The Bixography Discussion Group

A vehicle for Bixophiles and other interested individuals to ask questions, make comments and exchange information about Bix Beiderbecke and related subjects. Any views expressed in the Bixography Forum represent solely the opinions of those expressing them and are not necessarily endorsed or opposed by Albert Haim unless he has signed the message.

I started archiving some of the threads that have been inactive for some time. The archived threads can be found at http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/archivesforum.htm

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my Grandfather

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My father has told me a little about my grandfather. I am really excited to hear my grandfather played with the Scranton Sirens. He even played with the Dorsey brothers. I think he was a woodwind player,saxophone,violin,and clarinet. I was hoping that you might have pictures of him or with him in it. His name was John Louis Parrish or Bunny Parrish. If you can help me with this I would be so greatful. I would like to give them to my father. He lost my grandfather when he was very young. Thank you





Posted on Feb 11, 2013, 4:07 PM

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Hello Linda and welcome to the Bixography forum.

by

I am afraid I don't remember your grandfather being mentioned in the forum. I did a quick search and found no information in the forum or in the internet about a John Louis Parrish or Bunny Parrish who was a member of the Scranton Sirens.. We had several postings about the Scranton Sirens, but I did not find any posting that mentioned John Louis "Bunny" Parrish. Can you give more information?

Albert

PS A google search of "John Parrish" "Scranton Sirens" yields one hit:

IMDb: Most Popular People With Date of Death in 1988

uk.imdb.com/search/name?death_date=1988-01-01...12...
You +1'd this publicly. 
John Parrish Actor, The Barefoot Contessa. 241. ... He joined Bill Lustig's Scranton Sirens, then Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey's Wild Canaries... 249. Mirko Vojkovic ...
The John Parrish in the page is not your grandfather.


Posted on Feb 12, 2013, 5:10 AM

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Raggin'/Ragging the Scale

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The great Adrian Rollini recorded this tune three times.

1. May 7, 1930. Joe Venuti's Blue Four. OKeh 41432. Adrian Rollini (bass sax, goofus, hfp) Joe Venuti (vn) Itzy Riskin (p) Eddie Lang (g).

2. Feb 28, 1933. Joe Venuti-Eddie Lang Blue Five. Columbia 2765-D.  Jimmy Dorsey (ct, cl as) Adrian Rollini (bass sax, goofus, vib) Joe Venuti (vln) Phil Wall (p) Eddie Lang (g).

3.  1949-1950. Adrian Rollini Trio. Mercury MC 20011. Adrian Rollini (vib, chimes), ?Frank Victor (g), unknown (b).

But before we listen to some of these recordings, lets go back to 1915 when composer/pianist Edward B. Claypool published his composition Ragging the Scale.

From  http://www.ragpiano.com/comps/claypool.shtml

Edward Browne Claypoole (December 20, 1883 to January 16, 1952) was born in Baltimore, Maryland. Little Eddie was drawn to the piano at an early age, and in his formative years his abilities were demonstrated by his proud mother as he was propped up on cushions picking out tunes. There was a brief foray with formal lessons that did not work out, so they were soon abandoned. As a result, Eddie was mostly self-taught, focusing on popular music forms, and without harmony or theory training unable to notate. His high school music teacher helped him out with the latter when Eddie decided he wanted to submit pieces for publication. Some of the earliest were written for school or community theater presentations. But instrumentals were soon to follow.
Eddie was a local celebrity in Baltimore in the 1910s, and in demand for a number of musical functions. It was also one of his more productive writing periods. Alabama Jigger became a popular band hit, and his Reuben Fox Trot a decent seller. Then he tipped the scales of justice in his favor with - the scale. The simple concept of applying syncopation to a scale - a scale played in five different tonalities no less - earned Claypoole a permanent place in the ragtime hit parade.
Appearing first in a beautiful but limited edition clown cover

[linked image]

(inexplicably replaced by a fairly generic notated cover),

[linked image]

Ragging the Scale was a sensation for Eddie, as well as for Will Von Tilzer's Broadway Music Corporation, where it landed following it's initial and more colorful printing issued by Von Tilzer's ArtMusic subsidiary. It sold well, was performed often around the country, and was one of the most cleverly simple pieces of the ragtime era. Within in year the piece had found its way to several different piano roll renditions. 
In the early 1920s Edward decided to test the waters again, and came up with the clever Dusting the Keys which actually included a little gimmick where the player was to literally dust the keys with a cloth on their index finger in the trio. With lyrics added in short order to create a song edition of the piece, it was yet another hit, but now completely in the novelty genre. Encouraged, he wrote four piano novelties that were all readily printed up by Mills Music, a leader in that genre during the 1920s. He also joined ASCAP in 1929.

The first recording of Ragging the Scale is from Aug 2, 1915 by Conway's band, avialable in the LOC Jukebox.

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4032

The second recording is from June 1, 1916 by Fred Van Eps on banjo accompanied by an orchestra conducted by Rosario Bourdon.

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4504

There were a couple of recordings in the 1920s. The important one was by Claypoole himself, mar 16, 1927 for Victor. The record was not issued. There is the claim in youtube that the only copy that survived is available.

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4504

However, in one of the comments,  it is stated that this is not Claypoole's recording but take 1 of  Joe Fingers Carr "Bar Room Piano".

We come to 1930 with Joe Venuti's Blue Four excellent version. Venuti dominates and there are a couple of nice solos by Adrian and Riskin. Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6jDdE5tVR0

In 1933 we have the Joe Venuti-Eddie Lang Blue Five recording. Again Venuti dominates and there are solos by Wall and Jimmy. Lovely stuff!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9L8p3DAG8k

This version was emulated in the 1980s by Keith Nichols and Friends in the 1980s. Terrific recreation. And with pizzicato!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_daQ4v06ek

Another excellent emulation in 2012 by Keith Nichols, Emma Fisk, Frans Sjostrom, Martin Wheatley. Recorded on October 26, 2012 by Michael Steinman.

I hope you enjoyed this musical journey through the decades.

Albert



Posted on Feb 11, 2013, 11:18 AM

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Ragging the sacle

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Rollini recorded Raggin' the scale in January 1950 and it ws issued on the 10" LP Mercury
MG 20011 (not MC 2001).

Björn Englund

Solna, Sweden

Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 4:19 AM

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Thanks for the correction.

by

Indeed, I mistyped the letter G. I gave MC instead of MG. However, I did give the correct number, 20011.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 5:40 AM

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It's a pity...

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...that Adrian wasn't given more freedom on this tune when with Venuti. The 1980s version with John Barnes on bassax was certainly inspired by Adrian. Keith Nichols sent me a second take from this session. I'll dig it out and send you a copy. I feel it is even better than the filmed take. It's fun to play them back to back.

Thanks for the posting.

Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 8:51 AM

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The 1980s version...

by Russell Davies

...is excerpted from a BBC-TV programme I made (with Phil Speight directing) called The Lowest of the Low" -- a history of the bass-sax. John Barnes didn't own a bsx at the time, and so he's playing mine, brilliantly I think. At one stage in the film, we assembled 24 bass-saxes playing together (all Rollini fans, naturally): I believe "Sweet Georgia Brown" was the tune selected for broadcast. And in the final scene of the film, four of us played the old hymn "Abide With Me" in London's Natural History Museum, in the late evening, in the shadow of the biggest of their dinosaur skeletons. The four harmony parts were lowered -- that is, a contrabass sax took the bass part, I played the tenor part on bass-sax, Kathy Stobart played the alto part on tenor, and John Barnes played the top line on c-melody sax. The idea that the BBC might pay for such an excursion to be immortalized today... well, they just wouldn't, sadly.
R.D.

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 2:55 PM

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Bix was a busy guy on May 15, 1928. All with Whiteman.

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- Recorded My Melancholy Baby. Listen to Bix's obbligato behind the vocal.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpClMwGXQBA

- Was a participant in the filming of the Fox News item about Whiteman leaving Victor and joining Columbia.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V96ZxVFvCtM

- Played at Loew's Metropolitan Theatre in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, May 15, 1928.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 2:48 PM

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Who was Nelson Maples? A Satellite Whiteman band.

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Here is the cover of the sheet music of The Hoodoo Man.

[linked image]

Note the photo of Nelson Maple [incorrect spelling; icorrect spelling is Maples]. He was the director of one of Whiteman's satellite bands, Paul Whiteman's S. S. Leviathan Orchestra. I remind you that Whiteman returned from his 1923 trip to England on the S. S. Leviathan.

[linked image]

The Leviathan night club where the ship bands played for first-class passsengers.

[linked image]

There is another connection between Maples and Whiteman. Maples was the pianist in the Mason-Dixon Seven, a band that also included other future Whiteman's band musicians, Charles Gaylord, Austin Young and Jack Fulton.

Whiteman' orchestra recorded Hoodoo Man on May 2, 1924 (four takes, destroyed) and again on May 9, 1924 (three takes, take 7 mastered).

[linked image]

Don Rayno tells us this is an "interesting record, with a variety of solos." Indeed, listen.

