The Bixography Discussion Group

A vehicle for Bixophiles and other interested individuals to ask questions, make comments and exchange information about Bix Beiderbecke and related subjects. Any views expressed in the Bixography Forum represent solely the opinions of those expressing them and are not necessarily endorsed or opposed by Albert Haim unless he has signed the message.

I started archiving some of the threads that have been inactive for some time. The archived threads can be found at http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/archivesforum.htm

Albert Haim

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the world is ending soon!!!!!!! the end is coming!!

by hal smith

Worlds Records is going out of business.

Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 10:51 PM

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Agree!

by John

A sign of the end times? I don't know how I'll even know about most of the new releases, this is going to really hurt all those relatively small labels World's dealt in.

Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 12:14 PM

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It's Da Hipocalypse, I Tell Ya...

by

"... this is going to really hurt all those relatively small labels World's dealt in..."

Like mine, for instance! Worlds is, or was, the exclusive distributor of Superbatone Records, which has four new releases in preparation.

See youse in the funny papers...

Brad Kay

Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 7:26 PM

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Re: Agree!

by hal smith

I though the same thing myself about the "THE NEW RELEASES" anyone out there know where to go?

Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 11:30 PM

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NOT The End After All...

by

Ren Brown and I talked today. He said his "Denouement" is more of a re-organization than a full shut-down. He's taking the business on-line instead of issuing catalogs. World's still will carry esoterica from labels like mine and operate on a direct internet order basis. The responses of "Don't do it, Mr. Brown!" after his announcement were so many and heartfelt that he is re-assessing the big picture.

So stay tuned, everyone, and PLEASE support his efforts.

We've got the whole "Worlds" in our hands!

- Brad K

Posted on Mar 1, 2013, 11:50 PM

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jimmy dorsey's daughter

by hal smith

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrjPhTnmSX0

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 11:44 PM

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Re: jimmy dorsey's daughter

by David Sager

I wonder if any more interviews w Mrs Hilton exist? She is well-spoken and charming. I never got to meet her. I did know Tommy's eldest son, Thomas III, who was the sweetest guy you'd ever want to meet. Looked a lot like his old man, to boot.

DS

Posted on Feb 28, 2013, 12:22 PM

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Futuristic Rhythm

by John

Here's a different slant on Goose Pimples, not sure if the Bix version was sampled. A bit outré but I got a kick out of it so I thought other forumites might also:

Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 12:36 PM

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Hello John, and welcome!

by

I believe you forgot to give the link. sad.gif

Albert



Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 1:53 PM

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The missing link

by John

https://soundcloud.com/#cosmo-sheldrake/goose-pimples

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 6:57 AM

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Re: Goose Pimples

by

Wonder what the two versions would sound like if you synked them together?

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 4:31 PM

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Thumbs Up

by Andy Vaaler

That was fun, funky, and playful. Thanks for sharing. Send more.


Posted on Feb 25, 2013, 2:50 PM

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This is the first time i comment here

by

Hi:

I'm an Spanish 18 year old who is interested in jazz & interested to learn some things about Bix or any musician who worked with him or influenced him, but more of course, to know more.
I've got a serious doubt:
I've found on Rust's American Dance Band Discography on page 604, exactly the Lou Gold chapter that Eddie Edwards recorded with Lou Gold. I had to say it, but I wonder if that Eddie Edwards is the same man who recorded with the ODJB & his only mid-20s recordings where those of Gowan's Rhapsody Makers for Gennett?

Signed:
Javier Soria Laso

Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 10:58 AM

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Bienvenido al Forum de la Bixografia!

by

Muchas gracias por su comentario.

I believe that the Eddie Edwards in Rust's listing under Lou Gold is one and the same as the ODJB trombonist. But I will be happy to be corrected if this information is wrong. Eddie Edwards also recorded with Johnny Sylvester and Brad Gowans in the second half of the 1920s.

In the mid-1940s he has his own band, Eddie Edwards And His Original Dixieland Jazz Band. It included, among others, Tony Sbarbaro, Brad Gowans, Eddie Condon and Wild Bill Davison.

Un saludo cordial,

Albert

 

 



Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 1:42 PM

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RE: Your Welcome

by

Thanks for helping, Mr. Haim.
I believe that Miff Mole played on various Lou Gold recordings from July to early December from 1926.
By the way, how did you know my language?



Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 1:54 PM

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I spent many years in ....

by

.... Uruguay. With World War II coming, my father decided to leave France; he took the family to Uruguay in the 1930s. I lived there until 1954.

Miff Mole with Lou Gold? I don't think so.

Albert



Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 3:19 PM

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A check from Sam Lanin to Smith Ballew

by

Uploaded by Steve Hester in one of the facebook pages.

[linked image]

I did not find a recording of Sam Lanin or the Ipana Troubadours with Smith Ballew for Oct 18, 1928 in Rust's Dance band discography.

Perhaps an old debt from an earlier recording session? I thought musicians got paid right on the spot when they completed a recording session.

Albert



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 8:02 AM

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An interview of Smith Ballew.

by

Fascinating stuff.

http://archive.org/details/SmithBallewRadioBroadcast

Albert



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 8:11 AM

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Was It A Dream? Goldkette?

by

Recorded Jul 16, 1928 by The Dorsey Brothers' Concert Orchestra. OK41083.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=alDfPumvPeY

Smith Ballew tells the interviewer that the name on the record was "Dorsey Brothers" but that actually Jean Goldkette directed the band. I wonder. Rust tells us that the director was Eugene Ormandy.

Albert



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 10:15 AM

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Come to think of it, ....

by

..... $10 ain't not much for a recording session.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 8:23 AM

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Ah ha ! Yes indeed

by Malcolm Walton

Precisely Albert : I also thought that musicians got paid on the spot after the session. So what about the cheque made out to Bix, signed by Sam Lanin on 20th Oct 1927 ? I still wonder about the second Trumpet/Cornet on Sugar. Now that we have found two takes, the solos are different too !!

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 9:44 AM

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Hello Malcolm. Indeed, we discussed the possibility of an alternate take of "Sugar."

by

But it was the Red Nicols' recording. See

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1311075962

Albert



Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 1:33 PM

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A different record date

by Malcolm Walton

The "Sugar" that I am referring to was recorded on 20th Oct 1927 by Sam Lanin and his Orch. There is a Bixian short solo passage towards the end of the record that is most definitely not Red Nichols.Neither is it the lead trumpet player on the record. It is fairly "laid back" and behind the beat, just as Bix might have phrased it on a day when he was not under any pressure to produce a "work of art", e.g. when booked as a session sideman at scale. Recently an alternative take has emerged on which the solo is different, but by the same player. There are moments during the record where one can detect the occasional note, played by the second trumpet,articulated (tongued) just as Bix often did.This recording has been mentioned before on this forum some years ago, but I have only just got a copy of the second take.In the latest edition of the American Dance Band Discography the player is stated to be Jimmy McPartland. I can say,with some assurance,that it is not he. We know for certain that Sam Lanin issued a cheque for $25 to Bix on 20th Oct 1927, and I was merely acknowleging Albert's statement that musicians usually got paid on the day of the session !

Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 12:55 AM

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Sorry, Malcolm.

by

I did not remember your posting of 2004 with a discussion of Lanin's Sugar.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1082649732

An alternate take would be  a great thing to hear. One take -I don't know which- is available on youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLwEUMgNAms

Also Malcolm had kindly sent his transfer when he discussed the recording. This sound file has the solo repeated at the end.

http://bixography.com/sugarlanin.html

And take a look at this. http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/sam-lanin-orch-sugar-imperial-1860-148663106

Malcolm, can you make an mp3 file of the new take you just acquired and send it to me as an attachment to an email message? I think there would be great interest among forumites to listen  to it. Thanks.

Albert



Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 5:49 AM

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Re: Sorry, Malcolm

by

The YouTube version and Malcolm's 2004 version certainly do have a different ending solo, a quite Bixian one. It's too bad "EMGColonel" devoted screen time to his dancing couple instead of letting us have a good look at that record label to see what take it might be!

Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 8:20 AM

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Davenport school museum has bix relics (video)

by DavenportChad


Link to appropriate video here. Watch to end for additional mention of bix picks

http://www.kwqc.com/category/231919/video-landing-page?clipId=8350955&autostart=true

Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 6:43 AM

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Thanks for that link and welcome ....

by

.... to the Bixography Forum.

 I hope to be able to visit the Museum in August when I'll be in Davenport for the Bix Festival.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 7:21 AM

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Couldn't open it

by

It just had the TV station logo, and something about requesting the story Was anyone able to get the video up, and can they send to me? Thanks!

Laura

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 8:11 AM

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Are you using Windows Vista?

by

If so, you've been Gates'ed, just like me. I couldn't access it either, using Vista. Use Internet explorer or something else to access the link. I'm afraid I'm not good enough with the computer to send you a copy of the video, but mine works now that I'm not using Vista.

Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 3:44 AM

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Thanks, Alberta!

by

I'll give it a try! Would really like to see this -- :D


Laura

Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 5:28 AM

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Re: Using Vista

by

You're right, Alberta. I have a friend who was unfortunate enough to buy a new computer with Vista. Seeing all the things that it wouldn't do or would only do through lots of work-arounds, I hung on to my XP until Windows 7 came out! I'm glad you mentioned that because other people may be having the same problem without knowing why.

Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 7:49 AM

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I misspoke

by

It's VISTA PLUS MOZILLA that doesn't work. VISTA PLUS INTERNET EXPLORER does, in fact, work. That's how I accessed the video.

Sorry I didn't get it right. Old age!

Good luck!


Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 4:32 PM

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"Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now." Irving Kaufman?

by

Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now is a very nice composition by Walter Donaldson.

[linked image]

Professor Hot Stuff sent me an mp3 of a recording of this tune by an unknown band. Listen

bixbeiderbecke.com/BecauseMyBabyDontMeanMaybeNowUnknownBand.mp3

The vocalist sounds to me like Irving Kaufman. However, a comprehensive Kaufman discography by Patrick Humbert

http://patrickhumbert.com/irvingkaufmandiscography/IK.html

shows only one recording of the tune by Irving Kaufman. It is by Lou Gold  (as the Harmonians) on Har 667-H, Jun 11, 1928. As you can hear, a different recording. (Incidentally, the two recordings have a trumpet player who listened carefully to Bix; get a load of the trumpet obbligato behind Kaufman in the Lou Gold version).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UeT8ggdjdJ8

So, the question is: can anyone identify the band and the vocalist in the mp3 sent by Professor Hot Stuff? Thanks, guys.

Albert



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 5:43 AM

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This is a 1928 MARATHON track by Sam Lanin's Orch!

by John Leifert

Hi Albert - I have this side on a CDR! There was a session led by Sam Lanin in mid-1928 for the MARATHON label (an extremely rare and short-lived label which was produced by the Emerson Record Company, in their very last days of existence, in 1928). The vocalist is indeed Irving Kaufman, and I hear Leo McConville on trumpet and (to my ears, definitely) Jimmy Dorsey on alto sax near the end of the side. It is pitched just slightly fast.

This was issued as "Southern Melody Serenaders" on Marathon 223 (mx 31317-2), recorded ca. June 1928. It's session-mate is "Oh You Have No Idea", on Marathon 221 (mx 31315-2), ca. Jun 1928, on which Irving Kaufman also sings. Jimmy Dorsey is also present and soloing on that (and if it's not in JD's discography: I wouldn't be in the least surprised!)

I've been in touch several times with Patrick Humbert, who is really tackling the Mt. Everest of all artist discographies with the stupefyingly prolific Irving Kaufman (I'm convinced he had a cot or bedroom in every recording studio in the mid to late 20s, just bouncing from one studio to another!) Patrick admits that what he has up there is a decent percentage of Irving's sides, but is WAY FAR AWAY from being complete (with somebody like Kaufman, the odds of being "complete" are slim indeed, as somebody finds yet another side on which he takes the vocal refrain on Madison, Grey Gull, Marathon, Jewel, or the like..) He relishes any addition any collector may have to his website, which Albert kindly provided. I even found an animated cartoon from 1933 on which Kaufman sings! - and Patrick immediately confirmed that it was Irving. What DIDN'T Kaufman do ??

John L

Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 11:22 AM

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Excellent!

by

A bit of additional information about this rare label in

http://78records.wordpress.com/tag/marathon-78-rpm-records/

Includes sound files for both sides of Marathon 227.

Here is a label of a Marathon (# 225) record by Irving's brother Jack Kaufman.

[linked image]

Albert

 

 



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 12:30 PM

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Another version of "Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now" by Sam Lanin.

by

June 26, 1928. Cameo 8277 or Pathe 36827, I don't know which. Scrappy Lambert on vocal?

bixbeiderbecke.com/BecauseMyBabyDontMeanMaybeNowSamLanin.mp3

Kindly sent by Professor Hot Stuff from Jim Baldwin's show of 2010.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 1:49 PM

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"Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now"

by vince giordano

I agree with John the first track is Irving Kaufman,,,who is taking a few liberties with melody here and there..he didn't do that too many times.
I hear Jimmy Dorsey's sax there , too.
The pitch on that record is a half step fast...so it does make the vocal and performance a little wild.

The 2nd "Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now" is Scrappy Lambert...and there the pitch is almost a half step flat !

It's neat to hear "new" performances !



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 6:08 PM

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Re: Whiteman's "Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now"

by

While the various examples of the tune are of great interest to jazz buffs, they also illustrate just how far advanced of the others the Paul Whiteman Orchestra was.
With Bix playing at his peak at the time, along with the advanced orchestrations of Bill Challis and others, how fortunate we are that recording techniques in the mid late 1920's were able to capture on wax all that wonderful music for us to enjoy today.

Posted on Feb 23, 2013, 2:06 PM

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Re: "Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now"

by Professor Hot Stuff

Thanks for the corrections, Vince, and my apologies for not sending those tracks in the right key. Is the arrangement on the Sam Lanin versions of the tune more or less the stock arrangement, and if so, do we know who's arrangement that was? Your band is great, Vince. Keep up the great work.

Posted on Feb 24, 2013, 7:24 AM

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"Because My Baby Don't Mean Maybe Now"..the stock

by vince giordano

Many thanks for your nice words...The stock is by Frank Skinner and it's in key of "F"


Posted on Feb 27, 2013, 3:43 PM

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WBIX # 208.

by

Radio Program # 208. (loaded on 02/22/2013) The Last Ten Whiteman Recordings Before Bix Joined. 68 min 51 sec

Real Audio 
Streaming audio file.   
Download file.
  16.8 M  

mp3 files  
Streaming mp3 file    
http://bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX208.m3u
     
Download file            
bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX208.mp3    49.6 MB

All recordings by Paul Whiteman's Orchestra.

