The Bixography Discussion Group

A vehicle for Bixophiles and other interested individuals to ask questions, make comments and exchange information about Bix Beiderbecke and related subjects. Any views expressed in the Bixography Forum represent solely the opinions of those expressing them and are not necessarily endorsed or opposed by Albert Haim unless he has signed the message.

I started archiving some of the threads that have been inactive for some time. The archived threads can be found at http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/archivesforum.htm

Albert Haim

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The Wolverines Music was vital and earthly; they were sincere instead of merely clever.

by

Thus wrote Frank Marshall Davis (for the Associated Negro Press) about the Hot Record Society re-issue of ten Wolverine recordings in the Jan 27, 1940 edition of the New York Amsterdam News. Founded in 1909, the Amsterdam News is one of the oldest and most influential African-American publication in the US. 


But first, some background.


Jack Sohmer in jazztimes.com


In 1937, with an advisory board consisting of, among others, John Hammond, Marshall Stearns, Charles Edward Smith, Wilder Hobson, William Russell, Delaunay, Panassie, and Sinclair Traill (later founder of the British magazine Jazz Journal), Steve Smith initiated the Hot Record Society. In 1938, when both Columbia and Victor (on its 35-cent subsidiary, Bluebird) began their highly successful series of classic jazz reissues, Gabler and Smith decided to get into the business of making new records, with Commodore becoming the first and most prolific of the independents. H.R.S. recorded 124 performances in 25 sessions between August 1938 and September 1947.


Interestingly, HRS record # 1 consisted of takes 1 and 2 of Three Blind Mice by the Chicago Loopers. The Complete HRS sessions were released as a box set in 1999 by Mosaic Records.


 The five-record set "Young Man With A Horn: Bix Beiderbecke and the Wolverines," HRS # 22-26


[linked image]


consisted of eight recordings by the Wolverines and the two recordings by Bix and His Rythm Jugglers.


Here is the listing of these records in the 78-online discography.



22 BIX BEIDERBECKE and his Rhythm Jugglers DAVENPORT BLUES 90430 (12141) GE5654 Rich, Ind 1925 Bix Beiderbecke
22 THE WOLVERINES FIDGETY FEET 11751-A GE5408 Rich, Ind 2/18/1924 -
23 BIX BEIDERBECKE and his Rhythm Jugglers TODDLIN' BLUES 12140 GE5654 Rich, Ind 1925 -
23 The WOLVERINES SENSATION 9079 GE5542, Clax 40375 NYC 9/18/1924 -
24 The WOLVERINES TIGER RAG 11932 Br 02205, Pol 15387 Rich, Ind 1924 -
24 The WOLVERINES BIG BOY 9116 GE5565 NYC 10/8/1924 -
25 BIX BEIDERBECKE & the WOLVERINES OH BABY 90427 {11852} GE5453, Clax 40336 NYC 5/6/1924 DeSylva - Donaldson
25 BIX BEIDERBECKE & the WOLVERINES JAZZ ME BLUES 11754-A GE5408, Br 02203 Rich, Ind 2/18/1924 -
26 The WOLVERINES ROYAL GARDEN BLUES 11931-C GE 20062, Br 02204 Rich, Ind 1924 -
26 The WOLVERINES TIA JUANA 9115-B GE5565 NYC 10/8/1924 -

And here is a scan of the booklet that accompanied the set, courtesy of Forum contributor Rob Rothberg.


http://bixbeiderbecke.com/BookletHRS2/BookletHRS2.html


To read extremely detailed information about this set, please visit

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/CollectorsGuidetoJazzWheelerAboutBix.html

Finally, the review by Mr. Davis.


[linked image]


Brief and right on the mark. One of the myths surrounding Bix is that he played with inferior musicians: several jazz historians (white men) maligned the musical abilities of the men in the Wolverine orchestra. One of the worst culprits was Rudi Blesh. Here are so quotes from his book "Shining Trumpets."


Comments on the Wolverine's "Jazz Me Blues":"Jazz simply isn't in these grooves. There is no basic beat. The attack is fuzzy and uncertain."
"Much has been written about Beiderbecke's beautiful tone. Beautiful, it was not hot; nor were the attack and rhythm incisive."
"The Wolverines spirit is that of the sweet band and of the popular sentimental balladists, and their rhythm is deformed by the peculiar, jumpy pattern often called vo-de-o-do."
"The Wolverines could not escape the vo-de-o-do: cornet phrases are mutilated by it and tied together with meaningless short notes that accentuate the banal pattern."
"Romantic nineteenth-century European music, particularly German, entered with the Wolverines. The cloying, sentimental sweetness -though it may stem more directly form the "schmaltzy" little "oompah" band than form Wagner- comes from this source."
"The harmonic wanderings and musings, the adolescent self-conscious romanticism and phony philosophy of the late German school smother jazz under a blanket soggy with tears."


I commented about this savage attack in http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/961605157/%26quot%3BDissing%26quot%3B+Bix,+the+Rudi+Blesh+Vicious+and+Irrational+Way


It is refreshing, therefore, to see an early review -by a black reporter- with high praise, not only for Bix, but about his fellow musicians in the Wolverine Orchestra. In addition to the quote in the title of the present posting, I call your attention to the following excerpt:  the gusto with which these boys played as well as their musical patterns should provide plenty of appeal as well as the historic importance of these numbers.


Albert



Posted on Apr 6, 2013, 7:39 AM

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Bird of Paradise

by

What was the pop tune in which a gal wore this gaudy pin on her dress?

Posted on Apr 5, 2013, 4:19 PM

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Nobody's Sweetheart

by



Posted on Apr 6, 2013, 6:26 AM

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The Lyrics were written by

by

You're nobody's sweetheart now,
There's no place for you somehow,
With all of your fancy clothes, silken gowns,
You'll be out of place in the middle of your own hometown,
When you walk down the avenue,
All the folks just can't believe that it's you.
With all those painted lips and painted eyes,
Wearing a bird of paradise,
It all seems wrong somehow,
It seems so funny,
You're nobody's sweetheart now!
 
This tune was written in 1924: music by Billy Meyers and Elemer Schoebel; lyrics by Gus Kahn and Ernie Erdman. Here are two editions of the sheet music:
 
[linked image]
 
[linked image]
 
 A few recordings:
 
McKenzie and Condon Chicagoans. No lyrics http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdAc3m-t2YY
 
Isham Jones. No lyrics http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=42fkwzfcbC4
 
Guy Lombardo. With lyrics. Hot! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o6fcb2_GU4A

The great Mills Brothers http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eUuF9Sjlqfc
 
Adrian Schubert with Miff Mole and Bob Effoprs. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zQSwhy1a8Vs
 
Albert


Posted on Apr 6, 2013, 8:15 AM

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On the Leon Redbone album "Double Time"

by



Posted on Apr 6, 2013, 9:33 PM

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Here is the link to a youtube video of the recording.

by

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JJb5UryHPy0

The nice, muted  cornet in the background is probably played by Ed Polcer. Leon Redbone is credited with vocal, guitar and Throat Tromnet (a human voice doing what sounds like a trumpet according to various webpages).

Albert



Posted on Apr 7, 2013, 5:04 AM

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There was even a Soviet recording of the tune

by

By Leonid Utesov's band from 1938:

http://www.russian-records.com/details.php?image_id=12469&l=english/

(Utesov was a comedian-actor-singer-bandleader, a sort of Soviet Ted Lewis, though obviously without jazz musicians of the caliber that Lewis had, like Goodman and Spanier...)

Posted on Apr 9, 2013, 12:57 AM

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Bird of Paradise

by Mel Thompson

A great tune - and of course, Bird of Paradise is also a very flamboyant tropical flower that is very common in Southern California - could that be what was referred to as well? The bouquets presented to athletes during the 1984 L.A. Olympics features this flower.

Posted on Apr 6, 2013, 7:35 PM

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It really WAS a bird!

by

The original Bird of Paradise (Psephotus pulcherrimus) was a highly colorful species of parrot, native to Australia. According to the Web sitehttp://www.environmentalgraffiti.com/animals/news-11-rare-photos-now-extinct-birds?image=3, it "was an unusually colorful bird even amongst parrots. The plumage of these mid-sized parrots displayed patches of aqua, turquoise, scarlet, brown and black, and their tails were nearly as long as their bodies." During the late 19th century it became so fashionable for women to wear bird-of-paradise tail feathers in their hats that the bird was literally hunted down to extinction. After the bird became extinct in 1927 its feathers took on scarcity value and became even more prized. So the reference in the "Nobody's Sweetheart" lyric to "wearing a bird of paradise" refers to wearing one of the hats that included this rare and highly prized feather.