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9862

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 11:48 AM

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Nelson Maples and the S. S. Leviathan orchestra in the LOC Jukebox.

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http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/artists/detail/id/625/

Note that LOC pages give Maples, but the record labels give Maple.

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 11:59 AM

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Another Sheet Music Cover with the Leviathan Orhestra.

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[linked image]

Get a load of the band leaders who composed this tune, all having great success in California. Here are a couple of recordings of this lovely tune.

Art Hickman  http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/7222

Paul Whiteman  http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9864

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 12:18 PM

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I just found this photo of Old Whiteman and Young Bing.

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[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 12:37 PM

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A Young, Thin Whiteman

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From the LOC

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 11, 2013, 12:59 PM

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More Photos from the LOC Website. Roger Wolfe Kahn.

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Two poses of Roger Wolfe Kahn. No dates avialble.

[linked image]

[linked image]

One of myy favorite RWK recordings.

I Can't Believe That You're In Love With Me. Mar 2, 1927. Victor 20573. Lovely tune and great arrangement. Tommy Gott, Leo McConville, Miff Mole, Joe Venuti, Irving Brosky, Vic Berton among others.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3NmbNlBwKE

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 11, 2013, 2:53 PM

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More Phots

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The Benson Orchestra of Chicago.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 12, 2013, 1:28 PM

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Don Murray with Don Voorhees?

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From the Syracuse Journal, March 7, 1937.

[linked image]

Lots of first-class 1920s musicians cited as being part of Don Voorhees's band. Lord lists recordings of Voorhees with Mole, Nichols, McDonough, Goodman and Tommy Dorsey. No recordings that I know of with Jimmy  Dorsey, Venuti, Schutt and Livingston. Maybe they played with Voorhees but did not record? The one that really surprised me was Don Murray.

Does anyone know?

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 9, 2013, 3:59 PM

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Don Murray in Paris in 1928.

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Thanks to Mark Berresford in a facebook page.

[linked image]

Don Murray was in Europe with Ted Lewis' band. Here is a photo of the band in the Ambassadeurs Hotel in Paris. Don is holding a clarinet and is in front ot the bassist.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 14, 2013, 3:56 PM

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Another photo of Don Murray with the Ted Lewis Orchestra.

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[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 14, 2013, 4:12 PM

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Randy Sandke celebrates Bix's Birthday.

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RANDY SANDKE HOMAGE TO LOUIS ARMSTRONG +BIX BEIDERBECKE

[linked image] [linked image]

Saturday, March 9, 2013, 8:00 PM
Flushing Town Hall
$15/$10 Members and Students with ID

Born just two years apart, Louis Armstrong (New Orleans, 1901) and Leon Bismark Bix Beiderbecke (Davenport, Iowa) became two of the most influential musicians in the early history of Jazz. Tonight, Armstrong/Beiderbecke scholar, trumpeter, composer Randy Sandke performs an homage to these greats who called Queens their home, and are listed on FTHs Queens Jazz Trail Map©. Join us for a post-show Q&A and Birthday Cake in honor of Bix, who was born March 10, 1903.



Posted on Feb 9, 2013, 11:45 AM

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Problems with ahaim@bixography

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I exceeded by 4 GB the space alloted to Bixography.com. I cannot download email messages to my bixography address. Until further notice, please use my yahoo address alberthaim@yahoo.com

Thanks

Albert



Posted on Feb 8, 2013, 11:08 AM

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ahaim@bixography is working again

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Unfortunately, messages sent in the last two or three days were lost in the ether. Please send messages again.

Thank you.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 9, 2013, 6:57 AM

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Vera Cox Son

by Gerri Bowers

Dr. John "Jack" Korn died on Feb. 5th. He was born Nov. 14, 1928, son of Vera Cox and Ferdinand Korn. Dr. Korn used to come to the Festival. Very nice man, easy to talk to.

Posted on Feb 8, 2013, 7:32 AM

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Condolences to the Korn family

by

I interviewd Jack and his son in Davenport a few years ago. Both were extremely friendly and answered openly all the questions I asked. I am sorry to learn about Jack's passing.

Albert



Posted on Feb 8, 2013, 9:59 AM

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vera cox korn

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I had the privilege of meeting Vera at the Bix Fest in 1982. She told me a fascinating story about what it was like to go on dates with Bix, that they would go to a restaurant where there was a band, and Bix would ask to sit in. He could play anything - clarinet, drums....Meanwhile poor vera would be left by herself for the rest of the evening!

Posted on Feb 11, 2013, 6:42 AM

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Re: Vera Cox Son

by David Logue

Wasn't he the baby that Bix brought a bag peanuts to when he came to visit Vera?

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 7:04 PM

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Yes, it was....

by

.... according to "Bix, Man and Legend."

Albert



Posted on Feb 18, 2013, 12:11 PM

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Johnny Wiggs' Bayou Stompers

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNJya6jrn1I

Michael Steinman writes in his blog,

"Wiggs continues to astonish.  He saw Joe Oliver in New Orleans (I seem to remember this was 1919) and Oliver left a lasting impression.  But then Wiggs heard Bix and those wandering odes took over -- haunting but always mobile.
I hear in Wiggs, who was 73 at the time of this video, a sweet, sad evocation of what Bix might have sounded like had he lived on this long.  Wiggs' music plunges forward while looking over its shoulder in a melancholy, ruminative way.  And although Wiggs recorded early (1927) and from 1949 into the fifties, his late work fully expresses a kind of autumnal sensibility, delicate without being timid or maudlin -- the sweet voice of an elder who has seen a great deal and knows that life is sadly finite but celebrates that life with his cornet."

Indeed, echoes of Bix. Very nice tune, except for the title! It reminds me  of  Fats Waller's lovely Louisiana Fairy Tale http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yuD0QptJW0 

According to the description of the video,

"Manassas Jazz Festival- December 2, 1972. This clip is from an extremely poor video source, but thought the personnel and material was worth salvaging. Johnny Wiggs, Cornet - Raymond Burke, Clarinet - Graham Stewart, Trombone - Bob Greene, Piano - Danny Barker, Guitar - Freddy Moore, Drums. - "Fat Cat" McRee, M.C. -Stonewall Jackson HS, Manassas,VA

At the same jazz festival, Johnny Wigggsplayed I'll Be A Friend With Pleasure. One of the tracks in Fat Cats Jazz FCJ129.  But the personnel is different: Johnny Wiggs, c; Bill Allred, tb; Raymond Burke, cl; Art Hodes, p; George 'Butch' Hall, g; Van Perry, sb; Cliff Leeman, d; Johnson 'Fat Cat' McRee, vocal. Does anyone have this LP? If so, could you send an mp3 of Friend with Pleasure?

More about Johnny Wiggs in http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1240149034

And listen to Johnny with Snoozy Quinn doing "Singin' the Blues."

http://louisdl.louislibraries.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/JAZ/id/1166/rec/6

More about Johnny Wiggs in the Louisiana State Museum.

http://louisdl.louislibraries.org/cdm/search/collection/JAZ/searchterm/johnny%20wiggs/order/nosort

Albert



Posted on Feb 8, 2013, 7:14 AM

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A monster storm is coming (again!!) to ....

by

.... Long Island. Apparently, Suffolk County (where we live) will be hit the hardest. It is predicted that from Friday night into Saturday, we'll have a blizzard, maybe close to two feet of snow and winds up to 60 MPH. We will likely loose power - and maybe worse. Do not be surprised if your postings do not show up for a while.

Fortunately, I have a high quality snow blower. I tested it this afternoon, and it is working like a charm. Lots of food in the house, lots of gasoline for the snow blower and generator. As long as trees don't fall on the house, I think we are ready.

I'll give updates.

Albert



Posted on Feb 7, 2013, 3:43 PM

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Stay Safe!

by

We're hearing about that big blizzard here in Pittsburgh, where we're supposed to get messy freezing rain -- which won't close the university, but we'll be scarily creeping out at our own peril if it sleets. Luckily the policy is we can stay home if we feel unsafe in sleet or snow --

Albert, you and your wife be careful and keep us apprised if you can -- I certainly hope you can keep your electric power this time --

Laura

Posted on Feb 7, 2013, 7:00 PM

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Thanks for your concern

by

We appreciate it very much.

Albert



Posted on Feb 7, 2013, 7:37 PM

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Re: Thanks for your concern

by hal smith

What else is new

Posted on Feb 7, 2013, 10:49 PM

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Good Movie To See As The Snow Hits The Fan

by

"The Day After Tomorrow" (2004) starring Dennis Quaid, Jake Gyllenhaal.

Global Warming wreaks havoc with global weather: Los Angeles destroyed by F-5 tornadoes! Tokyo clobbered by soccer ball-sized hail! New York flooded and frozen over! Eye of the superstorm brings 150-degrees-below-zero supercooled air down from the stratosphere, instantly freeze-drying everything in its path! New Ice Age begins!

