The Bixography Discussion Group

A vehicle for Bixophiles and other interested individuals to ask questions, make comments and exchange information about Bix Beiderbecke and related subjects. Any views expressed in the Bixography Forum represent solely the opinions of those expressing them and are not necessarily endorsed or opposed by Albert Haim unless he has signed the message.

I started archiving some of the threads that have been inactive for some time. The archived threads can be found at http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/archivesforum.htm

Albert Haim

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Hello

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Im a reader of your work. Im impressed by the quality and depths in details that you apply in your research. I want to know about you. A biography so I can tell my Professor about you and your dedication to your work. Please contact me if you can through the email I have provided above. Thank you.

Posted on Nov 29, 2012, 10:04 PM

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Thank you.

by

A summary was sent to you offline.

Albert



Posted on Nov 30, 2012, 6:02 AM

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WBIX # 205

by

 Radio Program # 205. (loaded on 11/30/2012) Bix's Fellow Musicians: 1920s Recordings of Carl Kress.  60 min 33 sec

Real Audio Streaming audio file.    Download file.   14.8 M  

mp3 files  
Streaming mp3 file     
http://bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX205.m3u
     
Download file     
bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX205.mp3    29.1 MB

Am I Blue? Ben Selvin. Jul 15, 1929. Vocal by Smith Ballew.
I Wanna Be Loved By You. Ben Selvin. Oct 16, 1928. Vocal by Vaughn de Leath.

Imagination. Charleston Chasers. Sep 8, 1927.
Feelin' No Pain.
Charleston Chasers. Sep 8, 1927.
Chloe. All Star Orchestra. Dec 13, 1927.Vocal by Franklin Bauer.
My Melancholy Baby. All Star Orchestra. Jan 3, 1928.Vocal by Franklin Bauer.
Old Fashioned Girl. Lennie Hayton's Blue Four. Mar 1928.
Anytime Anyday Anywhere.
Lennie Hayton's Blue Four. Mar 1928.
Mary Ann. Tommy Dorsey. Feb 14, 1928.
Persian Rug.
Tommy Dorsey. Feb 14, 1928.
I Get the Blues When It Rains. Fred Rich. Mar 29, 1929. Vocal bt Irving Kaufman.
Why Can't You? Fred Rich. Apr 12, 1929. Vocal trio.
Pickin' My Way. Eddie Lang acompanied by Carl Kress. Jan 15, 1932
Feeling My Way. Eddie Lang acompanied by Carl Kress. Feb 17, 1932 (the Jan 15 recording of this tune was not issued)


WBIX # 205 will be uploaded on Dec 28, 2012.

Enjoy!

Albert



Posted on Nov 29, 2012, 8:05 AM

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The Klan’s indirect role in fostering the Jazz Age

by

http://blog.constitutioncenter.org/2012/11/the-klan%e2%80%99s-indirect-role-in-fostering-the-jazz-age/

Thanks to Rob for providing the link.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 30, 2012 2:57 PM

Posted on Nov 29, 2012, 4:34 AM

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Not So Fast, You Kluckers

by

The article is deleted from the page you gave; Here's another link that still works: http://news.yahoo.com/klan-indirect-role-fostering-jazz-age-100215753.html

I don't buy the premise that the Klan had so very much to do with the prosperity of Gennett records. The Kluckers certainly were a big client, making scores of sides at Gennett for their various custom labels ("KKK," "Our Song," and others). And of course some very popular and influential jazz records were made there. But neither the Klan nor Jazz were what kept the label in the black. The real financial backbone of Gennett in the '20s was the hundreds of thousands of dance band records it churned out by Ladd's Black Aces, Bailey's Lucky Seven and dozens of other orchestras. The KKK and Classic Jazz were but ships that passed in the Gennett waiting room.

It isn't all that shocking that someone like the chief engineer at Gennett belonged to the Klan. In the early '20s, there were something like four million card carrying members in the midwest. The KKK had legitimacy as an extreme social conservative movement, something like the Tea Party today. As the article says, their main agenda in the '20s was to stop unchecked immigration, a threat to "pure" America. In 1924, largely through Klan pressure, Congress passed an Immigration Quota bill. This success was the Klan's undoing. Agenda-less, and rocked by sex scandals among their leadership, the Klan collapsed into the relatively tiny and crazy racist group it remains today.

They DID make some entertaining records in their Gennett heyday, like "Daddy Swiped Our Last Clean Sheet and Joined the Ku Klux Klan."

-Brad K

Posted on Nov 30, 2012, 2:16 PM

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"Ladd's Black Aces"?

by

Ironically, the JSP Records boxed set "Gennett Jazz" contains records by "Ladd's Black Aces," but the personnel listings reveal that this was just a pseudonym for the Original Memphis Five, a white band.

Posted on Dec 14, 2012, 12:09 PM

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Correct: Recordings by the Original Memphis Five on Gennett .....

by

.... were indeed issued under the name of Ladd's Black Aces. Gennett had the photo of a band of black musicians in their ads for Ladd's Black Aces!!