The Calinda. Aug 19, 1927. Vocal by Bing Crosby, Jack Fulton, Charles Gaylord and Austin Young.
Just A Memory.
Aug 19, 1927.
It Won't Be Long Now.
Aug 20, 1927. Vocal by the Rhythm Boys.
Ooh! Maybe It's You.
Aug 22, 1927.  Vocal by Jack Filton, Charles Gaylord and Austin Young.
Shaking the Blues Away.
Aug 22, 1927.
Mississippi Suite. Parts 1 and 2. Sep 7, 1927.
Beautiful Ohio. Sep 21, 1927. Vocal by Jack Fulton.
Missouri Waltz.
Sep 21, 1927. Vocal by Bing Crosby, Al Rinker, Jack Fulton Charles Gaylord and Austin Young.
A Shady Tree.
Sep 22, 1927. Vocal by Mildred Hunt.
Dancing Tambourine. Sep 22, 1927.
Wang-Wang Blues.
Sep 22, 1927.

WBIX # 209 will be uploaded on Mar 29, 2013.

Enjoy!

Albert



Posted on Feb 21, 2013, 2:15 PM

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I hate to do this to you again!

by

But I have to report a glitch in WBIX #208: the announcement preceding "Beautiful Ohio" and "Missouri Waltz" is actually the one from WBIX #207 that introduced "Hoosier Sweetheart" and "Sunny Disposish" from George Carhart's New Yorkers. Oops! Otherwise, this was a great show and it was especially welcome to hear the original Whiteman recording of one of Ferde Grofé's most beautiful light-classical works, "Mississippi Suite."

Posted on Feb 25, 2013, 11:37 AM

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Thank you for pointing out the error.

by

I will create a new intro for "Beautiful Ohio" and "Missouri Waltz" and delete the incorrect one. Give me a day or so.

Albert



Posted on Feb 25, 2013, 1:37 PM

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More than a day or two.

by

I am very busy reformatting and making additions to our article Alice and Bix. The editor is very pleased with the article. End notes should be changed to footnotes. He also wants several clarifications. I am cleaning up some of the new images. We have a few new items that we want to incorporate. If I may say so, the article is awsome: lots of documented information, large number of images, and some important findings. Be patient. The article will be in the Spring issue of the Journal of Jazz Studies.

Albert



Posted on Feb 26, 2013, 12:14 PM

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George Harrison and Bix

by

Enrico gives a link to this video once a year.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZLZfG5QEIM

And from http://beatlesnumber9.com/dhani.html

The western music played chez Harrison was Jerry Lee Lewis, Chuck Berry, Little Richard, Bix Beiderbecke and Hoagy Carmichael. "People at school were surprised I liked that stuff, but those were hardcore dudes," says Harrison. "I only discovered electronic music as a teenager and I still love the Prodigy and Massive Attack."

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 20, 2013, 5:13 AM

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Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea

by

Maybe that's why George was always my favorite Beatle. Here's George doing Between the Devil and The Deep Blue Sea. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjiF6Rpa3kA

Posted on Feb 20, 2013, 7:43 AM

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I'll See You in My Dreams

by

When the big George Harrison memorial concert took place in London, the very last song played was the 1920's classic "I'll See You in My Dreams." The reason given was that song was the very last music George heard on his deathbed just before he expired.

Posted on Feb 21, 2013, 1:40 PM

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Re: George Harrison and Bix

by

Here's a citation from a magazine article on George Harrison and his fondness for "Barnacle Bill" that I posted back in 2010 in which Harrison talks about his fondness for Bix's period:

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1264539804/More+on+George+Harrison%2C+Hoagy%2C+%26quot%3BBarnacle+Bill%26quot%3B+and+Bix

Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 5:46 AM

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A three-part article about Whiteman in Radio Digest 1928-1929

by

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/WhitemanRadioDigest/WhitemanRadioDigest.html

Lots of information and images. A lot to read, but worthy the time.

Albert



Posted on Feb 19, 2013, 2:23 PM

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Need Help on Rare Jazz Record

by

I recently requested that Rich Conaty play a rare Jack Teagarden record on his "Big Broadcast" radio show at wfuv. I suggested that he might want to include one of the sides in any upcoming Big Broadcast CD.

On about 1930-31, Jack Teagarden made two jazz sides with a female harpist (no, not Casper Reardon in 1934). Conaty was
stumped.

Most collectors tell me there is no such record. Many years ago, a collector pulled out this 78 rpm at his home, played it for me--so I am sure this record exists...or am I just getting old? Maybe it weas a test(?)pressing.

Is anyone at the forum familiar with either of these delightful early Teagarden sides, or the harpist?

Posted on Feb 19, 2013, 8:10 AM

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I am afraid I don't know.

by

All I know is that there was a female harpist, Loretta McFarland, who recorded with Ted Lewis in 1934.

Speaking of Caspar Reardon, here is Hoagy's Washboard Blues recorded by Caspar's group on May 10, 1937; Tony Tortomas, t / Jimmy Lytell, Henry Wade, cl / Casper Reardon, harp /Mack Shopnick, sb / Herb Quigley, d, vib.

http://soundcloud.com/peter-mintun/washboard-blues-hoagy

Albert



Posted on Feb 19, 2013, 10:43 AM

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Jazzy Harp

by

Richard,

There was a guy named Lester Cruman who played jazzy harp with Paul Tremaine and his Aristocrats in '29. He gets off a peppy (though not very swinging) solo on their "Aristocratic Stomp" (Victor V-40176). Then there was Harpo Marx...

But far as I know, the true-blue trail-blazing original pioneer jazz harpist, who COULD really swing and go head-to-head with the likes of Jack Teagarden WAS Casper Reardon. He first appears around 1933*. If your memory is true, that you heard a record from 1930-'31 with Teagarden and an unknown, unsung girl jazz harpist (feminists take note), it not only would be a rare record, but the first of its kind. Otherwise - ARE YOU POSITIVE the record wasn't "Junk Man"? That so totally fits your description, except for the year and the gender of the harpist.


-Brad K

*as a jazz harpist - he also was a pianist and symphony harpist for about ten years prior. see: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0714094/bio

Posted on Feb 20, 2013, 1:38 PM

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Thanks for the info: still a mystery to me

by

Thanks Albert and Brad. My recollection is that the harpist was a female, and the collector told me
that Teagarden made the record with her out of some personal family friendship. Maybe it was Reardon,
but I don't think so, because another collector present said he first thought it was Reardon, and was pursuaded otherwise by the owner of the record.

I will continue to do some research--and maybe take a mystical memory pill--and report back.

Posted on Feb 20, 2013, 8:40 PM

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Adele Girard...

by Russell Davies

..replaced Caspar Reardon with the Three T's at the Hickory House. That was as late as 1936 -- but it does place a female harpist alongside Teagarden. They didn't record together officially, but here's a link to some preserved broadcasts...
R.D.

http://www.jazzoracle.com/catalogue/BDW_8056.asp

Posted on Feb 21, 2013, 6:42 AM

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Adele Girard Trio - "Harp Boogie"

by

Good music (if you like the boogie-woogie), but  a lousy dancer.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tNtkSzow0FY

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 21, 2013, 12:40 PM

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Sweet Sue, Just You.

by

Beautiful song by Victor Young (music) and Will J. Rogers (words).

[linked image]

Paul Whiteman recorded this song on Sep 18, 1928 for Columbia.