Call it Method movie-watching...

good luck,
Brad

Posted on Feb 7, 2013, 11:02 PM

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Re: Thanks for your concern

by Rob Rothberg

Good luck in the storm, Albert -- again! Already a few inches of snow here in NJ. Like you, I hope the trees stay up and the power stays on. No generator here, just a flashlight, some candles, and a crank-up phonograph. Best wishes to you and Mima.

Posted on Feb 8, 2013, 1:30 PM

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So far, so good, but the storm did not even start yet.

by

The nightmare comes in at night.

Thanks for writing. I hope things are not as bad in NJ as they are on LI. Take care, buddy.

Albert



Posted on Feb 8, 2013, 2:47 PM

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We did not loose electric power, but ....

by

.... the area of Long Island where I live got the brunt of the snowfall. The weather man said 30 inches in Stony Brook. I ran the snow blower last night and removed some of the snow. But a lot more fell overnight. I must have at least two feet right now. Time to go out and shovel enough snow so I can get the snowblower out of the garage.

Albert



Posted on Feb 9, 2013, 7:02 AM

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Our street has not been plowed yet ....

by

.... and long stretches of the Long Island Expressway and other main roads are still closed. The only time I remember having seen a worse snow fall was in the early 1960s when we lived in State College Pennsylvania. I could not open the front door of the house and after shoveling out the snow on the driveway, the snow on the sides was close to six feet in height.

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 5:35 AM

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Our street finally got plowed a few hours ago. They plugged my driveway.

by

It is raining a lot, so nothing that can be done until the rain stops. I am confident we will be able to clear the end of the driveway and go out tomorrow. In the meantime, I write a lot.

Albert



Posted on Feb 11, 2013, 11:21 AM

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His Master's Voice, Hayes, Middlesex, England.

by

From Ken B.

[linked image]

Ken writes, I have recently come across this reproduction of an early 1920's publicity postcard looking north.
Before the construction of the large Gramophone Company complex around 1900, Hayes was just a rural country village.
The main line railway from London to Bristol can be seen in the foreground.

Compare with the Victor Talking Machine Company complex in Camden NJ.
 
[linked image]
Courtesy of  mainspringpress.com
 
Thanks, Ken for the photo.
 
Take a look at this gorgeous HMV label of Bix's I'll Be A Friend With Pleasure.
 
[linked image]
 
Albert
 
 


Posted on Feb 5, 2013, 1:26 PM

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Hoagy and Bix.

by

On the occasion of the 1979 Newport Jazz Festival, the June 27, 1979 issue of the New York Times had an article about Hoagy Carmichael. Here is an excerpt where Bix is mentioned.

[linked image]

Bix's girl friend mentioned by Hoagy was Alice. I am pleased to announce that the article "Alice and Bix" by Albert Haim and Chris Barry has been accepted for publication, following peer review, in the Journal of Jazz Studies. It will appear in the Spring 2013 issue of the journal.

From http://jjs.libraries.rutgers.edu/index.php/jjs

Journal of Jazz Studies

ISSN 2158-1401

The Journal of Jazz Studies (JJS), formerly the print journal Annual Review of Jazz Studies, is an open-access online journal, which is peer reviewed and published by the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. Addressed to specialists and fans alike, JJS provides a forum for the ever-expanding range and depth of jazz scholarship, from technical analyses to oral history to bibliography to cultural interpretation. The editors of JJS are Edward Berger, Henry Martin, and Dan Morgenstern; the managing editor is Jeffery S. McMillan.

Albert



Posted on Feb 4, 2013, 4:15 PM

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Re: Hoagy and Bix

by

Hoagy's description of Bix as "He was a strange, distant man, very hard to know" appears to be the general consensus of most of his fellow musicians and colleagues, some of whom were interviewed in Brigitte Berman's 1981 film.
Hoagy also states in the 1955 book, "Hear me Talkin' to Ya" when commenting on the last few weeks of Bix's life, "The darkness was closing in on Bix and he didn't seem to care". And in a later paragraph, Hoagy, referring to the girl Bix had brought over to his apartment says, "We didn't have a drink, we didn't talk music, and it soon became apparent that this girl had no idea who Bix was. And then the terrible thought struck me--I didn't know either".
These words from Hoagy, who knew Bix as a friend closer than most from the time of the Wolverines to those last tragic days in August 1931.

Posted on Feb 4, 2013, 9:13 PM

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Myths

by

On July 25, 2008, I presented a lecture titled "Bix, the Man, Not the Legend" at the Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Festival, Davenport, Iowa. The point of my lecture was to argue against so many of the myths that have been propagated about Bix.

The first part of the lecture dealt precisely with the question of Bix being unfathomable. By means of words and images, I tried to bring in some facts about Bix's relationships with his fellow musicians. The power point presentation I used for the lecture is available in

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/PowerPointPresentations/Presentationdav2008post.ppt

(Be patient, it make take a while to download the file. You will need power point viewer, available free of charge from http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/powerpoint-help/view-a-presentation-without-powerpoint-2010-HA102000544.aspx )

Let us not forget that Bix was a musical genius. By definition, a genius is unknowable to the common, average individual. I developed in words the same arguments I had in the power point presentation. Take a look at my posting and comments in the thread that follows it.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1208291563/Not+an+enigma+for+me+%28warning-+long+posting%21%21%29

Albert



Posted on Feb 5, 2013, 7:15 AM

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Enigma

by Andy Vaaler

To be an enigma, there has to be some curious investigator trying to figure out what makes the mystery guy tick. You can hunt down the details and dates of a man's life, but this may never satisfy the curiosity to know the shape of his soul.

Rewrite some of the dialogue in this scene, and you can imagine Phil Evans getting the assingment from Mr Ralston to find Rosebud "dead or alive".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hj9lloAKw4c

Posted on Feb 6, 2013, 3:21 PM

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More on Hoagy's comments

by

If Hoagy, being one of Bix's closest friends but who still found him, even after knowing him for seven years, to be something of an enigma, then nobody, apart perhaps from his folks back home in Davenport could ever have got close to him.
Today, over eighty years after his death, it still adds to the fascination we hold of the life and music of this wayward genius.

Posted on Feb 5, 2013, 12:25 PM

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Can 't wait for the article!

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ALbert, I'm very much looking forward to reading this article! I hope this Spring issue appears very soon.

Laura

Posted on Feb 5, 2013, 7:38 AM

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Mostly about Alice and her family.

by

Chris and I don't have anything new about the relationship between Alice and Bix. The article is mostly about Alice before and after she met Bix.

Albert



Posted on Feb 6, 2013, 6:11 AM

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But that is very interesting

by

to know just who Bix's Alice was, and to have some information on her.

Laura

Posted on Feb 6, 2013, 6:16 AM

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More Hoagy

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Actually, Albert, this belongs rightfully on the other Hoagy thread. More convenient to post it here, though. When I was a kid, a cable channel out of Greensboro, NC(channel 48) came on-air, and it showed lots of 1950's shows, including a golfing show where Slammin' Sammy Snead would play different celebrities 9 holes of golf. One of the guys he beat the pants off of was our pal Hoagland Carmichael. Snead could have spotted Hoagy 2 or 3 strokes per hole and still won going away. Since neither Bix nor Hoagy was overly gifted with a set of clubs, I wouldn't have wanted to have to follow that twosome around any course unless I had a full day open. Must've taken them 5 hours or more to get in a round.

Albert, I have a few items to send you if you want them, an NBC radio guide with Amos 'n Andy on the cover dated October 1930, a picture of my dad and uncle in the Leaksville(NC) Cornet Band from around the turn of the century, and 4 pages of the El Paso Herald from 1919 which list my half-uncle, O. P. Lindsay from Madison(NC), as a WW1 flying ace with 6 kills. It's a HUGE paper, 2 columns wider than the size we use today. Just E-mail me with a safe address to send them to and I will get them in the mail next week. You're the only person I know who'd get just as much enjoyment from them as I have.

Hail Fredonia!
Dan Taylor
P.S Another of Snead's TV golf victims was Harpo Marx.


Posted on Feb 21, 2013, 9:00 AM

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An excellent photo of Elizalde's band.

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From Mike Thomas website.

[linked image]

Musicians, Standing, from left: George Hurley (violin), Nobby Knight (trumpet), Len Fillis (banjo/guitar), Norman Payne (trumpet), Mario Lorenzi (harp), Tiny Stock (bass), Chelsea Quealey (trumpet), Billy Mason (piano), Rex Owen, Phil Cardew, Bobby Davis, Harry Hayes (clarinets & saxophones), Adrian Rollini (bass sax and xylophone).
Sitting, from left: Ronnie Gubertini (drums), Al Bowlly (guitar and vocal), Fred Elizalde (at piano), Len Lee, Ben Frankel (violins).

Albert



Posted on Feb 4, 2013, 7:53 AM

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Only three of the guys are ....