Incidentally, the Bird of Paradise plant Mel Thompson mentioned (one I'm very familiar with since one grows outside my home!) was so named because of its resemblance to the tail feathers of a Bird of Paradise parrot. A photo of the plant can be seen on the cover of Cala Records CD CACD0549, "Stokowski: The Eternal Magician." Among the pieces on this CD are Stravinsky's "Firebird" suite, recorded in 1950. This has at least a tenuous Bix connection since Stokowski recorded the piece at least eight times during his long career, and given the wide distribution of his 1920's recordings with the Philadelphia Orchestra on Victor, it's likely Bix, who loved Stravinsky's music, first heard "Firebird" on one of the two recordings Stokowski made of it while Bix was alive.

Posted on Apr 7, 2013, 8:32 AM

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Get a load of this hat. Not just a feather, but the whole ....

by

,,,, kit and kaboodle including the head!

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Apr 7, 2013, 8:46 AM

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I WANT THAT HAT!!!!!

by

Oh my God, is it gorgeous!

I just bought myself a little lavender cloche hat from Macy's yesterday afternoon while shopping with my best friend - I like to have a little summer straw hat and occasionally "update" my retro seasonal hats-- love the big-brimmed hats of the late 19'teens-early 1920's -- they flatter everybody!

Laura

Posted on Apr 7, 2013, 12:25 PM

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Paul and Nipper

by

From the LOC collection. About 1922.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Apr 4, 2013, 4:44 PM

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Early Whiteman. Victor # 18744.

by

[linked image]

Underneath Hawaiian Skies. Mar 4, 1921.

[linked image]

The music file: http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/7813

Down Around the  'Sip 'Sip Sippy Shore. Mar 16, 1921.

[linked image]

The music file: http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/7815 A piano duet by Harry Akst and Ferde Grofe and a great banjo solo by Mike Pingitore doing the square dance thing. Lots of interpolations of other tunes including Berceuse from Godard's Jocelyn at 45 seconds, 1:36 and 2:45. In fact, this is described in the record label as a medley, lots of pieces.

I love the very early Whiteman acoustic recordings. I don't care if they are jazz or not.

Albert



Posted on Apr 4, 2013, 6:06 PM

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More interpolations of "Berceuse" de Jocelyn.

by

Too Busy by the Clicquot Club Eskimos. The intro and after the vocal.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ikQwlfma30M

See also http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1206466383

Albert



Posted on Apr 4, 2013, 6:36 PM

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Jean Goldkette could not get up early.

by

From the Brooklyn Daily Star, Mar 23, 1929.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Apr 4, 2013, 2:58 PM

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Frank Driggs' Collection Goes to Jazz at Lincoln Center

by

http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/04/trove-of-photographs-donated-to-jazz-at-lincoln-center/

Albert



Posted on Apr 4, 2013, 2:39 PM

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Not Politically Incorrect in the 1920s

by

Take a look at this ad from the Binghamton Press, Apr 15, 1929[linked image]

The word "negro" was in common use in the 1920s to refer to African Americans and was not considered offensive at that time.

The "George F." Pavilion was a beautiful structure  built in the mid-1920s

[linked image]

and demolished in the early 2000. Among the bands and artists who appeared in the Pavilion were Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway, Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Harry James, Guy Lombardo, Jimmy Lunceford, Glenn Miller, Artie Shaw, Frank Sinatra, Rudy Vallee and Paul Whiteman.

Paul Whiteman and his orchestra began their one-month tour in the winter of 1937 with an appearance at the George F. Pavilion on Jan 8, 1937. This is what the band sounded like a year earlier: from Mar 26, 1936, Gershwin's "Shall We Dance."

archive.org/download/PaulWhiteman-281-290/PaulWhiteman-ShallWeDance_64kb.mp3

Pops still had a great band. The two Teagardens have solos as does clarinetist John "Bullet" Cordaro.

Of course, I always associate this tune with the great Fred Astaire. If you haven''t seen the movie for some time, watch this. A fantastic number.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VS9rCo-sA9Q

Albert




Posted on Apr 4, 2013, 10:10 AM

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And ad for the appearance of Whiteman in the Pavilion.

by

From the Binghamton Press, Jan 6, 1937.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Apr 4, 2013, 10:31 AM

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If you want to hear Debussy Records the way Bix Did

by

Here is Debussy's 3 Nocturnes pour orchestre, recorded in 1928 and conducted by Piero Coppola -- if this no doubt European recording was made available in the States a year or so later, one might be sure Bix sought to have the latest electrically-recorded version in his phonograph collection. I coldn't imagine him not owning it if he could buy the set from one of the better New York phonograph record shops.

Laura



If this doesn't come through--I sometimes have trouble sending/posting you tube selections --it's on You Tube -- just type in the date and conductor info above.



Posted on Apr 3, 2013, 6:34 PM

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The url

by

Thanks for calling our attention to this early recording of some of Debussy's compositions. For the convenience of forumites, here is the link.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tb7tgeNtz_U

And here is Jan Paderewski's 1927 piano roll of Debussy's "Reflets dans l'eau."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9c_yZPIqoz0

Albert



Posted on Apr 4, 2013, 4:30 AM

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Piero's grandson

by

BTW, Piero Coppola is the grandfather of film director Francis Ford Coppola.

Posted on Apr 6, 2013, 1:55 PM

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If you are in the vicinity of Fullerton CA, try this.

by

From Brad:

Who:   Brad Kay and Company

What:   The Muckenthaler Ragtime Speakeasy

When:  TOMORROW EVENING, Thursday April 4th.   Doors open 7pm; Music 7:30 -  9:30

How Much:  $20

Where:  The Muckenthaler Mansion

              1201 Malvern Ave.

              Fullerton, CA

             Phone:  866-411-1212

Why:   See below - 

 

Tomorrow night, Thursday the 4th, Brad Kay and a Select Company of Entertainers & Musicians will give a concert in Fullerton, Orange County.  Some very classy music by Berlin, Porter, Gershwin, Kern, and Ellington, etc. will be played and sung by us. 

This concert is embedded in an event at the posh Muckenthaler Mansion:   The Ragtime Speakeasy, a fundraiser for the Orange County RagFest, held in October.  There will be speakeasy trappings and Gangster Melodrama, including an Egyptian Mummy springing from her Sarcophagus to sing Our Love Is Here To Stay while shooting a man dead.  But none of that can sway my mind, nor should it sway yours, from the underlying seriously high-class musical nature of the business.  I say its a concert, and the hell with it.   

 

The fee is $20 (its for a good cause, so dont squawk - quit stalling and pony up.)

 

The entertainers:

 

Mikal Sandoval   The San Francisco Songbird

Marea Boylan   PhD Pepperpot

Suzy Williams   Diva De-Luxe of Venice, Cal.

Barlia & Kay      Prize Winning Song-Slaughtering Duo of The Southland  

 

GINGER ALE AND HIS SPARKLERS:

Brad Kay piano; Oliver Steinberg - bass; Dan Weinstein - everything else  

 

 

Hope to see you!

 

Brad Kay   





Posted on Apr 3, 2013, 6:02 AM

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Did you ever hear the word "cokey"?

by

In his June 22, 1967 column for the Putnam County Courier, New York, Richard Gehmann (writer for Downbeat) writes,

Bix was a robust and personable young man, despite the way he punished his face with the mouthpiece of his horn. He was what musicians used to ' call a 'cokey." That meant that he did not exist for anything  but the music he was trying to get out of himself. The recordings did not matter to him, his old friends (those who are left) say: all he wanted was to go on making more music.

Bix's insatiable need (maybe obsession is the right word?) to make music has been mentioned  several times. What I had not heard before was the work "cokey." Anyone?