[linked image]

Here are the real Ladd's Black Aces.

[linked image]

Left to right: Phil Napoleon, Frank Signorelli, Miff Mole, Jimmy Lytell, Jack Roth.

From http://78records.wordpress.com/tag/original-memphis-five/

Gennett, incidentally, was not alone in portraying white players as black. In 1921 Okeh ran ads purporting to show Mamie Smith recording Sax-O-Phoney Blues. The backing group in the photo is clearly African-American, but the group that actually accompanied Smith on that title was a white band directed by Joseph Samuels, which filled in (badly) for a time after the Jazz Hounds defected to Columbia with Edith Wilson. Okeh obviously pulled a photo from one of the earlier Jazz Houndbacked sessions in an attempt to cover up their use of a decidedly klutzy white band behind their star blues singer.

The name "Ladd's Black Aces" was  also used by The Dixie Serenaders in 1931 in Los Angeles for their recordings on  Superior 2771 and 2748.

An interesting early (Feb 5, 1922) recording by Ladd's Black Aces is Virginia Blues with Cliff Edwards doing his "effin' ". According to the redhotjazz site,  the first recording of Cliff Edwards.

http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/misc/virginiablues.ra

Albert






    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Dec 14, 2012 5:00 PM

Posted on Dec 14, 2012, 4:59 PM

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Gennett's deception went further

by

Gennett's deception to promote the Original Memphis Five as black artists (i.e. Ladd's Black Aces) was extended to the vocalists on these records, so VERNON DALHART became "Shufflin' Phil", and a well-known white singer became "Mandy Lee".
A few days ago, I positively identified for whom the "Mandy Lee" pseudonymn stands - but you'll all have to wait for the next issue of VJM ("Discographical Ramblings" - column) to learn who really sang on Ladd's Black Aces' Gennett 5060, 5125 and 5142.

Ralph Wondraschek

Posted on Feb 4, 2013, 2:36 PM

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I am curious. If f you heard the following intro ....

by

.... but had never heard the complete record, what would be your guess for the name of the tune that follows? Also, would you care to make a guess for the name of the band?

bixbeiderbecke.com/IntroMystery.mp3

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 27, 2012 8:09 AM

Posted on Nov 27, 2012, 7:57 AM

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No need to respond in the forum.

by

If you have ideas, please shoot an email to ahaim@bixography.com  I am curious. After a reasonable amount of time, I will disclose the tune it reminds me of.

Albert



Posted on Nov 27, 2012, 11:51 AM

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There is no "right" answer.

by

Another way of asking the question it is as follows: What tune would not surprise you if it came right after the mystery introduction? I am sure different people will be reminded of different tunes. I am curious.

Albert



Posted on Nov 27, 2012, 12:22 PM

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A few answers are coming

by

China Boy

My Blackbirds Are Bluebirds Now

I'm in the Mood for Love

My guess for a tune that fits well following the mystery intro is I'm More Than Satisfied.

Any other responses? Go ahead, don't be shy!

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 28, 2012 5:15 AM

Posted on Nov 28, 2012, 5:00 AM

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The tune...

by Jim Baldwin

...I would guess is "Clementine."

Posted on Nov 28, 2012, 7:41 AM

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Another answer

by

From a Forumite: Well, my top choices were I'm in the Mood for Love and I'm More Than Satisfied so...to go out a bit in left field I think I could mentally graft it onto Bag O' Blues by Jack Pettis and His Pets although I might get a headache in the process!
 
Interesting choices, these as well as all previous. Thanks to all who are contributing. More, please!
 
Albert




    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 28, 2012 1:18 PM

Posted on Nov 28, 2012, 1:13 PM

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And another

by

There's A cradle in Caroline.

Thanks

Albert



Posted on Nov 28, 2012, 1:30 PM

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The introduction we discussed is from ....

by

.... the recording of My Melancholy Baby by the All Star Orchestra on Jan 3, 1928. You can hear the complete recording in the latest WBIX program (# 205) at  25 min 25 sec.

Streaming mp3 file     http://bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX205.m3u     
Download file            
bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX205.mp3    29.1 MB


Albert



Posted on Nov 29, 2012, 1:27 PM

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Keith Nichols's Bix Remembered band.

by

From the London Times, Feb 5, 2004.

Randolph Colville, jazz clarinettist and saxophonist, was born on May 23,
1942. He died on January 15, 2004, aged 61.

Of the British jazz musicians who opted to play in the more traditional areas
of jazz, few were more accomplished or versatile than Randy Colville, who
played with ensembles ranging from Rod Hamer's six-piece Dixieland band to the
fourteen man Midnight Follies Orchestra. His urbane clarinet playing owed much
to such masters as Matty Matlock and Irving Fazola, while he also specialised
in vintage saxophone styles, in particular recreating the C-melody solos of
Frank Trumbauer for Keith Nichols's Bix Remembered band.

Does anyone know about "Keith Nichols's Bix Remembered band"?