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.... smiling. I think the "say cheese" for people to smile when they are photographed is a modern invention. happy.gif I'll you my opinion, I prefer serious faces.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 4, 2013, 11:25 AM

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Juxtapositions: Sugar versus Sugar

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The complete Elizalde version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qSlLxykkjN8  Jan 15 1928

Bix's solos in Whiteman's two takes of Sugar.  
bixography.com/SugarBixTwoTakes.mp3

Solo in Elizalde's recording followed by Bix's solo in one of his takes. bixography.com/SugarElizaldeBix.mp3

We discusssed the fact that Elizalde's recording preceded Whiteman's by over a month and that the two arrangements were similar. Maybe Rollini brought the Bill Challis arrangement with him to England or remembered it from listening to Whiteman play the tune. But how could  Bix's improvised solo(s) of Feb 28, 1928 be copied on Jan 15, 1928??????

By the way, Chelsea Quealey and Norman Payne were present at the recording session where Elizalde recorded Sugar. Who does the Bix emulation? If Chelsea, could he have heard Bix playing a solo in Sugar in the US and remember it a month or two later in England? Not posssible. As far as I know, the first time that Whiteman played Sugar was on Nov 29, 1927 in Columbus OH. The Whiteman band had been on tour since Sep 25, 1927; Bix joined Whiteman in Indianapolis on Oct 27, 1927. Chelsea, Adrian and Bobby left for England soon after the New Yorkers folded in Sep 1927.  

It's a puzzlement!

Albert



Posted on Feb 4, 2013, 12:50 PM

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Arrival dates for Quealey, Davis and Rollini

by Nick Dellow


Chelsea Quealey, Bobby Davis and Adrian Rollini didn't leave for England soon after the New Yorkers Club folded in September 1927 (I want to mention here, just for the sake of clarity, that Quealey wasn't a member of Rollini's band at the New Yorkers Club). In fact, all three didn't leave for England until late December 1927. I have a copy of a letter from the Savoy Hotel's management to Manuel Elizalde (Fred's brother and manager) asking him to take the permits for Quealey, Davis and Rollini to the Liverpool docks where they disembarked. The letter is dated December 24th, 1927, so it is assumed that Manuel would have received it on 27th December (since there would have been no postal service on December 25th or 26th). Manuel presumably travelled to Liverpool on December 28th or 29th; the Elizalde band started at the Savoy Hotel on New Year's Eve. Given that the crossing would have taken about five days, the musicians would have probably departed from New York on December 23rd.

It is definitely Quealey who plays the trumpet solo on Elizalde's version of "Sugar". Norman Payne told me that Adrian Rollini brought a pile of Bill Challis arrangements with him. The Elizalde band recorded several of these, specifically Under The Moon, Sugar, My Pet, Smile and Coquette. I also have BBC radio broadcast sheets that list the numbers the Elizalde band played during their weekly broadcasts from the Savoy Hotel. Amongst these is "The Blue Room" and I wouldn't mind betting that this was the famous arrangement by Bill Challis that the Goldkette band (and the Elizalde band!) sadly never recorded.





Posted on Feb 5, 2013, 1:45 AM

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Thanks for providing exact dates. However, Chelsea could not have heard Bix ....

by

.... playing Sugar. As we know, Bix (and Tram) joined Whiteman on Oct 27, 1927 in Indianapolis while Whiteman was on his fall tour. After Indianapolis, the orchestra went to St. Louis, Chicago, Ohio, Michigan, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, various towns in Pennsylvania, and finally returned to New York City on Dec 31, 1927. By this time Chelsea had left for England.

Could Challis have written Bix's solo in his arrangement of Sugar? I don't think so. According to Don Rayno who examined all of Challis's arrangements for Whiteman, As he typically did, Challis wrote out the melody for Bix in his part, with the single instruction, "improvise." This is written specifically for the arrangment of  Sugar.

In my last posting I had a juxtaposition of Bix's solo with Chelsea's solo for one of the takes of Sugar. Here is a juxtaposition of Chelsea's solo with Bix's solo in the other take.

bixography.com/SugarElizaldeBix2.mp3

Chelsea uses a rip in the second part of his solo, just like Bix did in one of his solos. It seems to me that Chelsea is copying from both of Bix's solos. Can anyone shed some light on this mystery?

Albert



Posted on Feb 5, 2013, 6:20 AM

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Quealey, the Trail Blazer

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Very curious indeed. Chelsea Quealey could not have heard Whiteman with Bix play "Sugar" before leaving the States. Unless they did it on a broadcast or something. Barring that:

Yes, there are definite stylistic and gestural similarities between the solos here, even if the note-for-note details differ. Quealey certainly studied Bix. But is he really copying Bix? Is it possible that Mr. Quealey - no slouch creatively himself - arrived under his own steam at some of the same musical conclusions that Bix did in "Sugar"? Considering they were using the same arrangement? It might be enlightening to compare Quealey and Bix solos on other tunes they both recorded - if there are any!

-Brad K

p. s. The Devil is in the details. Comparing the two solos, I am struck more by their differences than their similarities. Quealey is striving, Bix is arriving.

Posted on Feb 5, 2013, 5:37 PM

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Blue River

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Bix with Goldkette incoming.jazz-on-line.com/a/mp3a/VIC20981-B.mp3

Bix with Trumbauer  incoming.jazz-on-line.com/a/mp3h/DH488728.mp3

Chelsea with the California Ramblers  http://redhotjazz.com/Songs/caramblers/blueriver.ra 4:31 in duration, an Edison recording. Nice for the extra length.

Here is a juxtaposition of Chelsea's and Bix's solos.

bixbeiderbecke.com/BlueRiverBixCheksea.mp3

I guess there are some similarities. But I remind you of two facts.
1.Bix with Tram's recording is from Aug 25, 1927, the California Ramblers' recording is from Sep 19, 1927.
2. This is the time when the Godlkette band was fodling and the New Yorkers were being constituted and had rehearsals.

Maybe Chelsea was present at the rehearsals. Maybe Chelsea saw the Goldkette band playing Blue River. In my book, likely on both counts.

Comments?

Albert

PS Do you think that Bobby Davis's solo  at 3:45 shows a Bixian influence? I think it does.



Posted on Feb 6, 2013, 9:39 AM

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Reality Check

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Indeed - some marked similarities in the two solos of "Blue River."

Bix and Chelsea Quealey both were VERY busy guys. Look at the California Ramblers discography: 1927 alone takes five pages in Rust. And that's only recordings - the Ramblers also were working constantly for dances and broadcasts (Ed Kirkeby's diary would substantiate that).

Point is, it would have been a rare treat for Chelsea Quealey, with his heavy agenda, to have had the time and opportunity to go hear his colleague Bix in action, and take notes on what Bix was playing. It seems much more likely that Mr. Quealey, who undoubtedly heard Bix here and there, and was deeply influenced, could generate very similar jazz whenever he wanted. The consistency of CQ's inventive playing on record after record is proof enough.

The Elizalde record of "Sugar," and the chronology of it, seems clearly to show Chelsea independently reaching some of the same musical conclusions as Bix. For me, that is a much more plausible explanation than CQ methodically hunting down every last Bixian note to copy.

-Brad K

Posted on Feb 6, 2013, 2:34 PM

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Too much of a coincidence

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There are strong similarities between the solos by Bix and by Chelsea in their respective solos for Blue River. I find it unlikely that two different musicians would come up with such similar concepts and ideas for their solos.


Some relevant facts.


1. The Goldkette band had an engagement at the Million Dollar Theatre in Atlantic City from Aug 8 to Sep 5, 1927).
2. On Aug 25, a group of Goldkette musicians went to the OKeh studios in New York City and recorded Three Blind Mice, Blue River and There's A Cradle in Caroline.
3. The Goldkette band's engagement at Roseland began on Sep 8, 1927 and ended on Sep 18, 1927. According to Irving Riskin, there were at least 200 musicians in Roseland on the last performance.
4. On Sep 15, 1927, the Goldkette band recorded Blue River and Clementine.
5. On Sep 9. 12, 13, 14, 19, 20 and 21, 1927, the New Yorkers had rehearsals.
6. Chelsea Quealey with the California Ramblers recorded Blue River on Sep 19, 1927.


Indeed, Chelsea was a busy guy. But he had free time. Few recording sessions in the period of interest. Between Sep 8 (when the Goldkette band moved to New York City and Sep 19, 1927 (when Chelsea recorded Blue River), Chelsea had only three recording sessions:
Sep 8, 1927 - Varsity Ramblers with Adrian Rollini
Sep 12, 1927 - Ted Wallace with Adrian Rollini
Sep 19, 1927 Golden Gate Orch, no Rollini.


We know that Adrian and Chelsea were childhood friends. Would it not be reasonable that when Adrian was rehearsing the New Yorkers, he would bring in his buddy, at least once, to observe the proceedings? After all, it was the first time that Adrian was going on his own, organizing his own band. Is it possible that Adrian and Chelsea attended the last appearance of the Goldkette band at Roseland? After all, several of the musicians in the Goldkette band had been signed up for the New Yorkers.