[linked image]

A great arrangement by Bill Challis with a 32-bar solo by Bix in hat.

Tom Lord online discography lists about 500 recordings of the tune, 17 in 1928, 10 in 1929, 3 in 1930, and 3 in 1932. Curiously, of the 33 recordings in 1928-1932, 3 were recorded in England, 9 in Germany, 2 in France and 1 in Argentina; the remaining in the US.

Red Nichols recorded the tune three times:

- Sep 24, 1928, Wabash Dance Orchestra, Duo D4009

- Jan 20, 1930, Louisiana Rhythm Kings, Br 4943

- Feb 18, 1932, Five Pennies, Br 6266

The recording of interest in that by the Wabash Dance Orchestra, a Red and Miff group who recorded for Duophone (owner of English Brusnwick at this time) in the Brunswick studios in New York City for exclusive distribution in England. Get a load of the roster of musicians:
Red Nichols (cnt,dir) Mannie Klein (tp) Miff Mole (tb) Arnold Brilhart (cl,as) ? Jimmy Crossan (cl,as) Fud Livingston (cl,ts,arr) Kurt Dieterle (probably wrong),  ? Murray Kellner (vln) Arthur Schutt (p) Carl Kress (g) ? Hank Stern (tu) Chauncey Morehouse (d) Phil Baker (vcl).

Thanks to Nick's generosity, here is an mp3 of the recording. Excellent arrangement, lots of first-class solos (Red, Miff and Fud) and a Bixian influence throughout, including Red's solo.

bixbeiderbecke.com/SweetSueWabashDanceOrchestra.mp3

Albert

PS See also the thread http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1254497794



Posted on Feb 16, 2013, 2:37 PM

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sweet sue

by al heenan

The version recorded by The Louisiana Rhythm Kings (1930) contains a magnificent solo by Red Nichols which comes closer to Beiderbeckes sound than any that I have heard.

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 9:52 AM

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Available on youtube.

by

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUOpPpk90eI

A harbinger of mid 1930s swing.

Albert



Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 11:48 AM

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jack fulton vocal

by hal smith

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKQIMnHsJDE

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 2:35 PM

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The link to the mp3 file was not working. Fixed now.

by

I am surprised only one person complained! The link is working now. Here it is again for your convenience.

bixbeiderbecke.com/SweetSueWabashDanceOrchestra.mp3

Albert



Posted on Feb 18, 2013, 5:31 AM

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Sweet Sue

by

This is my own copy of "Sweet Sue" as posted on my website www.mel-thompson.artistwebsites.com. Please visit to view many vintage and original works related to Bix, jazz, popular music and the like, thanks.

Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 5:17 PM

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Not everyone has a high opinion of Challis's arrangement

by

Though Bix's solo draws almost universal praise. Here is Benny Green's evaluation in *The Reluctant Art*:

The summation of the whole Bix-Whiteman paradox is
contained in the Whiteman recording of 'Sweet Sue*. Every
indelicacy that might conceivably be crammed into a four-
minute performance is included in what the sleeve notes to
the American Columbia Memorial album describe with some
restraint as *a real period piece'. Quacking brass, lumbering
tubas, the tinkling of bells and the clashing of cymbals,
portentous slow movements and dashing fast movements,
comically bogus profundity, saccharine harmonies, teashop
violins and what sounds like a deadly parody of every singer,
male, female and neuter, who ever sat in the ranks of a dance-
band. In the midst of this farrago, the listener may discover a
single chorus by Bix Beiderbecke which momentarily dispels
the nonsense as though by magic. There is no clucking inter-
ference from the rest of the band. The rhythm section merely
accompanies Bix for thirty-two bars, and everyone else, from
Whiteman to the lowest menial on his orchestrating staff,
leaves it to him.

The result is that Bix, playing casually enough, never at
any time approaching the intensity of 'I'm Coming, Virginia',
or 'Way Down Yonder in New Orleans', still reaches his own
level of invention, and by the effortless ease of his creativity,
reveals the pitiful gulf between his own mind and the minds
which conceived the holocaust preceding and following the
solo. It is a telling illustration of the truth that the natural
jazz player will create, without even stopping to think about it,
phrases which the merely literate orchestrators will never
think of simply because the scope of their training and
experience does not include that kind of inventive resource.

Bix's solo in 'Sweet Sue' is in no way untypical of the time,
1928. To refer to the text of this particular solo is in no way
loading the dice. For a Bix solo it is commonplace enough,
but it contains at least four instances of the peculiar Bixish-
ness of the man's style. The phrase linking the end of the

39



THE RELUCTANT ART

first eight bars with the start of the second eight contains no
rhythmic complexities of any kind, although the precision
and attack with which it is played creates the illusion of
rhythmic force. After climbing the chord of the major sixth,
the phrase descends in the ninth bar with three notes which
are archetypal for the curious elusive quality of wistfulness
one finds occurring so consistently in Bix's jazz. To say that
these three notes belong to this chord or that means nothing.
It is in their context in the time and space of the solo, and the
manner in which they are executed, that their effectiveness
lies.

In the movement from the twelfth to the thirteenth bar
occurs a quaver of silence in a run of quavers. The momen-
tary break is totally unexpected because it occurs off the beat,
where one's sense of rhythm has not led one to expect it,
instead of on the beat, where it might have sounded ordinary
enough. The result is a skipping effect which brings a gaiety
of spirit giving the solo fresh impetus, and causing a subtle
change of mood from the melancholia of the ninth bar.

In bars nineteen and twenty the conception of the phrasing
becomes far bolder than hitherto. The time values change
from quavers to minim triplets striding across the harmonies
with a freedom of tonality comparatively rare in those earlier
days of jazz. In bars twenty-one and twenty-two occurs a
phrase which appears to be leading on from itself but which
surprisingly evolves into a sequential echo of itself in the
following two bars. The solo ends with rather more depen-
dence on the fifth and tonic than is usual for Bix.

Now this kind of observation is mere quackery if it is to be
used to prove that Bix had a profound mind, if for instance
I were to suggest that Bix consciously played off the melan-
cholia of the ninth bar against the jollity of the skip three bars
later. When he played Bix was consciously thinking, as all
jazz musicians do, no matter what the psychoanalysts may

40



BIX BEIDERBECKE

say, only of the movement of the harmonies from resolution
to resolution. Whatever emotional or dramatic effects we may
care to observe in the result are the product of the intuitive
powers of the soloist, not his reasoning intelligence at work.

But examples like this do illustrate Bix's curious individu-
ality as a jazz musician, and his rare ability to evoke in the
listener a range of emotions not so common in jazz as one
might think. The very nature of the melancholia he conjures
is distinctively Bixian, sensitive and reflective, quite devoid
of the element of self-pity which obtrudes in so much later
jazz aiming consciously at the same effects Bix produced
instinctively. The 'Sweet Sue' solo is superbly musical. It
has been conceived by a born musician, and that such a man
could ever have seen any virtue in the feverish goings-on in
the preceding and subsequent choruses, is only further proof
of the mess in which the intuitive artist can land himself
when he lacks the normal reasoning powers.

http://archive.org/stream/reluctantart027100mbp/reluctantart027100mbp_djvu.txt

Posted on Mar 7, 2013, 7:37 AM

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Re: Not everyone has a high opinion of Challis's arrangement

by Alex Revell

Now, there's a bit of fine writing about jazz and Bix.