Albert





Posted on Nov 26, 2012, 1:43 PM

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The March 2003 Concert at Trinity College.

by

Thanks to the generosity of Ken Bristow, I am pleased to announce a new bixography webpage with information about a recreation of the 1924 Whiteman concert and a Tribute to Bix Beiderbecke. Please visit

http://bixography.com/KeithNichols2003ConcertWhitemanBix.html

Albert

 



Posted on Nov 29, 2012, 11:50 AM

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Star-Dust Troubadour ....

by

.... is the title of an article by Pete Martin in the Saturday Evening Post, November 8, 1947. To read the article in its entirety, go to

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/ArticlesinMagazines2.html

and click on the link "Star-Dust Troubadour."
Albert


Posted on Nov 26, 2012, 11:52 AM

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Speaking of Hoagy.

by

From the Indiana Government website.

GOV Daniels adds composer Hoagy Carmichael to Hoosier Heritage Gallery
Start Date:  7/27/2012 Start Time:  12:00 AM
End Date:  7/27/2012
Entry Description

News Release
For Immediate Release

Daniels adds composer Hoagy Carmichael to Hoosier Heritage Gallery

INDIANAPOLIS (July 27, 2012) A portrait of composer Howard Hoagland Hoagy Carmichael is the newest addition to the Hoosier Heritage Gallery that adorns the south wall of the governors office.

Born in Bloomington in 1899, Carmichael has been heralded as the "most talented, inventive, sophisticated and jazz-oriented song composer of the early 20th century. Carmichael was interested in music from an early age and taught himself to play piano by ear. After his family moved to Indianapolis in 1916, Carmichael began playing piano in local bars and restaurants. He befriended fellow piano player Reggie Duvall who introduced Carmichael to prominent ragtime musicians including Jelly Roll Morton and Louie Armstrong. Carmichael attended Indiana University and after graduating, briefly practiced law in Florida. After hearing one of his songs on the radio, he decided to return to Bloomington and become a full-time composer. In 1936, he married Ruth Meinardi, a New York City model, and together they had two sons. The family eventually moved to New York and later California where Carmichael gained fame and popularity for his compositions. He authored four of the most recorded American songs of all time: Stardust, Georgia on My Mind, The Nearness of You and Heart and Soul. He earned a number of awards and recognitions throughout his life including the 1952 Academy Award for Best Original Song for "In the Cool, Cool, Cool of the Evening.

Carmichael spent his later years in Los Angeles indulging in various hobbies including golf, coin collecting and painting. He died in 1981 and is buried at Rose Hill Cemetery in Bloomington.

The portrait of Carmichael, painted by an unknown artist, is on loan from the Archive of Traditional Music at Indiana University. It replaces the portrait of Bill Cook.

A photo of the portrait can be found here: [linked image]

In January 2006, Governor Daniels designated the south wall of the governors office as a place for portraits of historically important Hoosiersa change in the longstanding tradition of hanging portraits solely of former governors.  The portraits, which are loaned to the state, are part of a rotating exhibit that is updated periodically.  In addition to Carmichael, portraits of Saint Mother Théodore Guérin, Ernie Pyle and Col. Richard Lieber currently hang in the governors office.

Information about portraits previously featured in the Hoosier Heritage Gallery can be found here: http://www.in.gov/gov/2560.htm

Albert

Posted on Nov 26, 2012, 12:05 PM

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Ed Kirkeby 10 October 1891 – June 12, 1978

by

From allmusic.com

Ed Kirkeby, who is probably best-remembered for being Fats Waller's manager, had a multifaceted and productive life. A born leader, Kirkeby was a successful businessman with a knack for organization. In 1916 he became a salesman at Columbia Records, and the following year he was promoted to assistant recording manager. Kirkeby recorded some of the first jazz at Columbia and in 1920 helped organize the California Ramblers. Within a year, the band was recording regularly and it would be one of the most prolific outfits of the 1920's. Kirkeby started singing on their records in Sep. 1926. A few months later Kirkeby (using the pseudonym of Ted Wallace) became a leader on a series of records usually utilizing personnel from the Ramblers. After the Ramblers declined due to turnover, Kirkeby put a greater focus on his own recordings, recording under such names as Ted Wallace, Ed Kirkeby Wallace, Eddie Lloyd and Eddie Loyd. During 1930-32, Kirkeby directed a countless number of studio sessions for ARC although he largely stopped after July 1932. He then spent a couple years managing the Pickens Sisters. In 1935 he became an A&R person at Victor and, on four sessions with a revived version of the California Ramblers, Kirkeby took some vocals. He also sang on some transcriptions by the Joe Haymes Orchestra and appeared on a final date by Ted Wallace in 1936. In 1938, Kirkeby left Victor and joined the band booking department of NBC. Soon afterward he became Fats Waller's manager, staying with the great pianist-composer until his death in 1943. He spent the remainder of his life as a manager of many groups and personalities including the Deep River Boys, staying active until late 1977.

From SSDI data,  I found out that Wallace Kirkeby died in Port Washington, Nassau County, NY (about 40 miles east of where I live). That was easy. But none of the biographies I found give his birthplace. I had to go to the local library and consult ancestry.com.