I am not saying that Chelsea Quealey was following Bix around like a laptop. But the circumtances in Sep 1927 were rather unusual -the Goldkette band folding, the New Yorkers being organized by Chelsea's buddy Adrian. It is possible and even likely that Chelsea heard Bix doing his improvisations on Blue River, a tune that was "in the air" at the time (Bix recorded the tune twice at this time - once with Tram on Aug 25 and again with Goldkette on Sep 15, 1927.) The smoking gun, in my opinion, is the strong similarities between Bix's and Chelsea's solos in their respective recordings of Blue River. What is the probability that two different musicians would produce such similar improvised solos?


Of course, I still have the problem of  Sugar.


Albert



Posted on Feb 7, 2013, 12:11 PM

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Re: Too much of a coincidence

by Nick Dellow


I had a vague notion that there was an earlier post about Quealey copying Bix in another Elizalde recording, and I just found it!:-

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1185132733/Well+Done%21





Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 3:32 PM

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Re: Arrival dates for Quealey, Davis and Rollini

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The Dorsey Brothers did record the Challis Goldkette chart of "Blue Room" for Brunswick in 1933.

Posted on Feb 7, 2013, 9:07 PM

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A completely different version of Sugar by Adrian Rollini in ....

by

.... 1934 (not 1935 as the video tells us.) Klein, Teagarden, Goodman, van Eps, King  etc.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7MPVnmT_3Q

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 5:55 AM

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Second Attempt: The OM5 Recording Session of June 13, 1928

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On June 13, 1928, the Original Memphis Five recorded three sides for Vocalion: I'm More Than Satisfied, My Angeline and Fireworks. Discographies vary widely in the roster of musicians they assign to this session.

Rust, Jazz Discography 2002 edition - Phil Napoleon, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Hoagy Carmichael, unknown bj, Ray Bauduc.

Rust, Jazz Discography 1978 edition - Phil Napoleon, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Frank Signorelli, ? Stan King.

Lord, Jazz on line - Phil Napoleon, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Frank Signorelli, possibly Hoagy Carmichael in My Angeline, possibly Eddie Lang on guitar in Fireworks, Vic Berton.

Ross Laird, Brunswick Discography - Orch: six men.

Robert Stockdale in both the Jimmy Dorsey and Tommy Dorsey Discographies - Phil Napoleon, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Frank Signorelli, Stan King or Jack Roth.

Robert Stockdale in That's It - Studio records show that six men were involved and a banjo is heard on My Angeline leading some to suggest it is Eddie Lang.

Discography in Historical HLP 25, Hot Clarinets - Fireworks: Phil Napoleon, Jimmy Dorsey, Tommy Dorsey, Frank Signorelli, Jack Roth. 

Liners  in Timeless CD CBC 1-046 - Phil Napoleon, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Frank Signorelli, possibly Hoagy Carmichael in My Angeline, possibly Eddie Lang on banjo in Fireworks, Vic Berton.

These recordings are not listed in "The Fabulous Fives, A full discography of the "Six Big Fives" of early white New York jazz; Compiled by Horst H. Lange,1959, Germany.

There is no problem with the identities of trumpet, trombone and reed players: they are Phil Napoleon, Tommy Dorsey and Jimmy Dorsey, respectively.

Several problems arise with the identities of the musicians who play piano, banjo/guitar and, particularly, drums. First, here is an mp3 file with transfers of the three recordings.

bixbeiderbecke.com/CharlestonChasers13June1928.mp3

Piano. Most discographies give Frank Signorelli, but there is mention of possibly Hoagy Carmichael being the pianist in My Angeline. This suggestion is easily ruled out. Hoagy was in Bloomington, LakeGage and Indianapolis from late May 1928 to the end of the year.

On June 1, 1928, Hoagy was in Bloomington receiving an honorary degree from the Book Nook administrators. Here is the diploma.

http://fedora.dlib.indiana.edu/fedora/get/iudl:22721/LARGE

And here is a photo of Hoagy leading the Book Nook Commencement Parade.parade.

http://fedora.dlib.indiana.edu/fedora/get/iudl:14225/LARGE

 

For the rest of the summer, Hoagy had a band playing in resorts such as LakeGage. By the fall of 1928, he secured a position as band leader for the prestigious Columbia Club of Indianapolis.

 

Banjo/Guitar. There are suggestions of the possible presence of Eddie Lang on banjo or guitar in My Angeline and in Fireworks. Rust lists an unknown banjoist for the session. Questions: 1. Do you hear a banjo and or guitar in the three recordings under consideration. I think I hear a guitar behind the alto sax solo in My Angeline. I hear a banjo in Fireworks. Please give your opinions. 2. If a banjo or guitar, can you tell if it is Eddie Lang? I just wrote to Mike Peters, the Eddie Lang specialist, and asked him for his assessment.

 

Drummer. This is all over the place: Ray Bauduc, Jack Roth, Vic Berton, Stan King. I asked a question about the identity of the drummer in a facebook page and two people were of the opinion that the drummer was none of the above, but Chauncey Morehouse. I also asked drummer/jazz scholar Hal Smith. He thinks it is Ray Bauduc. I cant tell, but because of my respect for Hals judgment and musicianship, I would go with Ray Bauduc. Opinions, please.

 

In summary:

1. Banjo and/or guitar in which selections? Eddie Lang?

2. Who is the drummer?

 

I would appreciate comments on all of this. It is worth listening to these recordings carefully, they are really terrific.

 

Albert

 




Posted on Feb 3, 2013, 9:19 AM

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One forumite responded offline ....

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.... with a detailed and highly informative analysis. Thank you very much.

Are there any other forumites who find the subject worth examining?  If so, please write either on- or off- line. Thank you.

Albert



Posted on Feb 4, 2013, 7:21 AM

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fireworks

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I propose the following personnel for this session: Red Nichols (cornet)' Tommy Dorsey (trombone), Jimmy Dorsey (clarinet & alto saxophone) Spencer Clark (bass saxophone), Frank Signorelli (piano), Eddie Lang (banjo), Chauncy Morehouse (percussion). Thus far, no forumite has picked up on the presencs of the bass sax - I suggest they listen to the last 8 bars of the performance (!)

Posted on Feb 5, 2013, 8:13 AM

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I am afraid I don't hear a ....

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.... bass sax nor a brass bass. But unlike most old people, I have lost hearing not only for high notes but also for low notes. Can anyone hear a bass sax of or other bass instrument in Fireworks? Please respond whether you  do or you don't. Thanks.

Albert



Posted on Feb 6, 2013, 10:22 AM

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A Juxtaposition of Two Fragments.

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First, Boneyard Shuffle by Hitch's Happy Harmonists on May 19, 1925 then Waiting at the End of the Road by Paul Whiteman's Orchestra Dep 13, 1929.

Albert



Posted on Feb 3, 2013, 7:54 AM

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mp3 and m3u files for WBIX 1-122 are available now.

by

For the first  122 WBIX programs I had only created real media files (rm and ram). I am pleased to announce that, thanks to the help of Paul  St. Denis, Division of Information Technology, Stony Brook University, mp3 files are now also available for programs 1 to 122. Paul created the mp3 and m3u files and uploaded them to my bixography.com web site. I am grateful to Paul for his invaluable contribution.

http://bixography.com/wbixmp3/Listingmp3m3uWBIX1-122.html

I magine that this announcement will be welcome by those of you who despise real media and real player technology. 

Albert 



Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 6:12 PM

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Vince Giordano's triumphs continue! Highly deserved.

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Yesterday at the 100th anniversary of Grand Central Station.

NEW YORK, Jan. 18, 2013 Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks Orchestra will be headline entertainers for the evening concerts at Grand Central Terminals Centennial Celebration, Friday, February 1st, 2013. Playing at the main stage on the floor of Grand Central Terminals main hall, the Grammy-winning Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks will present an extended set of early jazz favorites and New-York-themed popular music of the early 20th Century for listening and dancing. For the event, the main floor of Grand Central Station will be a dance floor for hundreds of couples.

The Nighthawks set begins at 8:15 p.m. and concludes at 9:30 p.m. Admission is free and all events are open to the public.

[linked image]

In two weeks at the 166th birthday celebration of Thomas Alva Edison.

[linked image]

I wish Vince continuing success. He is one of my idols.

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 12:44 PM

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The Pleasantdale Chateau

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Built in the 1920s.

The Chateau.

[linked image]

The reception site

[linked image]

In my opinion, Edison's most original invention was the phonograph.

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 1:00 PM

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One of the first gigs of the California Ramblers in New York City

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According to several sources, Ed Kirkeby got the California Ramblers (this is the pre-Adrian Rollini edition) a job as accompanists of Eva Shirley. At this time, Ray Kitchingam was the band leader. Here is an ad in the Jan 8, 1922 edition of the New York Times for their appearance in the New Amsterdam Theatre.

[linked image]

Eva Shirley was a popular vaudeville artist in the 1910s and 1920s. She made her debut on Broadway in 1912. Here is an article from 1915  in Variety.

[linked image]

In 1919 she was appearing in the Palace with her own "Jazz Band." In 1924 the accompanists were "The Ten Famous  Players of Rhythm."