Posted on Mar 8, 2013, 9:21 AM

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Where was Paul Whiteman on Sep 14, 1926?

by

Paul Whiteman returned to New York from his 1926 European trip on Jul 30, 1926. During August he had several recording sessions for Victor and rehearsed the band for the forthccoming transcontinental tour. The first stop was Los Angeles. He arrived at the Union Station on Sep 14, 1926. Here is the description of his arrival in Don Rayno's Whiteman Chronology:

Paul, Vanda, Paul, Jr., and the band arrive in Los Angeles at 2 pm and disembark at Union Station. They are met by a throng that includes Mayor George E. Cryer and other public officials, scree stars, theatre executives, and fifteen local dance and marching bands. Twenty Willys-Knight autos transport the Whiteman troupe in a parade down to City Hall, where Mayor Cryer crowns Whiteman the King of Jazz.

Here are two photos of Whiteman at his arrival at Union Station.

[linked image]

[linked image]

With the crown, Paul is indeed the King of Jazz!

Albert



Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 5:33 PM

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What car did Whiteman have in Los Angeles in 1929?

by

While the Whiteman band members bought Ford cars at a special price when they went to LA in 1929, Whiteman had a Cord!! Take a look.

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 5:49 PM

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Whiteman in front of his Cord.

by

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 5:53 PM

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Weird Photos of Whiteman.

by

From Radio Digest, Dec 1929.

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 16, 2013, 5:23 PM

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Time to Re-Tire?

by

Those checkerboard-whitewalls are the COOLEST tires I have ever seen! Where is the Vogue Tire Store when you need it??

-Brad K

Posted on Feb 16, 2013, 10:16 PM

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A High Resolution Image of Whiteman Wearing the Crown.

by

[linked image]

And here is Paul being crowned as "Swing King" at the Eleventh Annual Rhododendron Festival on June 17 or 18 in Asheville, North Carolina by Herman G. Nichols,  King of the Festival. From ebay. From one king to another king!

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 16, 2013, 8:16 AM

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A Grotesque Caricature of Whiteman by Cugat.

by

In addition to holding a chihuahua in his arms, Xavier Cugat drew caricatures of celebrities. Here is one of Paul Whiteman from 1928.

[linked image]

Cugat should have devoted himself to holding his toy dog.

Albert



Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 11:11 AM

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I forgot to give the source.

by

This is from the October 1928 issue of Radio Digest.

Albert



Posted on Feb 18, 2013, 8:53 AM

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George, Paul, and Rhapsody in Blue.

by

From a 1930 issue of Radio Digest.

[linked image]

[linked image]

[linked image]

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 3:44 PM

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Before Rhapsody in Blue

by

Whiteman' orchestra recorded several Gershwin compositions before Rhapsody in Blue. The second recording by Whiteman of a Gershwin tune was When Buddha Smiles, Oct 27, 1921. I love this tune and  recording.

[linked image]

Listen http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/8253 

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 4:46 PM

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Correction.

by

Thanks to Vince Giordano for the following correction.

Victor 18839-B is a medley of two tunes: When Buddha Smiles and (Introducing) Drifting Along with the Tide. When Buddha Smiles was written by Nacio Herbert Brown (music) and Arthur Freed (lyrics). Drifting Along with the Tide is George Gershwin's composition. Both tunes are from 1921 and published by Harms.

Thanks Vince.

Albert



Posted on Feb 18, 2013, 4:59 AM

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A Weird Version of the Sheet Music for When Buddha Smiles

by

First the version published by Harms in 1921.

[linked image]

Next a version published in France also in 1921. Lyrics by Lucien Boyer.

[linked image]

Finally a version published in Latvia also in 1921. Lyrics in French and English.

[linked image]

Here is a nice version of When Buddha Smiles by the Club de Vingt Orchestra.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDdD5E2Z9EQ

And another nice one by Rudy Wiedoeft's Californians, Oct 1921.

bixography.com/whenbudhasmileswiedoeft.mp3

Finally, a lovely version by Marty Grosz and Hot Winds.

bixography.com/WhenBuddhaSmilesMartyGrosz.mp3

The Hot Winds are: Panic Slim (tb-3) Dan Block (cl,as,b-cl,bar) Scott Robinson (cl,sop,c-melody-sax,bar,cnt,echo-cnt,alto-horn) Marty Grosz (g,bj,vcl-1,arr) Vince Giordano (b,tu,b-sax,vcl-2) Rob Garcia (d,glockenspiel)

 [linked image]

Here is a photo of the Hot Winds from Michael.

 [linked image]

Albert

PS Lucien Boyer, poet, lyricist, singer wrote about 1,200 songs. He was the father of Jean Boyer, also songwiter but better known as a film director. Jean is very dear to me because he directed Charles Trenet, my all-time favorite French singer, in two movies, Romance de Paris and Frederica. Somewhere I have copies of these films on VHS.



Posted on Feb 18, 2013, 7:48 AM

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Much of This Article is B.S.

by

Gershwin's family was not poverty-stricken - they lived in reasonable comfort; Pop Gershwin always provided enough money for the necessary things.

Gershwin NEVER had to be dragged to a piano. Once his love of music kicked in, at about age 12, he just started playing and never looked back. Sometimes he had to be dragged FROM the piano.

"Rhapsody in Blue" was written in three weeks to a deadline, with George passing each completed sheet to Ferde Grofe in assembly-line fashion. Whiteman never had to had to harass George about it. The piece was ready for rehearsal by ten days before the concert.

How could Gershwin have been pacing nervously outside Aeolian Hall, waiting for the reaction to "Rhapsody" when he was onstage, performing it?

At least David Ewen made up for all this "Bixing" by writing (in 1955, revised 1970) a much more definitive and fact-based full-dress Gershwin biography.

-Brad K

Posted on Feb 20, 2013, 6:48 PM

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Re: Gershwin "Legendizing

by

I loved Brad Kay's use of the verb "to Bix" in regard to liberties taken with this Gershwin anecdote. In one way, such embroidering is just sloppy reporting or callous manipulation of the facts for personal gain, but looked at another way, fictionalizing is as old as the human race. The deeds of Gilgamesh, David, Cleopatra, Beowulf, Davy Crockett, you name it, were doubtless "enhanced" to make them more saleable or make the writer's point that this was an exceptional person. (Cf. the dramatic license taken with thoroughly documented events in the movie Lincoln.) The various Bix myths that are still questioned, debunked, and argued over are a case in point, to the point that, at least in the field of music, they have inspired a verb.



Posted on Feb 22, 2013, 5:18 AM

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From Forum Contributor Joe Mosbrook's Facebook Page.

by

Some early glitches have apparently been resolved and you can now read my 2003 "Cleveland Jazz History" book (full text and more than 300 photos) online. Go to The Cleveland Memory Project of Cleveland State University at www.clevelandmemory.com, click on "Read E-books," and scroll down to the book. It's presented chapter by chapter, reducing the time for downloading the full book. Many thanks to Bill Barrow and the folks at CSU for including it.
******************************
 
There is mportant information about Bix.
 
Albert


Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 11:20 AM

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I am writing a short piece on the ....

by

.... June 13, 1928 Original Memphis Five recording session. I want to acknowledge the kind forumite who sent me the information about the roster of musicans in Historical HLP 25, Hot Clarinets. I seem to have misplaced his mail message and I don't remember who he was. Please, write to me agai. Thanks.

