time approaching the intensity of 'I'm Coming, Virginia',
or 'Way Down Yonder in New Orleans', still reaches his own
level of invention, and by the effortless ease of his creativity,
reveals the pitiful gulf between his own mind and the minds
which conceived the holocaust preceding and following the
solo. It is a telling illustration of the truth that the natural
jazz player will create, without even stopping to think about it,
phrases which the merely literate orchestrators will never
think of simply because the scope of their training and
experience does not include that kind of inventive resource.

Bix's solo in 'Sweet Sue' is in no way untypical of the time,
1928. To refer to the text of this particular solo is in no way
loading the dice. For a Bix solo it is commonplace enough,
but it contains at least four instances of the peculiar Bixish-
ness of the man's style. The phrase linking the end of the

39



THE RELUCTANT ART

first eight bars with the start of the second eight contains no
rhythmic complexities of any kind, although the precision
and attack with which it is played creates the illusion of
rhythmic force. After climbing the chord of the major sixth,
the phrase descends in the ninth bar with three notes which
are archetypal for the curious elusive quality of wistfulness
one finds occurring so consistently in Bix's jazz. To say that
these three notes belong to this chord or that means nothing.
It is in their context in the time and space of the solo, and the
manner in which they are executed, that their effectiveness
lies.

In the movement from the twelfth to the thirteenth bar
occurs a quaver of silence in a run of quavers. The momen-
tary break is totally unexpected because it occurs off the beat,
where one's sense of rhythm has not led one to expect it,
instead of on the beat, where it might have sounded ordinary
enough. The result is a skipping effect which brings a gaiety
of spirit giving the solo fresh impetus, and causing a subtle
change of mood from the melancholia of the ninth bar.

In bars nineteen and twenty the conception of the phrasing
becomes far bolder than hitherto. The time values change
from quavers to minim triplets striding across the harmonies
with a freedom of tonality comparatively rare in those earlier
days of jazz. In bars twenty-one and twenty-two occurs a
phrase which appears to be leading on from itself but which
surprisingly evolves into a sequential echo of itself in the
following two bars. The solo ends with rather more depen-
dence on the fifth and tonic than is usual for Bix.

Now this kind of observation is mere quackery if it is to be
used to prove that Bix had a profound mind, if for instance
I were to suggest that Bix consciously played off the melan-
cholia of the ninth bar against the jollity of the skip three bars
later. When he played Bix was consciously thinking, as all
jazz musicians do, no matter what the psychoanalysts may

40



BIX BEIDERBECKE

say, only of the movement of the harmonies from resolution
to resolution. Whatever emotional or dramatic effects we may
care to observe in the result are the product of the intuitive
powers of the soloist, not his reasoning intelligence at work.

But examples like this do illustrate Bix's curious individu-
ality as a jazz musician, and his rare ability to evoke in the
listener a range of emotions not so common in jazz as one
might think. The very nature of the melancholia he conjures
is distinctively Bixian, sensitive and reflective, quite devoid
of the element of self-pity which obtrudes in so much later
jazz aiming consciously at the same effects Bix produced
instinctively. The 'Sweet Sue' solo is superbly musical. It
has been conceived by a born musician, and that such a man
could ever have seen any virtue in the feverish goings-on in
the preceding and subsequent choruses, is only further proof
of the mess in which the intuitive artist can land himself
when he lacks the normal reasoning powers.

http://archive.org/stream/reluctantart027100mbp/reluctantart027100mbp_djvu.txt

Posted on Mar 7, 2013, 7:37 AM

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Re: Not everyone has a high opinion of Challis's arrangement

by Alex Revell

Now, there's a bit of fine writing about jazz and Bix.

Posted on Mar 8, 2013, 9:21 AM

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Where was Paul Whiteman on Sep 14, 1926?