Obituary in the New York Times, Nov 23, 1982.
Eva Schainbaum, 92, Is Dead; Sang on Stage as Eva Shirley.
Eva Schainbaum, who sang in vaudeville in the early years of this century as Eva Shirley, died in Doctor's Hospital Saturday. She was 92 years old and lived in Manhattan.  Miss Schainbaum, whose career began on the Lower East Side, appeared at the Palace Theater with her own orchestra and presented songs ''from grand opera to syncopation.''

Connection to Bix. Eva Shirley sang When the One You Love Loves You  in Ed Wynn's Grab Bag, a 1924 Broadway musical which ran in the Globe Theater from Oct 6, 1924 to Mar 14, 1925. Here is the cover of the sheet music.

Note that the song  was co-composed by Paul Whiteman and recorded by his orchestra on Dec 24, 1924.

[linked image]

As described by Don Rayno, "a period waltz, tastefully done." Listen to this lovely number

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/10201

Albert

 

 



Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 10:33 AM

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Did you notice the other connection to Bix in the ad?

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Sophie Tucker appears with Al Seigel [sic]] Al was with Bee Palmer in Davenport in 1921. Al and Bee got married in Davenport. Bix saw Bee's act in the Columbia Theatre.

[linked image]

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 10:52 AM

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RE: Bix Connection

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Wasn't Sophie Tucker Bix's first "red-hot" fan?

Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 2:25 PM

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Please see ....

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http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1319403145/Connections+Between+Sophie+Tucker+and+Bix.

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 2:54 PM

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Helen Keller?

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The most fascinating thing about this ad for Bee Palmer's vaudeville appearance is the listing at the bottom for "Helen Keller, the World's Wonder Woman" as next weeks' headliner!

Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 4:59 PM

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'Play[ing] her part correctly': Helen Keller as Vaudevillian Freak ....

by

.... is the title of an article in the Disability Studies Quarterly, Summer 2005, Volume 25, No. 3.

http://dsq-sds.org/article/view/577/754

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 5:46 PM

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A Picture Story of Hoagy Carmichael

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From Picture News, January 1946. Thanks to Brad Kay for his generosity in providing the scans. Good images, amusingly written and, to boot, pretty accurate. The episode of Hoagy returning from Hollywood and sharing a berth with Bing Crosby is included!

Albert

http://bixbeiderbecke.com//HoagyPictureNewsJan1946/HoagyStoryPictureNewsJan1946.html

 

 



Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 7:17 AM

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Another Goody from Brad.

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From the Wellington Evening Post (New Zealand) of Aug 18, 1927. Just a few months after the record was released.

[linked image]

A couple of errors, but still fascinating to see that Bix and Tram were written up in the New Zealand press in 1927!

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 12:26 PM

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Hoagy's Picture Story

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Perusing the personnel of Hoagy's All Star Band, every Forumite will have noted the omission of a certain well known musician's name.

Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 2:01 PM

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Re: Omission

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My very first thought, too, Ken. How did that happen?

Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 2:32 PM

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Re: Picture story of Hoagy Charmichael

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Well, that was certaily appalling. Even depicting Hoagy's childhood in the 1910's -- he was born in 1899, right? -- they have his family dressed like the mid-1940's, the women in knee-length dresses and long bob hairstyles; same for the early 1920's jazz years -- sure, it's only a comic book, but how utterly trashy. They didn't even attempt to get anything pictorially accurate. Maybe they thought they were doing Hoagy a favor by trying to make him appear somehow "younger", and the events of his musical and educational evolvement were supposed to be considered as being much more recent, but no reader would have been that foolishly credulous.

Oh, let's not even get near the glaring omission of Bix. No doubt there would have been an equally mawkish, inaccurate rendition of Hoagy's pal.

Tawdry books, crappy magazines, movies dripping with an ignorance as pathetic as it is laughable -- it's like any early 1960's movie about "the Jazz Age", or 1920's gangsters -- women in bouffant hairstyles with Elizabeth Taylor eyemakeup and pale lips and 1960's dresses are supposed to be playing "flappers", and they put hats on the male actors wearing suspicously 1960's-styled suits and have them drive vintage cars, so the audience is supposed to believe it's all oh-so-authentic -- and of course the garbage soundtracks in these movies blare fake 1960-recorded Dixieland music. You know what trash I mean, all the stuff out between 1957-1963 -- -- the flick about Studs Lanigan, and the St. Valentine's Day Massacre, and the TV show about Eliot Ness' Untouchables -- there were plenty of people alive and only in late middle age around who could have so easily corrected the glaring faults of these represensations. Or how about the howlingly camp 1967 Bonnie and Clyde movie? Why even bother spending all that money to make a movie when it nowhere near represented the early 1930's era?

Which brings me back to the foolish comic book about Hoagy -- Classics Illustrated it sure isn't!

Well, it was ridiculous fun to look at, anyway.

Laura


Posted on Feb 3, 2013, 2:00 PM

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Bix and Lebert

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What do you know about this? From http://dotydocs.theatreinlondon.ca/Archives/lombardo/lebert.htm

By the early 1920s Lebert was in great demand as a jazz soloist. Jean Goldkette considered him the equal of Bix Beiderbecke and attempted to lure him to his Detroit-based band. However, Lebert remained true to the family orchestra, following Guy and Carmen through their moves to Cleveland, Chicago and New York.

I don't remember having seen this before. Fascinating. I was going to write to Christopher Doty, but, unfortunatley, he died a few years ago (at age 40).  

More Bix connections.

Bixian Obbligato. Listen to the terrific Bixian obbligato by Lebert in the Nov 14, 1928 recording of Baby by Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians. Also the highly Bixian break at 1:50.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2v8RHcYllwY

Guy and Brothers Record for Gennett in Richmond. The first recording of Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians took place in the Gennett Studios in Richmond IN on Mar 10, 1924, Bix's 21st birthday.

[linked image]

Of course, Bix had his recording debut in the same studio three weeks earlier.

Guy Lombardo in Detroit. From http://dotydocs.theatreinlondon.ca/Archives/lombardo/bio1.html

The year 1923 was an incredible one for the Lombardos. In the spring they landed their most prestigious gig to date - as the house band for the Hopkins Casino at the Lake Erie resort town of Port Stanley (pictured on the left). Carmen, who had secured a job as a saxophonist in a Detroit band, resigned so he could return to London.

I wonder if Carmen met Goldkette at this time. I think it is very likely. What Detroit band was Carmen associated with?

Albert

PS The first recording by Guy Lombardo: Cotton Pickers Ball. Mar 10, 1924.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rj3od1Cnao0

A photo of the Lombardo brothers from the Freeport (Long Island) Library collection.

[linked image]



Posted on Feb 1, 2013, 6:53 AM

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Another Gennett Studio Photo

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The picture of Guy Lombardo's Canadians is yet another of those familiar William Dalbey shots of the doings inside the Richmond Gennett Studio. Since about 2009 I've been amassing a file of these. Presently it contains:

The Wolverines (hi res)
Bix and his Rhythm Jugglers, playing (hi res)
Bix and his Rhythm Jugglers, posing
Bernie Cummins' Toadstool Inn Orch.
Art Landry's Call-of-the-North Orch.
Hitch's Happy Harmonists ("Washboard Blues" session w/Hoagy)
Hitch's Happy Harmonists (another session, with the reed players sitting on a riser)
William Jennings Bryan and musicians, side shot
Wally Erickson's Coliseum Orch, playing
Wally Erickson's Coliseum Orch, posing
A band I can't identify - maybe you can - will post it here.

plus:
Bailey's Lucky Seven w/ Nick Lucas at the Gennett New York studio
The Gennett mobile recording van
The Gennett portable equipment in action at St. Paul.

This makes eleven photos of the Richmond studio. Do we know of any more? I like Russell Davies' idea of seeking out Dalbey descendents who might have some of these fascinating images.

-Brad Kay

Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 12:56 AM

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The Band I Can't Identify

by

No need to post the picture - it's already contained in Albert's post, "We all should be grateful to William Daubney. Who?" a little upstream. It's the second-to-last picture, above the one of Bernie Cummins. Who are they? Maybe this is old hat to everyone but me.

-Brad K

Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 1:38 PM

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It is ....

by

.... Charlie Davis's orchestra.

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 1:54 PM

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Charlie Davis

by

Thanks. VERY interesting that we have this picture of the Davis band, but no Gennett record to show for it. They recorded "There'll Be Some Changes Made" Oct. 24, 1924, which never came out.

BK


Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 5:49 PM

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There was an earlier Charlie Davis recording session for Gennett.

by

This was on Sep 27, 1923 and all three recordings were rejected: My Gal, Grandma Blues and You Better Keep Babying Baby.

Eventually, six years later, Davis successfuly recorded two numbers for Gennett Gennet. This was on June 29, 1929: Mean to Me and On the Road to Mandalay were issued as Gennett 20353.

You can hear a radio transcription of Mean to Me (and Copenhagen) by Charlie Davis in

http://indianapublicmedia.org/nightlights/gennett-days-hot-jazz-heartland/

There is a lot of other good stuff in the program, for example, Hoagy talking about Washboard Blues.