Albert



Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 1:12 PM

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Of course I did!

by

In the lyrics to Cab Calloway's mega-hit, "Minnie the Moocher": "She messed around with a guy named Smokey/She really loved him, though he was cokey/He took her down to Chinatown/Showed her how to kick the gong around." In the song it meant someone who used cocaine -- and doubtless other drugs, too, since the mention of "Chinatown" would have led 1931 audiences to think of opium and its derivatives. But it seems an odd word to use in connection with Bix, who for all his problems with alcohol doesn't seem ever to have used hard drugs.

Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 1:37 PM

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Re: "Cokey"

by

Perhaps the writer of the lyrics of "Minnie the Moocher" was using the old poetry trick of layering meanings, using a word that suggests an alternate meaning along with the overt meaning of a word within a phrase.



Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 3:58 PM

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I always thought the word referred to a cocaine user...

by

As in "Minnie the Moocher":

She messed around with a bloke named Smoky,
She loved him though he was cokey.
He took her down to Chinatown
And showed her how to kick the gong around...

Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 2:01 PM

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I meant "cokey" as a musician ....

by

.... totally devoted to his music.

Albert



Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 3:09 PM

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Bix was crazy about music

by Nick Dellow


Cokey was an old (pos. 19th century) North American slang term meaning "crazy", so as Bix was crazy (i.e. obsessed) about music he was obviously viewed as being "cokey".

However, the meaning of the word is, I would suggest, still likely to find its origin in cocaine usage. Serious cocaine users would no doubt "go crazy" to get the drug, or be viewed as acting "crazy" while on it, and in the way that vernacular language often does, the word probably morphed into several meanings, and I'm absolutely sure the use of "cokey" in describing Bix's near-obsession with music simply means that he was "crazy about music" and, in this instance, it had no connection with cocaine.

The word re-surfaced, in a roundabout way, in the British wartime song "The Hokey Cokey". There is an interesting connection here to both meanings - i.e. "crazy" and "cocaine user" - through miners in Canada!! For more information see the Wikipedia entry for the song.


Posted on Apr 3, 2013, 12:59 AM

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Record of the Week

by David Sager

from the National Jukebox

http://www.loc.gov/rr/record/recordoftheweek.html



Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 12:58 PM

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Thanks, David.

by

I clicked on the link to acoustic recordings and found this terrific photo of an acoustic recording session.

[linked image]

Any information about studio location, date and/or identity of the band? The guy with the Stroh violin does not look like Andy Stein to me. happy.gif

Albert



Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 1:24 PM

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Name of orchestra

by

That picture is in an old text about recording technology, and is labelled Rosario Bourdon and the Victor Salon Orchestra.

A. B. Bonds

Posted on Apr 3, 2013, 9:00 AM

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Thanks, A. B. Bonds and welcome to the Bixography Forum.

by

Rosario Bourdon. From Wkikipedia.

In 1909, the Victor Talking Machine Company hired Bourdon as the "in-house" cellist, and he did a number of tasks for the company. He performed on piano and cello for Victor artists. He served as conductor for the Victor Concert Orchestra, the Victor Symphony Orchestra, the Victor Salon Orchestra and occasionally Sousa's Band. Thousands of Victor recordings for which Bourdon was the conductor or an instrumentalist are documented on the EDVR (Encyclopedic Discography of Victor Recordings).[3] In 1920, he was promoted to musical co-director at Victor, a position shared by Josef Pasternack. Bourdon left Victor in 1931.

I seem to remember Bourdon's name in connection with Bix and/or Whiteman, but can't figure out the context. Maybe music director for one of Whiteman sessions?

Albert

Melody in F, composed by Arthur Rubinstein, played by the Victor Concert Orchestra  under the direction of Rosario Bourdon.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1nEGAcPS_M0



Posted on Apr 3, 2013, 10:28 AM

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Another photo of the Victor Salon Orchestra.

by

This one, a terrific photo, from 1926, the orchestra under the direction of Nat Shilkret. From the LOC.

[linked image]

The trumpet player with glasses and mustache is Del Staigers.

http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=6589591

Albert



Posted on Apr 4, 2013, 6:20 PM

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Benny About Bix

by

The Knickerbocker News (Albany, NY) of Apri 14, 1959 carries an article about Benny Goodman about to celebrate his 50th birthday. I will post the complete article later. Right now, I want to bring in what Benny says about Bix.

[linked image]

No small praise coming from a highly demanding guy like Benny.

Albert



Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 6:46 AM

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The Complete Article

by

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 10:56 AM

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Benny's Tribute to Bix On Radio.

by

From the Tonawanda Evening News, Sep 6. 1938.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 11:22 AM

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Maybe this is a repeat, but it is worth seeing it again.

by

The Old Gold Hour orchestra with Bix. From the bingmagazine.co.uk website.

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Apr 1, 2013, 6:53 AM

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Re:Old Gold Orchestra with Bix

by

The person indicated by the red arrow doesn't look much like Bix to me.

The man with a mustache like Bix had in that approximate period is in front of the piano, third from the right in the middle row, seen behind the guy with the alto sax, fourth from right on the front row. Of course, Bix could have shaved his mustache off and re-grew it later.

If I'm right, then who is the guy with the red arrow? Are there names of all the players in the article?

Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 3:36 PM

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Names not given

by

Yes, Bix is the guy with the mustache, third from right in middle row.

I am sure you can recognize others, Frank Trumbauer, Harry Barris, Al Rinker, Mike Pingitore, Harry Goldfield, Charlie Margulis, etc., the usual suspects in Whiteman's 1929 recordings.

Albert



Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 4:08 PM

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Names...

by

Mike Pingitore is always easy to spot!

Posted on Apr 3, 2013, 4:06 PM

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The fella with the arrow pointing toward him...

by

....looks like Bing Crosby and as further corroboration, the fella to his left looks a lot like Al Rinker, and the fella to HIS left looks like the guy who wrote Missippi Mud.


HAIL FREDONIA!
Dan Taylor

Posted on Apr 16, 2013, 9:15 AM

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Re: Old Gold Orchestra Personnel

by

The red-arrow guy looks like Bing to me.

Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 3:39 PM

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It is Bing.

by

This comes from the bing website, so it is logical that Bing be highlighted with the arrow.

Albert



Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 3:42 PM

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Microphone Technology

by

What a pity none of these Old Gold shows were ever filmed. On closer inspection of the photo, dated March 1929 by Evans & Evans, apart from the one that announcer Ted Husing and Paul are using, is that a microphone suspended from the ceiling? There's a 30 strong orchestra there in the studio. Just using a single microphone for a coast to coast transmission?

Posted on Apr 2, 2013, 4:21 PM

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Thanks for reminding me that ....

by

.... the photo is also found in p. 435 of Evans and Evans.

For Glenda: the names of all the men in the photo are given by E & E.

Albert



Posted on Apr 3, 2013, 6:09 AM

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Does this remind you of anyone?

by

From http://lateralcut.wordpress.com/2010/05/03/fletcher-henderson-hes-the-hottest-man-in-town/

Coleman Hawkins was terribly embarrassed whenever he heard one of his old records from the beginning of his career. Sometimes he would flat-out deny that he had played that solo. Other times he would sheepishly declare, Oh, that was my grandfather.

This particularly good performance by Fletcher Hendersons band gives Hawkins a full chorus to demonstrate to us whether he really had anything to be embarrassed about. I think what embarrassed him was that his style changed radically over the years, and a musician is apt to regard his stylistic changes as a course of continuous improvement and discovery. We might hear his early style as something legitimately good in its own right, but to the musician it seems like what he played when he didnt know any better.

Albert



Posted on Mar 31, 2013, 10:15 AM

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Re: Does This Remind You of Anyone?

by

Oh, yeah! Bix thought his sock time recordings were totally passé only a few years after he recorded them. Of course, Bix and Coleman had no inkling of the possibility of a traditional jazz revival in those days, since jazz was still in in its early years and they had no idea of how later listeners would see their early work in a different perspective, just in the same way a music lover might listen to Bach and Debussy and appreciate them equally today despite their different styles.