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Paul Whiteman returned to New York from his 1926 European trip on Jul 30, 1926. During August he had several recording sessions for Victor and rehearsed the band for the forthccoming transcontinental tour. The first stop was Los Angeles. He arrived at the Union Station on Sep 14, 1926. Here is the description of his arrival in Don Rayno's Whiteman Chronology:

Paul, Vanda, Paul, Jr., and the band arrive in Los Angeles at 2 pm and disembark at Union Station. They are met by a throng that includes Mayor George E. Cryer and other public officials, scree stars, theatre executives, and fifteen local dance and marching bands. Twenty Willys-Knight autos transport the Whiteman troupe in a parade down to City Hall, where Mayor Cryer crowns Whiteman the King of Jazz.

Here are two photos of Whiteman at his arrival at Union Station.

[linked image]

[linked image]

With the crown, Paul is indeed the King of Jazz!

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 15, 2013 5:33 PM

Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 5:33 PM

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What car did Whiteman have in Los Angeles in 1929?

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While the Whiteman band members bought Ford cars at a special price when they went to LA in 1929, Whiteman had a Cord!! Take a look.

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 5:49 PM

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Whiteman in front of his Cord.

by

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 5:53 PM

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Weird Photos of Whiteman.

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From Radio Digest, Dec 1929.

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 16, 2013, 5:23 PM

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Time to Re-Tire?

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Those checkerboard-whitewalls are the COOLEST tires I have ever seen! Where is the Vogue Tire Store when you need it??

-Brad K

Posted on Feb 16, 2013, 10:16 PM

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A High Resolution Image of Whiteman Wearing the Crown.

by

[linked image]

And here is Paul being crowned as "Swing King" at the Eleventh Annual Rhododendron Festival on June 17 or 18 in Asheville, North Carolina by Herman G. Nichols,  King of the Festival. From ebay. From one king to another king!

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 16, 2013, 8:16 AM

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A Grotesque Caricature of Whiteman by Cugat.

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In addition to holding a chihuahua in his arms, Xavier Cugat drew caricatures of celebrities. Here is one of Paul Whiteman from 1928.

[linked image]

Cugat should have devoted himself to holding his toy dog.

Albert



Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 11:11 AM

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I forgot to give the source.

by

This is from the October 1928 issue of Radio Digest.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 18, 2013 8:54 AM

Posted on Feb 18, 2013, 8:53 AM

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George, Paul, and Rhapsody in Blue.

by

From a 1930 issue of Radio Digest.

[linked image]

[linked image]

[linked image]

[linked image]

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 17, 2013 4:21 PM
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 17, 2013 4:05 PM

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 3:44 PM

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Before Rhapsody in Blue

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Whiteman' orchestra recorded several Gershwin compositions before Rhapsody in Blue. The second recording by Whiteman of a Gershwin tune was When Buddha Smiles, Oct 27, 1921. I love this tune and  recording.

[linked image]

Listen http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/8253 

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 4:46 PM

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Correction.

by

Thanks to Vince Giordano for the following correction.

Victor 18839-B is a medley of two tunes: When Buddha Smiles and (Introducing) Drifting Along with the Tide. When Buddha Smiles was written by Nacio Herbert Brown (music) and Arthur Freed (lyrics). Drifting Along with the Tide is George Gershwin's composition. Both tunes are from 1921 and published by Harms.

Thanks Vince.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 18, 2013 5:45 AM

Posted on Feb 18, 2013, 4:59 AM

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A Weird Version of the Sheet Music for When Buddha Smiles

by

First the version published by Harms in 1921.

[linked image]

Next a version published in France also in 1921. Lyrics by Lucien Boyer.

[linked image]

Finally a version published in Latvia also in 1921. Lyrics in French and English.

[linked image]

Here is a nice version of When Buddha Smiles by the Club de Vingt Orchestra.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDdD5E2Z9EQ

And another nice one by Rudy Wiedoeft's Californians, Oct 1921.

bixography.com/whenbudhasmileswiedoeft.mp3

Finally, a lovely version by Marty Grosz and Hot Winds.

bixography.com/WhenBuddhaSmilesMartyGrosz.mp3

The Hot Winds are: Panic Slim (tb-3) Dan Block (cl,as,b-cl,bar) Scott Robinson (cl,sop,c-melody-sax,bar,cnt,echo-cnt,alto-horn) Marty Grosz (g,bj,vcl-1,arr) Vince Giordano (b,tu,b-sax,vcl-2) Rob Garcia (d,glockenspiel)

 [linked image]

Here is a photo of the Hot Winds from Michael.