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 6:29 PM

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Re: Lombardo Brothers

by

This is all news to me. The idea of a jazzy Lombardo recording boggles, but Lebert was GOOD.

When I was growing up, the Lombardo orchestra was the squarest of the square (our most popular derogatory term), and was so stiff that their efforts to swing were considered cringe material, even out-squaring the Champagne Orchestra of Lawrence Welk.

It's good to find out that it wasn't ever thus!

Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 9:49 AM

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The Andrew Sisters

by

Earlier this week we heard the sad news of the passing of Patti Andrews, the last surviving member of the Andrew Sisters. Patti was 94. Their unique style of harmonising along with the big bands, Bing and others bring memories back to those of us who were around at the time.

Posted on Jan 31, 2013, 8:50 PM

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Re: Singing Sisters

by

Coming so soon after Hal Smith's posting on the Boswell Sisters, Ken's reference to the Andrews Sisters reminds us of the important careers in jazz that these trios had and the memorable music they left to us. Both groups used tricky jazz rhythms, unusual harmonies, and unique stylings.

Posted on Feb 1, 2013, 5:33 AM

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"Hoagy" or "Hoagie" Carmichael?

by

On June 1, 1928, Hoagy/Hoagie Carmichael received an honorary degree from the Book Nook authorities. Take a look

http://fedora.dlib.indiana.edu/fedora/get/iudl:22721/LARGE

Note that Carmichael's nick name is spelled "Hoagie." Note also that degree is spelled "dergree."

Another instance of the spelling "Hoagie" is found in this photograph of Face Bailey (she is not mentioned in "Stardust Road/Sometimes I Wonder.".

http://fedora.dlib.indiana.edu/fedora/get/iudl:14556/LARGE

By the way, another Apeda Studio photograph. It was taken in New York.

If you google "Hoagie Carmichael" you get close to 16,00 hits. "A search for "Hoagy Carmichael" yields nearly 1,000,000 hits.

Hoagy is the correct spelling.

Albert

 



Posted on Jan 31, 2013, 10:41 AM

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A rose by any other name...

by

...would still smell as sweet. Or, as Bix once wrote on a piece of music autographed to Hoagie, "Long may your bum reek". Not as eloquent as Shakespeare, but it gets the job done.

BTW Albert, did you ever see the episode of "The Flintstones" on which Hoagie guested? The real scream is when Fred's character sings perfectly dreadful(and off-key, if memory serves) homemade lyrics to Hogie's 'Stardust', which Fred doesen't know as 'Stardust'. The finale features Hoagie singing a song he must have written for that show called 'Yabba Dabba Doo'. Pretty enjoyable.

HAIL FREDONIA!
Dan Taylor



Posted on Feb 5, 2013, 1:47 PM

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Long time no see!

by

How have you been? Good to hear from you.

I did not see the Flintstones episode with Hoagy. From http://tinyurl.com/abuxa2c

[linked image]

By the way, what Bix wrote is "Long may your lum reek".

Albert



Posted on Feb 5, 2013, 2:09 PM

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Re: A Rose by Any Other Name

by

Don, on first reading I thought that inscription said "bum," too. But on closer scrutiny, it seems to be "Lang may your lum reek." "Lum" is a Britishism (perhaps Scots) which means "chimney," which must suggest that as long as your chimney smells smokey, you must be alive and kicking. Perhaps Bix picked that one up from P.G. Wodehouse. Any Wodehouse scholars out there who can shed some light upon where Bix got that proverbial saying?

Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 10:49 AM

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I believe this is the first posting about the correct identification of the dedication.

by

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1166047587

No information about Wodehouse, though. See also

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1166172571

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 11:19 AM

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Thanks, Glenda!

by

I've read a story or two by our friend Wodehouse, but somehow missed the one in which he uses that expression. Your explanation makes scads more sense than 'Eddie Lang may your Lum and Abner reek.'

BTW, it's great to see King Albert is still alive and kicking. I have several things to send him if he will e-mail me.

Hail Fredonia!
Dan

Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 10:23 AM

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and sometimes a sandwich is a "Hoagy"

by

I'm currently in Minneapolis, where Davanni's, a local pizza & sub chain, always spells it "hoagy." Maybe there's a Carmichael fan in the home office.

Posted on Feb 9, 2013, 5:17 PM

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To Carlton R. Young

by

I just noticed your posting

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1328491055/Min+Leibrook

Do you have any photos, letters or other documents pertaining to your uncle? If you do, I would love to post them here.

Thank you.

Albert



Posted on Jan 31, 2013, 8:01 AM

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boswell's

by hal smith

http://theboswellsisters.com/index.html

Posted on Jan 30, 2013, 11:09 PM

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Some Bix Tunes Arranged for Guitar.

by

http://stefangrossmansguitarworkshop.yuku.com/topic/3849/The-Music-of-Bix-Beiderbecke-Arranged-for-Fingerstyle-Guitar#.UQfFK_Kf3ps

Interesting that Star Dust is one of the arrangements.

Albert



Posted on Jan 29, 2013, 11:13 AM

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The 1930 Studebaker Goldkette Film "Wildflowers."

by

We discusssed this film in 2005 and we mentioned it again a couple of months ago.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1112485404

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1354482466/

The film is now available on youtube. See

https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=o0bZpjQkA9o

Albert



Posted on Jan 29, 2013, 11:11 AM

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Re: The 1930 Studebaker Goldkette Film "Wildflowers."

by hal smith

Nice to see but the band and those arrangements, were as bad as minton's.

Posted on Jan 30, 2013, 11:20 PM

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Does Bix Play on "Why Do I Love You?"

by Michael Rozeff

My "credentials" are that I played trumpet from age 8 to 30, and I've been a jazz fan and collector for 55 years.

On "Why Do I Love You", there are quite a few telltale signs that this is not Bix playing. They include attack on the notes, fluidity, and vibrato. The opening trumpet playing is certainly not Bix. It's someone with an ability to jump to higher notes with ease and fluidity, and a tighter vibrato than Bix's comes in on all the notes of longer value. This is evident in the second phrase that is played right after the sax introduces the melody, where the trumpet completes the tune. The fluid or continuous phrasing is not like Bix, and the tone is also much more like a classically-trained trumpet. Shortly after this, there is a downward triplet or grace note figure that is unlike Bix. The trumpet player then soars effortlessly higher and with vibrato, neither of which sound like Bix.

Around 1:50 in, we start to hear some staccato figures. The extension of these notes is more clipped than the fuller tones that Bix produced. Bix has a more diffuse attack on his notes and a slower vibrato. His notes sing out more and last longer.

There follows the solo somewhat in the note-style of Bix, but not entirely, and not with his tone or feeling. This trumpet player plays in a very relaxed and proficient way. His solo is more legato than Bix usually played. In the final 8 bars, he does two descending runs that don't sound like Bix at all. Mainly, although this solo is surely Bix-ish, it's the timing of the notes that differ so much from Bix. Bix tends to play with more spacing between notes and more deliberately. The opening of this solo features what almost sounds like double-tonguing as the player plays successive sixteenth notes. This too is unlike Bix.

Posted on Jan 29, 2013, 7:20 AM

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Brian Rust's opinion

by

In his sleeve notes on these two tracks (Ol' Man River" was the other), by Lou Raderman & His Pelham Heath Inn Orchestra, Brian Rust wrote in 1981,
"Lou Raderman listened to the two sides on this set not long ago, and affirmed Bix's presence. Manny Klein, the straight trumpet man on these, thought he himself had played the jazz solos, but it is my (Rust's) belief that Bix was indeed sitting in, making the second of three records he made of "Ol Man River". The style of the improvised solos on this and "Why do I love you?" is too much like Bix to be anyone else".
But this was March 1928, when Bix was at the peak of his career with Whiteman. Why would he risk moonlighting on a session with an inferior band on a record label still using the acoustic process?

Posted on Jan 29, 2013, 12:41 PM

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It's Klein, Klein, Klein!

by

Just how long is this bit of Bixing going to last? Anyone who makes the relevant comparisons between the March 1928 Lou Raderman recordings and the known works of both Bix and Mannie Klein can quickly tell that the featured soloist on the Raderman recordings isn't Bix! The double-time opening of Mannie Klein's solo on "Why Do I Love You?" sounds like NOTHING in the genuine Bix canon. "Ol' Man River" is closer to Bix's style, but the moment I set my computer to play the Raderman "Ol' Man River" and then the Bix and HIs Gang record of the same song it was obvious that the solos were by two different people: the power, imagination and genius of the genuine Bix recording were miles ahead of Klein's work on the Raderman version. I topped off the comparison with a known Klein solo on Frankie Laine's 1947 "By the River Sainte Marie" (the flip side of Laine's star-making record, "That's My Desire") and, despite the passage of 19 years, heard a solo style quite similar to that on the Raderman sides. Klein has been a particular victim of this sort of legend-mongering: for years his great work on Adrian Rollini's big-band date for Decca in October 1934 (with Benny Goodman and Jack Teagarden in the band, and two Bix songs in the repertoire, "Davenport Blues" and "Riverboat Shuffle") was misattributed to Bunny Berigan!