I found the Kirkeby family in the US Census for 1900, 1910 and 1940.

 

In 1900, Brooklyn, NY.  the head was T. Edward Kirkeby, age 35, born in New York, father born in Denmark, mother born in New York. Mother was Elizabeth (Lizzie), age 32, born in New Jersey, parents born in New York. There were three children, L. Edward, T. Wallace, D. Clarence, ages 10, 8 and 4. Interesting that father and sons have names starting with an initial followed by a given name.

 

In the 1910 census, the names are Edward, Lloyd, Wallace and Clarence.

 

In the US Census fro 1940, Wallace is still living in Brooklyn with his parents and his occupation is artist representative.

 

Ed Kirkeby is found in World War I and II registration cards. In the WWI card (1917), Wallace T. Kirkeby is assistant to a manager of the Columbia Graphophone Co at 102 W. 38th St, New York City. In the WW II (1942) card, he is self-employed at 3108 RKO Bldg, Rockefeller Center, New York Citty. Ed Kirkeby never married. He was buried in the Green-WoodCemetery in Brooklyn, NY on Jun 14, 1979.

 

Rust's dance band discography has eight pages of listings for Ted Wallace. The names used are Ted Wallace and His Orchestra, Eddie Lloyd and His Singin Boys,, Ted Wallace and His Campus Boys, Ed Loyd and His Orchestra. It is interesting that Ed Kirkeby used his father name (Edward, shortened to Ed), his Older Brother Lloyd (straight or shortened to Loyd) and his own given name as a family name.

 

Nick kindly sent mp3 files of two of Ted Wallace's recordings issued on OK 40965:

Mary  Nov 23, 1927  bixography.com/MaryTedWallace.mp3

Cobblestones  Dec 7, 1927  bixography.com/CobblestonesTedWallace.mp3

 

As an extra, Nick sent an mp3 file of Clementine,

bixography.com/ClementineGoofusFive.mp3

recorded by the Goofus Five (another Ed Kirkeby band) on Aug 10, 1927

 

Nick writes,  "The hot alto sax and soprano sax on the Ted Wallace sides is undoubtedly Pete Pumiglio, who replaced Bobby Davis in Ed Kirkeby's studio bands in September 1927, and the hot Bixian trumpet is Chelsea Quealey. The very nice jazz-tinged violin is by Al Duffy. Quealey, Davis and Adrian Rollini are on Clementine by the Goofus Five (another Ed Kirkeby band of course), recorded on August 10th, 1927, just a few weeks before Rollini left the California Ramblers (taking Bobby Davis with him) to form the star-studded band that would play for just a few weeks at the New Yorkers Club with Bix. Quealey's recording activities with the Kirkeby bands subsequently finished in late November or early December 1927, when he, Davis and Rollini travelled to England to join Fred Elizalde's band at the Savoy Hotel."

 

Thanks very much, Nick, great recordings.

 

Albert

 

 

 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 26, 2012 4:40 AM
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 25, 2012 1:13 PM

Posted on Nov 25, 2012, 1:11 PM

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Ed Kirkeby and "Clementine (from New Orleans)"

by

Thanks Nick. I've been listening to Goldkettes "Clementine" for well over fifty years. Now at last I finally know the lyrics too!

Posted on Nov 25, 2012, 2:22 PM

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Re: Ed Kirkeby and "Clementine (from New Orleans)"

by Nick Dellow

It's a pleasure Ken. There were some problems with the links to the Ted Wallace sides, but Albert has now fixed these, so please do take a listen. Thanks, Nick

Posted on Nov 26, 2012, 4:46 AM

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The problems with the links ....

by

.... the music files have been fixed.

Albert



Posted on Nov 26, 2012, 4:41 AM

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The puny obituary of Ed Kirkeby in the New York Times.

by

[linked image]

Victor? Ed Kirkeby was a Columbia man. There are two Victor tests by the California Ramblers.

Matrix [Trial 1925-10-07-01]. Dusting the donkey / California Ramblers

Primary Title Source
Dusting the donkey Victor ledgers

Title Source
Dusting the donkey (Primary title) Victor ledgers

Personnel
Notes
California Ramblers (Musical group)

Primary Performer Notes
California Ramblers (Musical group)

Description: Jazz/dance band
Category: Instrumental

Take Date and Place
Take
Status Label Name/Number
Format
Note
10/7/1925 (New York, New York) [1] Destroy
10/7/1925 (New York, New York) [2] Destroy

 

Matrix [Trial 1925-10-07-02]. Sweet man / California Ramblers

Primary Title Source
Sweet man Victor ledgers

Title Source
Sweet man (Primary title) Victor ledgers
Fox trot (Title descriptor) Victor ledgers

Personnel
Notes
California Ramblers (Musical group)

Primary Performer Notes
California Ramblers (Musical group)

Description: Jazz/dance band
Category: Instrumental

Take Date and Place
Take
Status Label Name/Number
Format
Note
10/7/1925 (New York, New York) [1] Destroy
10/7/1925 (New York, New York) [2] Destroy

Albert



Posted on Nov 26, 2012, 5:29 AM

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Ed Kirkeby as vocalist

by

Ed Kirkeby was a decent vocalist and recorded dozens of sides where he took the vocal. Here is one example.