"He's the Hottest Man in Town" is a whale of a recording. Hawkins' solo is excellent, and Charlie Green shows once more that he doesn't get enough appreciation as a trombonist. Great jazz for any time. Here it is on YouTube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhmIjYHUGuw




Posted on Mar 31, 2013, 3:44 PM

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That's Anabelle - Ben Selvin's Harmonians (with a very nice trumpet solo a la Red Nichols)

by

Hi:

Just have found a video of this Ben Selvin recording with Irving Kaufman's vocals made for Harmony which also features a very nice trumpet solo a la Red Nichols & some great piano work in an hybrid between Arthur Schutt & Rube Bloom.
According to Brian Rust's American Dance Band Discography, this recording was made on July 30 from 1926 in New York & issued on Harmony 234-H.
I wonder who are those hot soloists?
Here's the link:
http://youtu.be/7vgku3yQMj8

Signed:
Javier Soria Laso

Posted on Mar 31, 2013, 12:11 AM

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Welcome to the Bixography Forum and thanks for calling ....

by

.... our attention to the Harmonians (Bar Harbor Society Orchestra) recording (Har 234-H) of That's Annabelle. I'll give you my opinion for what it's worth. It's not Red Nichols to my ears. I would guess Earl Oliver. Ben Selvin recorded a few days earlier the same tune for Brunswick (Br 3277) and Earl Oliver is credited as the trumpet player by Rust. Here it is:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7fZ0giB28Q

The trumpet player in the Harmony recording sounds to me very much like the one in the Brusnwick recording.

I will ask Steve Hester, the Red Nichols specialist.

Albert

 



Posted on Mar 31, 2013, 5:04 AM

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Thanks for speaking, Mr. Haim.

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I agree.
Earl Oliver might have changed his style of soloing for this recording.
Here's 2 other examples on which the trumpet solos sounds a little bit like Red Nichols:
1. I Don't Believe It, But Say It Again - Recorded on February 16 from 1926 & issued on Harmony 127-H & Regal G-9628 (as Corona Dance Orchestra) -http://youtu.be/AQt4yMO2c7U
2. Where you'd get those eyes? - Recorded on May 27 from 1926 - issued on Harmony 198-H -http://youtu.be/2wr7-bH1dnI.

In the first side, the singer is Billy Jones (Billy West on the label) & it has also a very nice alto sax solo by Larry Abbott, who sounds sometimes like Bobby Davis.
As for the 2nd side, the singer is Irving Kaufman.

Posted on Mar 31, 2013, 7:00 AM

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The responses in the Red Nichols Facebook page.

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John LandryI have the Brunswick version and while I'm pretty certain the group is largely the same, the solo on the Harmony record is definitely more Nichols-like. But I highly doubt it is Red. It does sound to my ears like a cornet, and that makes Earl Oliver the leading choice. Hymie Farberman (who would be second guess) played trumpet. It's way too hot to be Jules Levy, Jr. (whom Selvin used on the Manhattan Dance Makers sides on Harmony).
Stephen HesterDad has this as Earl Oliver even though there are several places of characteristics of Red. I agree with him. If I'm not mistaken didn't Jules Levy Jr pass away in fall of 1923?
John LandryPerhaps-- I'll have to look closer at the discography.
 
I guess Earl Oliver is the most likely candidate according to those who offered their opinions.
 
Albert


Posted on Apr 1, 2013, 5:03 PM

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The Geechie Call was discussed in the Bixography Forum several times.

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Use the search function with the word geechie and you will find what was discussed before. Here is another example of the "geechie call." It is the coda in the Dec 1928 recording of  "Sizzling the Blues" by Monk Hazel and His Bienville Roof Orchestra, the first number in this youtube video.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DX9cAC01NaI

Also note the similarity of the introduction with the part when Bix comes in on cornet in For No Reason At All in C.

Albert

 

 



Posted on Mar 30, 2013, 6:02 AM

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Sidney Arodin

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The clarinetist in these recordings is Sidney Arodin. His ancestry was discussed in the redhotjazz Yahoo group in 2006. Some thought he was a creole. Here is what I found about Sidney on May 9, 2006.:

I wrote to Wesley Charter, Sidney Arodin's nephew, and asked him about his uncle's ancestry. He kindly responded promptly. Here is what he wrote.

"My Uncle was white and French. Both of his parents were of French
descent. Of course, if you know any history of France, you will
recall that the Moors conquered Spain and parts of France and never
returned to Africa. In this sense, he might be considered to be
part black, but that is a stretch. [Here is my comment: As I
understand it, Moors were Muslims, Arabs and Berbers, dark-skinned,
but not necessarily black]. I was under the impression that he was
born in 1902 and I remember this because my father was born in 1903.

He was married 3 times and had a daughter named Lillian (Regan)
Arnondin who lived in Dallas, TX until her death several years ago. I
don't remember the names of all of his wives.

Sidney had 3 sisters. My aunts Pauline, Nora and my mom, Zoe. Many
people of French descent claimed to be creole but this was a commom
mistake still made by many. My understanding of the word creole was a
person of mixed French and Spanish decent.

In regards to my grandmother's last name before marriage, it was
Jambon. Literally translated, this means Ham in English. Her dad came
over from Marseille France and died at the age of 94 after retiring
when he was 47. He subscribed to a Marseille newspaper right up until
the time he died."

I have seen the name spelled as Arondin, Arnondin and Arnandan. Victor Arnandan (Sidney's father) is listed in the 1910 US Census living in Jefferson Parrish with his wife, his son Sidney and his daughters Pauline (spelled Poline in the Census), Nora and Zoe. They are all listed as "white" and all their neighbors are also listed as "white."

Albert



Posted on Mar 30, 2013, 7:44 AM

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Re: Sidney (the Man of Many Surnames!)

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That was quite an interesting bit of primary source information. I have read that Sidney Arodin did not record very much, but that he did spend some time in New York (with Jimmy Durante's band?) and outside the south.

Since I've always loved his sound, it's good to see this letter from a relative.

"Creole" is a term loosely applied to people of Spanish-French ancestry or to people of African American and French ancestry (cf. Sidney Bechet and Edward Ory) in New Orleans, a confusion which probably explains why Arodin is sometimes believed to of mixed race.

Is there a discography of Arodin's recordings? Wikipedia offered only a list of the bandleaders with whom he played and the interesting tidbit that he worked with Hoagy Carmichael on "Lazy River," who used a warm-up exercise of Sidney's for the main theme and collaborated with him on the lyrics. Apparently, Hoagy was savvy enough to keep his ears open around musicians and to use anything (such as "Bix's licks," as he called them, for "Stardust" and "Skylark") around which to build a classic hit.

Here's Hoagy and his Orchestra in 1930 with "Lazy River:"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQwCi8f3iuk

Does Arodin play on this recording?

Posted on Mar 30, 2013, 10:04 AM

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Sidney Arodin does not play in ....

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.... Hoagy's recording  of Lazy River. The clarinetist is Jimmy Dorsey.

If you have Tom Lord's or Brian Rust's discography in digital form, you can construct a list of recordings by Sidney Arodin.  Sidney participated in 37 recording sessions between 1922 and 1937. Not a very prolific musician.

Albert



Posted on Mar 30, 2013, 10:47 AM

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Bix and Monk Hazel

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We know that Monk Hazel was a friend of Emmett Hardy and that he was one of the New Orleans musicians who went backstage and convinced Whiteman to let Bix and the rest of the "hot unit" do a segment in the second part of his concert in New Orleans.

You did well to spot the Geechie call similarity. Doesn't it seem possible that Bix might have had some of Monk Hazel's records in his own personal collection and Monk had Bix's records and conveniently borrowed the Geechie call for "Sizzlin' the Blues?"

Posted on Mar 30, 2013, 10:15 AM

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As far as I can remember, the Geechie call was around even ....

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.... before Bix recorded Davenport Blues.

Albert



Posted on Mar 30, 2013, 11:08 AM

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WBIX # 209

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 Radio Program # 209. (loaded on 03/29/2013) Recordings of Frank Trumbauer with the Benson Orchestra of Chicago. 58 min 27 sec

Real Audio 
Streaming audio file.    Download file.   14.3 M  

mp3 files  
Streaming mp3 file   http://bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX209.m3u    
Download file   
bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX209.mp3    42.1 MB

All recordings by the Benson Orchestra of Chicago.

Trot Along. Jan 30, 1923.
Think of Me.
Jan 30, 1923.
Loose Feet. Jan 31, 1923.
I Never Miss the Sunshine. Jun 14,
The Cat Whiskers. Jun 15, 1923.

Somebody's Wrong.
Jun 25, 1923.
Riverboat Shuffle.  Mar 23, 1925.
Copenhagen.
Sep 8, 1924..
Sobbin' Blues.
Aug 17, 1923..
Mean, Mean Mamma. Aug 21, 1923.
That Old Gang of Mine.
Aug 27, 1923..
Wolverine Blues Sep 10, 1923.