Posted on Jan 30, 2013, 11:18 AM

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Welcome to the Bixography Forum and ....

by

.... thanks for the posting.

[linked image]

The Mar 3, 1928 recordings of  Lou Raderman and his Pelham Heath Inn orchestra have been the subject of discussion and controversy for a long time. I summarized analyses and opinions in

http://ic.sunysb.edu/Faculty/alhaim/recordingsanalysis.htm

This is what the interior of the Inn looked like.

[linked image]

According to Rust (Dance  Band Discography), Lou Raderman waxed several recordings on Apr 4, 1928 - There's Something About A Rose, In A Little Two By Four For Two, I'm Riding to Glory- with "possibly" Manny Klein. The records were released on Imperial as by Ernie Golden. It might be worthwhile listening to these. Does anyone have copies?

Albert



Posted on Jan 30, 2013, 6:26 AM

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Whiteman Fines Bix. Several versions of the legend.

by

I imagine we are all familiar with the story of Bix missing the performance of Whiteman's concert in Ponca City on Nov 11, 1928. There are two versions in books and one in a newspaper.

Sudhalter and Evans. Bix arrives on time to the train station, but boards the train going in the wrong direction. When he realizes his mistake, he gets off the train and hires a pilot and a plane. Arrives on time for the afternoon concert, but falls asleep and misses the evening concert.

Evans and Evans. Bix misses the train, hires a pilot and plane, arrives on time but falls asleep and does not make it to the concert. 

Don Rayno. Same as Sudhalter and Evans.

From the Dunkirk Evening Observer, Oct 27, 1938 and other newspapers. This is a third version, different than the other two.

[linked image]

The legend begins and gets modified as recollections of witnesses begin to fade and become embellished when they are interviewed.

The program for the concert:

I. Introduction - Yes, jazz is savage.
II. a) Sugar - Nicholas, Ager and Yellin; b)  Gypsy - Gilbert, Malneck and Signorelli; c)Tiger Rag - LaRocca.
III,
 Concerto in F for pianoforte and orchestra -George Gershwin (scored by Ferde Grofe), Roy Bargy soloist.
IV
. a) Just Like a Melody Out Of the Sky - Donaldson; b) Valse  inspiration (saxophone solo) - Hazlett-Chester Hazlett; c) Melancholy Baby - Norton. 
Interval.
V. Metropolis (first performance) - Ferdc Grofe.
VI. Band  divertissement: "Free Variations based on noises from a garage" - Ferde Grofe,Wilbur Hall- and woodwind choir.
VII.
Popular request numbers: a) Chiquita - Gilbert and Wayne; b) American Tune - Henderson.

Albert



Posted on Jan 28, 2013, 10:16 AM

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Where were Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra on Feb 18, 1923?

by

What? You don't know? But, of course, they were giving a concert at the Poli Palace Theatre in Bridgeport, CT.

Here are an ad for the concert ("Positive Appearance"???) and the accompanying text (complete roster of musicians given); from the Bridgeport Telegram of Feb 17, 1923.

[linked image]

[linked image]

The 3,642 seat Poli Palace Theatre, built in 1922, was the biggest theatre in Connecticut. It does not look much from outside.

[linked image]

But get a load of the magnificent and opulent interior.

[linked image]

[linked image]

The theatre closed in 1976 and has fallen into disrepair.

[linked image]

Here is an article where the author reminisces about the past glory and laments the sorry present.

http://www.damnedct.com/poli-palace-majestic-theater-savoy-hotel-bridgeport/

Albert



Posted on Jan 28, 2013, 11:24 AM

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Another Ad.

by

From the Feb 15, 1923 issue of the Bridgeport Telegram.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Jan 28, 2013, 3:30 PM

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What did the Whiteman band sound like in early 1923?

by

The Whiteman band made several recordings around the time it gave the concert in the Poli Palace Theatre. Here are some examples.

Wonderful One - Jan 25, 1923
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4984

Fate - Jan 18, 1923
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9176

Burning Sands - Feb 27, 1923
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/8450

Lady of the Evening - Jan 25, 1923
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9184

Underneath the Mellow Moon - Jan 25, 1923
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9185

Falling - Feb 2, 1923
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9193

By the Shalimar - Feb 23, 1923
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9233

Way Down Yonder in New Orleans - Feb 21, 1923
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/8457

Parade of the Wooden Soldiers - Jan 2, 1923
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9135

Mister Gallagher and Mister Sheen - Jan 2, 1923
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9138

Dearest - Feb 21, 1923
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9192

And although this one is from later in the year (Sep 4, 1923), I present here because I love the song and the recording! Last Night in the Porch. Watch for the obbligato by Ross Gorman on bass clarinet.
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9451

Albert




Posted on Jan 28, 2013, 4:09 PM

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What a shame about the theater

by

What a beautiful old building, and how sad it looks in its shabby neglect. I hate to see gorgeous old places like that go to seed -- especially when hideous modern buildings and people's disgustingly opulent McMansions go up.

Wish someone could come up with the dough to restore it to its former glory, declare it an historical landmark.

Laura

Posted on Jan 29, 2013, 5:23 AM

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Photos kindly sent by Ann, the daughter of Tommy Gott's cousin.

by

Passport photo with (second) wife Anna.

[linked image]

Tommy had a sister, Imogene Elizabeth, who was about eight years younger. She was the first girl cheer leader in Indiana.

[linked image]

Tommy was a member of the Lopez and Hamilton's Kings of Harmony in 1920. Note that the photo was taken at the Apeda studios.

[linked image]

Lopez and Hamilton's Kings of Harmony. Left to right: Tommy Gott, Tony White, Billy Hamilton, Vincent Lopez, Harold Geiser.

Thank you, Ann, for sending the scans and for permission to post them here.

Albert



Posted on Jan 28, 2013, 6:31 AM

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Lopez and Hamilton's Kings of Harmony

by

You can hear several recordings made by this group in

http://redhotjazz.com/lhkho.html

Certainly influenced by the ODJB.

Albert



Posted on Jan 28, 2013, 6:36 AM

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Tommy Gott in a high school band.

by

From the West Lebanon Gazette (Indiana), Sep 15, 1910.

********************************************
An orchestra has been organized in the High School with the following instrumentation;

CornetThomas Gott.
First ClarinetJohnie Bader.
Second ClarinetDee Green.
First ViolinCecil Patton.
Second ViolinMiss - Mode Crooks.
TromboneMiss Dortha Wood
PianoMiss Gladys Hall.
TubaPrank Martin.
Trap DrumsMiss Ruby Day.

Nearly all the members are experienced players and the orchestra will be ready for work in a short time.
********************************************

What kind of music would such a band play? The instrumentation is not that different from that of the 1920 Whiteman band: there is an extra violin and no banjo. Was that the common instrumentation for a high school band in 1910? Certainly not a marching or concert band. But perhaps about right for a small band. Here is the 1910 Greenwood, WI high school band. Very similar, except that there is no tuba.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Jan 28, 2013, 7:03 AM

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Personnel in Tommy Gott's High School Band

by

It was interesting to see young women playing "non-girly" instruments--drums and trombone. I wonder how common it was at that time. It was more common to see females playing piano or violin, but even today, middle school and high school trombonists and percussionists are usually boys.

Posted on Jan 29, 2013, 5:44 AM

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The Ingenues

by

Check out 'The Ingenues' on Youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ACtACBX0gM

Posted on Jan 31, 2013, 8:59 PM

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Miscellaneous Tangents

by

Past clarinetists are much written of within this forum.
Among contemporary players in jazz, let me suggest
hearing Anat Cohen and Doreen Ketchens.

And finally, next time you're playing Jack Teagarden,
listen to "Meet Me Where They Play The Blues."
Perhaps my favorite of his.

Posted on Feb 1, 2013, 7:23 PM

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Re: Girl Players

by

Thanks, Fred. "The Ingenues" were great, but those girls with Tommy Gott were playing a decade or more earlier than 1928! By 1928 women were trying everything!

Posted on Feb 2, 2013, 2:29 PM

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Candlelights by the Saffier Saxophone Quartet from Holland

by

In a recent posting, I mentioned that Dr. Michael D. Nascimben wrote arrangements of Bix's piano compositions for a saxophone quartette. See

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1358862648/

It turns out that two years ago, Nick sent Dr. Nascimben's arrangements to Frank van Nus who in turn made them available to the Saffier Saxophone Quartet of the Netherlands.   The Saffier Saxophone Quartette recorded the arrangement of Candlelights. Here is their recording, kindly sent by Nick.
 
bixography.com/SaffierSaxQuartetCandlelights.mp3
 
It is an excellent rendition that illustrates what a superb composer Bix was and how his works can be adapted for chamber music groupings such as this. 
 
Thank you, Nick, Frank and the saxophonists of the Saffier Saxophone Quartette of the Netherlands.
 
Albert

 

 



Posted on Jan 27, 2013, 9:03 AM

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