Albert



Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 7:17 AM

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Disagreement about the script was not the only ....

by

.... problem that Whiteman had in the summer of 1929 when he was in Hollywood to film King of Jazz. There was a union dispute also. Take a look.

[linked image]

No wonder, Whiteman left Hollywood without reaching an agreement.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 3:30 PM

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Delays on making the "King of Jazz"

by

Unresolved conflicts over Union rules, followed by disagreements between Whiteman and Universal over the script and format of the film itself, although no one would have realized at the time, were to rob jazz history of the one chance of seeing and possibly hearing Bix when the film was eventually released.
One of those "if only" examples that occurred regularly during Bix's life.

Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 11:43 PM

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From Radio Digest Nov 1929.

by

A

Broadway Welcome

Paul

Whiteman returned to New York from his Hollywood hunt for film fame because producers could find no suitable story for his picture. On the first night of broadcasting after getting back East the King of Jazz found the CBS studio tilled with flowers sent by friends and Tin Pan Alley.

That

was a cheerful sight, but more cheering now is the assurance that Universal Pictures has discovered a satisfactory story so that Whiteman's next journey to the west coast will witness the certain making of a "talkie."

Posted on Feb 16, 2013, 4:48 PM

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This is Why Movie Moguls Got Bad Publicity

by

Two points:

1)Universal Studios at this point in time was near or at bottom of the big motion picture factories, both in money earned and prestige. Laemmle's imperious behavior toward PWO certainly shows one reason why. Not letting Whiteman and orchestra perform a benefit is like whacking Bambi across the mouth with a two by four.

2)That 13 G's per week salary figure attributed to PWO may or may not be accurate. Sometimes salaries were grossly inflated in press releases to make motion-pic moguls appear more big hearted and free spending than they were. All threw nickels around like manhole covers.

HAIL FREDONIA!
Dan



Posted on Mar 9, 2013, 8:47 AM

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new 20's jazz

by hal smith

it sounds pretty good http://www.bryanferry.com/

Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 1:14 AM

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Sad News About Mike Durham

by

From Mike's facebook page:

Dear Mike's Facebook friends....for those of you that do not know already, I have some sad news. This is  Cassie Durham, Mike's daughter and I am writing to tell you that Dad is seriously ill having being diagnosed with terminal (and untreatable) brain tumours on January 22nd. Things have moved on very fast and he is now in a hospice in Newcastle. I could not think of another way of letting everyone know and this seemed a good an option as any. As you can imagine, it has been a huge shock to Mum and Dad and my brother and I and all I can say is that he is comfortable and is not in any pain....say a wee prayer for him all of you - thanks.
 
I met Mike several times in Davenport and in Racine. We had breakfast and dinner together many times. A very interesting individual, an excellent musician and a man with a great sense of humor. He will be missed.
 
Albert


Posted on Feb 12, 2013, 4:12 PM

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Sad news about Mike Durham

by

Yes, sad news indeed. He has been very involved in many ways in keeping our music alive in Britain. In recent years this has included the incredibly successful Whitley Bay jazz festivals/parties which bring together sympathetic musicians from the UK, Europe and USA for a weekend of musical treats and fun. This has included a number of Bix related events.
The next party takes place at the start of November.


Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 2:18 AM

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A Great Sense of Humor is putting it mildly

by

I'm extremely sorry to learn of Mike's condition. We became friends at one of the Racine Birthday Bash's in 2006. My wife and I greatly enjoyed Mike and Patty's company at dinner when he was here playing the Bix Festival in Davenport with his wonderful "Spats Langham" band and we connected by Email now and then. He was especially thrilled when he became a grandpa.
Mike always had something very witty to say between numbers with his band. I remember John Otto telling of a friend who had 75 trombones and Mike speaking up and saying, "What? He couldnt come up with one more?" (Remember the "Music Man").
Mike admitted to having quite a few Saxophones in his home and added, "I can't play the bloody things, I just like how they look!"
As we motored back to the Motel after breakfast one morning in Racine, Mike was driving and stopped for a red light. Rich Johnson and John Otto were in the back seat and a lively conversation was taking place. The light turned green but Mike was involved in conversation, and seeing no one was coming up behind us, I stayed quiet for a time. Finally, thinking we might sit through the light, I just said, "Mike, the lights green." He acted a bit startled and said, "Oh, I was just waiting for just the right shade of green."
Mike really enjoyed the Knoxville Tap jam sessions held after the Bix week end. He said he felt the closest to Bix when he was there since the place hadn't really changed since the time when Bix and Louie Armstrong played there. He said he hoped he was sharing a few molecules of air that they might have breathed and "looked closely at the towels in the mens room to see if he could find their finger prints"!
I will pray for our friend and that's a promise......
Jim Petersen, Davenport, Iowa

Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 1:48 PM

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The first recording of Bing Crosby Under His Own Name.

by

March 14, 1929. My Kinda Love/Till We Meet. Col 1773-D. Accompanied by Matty Malneck (vn), Roy Bargy (p), Edwin "Snoozer" Quinn (g). Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPop4X87vjo Note the change in tempo (twice)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnbpiJ7FqNQ

Note that Eddie Lang was not the accompanist on guitar. Matty, Roy and Snoozer were members of the Whiteman band. Eddie did not join Whiteman until May 1929. So the first recording of Bing under his own name with Eddie (in fact, the second recording of Bing under his own name) was from May 24, 1929. I Kiss Your Hand, Madame/Baby, Oh Where Can You Be? Col 1851-D. Accompanied by Matty Malneck (vn), Roy Bargy (p), Eddie Lang (g).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R7IkZdOatmY I believe the first time we hear Bing whistle on record.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7GNzLOn6XE

Albert

 

 



Posted on Feb 12, 2013, 12:07 PM

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Thanks to Dutch Forum reader Albert, ....

by

.... here is the information about the session of the OM5 in the revised edition of Lange's Fabulous Fives.

Phil Napoleon, Tommy Dorsey, Jimmy Dorsey, Frank Signorelli, unknown bj, Stan King.

We still have two problems: the identities of the banjoist and of the drummer. I'm giving up on the banjoist, although I don't think it is Eddie. For the drummer, I lean more and more toward Ray Bauduc.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 12, 2013, 5:21 AM

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Transcription of Sol Hoopii playing Bix Beiderbecke

by

http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?p=14878941

Albert



Posted on Feb 12, 2013, 4:21 AM

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my Grandfather

by

My father has told me a little about my grandfather. I am really excited to hear my grandfather played with the Scranton Sirens. He even played with the Dorsey brothers. I think he was a woodwind player,saxophone,violin,and clarinet. I was hoping that you might have pictures of him or with him in it. His name was John Louis Parrish or Bunny Parrish. If you can help me with this I would be so greatful. I would like to give them to my father. He lost my grandfather when he was very young. Thank you





Posted on Feb 11, 2013, 4:07 PM

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Hello Linda and welcome to the Bixography forum.

by

I am afraid I don't remember your grandfather being mentioned in the forum. I did a quick search and found no information in the forum or in the internet about a John Louis Parrish or Bunny Parrish who was a member of the Scranton Sirens.. We had several postings about the Scranton Sirens, but I did not find any posting that mentioned John Louis "Bunny" Parrish. Can you give more information?

Albert

PS A google search of "John Parrish" "Scranton Sirens" yields one hit:

IMDb: Most Popular People With Date of Death in 1988

uk.imdb.com/search/name?death_date=1988-01-01...12...
You +1'd this publicly. 
John Parrish Actor, The Barefoot Contessa. 241. ... He joined Bill Lustig's Scranton Sirens, then Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey's Wild Canaries... 249. Mirko Vojkovic ...
The John Parrish in the page is not your grandfather.