WBIX # 210 will be uploaded on Aprr 26, 2013.

The problem with WBIX # 209 will be fixed later.

Enjoy!

Albert



Posted on Mar 29, 2013, 6:26 AM

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Nice show, and glitch-free!

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Nice show, and glitch-free! Congratulations! I think Frank Trumbauer is the most underrated jazz musician of all time (with Henry "Buster" Smith, Charlie Parker's saxophone teacher and a first-rate soloist in his own right who recorded very little, a close runner-up) and it's welcome to hear this tribute to him via his very earliest works. The Benson Orchestra of Chicago was NOT a jazz orchestra, though, and the incredibly corny trumpet solo just before Trumbauer's remarkable chorus on "I Never Miss the Sunshine" shows just how much Tram needed Bix.

Posted on Mar 30, 2013, 12:02 PM

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A miracle! I didn't screw up.

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Yes, Tram is highly underrated. Perhaps, his association with Bix can explain it. Perhaps listeners were blinded by Bix's genius and could not see the brilliance of Tram's musicianship.

Albert



Posted on Mar 30, 2013, 2:25 PM

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Re: Benson Orchestra

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Pretty draggy stuff except when the Benson Orchestra hits "Copenhagen," where they actually began to swing!

Posted on Mar 30, 2013, 7:34 PM

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Happy Birthday, Pops!

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Paul Whiteman was born on Mar 28, 1890 in Denver, CO an died on Dec 29, 1967 in the Doylestown, PA hospital.

[linked image]

I cannot recommend strongly enough the two-volume mammoth biography of Paul Whiteman by Don Rayno. Thoroughly researched, filled with highly significant information about Paul's life and music. Volume I is available for $60.45 (free shipping) from amazon. Volume 2, also sold by amazon, goes for $85 with free shipping. Worth every penny.

I also recommend John Wilson's essay in the New York Times when Mr. Whiteman died.

[linked image]

A musical giant in the first half of the twentieth century, we have lots to be grateful to him. RIP.



Posted on Mar 28, 2013, 9:29 AM

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My favorite waltz recorded by Paul Whiteman.

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Apr 25, 1924. Irving Berlin's What'll I Do. It took 8 takes to get a master. Wonderful solos by Strickfaden and Gorman.

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9769/

[linked image]

[linked image]

From wikipedia: "What'll I Do" is a song written by Irving Berlin in 1923. It was introduced by singers Grace Moore and John Steel late in the run of Berlin's third Music Box Revue and also was included in the following year's (1924) edition. [see note 1] In the lyrics, the singer questions how he or she will get by now that a recent romance has ended."

Note 1. John Murray Andersen was in charge of staging for the 1924 production. Six years later, Mr. Anderson directed the Hollywood film "King of Jazz."

Albert



Posted on Mar 28, 2013, 3:03 PM

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Re: Paul Whiteman

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Never in this Forum, but elsewhere in the jazz world, Paul sometimes doesn't quite get the credit he so rightly deserves.
In bringing jazz, dance and modern music not only to the notice of the American public, but internationally as well, and by introducing jazz musicians into the symphonic ranks of his orchestra, he has made his contribution to the wonderful decade, musically speaking, of the Roaring Twenties, and has certainly earned his rightful place in the history of jazz music.

Posted on Mar 28, 2013, 6:24 PM

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Re: Paul Whiteman

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As Ken Bristow says, Paul Whiteman brought dance music to a wide audience, music that slipped in under the radar of the public ear with snatches and snippets of real jazz. If for nothing else, he is to be honored for providing support and encouragement to the extraordinary jazzmen whom he welcomed and who passed through his ranks and on into history.

Posted on Mar 29, 2013, 5:22 AM

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Obviously influenced by Bix, Eddie and Joe.

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A wonderful recording of the Donaldson and Kahn tune She's Wonderful from May 8, 1929. Harry Shalson accompanied by Carol Gibbons (p), Sylvester Ahola (t), Eric Siday (v) and Joe Brannelly (g).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5N9WTcppUUo

Shades of For No Reason At All in C in the introduction. And get a load of Siday's and Hooley's obbligatos behind Harry. From John Wright's collection.

Albert



Posted on Mar 27, 2013, 6:44 AM

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Ben Pollack's Californians

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From the Glenn Miller archives at the University of Colorado.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Mar 25, 2013, 2:59 PM

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Bix a member of Pollack's band?

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From   http://music.colorado.edu/departments/amrc/gma/meet-glenn-miller/

Eventually he (Glenn Miller) landed in Los Angeles and went to work for Max Fischers band at the Forum Theatre.  It was there that he would get the break that was to change his entire musical career and his entire life.  He was hired by bandleader Ben Pollack.  The Pollack band was one of the most influential and idolized bands of its day.  The band was filled with young, jazz-oriented musicians, including Bix Beiderbecke and Benny Goodman, who became Glenns roommate.  Pollack hired Glenn Miller as much for his interest in arranging as to be a trombone player.  The Pollack band would work primarily in Chicago, where it was a smash at the Blackhawk and recorded for Victor records.  In March 1928, the Pollack band went east to New York where its success continued.

Why doesn't anyone with knowledge of the era review what is being written?

Albert



Posted on Mar 25, 2013, 3:06 PM

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Bix tutored in harmony by Roy Bargy.

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From Chicago Jazz: A Cultural History, 1904-1930 by William Howland Kenney.

"Pianist/leader Roy Bargy was widely admired by jazz musicians and had been Bix Beiderbecke's tutor in harmony."

Sudhalter and Evans:

"Bargy, star of the Benson orchestra of Chicago, was later to help an older, more ambitious Bix with difficult chord sequences and voices when both were members of the Paul Whiteman orchestra."

I wonder if Bill Challis also helped Bix with complicated harmonies. I wouldn't be surprised if he did when he transcribed Bix's piano compositions. However, Bix, intuitively, if not formally, knew a lot about harmony. I believe Jimmy McPartland commented on Bix's mastery of harmony.

Albert



Posted on Mar 27, 2013, 7:05 AM

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Kollege of Musical Knowledge

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Part of Bix's enthusiasm on joining the Whiteman orchestra was about expanding his musical reach. In the company of some of the most thoroughly trained musicians in America, Bix must have grabbed every chance to remedy his "musical degeneracy." Besides consulting with Bargy and Challis, he probably got all kinds of technical advice from Chas. Margulis, his section-mate.

On the Trumbauer "Mississippi Mud," they sound so alike that when Margulis jumps in for the transition after Bix's epic solo, it sounds like an extension of the solo.


Brad K

Posted on Apr 1, 2013, 12:24 PM

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A new Book by Bo Lindstrom and Dan Vernhettes

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Jazz Puzzles (Vol. 1)

by Bo Lindström and Dan Vernhettes
 


Jazz Puzzles (Vol. 1)
by Dan Vernhettes with Bo Lindström
Foreword by Bruce Raeburn
Published by JazzEdit in a limited edition of 500 copies
240 pages (24 pages more than Traveling Blues, for the same price), English text, 300 illustrations, Format: 26 cm x 28,5 cm, offset quadri

Presentation and research of the same quality as Traveling Blues.

Available at a cost of 40 euros per copy (+ mailing 10 euros) on www.jazzedit.org or directly at jazzedit@sfr.fr Also at Bolm@telia.com

[linked image]

Everyone interested in the history of jazz music has long been puzzled by the mysteries surrounding its origins. Many facts especially concerning the lives of musicians, were not reliably documented, and we are left with countless questions: How did jazz emerge in Louisiana?...
What is its real chronology?...
What do we know of the creators - from names such as Buddy Bolden, Joe Oliver, Freddie Keppard, Sidney Bechet to lesser-known musicians who were just as involved - the McNeal brothers, Frankie Duson, Tig Chambers, Manuel Perez, Ernest Coycault, Chris Kelly, Buddy Petit, Evan Thomas, Lorenzo Tio, Arnold Métoyer, Kid Rena and many others?...
What was their ancestry and cultural backgrounds?...
Where did they play?...
Jazz Puzzles supplies many of the answers. In 14 thoroughly-researched biographies of early, influential musicians, the fuller picture starts to emerge. Through a diversity of personal lineages, lives and achievements, the shadowy figures of the musicians involved take on the mantle of real people and the history of early jazz in Louisiana begins to unfold. Illustrated with many rare and original photographs, maps and documents, including an original map of New Orleans showing sites with addresses of 124 places where musicians played and lived, a map of Chicago jazz venues, and complete discographies Jazz Puzzles is not only a history book and a jazz book, but a fascinating picture book that is hard to put down.