 [linked image]

Albert

PS Lucien Boyer, poet, lyricist, singer wrote about 1,200 songs. He was the father of Jean Boyer, also songwiter but better known as a film director. Jean is very dear to me because he directed Charles Trenet, my all-time favorite French singer, in two movies, Romance de Paris and Frederica. Somewhere I have copies of these films on VHS.





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 18, 2013 7:51 AM

Posted on Feb 18, 2013, 7:48 AM

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Much of This Article is B.S.

by

Gershwin's family was not poverty-stricken - they lived in reasonable comfort; Pop Gershwin always provided enough money for the necessary things.

Gershwin NEVER had to be dragged to a piano. Once his love of music kicked in, at about age 12, he just started playing and never looked back. Sometimes he had to be dragged FROM the piano.

"Rhapsody in Blue" was written in three weeks to a deadline, with George passing each completed sheet to Ferde Grofe in assembly-line fashion. Whiteman never had to had to harass George about it. The piece was ready for rehearsal by ten days before the concert.

How could Gershwin have been pacing nervously outside Aeolian Hall, waiting for the reaction to "Rhapsody" when he was onstage, performing it?

At least David Ewen made up for all this "Bixing" by writing (in 1955, revised 1970) a much more definitive and fact-based full-dress Gershwin biography.

-Brad K

Posted on Feb 20, 2013, 6:48 PM

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Re: Gershwin "Legendizing

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I loved Brad Kay's use of the verb "to Bix" in regard to liberties taken with this Gershwin anecdote. In one way, such embroidering is just sloppy reporting or callous manipulation of the facts for personal gain, but looked at another way, fictionalizing is as old as the human race. The deeds of Gilgamesh, David, Cleopatra, Beowulf, Davy Crockett, you name it, were doubtless "enhanced" to make them more saleable or make the writer's point that this was an exceptional person. (Cf. the dramatic license taken with thoroughly documented events in the movie Lincoln.) The various Bix myths that are still questioned, debunked, and argued over are a case in point, to the point that, at least in the field of music, they have inspired a verb.



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 5:18 AM

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From Forum Contributor Joe Mosbrook's Facebook Page.

by

Some early glitches have apparently been resolved and you can now read my 2003 "Cleveland Jazz History" book (full text and more than 300 photos) online. Go to The Cleveland Memory Project of Cleveland State University at www.clevelandmemory.com, click on "Read E-books," and scroll down to the book. It's presented chapter by chapter, reducing the time for downloading the full book. Many thanks to Bill Barrow and the folks at CSU for including it.
******************************
 
There is mportant information about Bix.
 
Albert


Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 11:20 AM

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I am writing a short piece on the ....

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.... June 13, 1928 Original Memphis Five recording session. I want to acknowledge the kind forumite who sent me the information about the roster of musicans in Historical HLP 25, Hot Clarinets. I seem to have misplaced his mail message and I don't remember who he was. Please, write to me agai. Thanks.

Albert



Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 7:17 AM

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Disagreement about the script was not the only ....

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.... problem that Whiteman had in the summer of 1929 when he was in Hollywood to film King of Jazz. There was a union dispute also. Take a look.

[linked image]

No wonder, Whiteman left Hollywood without reaching an agreement.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 3:30 PM

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Delays on making the "King of Jazz"

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Unresolved conflicts over Union rules, followed by disagreements between Whiteman and Universal over the script and format of the film itself, although no one would have realized at the time, were to rob jazz history of the one chance of seeing and possibly hearing Bix when the film was eventually released.
One of those "if only" examples that occurred regularly during Bix's life.

Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 11:43 PM

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From Radio Digest Nov 1929.

by

A

Broadway Welcome

Paul

Whiteman returned to New York from his Hollywood hunt for film fame because producers could find no suitable story for his picture. On the first night of broadcasting after getting back East the King of Jazz found the CBS studio tilled with flowers sent by friends and Tin Pan Alley.

That

was a cheerful sight, but more cheering now is the assurance that Universal Pictures has discovered a satisfactory story so that Whiteman's next journey to the west coast will witness the certain making of a "talkie."

Posted on Feb 16, 2013, 4:48 PM

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This is Why Movie Moguls Got Bad Publicity

by

Two points:

1)Universal Studios at this point in time was near or at bottom of the big motion picture factories, both in money earned and prestige. Laemmle's imperious behavior toward PWO certainly shows one reason why. Not letting Whiteman and orchestra perform a benefit is like whacking Bambi across the mouth with a two by four.

2)That 13 G's per week salary figure attributed to PWO may or may not be accurate. Sometimes salaries were grossly inflated in press releases to make motion-pic moguls appear more big hearted and free spending than they were. All threw nickels around like manhole covers.

HAIL FREDONIA!
Dan



Posted on Mar 9, 2013, 8:47 AM

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new 20's jazz

by hal smith

it sounds pretty good http://www.bryanferry.com/

Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 1:14 AM

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Sad News About Mike Durham

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From Mike's facebook page:

Dear Mike's Facebook friends....for those of you that do not know already, I have some sad news. This is  Cassie Durham, Mike's daughter and I am writing to tell you that Dad is seriously ill having being diagnosed with terminal (and untreatable) brain tumours on January 22nd. Things have moved on very fast and he is now in a hospice in Newcastle. I could not think of another way of letting everyone know and this seemed a good an option as any. As you can imagine, it has been a huge shock to Mum and Dad and my brother and I and all I can say is that he is comfortable and is not in any pain....say a wee prayer for him all of you - thanks.
 
I met Mike several times in Davenport and in Racine. We had breakfast and dinner together many times. A very interesting individual, an excellent musician and a man with a great sense of humor. He will be missed.
 
Albert




    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Feb 12, 2013 4:13 PM

Posted on Feb 12, 2013, 4:12 PM

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Sad news about Mike Durham

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Yes, sad news indeed. He has been very involved in many ways in keeping our music alive in Britain. In recent years this has included the incredibly successful Whitley Bay jazz festivals/parties which bring together sympathetic musicians from the UK, Europe and USA for a weekend of musical treats and fun. This has included a number of Bix related events.
The next party takes place at the start of November.


Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 2:18 AM

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A Great Sense of Humor is putting it mildly

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I'm extremely sorry to learn of Mike's condition. We became friends at one of the Racine Birthday Bash's in 2006. My wife and I greatly enjoyed Mike and Patty's company at dinner when he was here playing the Bix Festival in Davenport with his wonderful "Spats Langham" band and we connected by Email now and then. He was especially thrilled when he became a grandpa.
Mike always had something very witty to say between numbers with his band. I remember John Otto telling of a friend who had 75 trombones and Mike speaking up and saying, "What? He couldnt come up with one more?" (Remember the "Music Man").
Mike admitted to having quite a few Saxophones in his home and added, "I can't play the bloody things, I just like how they look!"
As we motored back to the Motel after breakfast one morning in Racine, Mike was driving and stopped for a red light. Rich Johnson and John Otto were in the back seat and a lively conversation was taking place. The light turned green but Mike was involved in conversation, and seeing no one was coming up behind us, I stayed quiet for a time. Finally, thinking we might sit through the light, I just said, "Mike, the lights green." He acted a bit startled and said, "Oh, I was just waiting for just the right shade of green."
Mike really enjoyed the Knoxville Tap jam sessions held after the Bix week end. He said he felt the closest to Bix when he was there since the place hadn't really changed since the time when Bix and Louie Armstrong played there. He said he hoped he was sharing a few molecules of air that they might have breathed and "looked closely at the towels in the mens room to see if he could find their finger prints"!
I will pray for our friend and that's a promise......
Jim Petersen, Davenport, Iowa

Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 1:48 PM

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