Crazy Words  Crazy Tune    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qndEraZhhLgAA

Albert



Posted on Nov 26, 2012, 5:42 AM

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Albert Brunies. Was he influenced by Bix?

by

Glenda kindly sent an mp3s of two recordings of Albert Brunies with the Halfway House orchestra.

When I'm Blue  bixography.com/WhenImBlueHalfwayHouseOrch.mp3

If I Didn't Have You   bixography.com/IfIDidntHaveYouHalfwayHouseOrch.mp3

Glenda writes,

Listening to the album New Orleans Jazz 1925-1928: The Halfway House Orchestra,  I was struck with how different Abbe Brunies' cornet sounds on this song; it's almost as if he'd been listening to Bix and the Wolverines just before  recording "When I'm Blue."   Brunies usually uses a rougher, buzzier sound, with growls and what has been described as a "raggy" tone, but in this one he sounds smoother and quite Bixian to me.  Listen to the phrasing in his solo, from about 1:22 on.  Sounds like Bix's influence was in there.   And on "If I Didn't Have You,"  notice Abbe's obbligato behind the vocal. It immediately made me think of Bix on "Take Your Tomorrow."     These are quite lovely recordings, very easy-going and sweet-hot. I didn't think Brunies sounded so Bixian in "If I Didn't Have You" except in those obbligato parts. He's more consciously sentimental in style here than Bix ever was.  But I'll bet the young dancers liked that song.
 
My response to Glenda.
 
Thanks for calling my attention to these recordings. I agree, Albert Brunies does sound Bixian in the mp3s you kindly sent.
In a posting in the Bixography
http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1095681434/Some+Information
I quoted the following: "Brunies himself seems to have undergone a stylistic transition in the late '20s, showing an understanding of the Paul Whiteman concepts of orchestrating jazz, even going as far as to toss in a few Bix Beiderbecke licks." [The quoted sentence appears in several web pages; I have not yet traced its origin]. I remember also about 10 years ago, Jean Pierre Lion mentioned an earlier recording by Tony Parenti (Be Yourself, available in the redhotjazz site, http://redhotjazz.com/parenti.html) where JP thought Albert Brunies sounded Bixian.
 
Albert
 

 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 24, 2012 9:38 AM

Posted on Nov 24, 2012, 9:37 AM

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A comprehensive article about Albert Brunies by Ate van Delden.

by

http://www.vjm.biz/new_page_19.htm

Albert



Posted on Nov 24, 2012, 9:55 AM

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Question About photos

by

Albert, I thought I was having a brain blip or something -- didn't this attachment article previously also include photographs depicting both the acousital and electronic methods of recording at Victor studios in 1925? Or was that something else?

Could you re-forward or make available again those particular photos? They really are fascinating and I wanted to see them again.

Thanks, from Laura

Posted on Nov 27, 2012, 6:09 AM

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The photos you remember are ....

by

.... also in a vjm article, but a diffferent one. See

http://www.vjm.biz/new_page_25.htm

Albert



Posted on Nov 27, 2012, 7:43 AM

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Thank you!

by

So very much, Albert -- ha ha, I KNEW the background was orange!

Many thanks again --

Laura

Posted on Nov 27, 2012, 7:45 AM

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"My Reverie" is a song written by Larry Clinton. In A Mist

by

It is based on Debussy's Reverie. It was recorded by Larry Clinton on Jul 16, 1938. Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mdGXN6JuCcs

Now listen to Debussy's composition. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y5ot-88UV-Y

The inside front cover of the sheet music of My Reverie has the following ad for three piano compositions. Take a look.

[linked image]

Courtesy Indiana University website.

The first is Rube Bloom's On the Green. You can listen to the Rube Blooom recording of 1935 in the RRR program of April 29, 2012. On the Green comes in at ca 5 min.

http://www.glennrobison.com/?p=34

The second is In A Mist.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2u9JbdoZvgk

The third is Meditation by Lee Sims. Listen to the composer playing his composition in 1928.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6l8pW0Pg0gQ

You can read about Sims in http://tibia.us/main/lee_sims,_pianist.htm 

Born in 1898 in Champagne, Illinois, Sims grew up in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and moved to Chicago in 1920. I wonder if he knew Bix.

According to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Sims 

Lee Sims was deeply imbued with the nineteenth century European tradition and especially interested in the newer, impressionistic harmonies of Debussy and Ravel. While he recorded mostly sentimental popular songs, he had more serious ideas and aspirations. In 1928, his collection of "Five Piano Rhapsodies" was published. In that same year, Sims recorded two of the Rhapsodies arranged for piano and orchestra on a Brunswick 12" disk. Sims appeared with the London Symphony Orchestra to play his symphonic tone poem, "Blythewood," with an orchestration by Ferde Grofe. Art Tatum biographer James Lester described Sims's compositions as being "drawn from the same sources as Bix Beiderbecke's 'In a Mist.'"
Sims's style was entirely outside the realm of
jazz as we think of it today. Nevertheless, Sims influenced at least one notable jazz figure. Art Tatum listened to Sims's radio broadcasts and acknowledged Sims as an important influence on his musical development.