Posted on Feb 12, 2013, 5:10 AM

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Raggin'/Ragging the Scale

by

The great Adrian Rollini recorded this tune three times.

1. May 7, 1930. Joe Venuti's Blue Four. OKeh 41432. Adrian Rollini (bass sax, goofus, hfp) Joe Venuti (vn) Itzy Riskin (p) Eddie Lang (g).

2. Feb 28, 1933. Joe Venuti-Eddie Lang Blue Five. Columbia 2765-D.  Jimmy Dorsey (ct, cl as) Adrian Rollini (bass sax, goofus, vib) Joe Venuti (vln) Phil Wall (p) Eddie Lang (g).

3.  1949-1950. Adrian Rollini Trio. Mercury MC 20011. Adrian Rollini (vib, chimes), ?Frank Victor (g), unknown (b).

But before we listen to some of these recordings, lets go back to 1915 when composer/pianist Edward B. Claypool published his composition Ragging the Scale.

From  http://www.ragpiano.com/comps/claypool.shtml

Edward Browne Claypoole (December 20, 1883 to January 16, 1952) was born in Baltimore, Maryland. Little Eddie was drawn to the piano at an early age, and in his formative years his abilities were demonstrated by his proud mother as he was propped up on cushions picking out tunes. There was a brief foray with formal lessons that did not work out, so they were soon abandoned. As a result, Eddie was mostly self-taught, focusing on popular music forms, and without harmony or theory training unable to notate. His high school music teacher helped him out with the latter when Eddie decided he wanted to submit pieces for publication. Some of the earliest were written for school or community theater presentations. But instrumentals were soon to follow.
Eddie was a local celebrity in Baltimore in the 1910s, and in demand for a number of musical functions. It was also one of his more productive writing periods. Alabama Jigger became a popular band hit, and his Reuben Fox Trot a decent seller. Then he tipped the scales of justice in his favor with - the scale. The simple concept of applying syncopation to a scale - a scale played in five different tonalities no less - earned Claypoole a permanent place in the ragtime hit parade.
Appearing first in a beautiful but limited edition clown cover

[linked image]

(inexplicably replaced by a fairly generic notated cover),

[linked image]

Ragging the Scale was a sensation for Eddie, as well as for Will Von Tilzer's Broadway Music Corporation, where it landed following it's initial and more colorful printing issued by Von Tilzer's ArtMusic subsidiary. It sold well, was performed often around the country, and was one of the most cleverly simple pieces of the ragtime era. Within in year the piece had found its way to several different piano roll renditions. 
In the early 1920s Edward decided to test the waters again, and came up with the clever Dusting the Keys which actually included a little gimmick where the player was to literally dust the keys with a cloth on their index finger in the trio. With lyrics added in short order to create a song edition of the piece, it was yet another hit, but now completely in the novelty genre. Encouraged, he wrote four piano novelties that were all readily printed up by Mills Music, a leader in that genre during the 1920s. He also joined ASCAP in 1929.

The first recording of Ragging the Scale is from Aug 2, 1915 by Conway's band, avialable in the LOC Jukebox.

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4032

The second recording is from June 1, 1916 by Fred Van Eps on banjo accompanied by an orchestra conducted by Rosario Bourdon.

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4504

There were a couple of recordings in the 1920s. The important one was by Claypoole himself, mar 16, 1927 for Victor. The record was not issued. There is the claim in youtube that the only copy that survived is available.

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4504

However, in one of the comments,  it is stated that this is not Claypoole's recording but take 1 of  Joe Fingers Carr "Bar Room Piano".

We come to 1930 with Joe Venuti's Blue Four excellent version. Venuti dominates and there are a couple of nice solos by Adrian and Riskin. Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k6jDdE5tVR0

In 1933 we have the Joe Venuti-Eddie Lang Blue Five recording. Again Venuti dominates and there are solos by Wall and Jimmy. Lovely stuff!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9L8p3DAG8k

This version was emulated in the 1980s by Keith Nichols and Friends in the 1980s. Terrific recreation. And with pizzicato!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l_daQ4v06ek

Another excellent emulation in 2012 by Keith Nichols, Emma Fisk, Frans Sjostrom, Martin Wheatley. Recorded on October 26, 2012 by Michael Steinman.

I hope you enjoyed this musical journey through the decades.

Albert



Posted on Feb 11, 2013, 11:18 AM

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Ragging the sacle

by

Rollini recorded Raggin' the scale in January 1950 and it ws issued on the 10" LP Mercury
MG 20011 (not MC 2001).

Björn Englund

Solna, Sweden

Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 4:19 AM

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Thanks for the correction.

by

Indeed, I mistyped the letter G. I gave MC instead of MG. However, I did give the correct number, 20011.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 13, 2013, 5:40 AM

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It's a pity...

by

...that Adrian wasn't given more freedom on this tune when with Venuti. The 1980s version with John Barnes on bassax was certainly inspired by Adrian. Keith Nichols sent me a second take from this session. I'll dig it out and send you a copy. I feel it is even better than the filmed take. It's fun to play them back to back.

Thanks for the posting.

Posted on Feb 15, 2013, 8:51 AM

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The 1980s version...

by Russell Davies

...is excerpted from a BBC-TV programme I made (with Phil Speight directing) called The Lowest of the Low" -- a history of the bass-sax. John Barnes didn't own a bsx at the time, and so he's playing mine, brilliantly I think. At one stage in the film, we assembled 24 bass-saxes playing together (all Rollini fans, naturally): I believe "Sweet Georgia Brown" was the tune selected for broadcast. And in the final scene of the film, four of us played the old hymn "Abide With Me" in London's Natural History Museum, in the late evening, in the shadow of the biggest of their dinosaur skeletons. The four harmony parts were lowered -- that is, a contrabass sax took the bass part, I played the tenor part on bass-sax, Kathy Stobart played the alto part on tenor, and John Barnes played the top line on c-melody sax. The idea that the BBC might pay for such an excursion to be immortalized today... well, they just wouldn't, sadly.
R.D.

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 2:55 PM

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Bix was a busy guy on May 15, 1928. All with Whiteman.

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- Recorded My Melancholy Baby. Listen to Bix's obbligato behind the vocal.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XpClMwGXQBA

- Was a participant in the filming of the Fox News item about Whiteman leaving Victor and joining Columbia.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V96ZxVFvCtM

- Played at Loew's Metropolitan Theatre in Brooklyn. (Brooklyn Daily Eagle, May 15, 1928.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 2:48 PM

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Who was Nelson Maples? A Satellite Whiteman band.

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Here is the cover of the sheet music of The Hoodoo Man.

[linked image]

Note the photo of Nelson Maple [incorrect spelling; icorrect spelling is Maples]. He was the director of one of Whiteman's satellite bands, Paul Whiteman's S. S. Leviathan Orchestra. I remind you that Whiteman returned from his 1923 trip to England on the S. S. Leviathan.

[linked image]

The Leviathan night club where the ship bands played for first-class passsengers.

[linked image]

There is another connection between Maples and Whiteman. Maples was the pianist in the Mason-Dixon Seven, a band that also included other future Whiteman's band musicians, Charles Gaylord, Austin Young and Jack Fulton.