CONTENTS Page
Forwords 5
Acknowledgments 8
Chapter 1 John P. Robichaux 9
Chapter 2 Buddy Bolden 29
Chapter 3 Manuel Perez 59
Chapter 4 Ernest and Jerome Coycault 75
Chapter 5 Joe Oliver 85
Chapter 6 Chris Kelly 105
Chapter 7 Freddie Keppard 117
Chapter 8 Lorenzo Tio 149
Chapter 9 Arnold Métoyer 161
Chapter 10 JEvan Thomas 165
Chapter 11 Punch Miller 173
Chapter 12 Buddy Petit 195
Chapter 13 Sidney Béchet 215
Chapter 14 Kid Rena 227
Index

A review by Ian Thiel, the editor of the IAJRC Journal.

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Mar 25, 2013, 8:39 AM

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Who was Dr. Hugo Riesenfeld?

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From imdb.com

Biography for
Hugo Riesenfeld

Date of Birth 26 January 1879, Vienna, Austria-Hungary (now Austria)
Date of Death 10 September 1939, Los Angeles, California, USA (following lengthy illness.)

From 1917-1925 Hugo Riesenfeld was the manager of the Rivoli, Rialto and Criterion Theatres in New York City. A conductor and violinist, Riesenfeld was educated at the Conservatory of Music in Vienna and the University of Vienna. He then conducted with the Imperial Opera House in Vienna. In 1907 he came to the US with Oscar Hammerstein and for four years worked with the Manhattan Opera Company in New York. While on Broadway he demonstrated the artistic and commercial possibilities of using intelligent music to accompany films. In 1928 he was appointed general musical director in charge of musical productions for United Artists Pictures.
***********************************************************

What does the good doctor have to do with Bix? Well, let me tell you. In October 1926, the Jean Goldkette orchestra was on its Eastern tour. On Wed, Oct 6, 1926, the band opened in Roseland in a battle of the bands with Fletcher Henderson's orchestra as the opponent. The battle was repeated on Oct 13, 1926..
 
[linked image]
 
Here comes the connection. From the New York Sun, Oct 4, 1926:

Roseland's Fall Opening.

Next Wednesday evening at the opening of the fall season at Roseland Ballroom "a bitter contest" is to be held between Fletcher Henderson and his coterie of Jazz artists and Jean Goldkette's orchestra, Western favorites. Dr. Hugo Reisenfeld, aided by the audience, will decide the winner. There will be other special features for the occasion.
 
This is the first time I read about a judging of the contest/battle between the Henderson and Goldkette orchestras. I have no idea of what the formal decision was. Of course, from comments by Henderson and Goldkette musicians, we know that the Goldkette guys beat the daylights out of Henderson's men. I will research the question of Dr. Riesenfeld doing the judging. Does anyone know the "official" result?
 
Albert


Posted on Mar 24, 2013, 5:42 PM

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I looked everywhere I could think of, but ....

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.... no cigar.

Dr. Hugo Riesenfeld was into contests and prizes. In 1925, he established a gold medal for the best short film of the year. The winner in 1925 (for a film produced in 1924) was  Louis Starewitch, a Polish artist, for "The Voice of the Nightingale."

Albert



Posted on Mar 24, 2013, 6:13 PM

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Two Images of Roseland.

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From Magee's book on Fletcher.


The interior in 1926.


[linked image]


The marquee with Fletcher Henderson's name.


[linked image]


Albert



Posted on Mar 25, 2013, 5:38 AM

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Where Was Bix On April 27, 1927?

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On April 11, 1927, the Jean Goldkette Orchestra left Detroit for another eastern tour. Bix biographies give a fairly complete chronological account of the whereabouts of the band. However, there is a blank for the period April 22 when the band was at the Junior Prom at Indiana University and April 29 when the band played at the Penn State prom. It turns out that the Jean Goldkette orchestra played at the Kalurah Temple in Binghamton, NY on April 27.


Here is an ad from the Binghamton Press in the April 25, 1927 issue.


[linked image]


Another ad from Apr 26, 1927.


[linked image]


A write up from Apr 26, 1927. Unfortunately, the top of the image was truncated in the link to the page.


[linked image]


It will be seen that the appearances in Pittsburgh, Worcester, Cornell and Kentucky are not listed in Bix biographies. I'll do some research on these.


Albert


 



Posted on Mar 23, 2013, 8:26 AM

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The Kalurah Temple

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The Kalurah Temple was a magnificent building. Construction started in 1916 and was completed in 1918.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Mar 23, 2013, 8:30 AM

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On May 14, 1927 Jean Goldkette with Bix played ....

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.... in Princeton University as part of the Eastern tour in the Spring of 1927. The Goldkette band was one of 14 who played the weekend of May 13-15 in various clubs. Here is the announcement in the Daily Princetonian of May 13, 1927.

http://tinyurl.com/dy9pgat

Imagine being a student at Princeton in 1927 and dancing to the music of all these magnificent bands?

I wonder if the muscians listened to each other. Note that the Oliver Naylor band was one of the 14. Did they hear Bix doing Clementine and eventually copied Bix's solo? Was Clementine already copyrighted in May 1927?

Albert



Posted on Mar 23, 2013, 11:08 AM

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Re: May 14, 1927

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Was "Clementine" in the Victor Orchestra's book in May of 1927? The accounts of that Liederkrantz Hall session (Bill Rank's, for example) in which it was recorded seem to be suggesting that the song was not one of theirs and had to be quickly worked out by the sections on the spot.

Posted on Mar 23, 2013, 6:42 PM

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Probably not in May 1927.

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Most of the recordings of Clementine date from the fall of 1927. There is one in July 1927. So the Naylor band would not have heard Clementine. But I guess they probably went to listen to the Goldkette band and Bix, who by this time had quite a reputation among musicians. The remarkable recording of Singin' the Blues had been waxed on Feb 4, and, once released, Bix's fame spread like wildfire.

Albert



Posted on Mar 24, 2013, 11:33 AM

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Cal Ramblers personnel at Princeton

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Kirkeby sent 6 Ramblers to Princeton on the weekend of 13-14 May 1927, .... Tracy, Roy Johnston, Spencer Clark, ..... Skip, Joe Albin and Tommy Felline.

Posted on Mar 26, 2013, 10:26 AM

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Interesting and surprising.

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Why not Adrian Rollini, Bobby Davis, Chelsea Quealey, Jack Russin, Herb Weil? Princeton was a prestigious university with students very interested in jazz and hot dance bands. I would have thought that Kirkeby would send his "A" team.

Albert



Posted on Mar 26, 2013, 5:56 PM

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May 20, 1927

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As part of the Eastern tour, the Goldkette orchestra was in Cornell University, Ithaca, NY playing for the Spring Day Ball.


Here are the references to the appearance of Goldkette's orchestra in the sudent newspaper, the Cornell Daily Sun.


Early Announcement. Mar 30, 1927.


[linked image]


Two comments. 1. The band is credited as the Book Cadillac Hotel Orchestra, although it was, as we will see below, the Victor Recording Orchestra. 2. The Navy Ball Committee was in charge of organizing the annual Spring Day Ball.


Another announcement. May 14, 1927.


[linked image]


The appearance of the Goldkette band on May 6, 1927 at the Ivy Ball at the University of Pennsylvania is referred to in this article. Bix's last name is misspelled and he is given credit as the writer of Copenhagen.


Final announcement. May 19, 1927.


[linked image]


Note the point made about the cost of the band. Why did the band go broke a few months later? They were playing in various prestigious (and expensive) Ivy League schools, charging good money and they had their steady engagement at the Graystone.


And ad for Goldkette records. May 24, 1927.


[linked image]


Apparently, the numbers recently recorded by the band were used in the ball. This seems to be incompatible with the accepted view that the Goldkette musicians were rather unhappy, with a few exceptions, about the numbers they had to record. The numbers seemed to be part of the Goldkette book.