Albert

 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 22, 2012 9:22 AM

Posted on Nov 22, 2012, 8:56 AM

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More About Lee Sims

by

Kindly sent by Hans Enderman.

[linked image]

Hans writes:

I have a single Lee Sims solo recording on LP:
Mine - All Mine (Brunswick 3754, December 1927) on New World NW 298 'It Had To Be You - Popular Keyboard From The Days Of The Speakeasy To The Television Era' (released 1977).
It is a stomping piano solo, and I think it should be included in the jazz discographies. Label is attached.
It can be heard on a noisy 78 on youtube:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gel0SvkIhSk

It reminds me of the Frank Melrose piano solos on Brunswick, but those were recorded 8 Mar 1929, thus a year later.
I have no idea if there is some jazz interest in the Lee Sims recordings of Ain't Misbehavin', St. Louis Blues, Sister Kate.
He also recorded Star Dust and Rockin' Chair.

There are several piano rolls and disc recordings of Lee Sims in youtube and in archive.org Here are the results of searching for "Lee Sims".

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=%22lee+sims%22&oq=%22lee+sims%22&gs_l=youtube-reduced.3...93160.104687.0.107478.12.12.0.0.0.0.110.1096.9j3.12.0...0.0...1ac.1.5A5wDgXyoUE

http://archive.org/search.php?query=%22lee%20sims%22

Thank you, Hans.

Albert



Posted on Nov 23, 2012, 7:01 AM

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James Lester about Lee Sims and Bix Beiderbecke

by

James Lester is the author of  Too Marvelous for Words: The Life and Genius of Art Tatum.

[linked image]

Here is what Lester writes about Bix and Sims.

[linked image]

I agree, Bix's In A Mist and his other piano compositions were written for the piano. That is why I have a hard time listening to In A Mist played by an orchestra. I also remind you of what Challis told Norman Gentieu: One thing I hate to hear is for people to play In A Mist and improvise the tune. It is already an improvisation in itself. Play it the way Bix put it down!

Albert



Posted on Nov 23, 2012, 8:41 AM

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Re: Improvisation

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Every composition begins as an "improvisation," a new combination of notes out of the composer's mind, and remains so until it is finally written down and "published," made public in a fixed medium. Whether it is "Clarinet Marmalade" or Beethoven's Fifth, a piece begins with one or more persons playing around with a series of notes, improvising.

Every performance by a human is in some ways an "improvisation," at least in the sense that it is an interpretation of the written notes by a player, a group, or a conductor. Tempos vary from orchestra to orchestra even in the most familiar classical works. Soloists sound different from each other without trying.

For example, Marian McPartland played "In A Mist" differently from Bix, and I think he might have enjoyed hearing what she did with it. Jess Stacy, Ralph Sutton, and Dick Hyman play "In the Dark" differently, maybe not changing the actual notes so much, but voicing them very individually. Those varying interpretations are what keep a piece of music alive. The listener hears different qualities in the same notes when they are played in differing styles and actually "hears" the piece anew. Of course, some "interpretations" are better than others, depending on individual taste.

After all, Bix didn't play "In A Mist" the same way every time, to Bill Challis' despair. He finally had to let it be written down in one form under the press of time, just as he didn't play "In A Mist" the same way in the first takes that overran the wax. (As we know, the sheet music had a section that Bix had to cut out on the record.) If he'd had a 12-inch disc to work with, he would almost surely have played it differently from the version that was played to come in just under the wire, perhaps more slowly, certainly with that beautiful "tranquil" section included. If he had lived decades longer, I feel sure he would not have stuck to the sheet music when he played "In A Mist." "That's what I like about jazz,"Bix said. "I never know what going to happen next, do you?"





Posted on Nov 23, 2012, 6:07 PM

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Composition, Interpretation, and Improvisation.

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Composition and improvisation. They are different, in my opinion. A composition begins in the mind of the composer, there is nothing in existence prior to the composition. In contrast, improvisation is based  on a previously existing composition. Yes, the improvisation is created by the performer extemporaneously, but it is created on a existing framework. Notes 1 and 2. There is an interesting essay on the subject.

http://music.arts.uci.edu/dobrian/CD.comp.improv.htm

I don't necessarily agree with everything Mr. Dobrian writes, but he provides a lot of food for thought. Here are his main points.

1. Composition is written. Improvisation is not.

2. Improvisation takes place in real time. Composition does not.

3. Improvisation is often a group activity. Composition is rarely a group activity.

Interpretation and Improvisation. Again, in my opinion different concepts. In an interpretation, the performer confines himself or herself to the written score, and brings in his/her technical skills, tone, articulation, dynamics, expression to the piece. A Bach composition can be interpreted with a baroque sensibility or a romantic sensibility, for example. The results are different (I much prefer the first), but both play the notes that the original composer had created and put down on the pentagram. An improvisation deviates from the written score, the notes are changed, sometimes to a considerable extent, other times to a minor extent, but in all cases there is a change as compared to the written score. I bellieve that this is what Bill Challis had in mind: follow the score, don't change it.
 