Whiteman' orchestra recorded Hoodoo Man on May 2, 1924 (four takes, destroyed) and again on May 9, 1924 (three takes, take 7 mastered).

[linked image]

Don Rayno tells us this is an "interesting record, with a variety of solos." Indeed, listen.

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9862

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 11:48 AM

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Nelson Maples and the S. S. Leviathan orchestra in the LOC Jukebox.

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http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/artists/detail/id/625/

Note that LOC pages give Maples, but the record labels give Maple.

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 11:59 AM

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Another Sheet Music Cover with the Leviathan Orhestra.

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[linked image]

Get a load of the band leaders who composed this tune, all having great success in California. Here are a couple of recordings of this lovely tune.

Art Hickman  http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/7222

Paul Whiteman  http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9864

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 12:18 PM

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I just found this photo of Old Whiteman and Young Bing.

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[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2013, 12:37 PM

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A Young, Thin Whiteman

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From the LOC

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 11, 2013, 12:59 PM

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More Photos from the LOC Website. Roger Wolfe Kahn.

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Two poses of Roger Wolfe Kahn. No dates avialble.

[linked image]

[linked image]

One of myy favorite RWK recordings.

I Can't Believe That You're In Love With Me. Mar 2, 1927. Victor 20573. Lovely tune and great arrangement. Tommy Gott, Leo McConville, Miff Mole, Joe Venuti, Irving Brosky, Vic Berton among others.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3NmbNlBwKE

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 11, 2013, 2:53 PM

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More Phots

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The Benson Orchestra of Chicago.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 12, 2013, 1:28 PM

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Don Murray with Don Voorhees?

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From the Syracuse Journal, March 7, 1937.

[linked image]

Lots of first-class 1920s musicians cited as being part of Don Voorhees's band. Lord lists recordings of Voorhees with Mole, Nichols, McDonough, Goodman and Tommy Dorsey. No recordings that I know of with Jimmy  Dorsey, Venuti, Schutt and Livingston. Maybe they played with Voorhees but did not record? The one that really surprised me was Don Murray.

Does anyone know?

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 9, 2013, 3:59 PM

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Don Murray in Paris in 1928.

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Thanks to Mark Berresford in a facebook page.

[linked image]

Don Murray was in Europe with Ted Lewis' band. Here is a photo of the band in the Ambassadeurs Hotel in Paris. Don is holding a clarinet and is in front ot the bassist.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 14, 2013, 3:56 PM

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Another photo of Don Murray with the Ted Lewis Orchestra.

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[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 14, 2013, 4:12 PM

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Randy Sandke celebrates Bix's Birthday.

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RANDY SANDKE HOMAGE TO LOUIS ARMSTRONG +BIX BEIDERBECKE

[linked image] [linked image]

Saturday, March 9, 2013, 8:00 PM
Flushing Town Hall
$15/$10 Members and Students with ID

Born just two years apart, Louis Armstrong (New Orleans, 1901) and Leon Bismark Bix Beiderbecke (Davenport, Iowa) became two of the most influential musicians in the early history of Jazz. Tonight, Armstrong/Beiderbecke scholar, trumpeter, composer Randy Sandke performs an homage to these greats who called Queens their home, and are listed on FTHs Queens Jazz Trail Map©. Join us for a post-show Q&A and Birthday Cake in honor of Bix, who was born March 10, 1903.



Posted on Feb 9, 2013, 11:45 AM

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Problems with ahaim@bixography

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I exceeded by 4 GB the space alloted to Bixography.com. I cannot download email messages to my bixography address. Until further notice, please use my yahoo address alberthaim@yahoo.com

Thanks

Albert



Posted on Feb 8, 2013, 11:08 AM

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ahaim@bixography is working again

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Unfortunately, messages sent in the last two or three days were lost in the ether. Please send messages again.

Thank you.

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 9, 2013, 6:57 AM

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Vera Cox Son

by Gerri Bowers

Dr. John "Jack" Korn died on Feb. 5th. He was born Nov. 14, 1928, son of Vera Cox and Ferdinand Korn. Dr. Korn used to come to the Festival. Very nice man, easy to talk to.

Posted on Feb 8, 2013, 7:32 AM

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Condolences to the Korn family

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I interviewd Jack and his son in Davenport a few years ago. Both were extremely friendly and answered openly all the questions I asked. I am sorry to learn about Jack's passing.

Albert



Posted on Feb 8, 2013, 9:59 AM

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vera cox korn

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I had the privilege of meeting Vera at the Bix Fest in 1982. She told me a fascinating story about what it was like to go on dates with Bix, that they would go to a restaurant where there was a band, and Bix would ask to sit in. He could play anything - clarinet, drums....Meanwhile poor vera would be left by herself for the rest of the evening!

Posted on Feb 11, 2013, 6:42 AM

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Re: Vera Cox Son

by David Logue

Wasn't he the baby that Bix brought a bag peanuts to when he came to visit Vera?

Posted on Feb 17, 2013, 7:04 PM

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Yes, it was....

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.... according to "Bix, Man and Legend."

Albert



Posted on Feb 18, 2013, 12:11 PM

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Johnny Wiggs' Bayou Stompers

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNJya6jrn1I

Michael Steinman writes in his blog,

"Wiggs continues to astonish.  He saw Joe Oliver in New Orleans (I seem to remember this was 1919) and Oliver left a lasting impression.  But then Wiggs heard Bix and those wandering odes took over -- haunting but always mobile.
I hear in Wiggs, who was 73 at the time of this video, a sweet, sad evocation of what Bix might have sounded like had he lived on this long.  Wiggs' music plunges forward while looking over its shoulder in a melancholy, ruminative way.  And although Wiggs recorded early (1927) and from 1949 into the fifties, his late work fully expresses a kind of autumnal sensibility, delicate without being timid or maudlin -- the sweet voice of an elder who has seen a great deal and knows that life is sadly finite but celebrates that life with his cornet."

Indeed, echoes of Bix. Very nice tune, except for the title! It reminds me  of  Fats Waller's lovely Louisiana Fairy Tale http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yuD0QptJW0 

According to the description of the video,

"Manassas Jazz Festival- December 2, 1972. This clip is from an extremely poor video source, but thought the personnel and material was worth salvaging. Johnny Wiggs, Cornet - Raymond Burke, Clarinet - Graham Stewart, Trombone - Bob Greene, Piano - Danny Barker, Guitar - Freddy Moore, Drums. - "Fat Cat" McRee, M.C. -Stonewall Jackson HS, Manassas,VA

At the same jazz festival, Johnny Wigggsplayed I'll Be A Friend With Pleasure. One of the tracks in Fat Cats Jazz FCJ129.  But the personnel is different: Johnny Wiggs, c; Bill Allred, tb; Raymond Burke, cl; Art Hodes, p; George 'Butch' Hall, g; Van Perry, sb; Cliff Leeman, d; Johnson 'Fat Cat' McRee, vocal. Does anyone have this LP? If so, could you send an mp3 of Friend with Pleasure?

More about Johnny Wiggs in http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1240149034

And listen to Johnny with Snoozy Quinn doing "Singin' the Blues."

http://louisdl.louislibraries.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/JAZ/id/1166/rec/6

More about Johnny Wiggs in the Louisiana State Museum.

http://louisdl.louislibraries.org/cdm/search/collection/JAZ/searchterm/johnny%20wiggs/order/nosort

Albert



Posted on Feb 8, 2013, 7:14 AM

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