Albert 


 



Posted on Mar 26, 2013, 11:30 AM

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The advertisement for Lent's Music Store

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The Lent's Music Store ad shows what is supposed to be the boys in action, with Goldkette conducting and featuring a mystery euphonium player front row centre.
But it could have been roughly copied from an original photo of the band. Three trumpets are clearly visible, the second horn man bearing quite a strong resemblance to Bix himself.

Posted on Mar 26, 2013, 4:19 PM

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A Highly Significant Document Signed by Bix.

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We know that Bix signed dedications to his friends on the covers of the sheet music for his piano compositions. Perhaps the most famous is the dedication to Hoagy.

This comes from the Carmichael collection at Indiana University

http://i72.phalbums/i198/ahaim/candlelightstohagyfrombix.jpgotobucket.com/

This is the caption for the image:

Handwritten below the photograph, on the cover of a piece of music written by Bix, "To Mr. Carmichael, I am glad to have met such a man-"Long may your bum reek"-Your friend, Leon Bix Beiderbecke, p.s. I am not a swan." [photograph 2/136; negative 13/64]. The transcription of part of the dedication is incorrect. It reads, in fact: "lang may your lum reek" an old Scottish expression meaning "Long may your chimney smoke."

Here is one to Leo McConville. In Evans and Evans and Wikipedia.

There are two more in Evans and Evans.

Here is the cover of the sheet music for In A Mist dedicated by Bix to his sister Mary Louise, courtesy of  a donor whose name I do not publicize in order to protect his/her privacy. The very nice dedication demonstrates, once more, the excellent relations that Bix had with his family.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Mar 22, 2013, 11:34 AM

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A very nice version of "My Ohio Home."

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Cass Hagan, Columbia 1301-D, Jan 27, 1928.

According to Rust: Henry Levine, Bo Ashford, t; Al Philburn, tb (nice breaks in Miff's style); Don Murray, cl, as, bar; Roy Thrall, as; Frank Crum, ts; Cass Hagan, vn; Fred Frank, p; Jim Mahoney, bj; Al Webber, bb; Chick Condon, d; Irving Kaufman, voc.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TvEMuaX1npw&NR=1&feature=endscreen

In the description of the video, we read, "American bandleader who led several orchestras during the 1920s and 1930s. At various times his line-up consisted of such stars as Bix Beidebecke, Tommy Dorsey, Red Nichols and Pee Wee Russell." This exact sentence is found all over the internet. Do they know something that we don't? Time for a Cass Hagan CD and research on biographical information and his musical activities. On a quick search, all I found were radio listings in 1927 and 1928 for his Hotel Manger and Park Central orchestras and a couple of ads. Here is one of them.

[linked image]

The Manger Hotel was adjacent to the Roxy Theater. Quite a luxurious place.

[linked image]

Another luxurious place, the Park Central Hotel.

[linked image]

Albert

Probably the most famous recording of Cass Hagan is the Varsity Drag.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hs-rzU7vnkQ



Posted on Mar 21, 2013, 8:51 AM

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Preliminary Information About Cass Hagan.

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850fedc4-153d-46d2-8177-be2048b89a94.jpg?Client=MCCManager&NamespaceID=1093&MaxSide=160
Charles Casserly Hagan, 1904-1964.

Bix in August 1930.

"Man & Legend", Chapter 21, page 308:

"Around this time Bix and Tommy Dorsey joined violinist Cass Hagan in an attempt to sell a new all-star band to bookers around New York, and even perhaps interest them in a European tour. Audiences in Britain and on the Continent had been getting the Victor, Columbia and Okeh records regularly on their own labels. They knew the names of the sidemen in such bands as Whiteman's far better than did the average American. According to 'Slim Evans' Neirouter, friend from Cincinnati and Chicago days, the proposed big band actually rehearsed a few times and played one engagement, an American legion outing in Merrick, Long Island, out near where Dorsey lived."


"Bix: The Leon Bix Beiderbecke Story", page 514:

Cass Hagan via Woody Backensto (date unknown):
"Bix, Tommy Dorsey and I formed a band and for a time rehearsed it at the Roseland Ballroom. The "Depression" and the gods were against us. We didn't play any engagements."


Variety, Aug 3, 1927:

RECOMMENDED DISK RECORDS Columbia-Get Cass Hagan's version of "Variety Stomp" and "Melancholy Charlie." Real blues, sizzling and yet not unmelodius. Hagan plays torrid jazz cleanly and does not obliterate the original melody motif.

Albert

Variety Stomp http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2QwsuY27iwA

Sometimes I'm Happy http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s2Th0WNIIGQ

Manhattan Mary http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YAHTFzlgjEU



Posted on Mar 21, 2013, 11:10 AM

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A Bit More

by

I found Charles C. Hagan (Cass) in the US Censuses for 1910, 1920, and 1930. The family must have been reasonably well-off as they had two domestics living in. In 1910, Charles C. was living with his father James (48) born in New Jersey of English parents, his mother Cecilia (43) born in New York of Irish parents, and  two sisters and five brothers. Cass was the youngest. Same in 1920, except that everyone was 10 years older. In 1930, Cass was married to Dolly (23) born in New York, is described as an orchestra musician,  and lived with his mother,  described as the head, and  his two sisters, now married, and their respective husbands. Two generations in one household and a bunch of in-laws. One son-in-law is a secretary and the other a golfer!

Albert



Posted on Mar 22, 2013, 8:24 AM

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Red Nichols and Cass Hagan, co-conductors.

by

https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/s480x480/601625_4348905130307_357384008_n.jpg

Albert



Posted on Mar 21, 2013, 11:32 AM

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Please help Sue Fischer with her medical expenses!!!!

by

Our dear friend, and devoted Bix fan, has ovarian cancer. There is a pay pay account set up to help defray her medical expenses:

https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=H5Y6WVKTHRVAE

Sue had surgery to remove the tumor and affected organs. She will be undergoing about five months of chemo. She is off work now WITHOUT PAY because she has exhausted all her sick time. She has no income at the moment (and has already received her first hospital bill)!!! If everything goes well, she might be back to work in May.
Thanks, everybody and spread the word/link.




Posted on Mar 20, 2013, 8:54 AM

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Sorry to hear about Sue's health problem.

by

I hope she will recover completely. Of course, I will make a contribution. I urge others to do the best they can.

Albert



Posted on Mar 20, 2013, 9:37 AM

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Thanks, Albert.....

by Liz Beiderbecke-Hart

And thanks, everyone, in advance, for any donation you can make. Sue is very humbled by all this, and so deserving. Blessings.

Posted on Mar 20, 2013, 9:50 AM

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Thank you, Liz..

by Debbie White

Thanks SO much for setting this up, Liz ! Medical expenses of this kind can be devastating, and I hope we will collectively be able to ease some of the burden for Sue so that she can concentrate on her recovery. She is an incredible person, and her strength is an inspiration !

Posted on Mar 23, 2013, 12:13 PM

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Happy Birthday to Jean Goldkette.

by

A man of superior musical taste. RIP.

Albert



Posted on Mar 18, 2013, 6:34 AM

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What's Left of Goldkette

by

http://bixography.com/aftergoldkette.html

Albert



Posted on Mar 18, 2013, 7:18 AM

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Music in the Twenties. Jean Goldkette. By Russell B. Nye

by

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/GoldketteNye.pdf

Albert



Posted on Mar 18, 2013, 7:21 AM

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Jean Goldkette in Metronome.

by

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/goldkette/Goldkettemetronome.html

Albert



Posted on Mar 18, 2013, 7:28 AM

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The Jean Goldkette Orchestra With Bix at the Penn State Prom

by

State College PA April 29, 1927.

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/GoldkettePennStateProm/GoldkettePennState.html

Albert

PS State College PA is where my younger son was born. A nice little town. I spent four years in State College. The first two as assistant professor, the last two as associate professor at Penn State University.