Albert
 
Note 1. Of course, it is possible for an individual to sit at a piano (or any other instrument) and compose on the spot, with no reference to a previouly existing framework. But the result, ordinarily, would not be completely coherent as in a composition where the author has time to change things, add and subtract, in short, edit. 
Note 2. Strict improvisation is based an a theme and pattern. But there is also free improvisation (in modern jazz) where the performer improvises without any reference to a pre-existing framework. 




    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 24, 2012 7:11 AM

Posted on Nov 24, 2012, 6:55 AM

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Re: Composition, Interpretation, and Improvisation

by

The nature of a "composition" is a fascinating subject. Your exposition of the differences between "interpretation," "improvisation," and "composition" was quite cogent and, well, um, well composed. It does a very good job of defining the three forms. I couldn't argue with anything you said as a sort of schema of the archetype of each.

But like most things, distinctions can blur. The blurring of distinctions parallel the changing meaning of "copyright" as a written work fixed in a published book, journal, or collection of speeches or the like. But nowadays, with so many forms of media in which things can be presented, the definition of "published" has broadened. Your concise explanation above of the three catgegories would now be considered copyrighted, even though not a drop of ink has yet been expended: I couldn't legally put your words into a magazine article or textbook without attribution as if they were my own, even though at this point your words "exist" in a non-tangible medium, little electrons traveling together, so to speak, not all that different from the sound waves in an improvised solo in a way.

Since recordings also "fixed" the improvisations of musicians in a permanent form (as permanent as anything gets to be on earth), they now exist in our minds as independent "compositions." Many of Bix 's solos are as fixed in some of our brains as the tune to "The Star-Spangled Banner," and many of them have been transcribed to print media as well. They are virtually independent compositions, especially since we have some evidence he "edited" them in succeeding takes. Jazz improvisations do follow a certain chord structure, but so do many distinct songs, and improvisations often don't even follow the written time signature except in the broadest sort of way.

So here's the question: assuming Jess Stacy tried to play "In the Dark" exactly by the written score at the same pace and in the same style as Bix played "In A Mist," was he merely performing the piece "as written?" And if so, when Dick Hyman played it, in a slow tempo, repeating sections and adding some notes here and there to transition, was he improvising or just interpreting? When does interpretation become "improvisation on a theme by Beiderbecke?" Is Stacy's the only version that is authentic? Are the others imposters? Reverse copyright violators? I'm not arguing with you or your definitions. I just feel that there seems to be room for shades or degrees of transition between them. The subject is a pleasant one for discussion, though going to the heart of what jazz is. Thanks for the opportunity to think out loud, Any other thoughts out there?

Posted on Nov 24, 2012, 6:10 PM

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Re: Composition, Interpretation, and Improvisation

by alex revell

It's the old question: Which comes first the chicken or the egg. Composition is improvisation written down. It's not complicated.
Can anyone help me with a problem. Mike Heckman is an old friend,with whom I talk by email very frequently. I now can't answer his mails because his ISP has suddenly decided that my ISP is 'untrustworthy' and will not accept my Emails to him. Consequently, I fear that he might think I am ignoring his and not answering them. If anyone has his email address would they please let him know what is happening.

Posted on Dec 6, 2012, 8:50 AM

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Hoagy! A one-hour radio special from the Public Radio stations of Indiana.

by

http://wfiu.org/hoagy.htm

Albert



Posted on Nov 22, 2012, 7:34 AM

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Where Was Bix at Noon on May 10, 1924?

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[linked image]

Courtesy Indiana University website.

You will see that Bix and eight other musicians were playing at Ed Williams Music store. The ad specifies Wolverine Orchestra of Nine Musicians. But ... but ... they were only seven: Bix, Jimmy Hartwell, George Johnson, Dick Voynow, Bob Gillette, Min Leibrook, Victor Moore. Phil Evans speculates that Hoagy was the eigth and an unknown the ninth. Maybe.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 23, 2012 7:42 AM
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 22, 2012 1:16 PM
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 22, 2012 9:22 AM

Posted on Nov 22, 2012, 7:13 AM

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Re: "Where was Bix...?

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I'm guessing that gig was booked by Hoagy!

I do wonder if Dick Voynow let Hoagy play piano or if perhaps he played second cornet with Bix? Wouldn't it be great to have a snapshot of that?

Maybe the ninth man was a trombonist from Carmichael's Collegians or one of the other local bands Hoagy was booking back then. I really wish the Wolverines could have kept Al Gandee. The later recordings with George Brunies and Miff Mole sound different and quite good!

Posted on Nov 23, 2012, 6:21 AM

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"Holiday Tea at Three" with Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks

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Saturday, December 8, 2012, 3-6 pm.