Posted on Mar 18, 2013, 7:37 AM

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An ad in Variety, Sep 4, 1929

by

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Mar 18, 2013, 7:51 AM

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Jean Goldkette's WGN Orchestra

by Nick Dellow


...and of course Jean Goldkette's WGN Orchestra mentioned in this advert was also his "Victor Recording Orchestra". This was Goldkette's "number one" band, based at the WGN radio studios in Chicago (where they were the studio's house band) and which also recorded for Victor at its recording studios situated literally just over the road from the WGN studios. On July 27th, 1929, the band recorded five sides in these Chicago studios, including the Don Redman arrangement of "Birmingham Bertha" and the rejected side "I'm Refer'n' Just To Her 'n' Me", which, incidentally, was presented to the world for the very first time on August 10th, 2011, on this very forum! These sides feature solos by Goldkette sidemen Sterling Bose, Larry Tice, Volly De Faut and Pee Wee Hunt. Two other sides recorded at the same session by the band were, like "I'm Refer'n' Just To Her 'n' Me", also rejected. The remaining side, "An Old Italian Love Song" was, however, issued and like "Withered Roses" recorded at an earlier Victor session (during which the band also waxed Don Redman's arrangements of "My Blackbirds Are Bluebirds Now" and "Don't Be Like That") it features Nat Natoli's straight trumpet rather than Bose's hot, Bixian horn.

In fact, all the Goldkette bands mentioned here were effectively Jean Goldkette's WGN Orchestra, but with the addition of other instruments. The WGN orchestra did have its own full-time three-piece string section, but this was augmented (as were other sections of the band) for the coast-to-coast NBC broadcasts.


Posted on Mar 18, 2013, 8:35 AM

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More Images of the Gennett Studio (Brad, for you)

by

[linked image]

From the Indiana University Collection. According to Duncan Schiedt this is from May 19, 1925. From left to right: Haskell Simpson, Maurice May (not Mays), Harry Wright, Earl McDowell, Arnold Habbe, Hoagy Carmichael, Curt Hitch, Fred Rollison.

Here is another photo of Hitch's Harmonists I guess from Sep 19, 1923 or Feb 23, 1924. 

 [linked image]

From Rust's discography for theses sessions , Curt Hitch, p; Fred Rollison, cornet; Jerry Bump, trombone; Harry Wright, clarinet; Rookie Neal, C-melody sax; Dewey Neal, bass sax; Maurice Mays, banjo; Earl McDowell, drums. But the guy behind the piano does not look like the guy sitting next to Hoagy in the previous photo. And did Maurice May/Mays play both sax and banjo? I don't have time now to research this. I'm leaving in a little while. Opinions?

Albert



Posted on Mar 18, 2013, 6:09 AM

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I did a search of the forum and found lots of photos.

by

See the thread http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1254116701

I also found a posting by Maurice May grandson. I just wrote to him.

Albert



Posted on Mar 18, 2013, 6:27 AM

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From Maurice May's grandson. A fast and friendly reply.

by

Yes, Maurice played both banjo and saxophone. More in early April. Right now Muarice's grandson is out of town.

Albert



Posted on Mar 18, 2013, 7:26 AM

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They must've been --

by Laura Demilio

SWELTERING. All of those bands posed with rolled-sleeved shirts and loosened ties -- the new edition of Jelly Roll, Bix and Hoagy once more confirmed how horribly hot it was in that crude little recording studio, summer or winter, and every photo I've seen of the bands, those guys sure look it.



Posted on Mar 18, 2013, 11:27 AM

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Hey, Thanks...

by

I could've sworn the HHH photo with Hoagy sharing the piano bench was in my file, but it was not. That makes eighteen Gennett studio pix gleaned so far.

Happy Birthday!

-Brad K

Posted on Mar 19, 2013, 6:16 PM

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Two days in the big apple to celebrate my 82nd birthday.

by

Monday evening:
Vince Giordano's Nighthawks at Sofia's

[linked image]

[linked image]

Tuesday early afternoon

Le Bernardin, French Restaurant (my favorite restaurant in New York City)

[linked image]

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Mar 15, 2013, 6:09 PM

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Re: Two days in the big apple to celebrate my 82nd birthday.

by Mario

Happy Birthday,Albert.

Posted on Mar 16, 2013, 4:41 PM

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Happy Birthday, Albert

by Laura Demilio

Hope it was wonderful.

Spring issue with your and Chris' article coming up soon?


Laura

Posted on Mar 16, 2013, 6:58 PM

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Thanks, but the visit to the Big Apple will be ....

by

.... tomorrow and Tuesday. I'll let you know how it went.

Chris and I went through the manuscript in detail, added a few things and modified a few other things. We sent the revised version to the editor on Friday and I am pretty sure it will be in the Spring 2013 edition of the Journal of Jazz Studies. Nothing new about Bix and Alice; mostly about Alice.

Albert



Posted on Mar 17, 2013, 8:06 AM

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Thank you.

by

Very kind of you.

Albert



Posted on Mar 17, 2013, 8:07 AM

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We had a great time.

by

The evening in Sofia's restaurant with Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks was fabulous. Vince's hospitality was immenselyI appreciated, as were his kind words about my Bix website. The band is doing so well, great musicianship, the guys are relaxed, enjoying to no end what they are playing. And I am amazed at Vince's multi-tasking abilities: introducing each song with a fascinating bit of jazz history, playing bass sax, tuba, string bass, doing vocals, cracking jokes, keeping the evening going smoothly, talking individually to most of the members in the audience. And the versatilty of the band is remarkable: dance band music, jazz, rumba, waltz, big band, dixieland, you name it: the talented Nighthawks can play it all with great gusto. How does Vince do it? Of course, Sofia's gigs are not all there is to Vince. What about his music for the Boardwalk Empire HBO series and in soundtracks of movies? Concerts in several venues, etc, etc. Vince's generosity whenever and wherever needed is legendary.  Some one said in his blog that Vince is a National Treasure. Indeed, he has a variety of unusual talents. He  is one of my idols, and I don't have many.

On Tuesday we had lunch in one of the best French restaurants in New York City.

All in all, a great two days.

Albert



Posted on Mar 20, 2013, 7:10 AM

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The Paul Whiteman Orchestra in 1922

by

[linked image]

Personnel from Rayno's biography of Whiteman, Vol. I.
Left to right:
Seated: Mike Pingitore, Sam Lewis, Tommy Gott, George Unger, Henry Busse, Ferde Grofe, Hale Byers, Morris Speinson, Donald Clark, Herman Hand, Ross Gorman.
Standing: Harold McDonald, Jack Barsby, Paul Whiteman, Phil Ohman.

Albert



Posted on Mar 15, 2013, 5:45 PM

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Was Charlie Teagarden the nearest trumpeter to ....

by

.... Bix Beiderbecke alive in 1940? That is what is claimed in this article from the Mar 28, 1940 issue of the Rome Daily Sentinel.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Mar 15, 2013, 11:18 AM

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The Kallet Capitol Theatre in Rome, New York

by

Not much to brag about from outside.

[linked image]

But get a load of the luxurious interior

[linked image]

and the organ

[linked image]



Posted on Mar 15, 2013, 11:40 AM

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Little Kallet in Reidsville, N C

by

Albert, Reidsville's Rockingham Theatre is a crackerbox compared to the Kallet but is built (and well-preserved for the most part) generally along Kallet lines. Erected in 1929 as the third theatre of a chain (not sure which) equipped for sound (the first two were in Los Angeles and Milwaukee, I believe), the inside of the theatre looks a lot like a gingerbread house. Very colorful, with some slight plaster damage. It's still got a large ledge in front of the screen from which I'm told certain live performances by locals originated AND still has its orchestra pit, albeit boxed over. It's owned by a fella who survives by showing 5 dollar movies.


While on the subject of theatres, an article ran about thirty years ago in the Danville Register and Bee regarding a pharmacy on the main drag in town that showed silents in the early teens in a former life and still had the screen set into one of its walls. It was very small.

Hope your birthday went well. I didn't get a call, so I assume you didn't land in jail for celebrating too strenuously.

HAIL FREDONIA!
Dan

Posted on Apr 4, 2013, 10:44 AM

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Who is that publicity man kidding?

by

To be sure, I have only heard a couple handfulls of records on which Charlie Teagarden played (on the Mosaic Bix/Tram/Teagarden set),but from the tunes I heard my impression of Charlie was of a guy with a nice tone and without overly inventive solo construction who sounds absolutely NOTHING like our guy Bix. This had to be a publicity man's puff piece in the 'super colossal tremendous' movie-making tradition.

HAIL FREDONIA!
Dan

Posted on Apr 4, 2013, 10:53 AM

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