Chartwell Booksellers present Holiday Tea at Three with Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks! On Saturday, December 8th. Take a break from your holiday shopping and enjoy a special afternoon tea dance from 3p-6p. This is FREE and open to the public of all ages. Large dance floor in the arcade of the Park Avenue Plaza, 55 E 52nd Street (between Park & Madison), NYC. Chartwell Booksellers: 212-308-0643.

My wife and I have been going to these wonderful "Holiday Teas at Three" for several years. We plan to go again this year. It has become one of the many joys of the Christmas season.

Albert

 




    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 22, 2012 5:30 AM

Posted on Nov 22, 2012, 5:26 AM

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Paul Whiteman and Fats Waller: three connections.

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1. We all know about Whiteman recording of Waller's composition Whiteman Stomp. See

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1321972989/Whiteman+Stomp

2. We also know about the failed attempt of Whiteman to record Whispering on Jan 26, 1928. Waller was on organ and the rehearsal took place at the Church studio in Camden. By the way, there is a fascinating article  "Victors Church Studio, Camden (1918 1935): Lost and Found?" by Ben Kragting Jr and Harry Coster in  http://www.vjm.biz/new_page_25.htm

3. This is one connection new to me. From the Chicago Defender of Dec 20, 1930.

Thomas (Fats) Waller who was guest organist  at the Regal Theatre, Chicago, about a month ago, is now playing at Connie's Inn, New York on an organ that was installed especially for him. Fats has been playing the radio and stage jumps. He was held in Cleveland over WLW for more than three months. While in Chicago, at present the Mecca of all the big time bands, Fats made some arrangements for several North side units and was invited to dine with none other than Paul Whiteman.

I am looking forward to reading about this in Vol 2 of Don Rayno's Whiteman biography.

Albert



Posted on Nov 21, 2012, 7:09 AM

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Fats Waller plays Whiteman Stomp in a Maxwell Hour Radio Program

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San Antonio Express, Sep 18, 1930

 

RADIO ARTISTS MAXWELL HOUSE GUESTS TONIGHT

Novelties on Program;

 

One o£ the mort novel and interesting programs ever staged by Willard Robison will be presented by the Maxwell Hour- Ensemble tonight, with a small army of radio stars appearing as guest artists. The program will be broadcast from -WOAI at 7:30 o'clock.

The guest artist -who will be heard include lames Melton, one of radio's most popular young tenors; Thomas Waller, dusky Harlem pianist, who is known for his skill as the "two-piano pianist;" Lou Raderman, recording violinist, the Mariners' trio, a male vocal group, making its first appearance on the Maxwell House programs, and the newly organized Maxwell House Saxophone Sextet, headed by Ross Gorman, one of the greatest masters of the saxophone since that instrument first came into popularity.

Willard Robison, director of the program, will dust off one of the masterpieces of jazz as his contribution to the program when he sings his own interpretation of Handy's famous, "Memphis Blues."

The Maxwell House Saxophone Sextet -will offer an even earlier number, "The Twelfth Street Rag." By way of contrast. Melton will be heard .in the melodic "Darling Nelly Gray" and a specially prepared arrangement of "High Water," one of the best-known later-day spirituals.

Thomas Waller's fingers will scamper through his own composition, "Whiteman's Stomp," and the Mariners will offer the latest composition .from Willard Robinson'spen"Just Another Party" the first time it has been heard anywhere. Lou Raderman will play Grainger's "From the Canebrake," assisted by Arthur Schutt at the piano.

The program in full follows:

"Whiteman's stomp" ...ThomasWaller Orchestra and Waller piano solo

"Darling Nelly Gray" ...Jarnes Melton and orchestra

"From the Canebrake" ....Percy Grainier Violin solo by Lou Raderman

"Indian Summer" .Victor Herbert  Orchestra

"Memphis Blues" ... .W. C. Handy Willard Robison and Orchestra

"Twelfth Street Ras" ...Euday Bowman  Maxwell House Saxophone Sextet

"Just Another Party" ..Willard Robison Mariners Trio

"High Water" James Melton and- Orchestra

"Who," from Sunny Full Ensemble, Orchestra and Trio

**********************************************

 

What an amazing amount of talent under just one program. Willard Robison surely knew how to choose them! And get a load of all the connections to Bix.

 

Albert



Posted on Nov 21, 2012, 9:02 AM

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Hoagy was a guest in a Maxwell House Radio Program

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From the San Antonio Express, Aug 14, 1930.

 

Blues Writer Guest

 

Two guest artists will share honors with Willard Robison, young composer, singer and director of the Maxwell House Ensemble, when the program of the ensemble is broadcast from WOAI tonight at 7:30 o'clock. They are Hoagy Carmichael, who ranks with Robison and W. C. Handy as the greatest blues interpreters of a1l time; and Elizabeth Sheridan, soprano.

Carmichael, who is famous for such works as "The Washboard Blues," will sing one of his own compositions, "Chained to My Rockin' Chair," accompanied by the .Maxwell House orchestra. In |it he plays a double part, voicing the plaint of the aged patriarch

who is chained to his rocking chair, and answering in the person of the vigorous young nephew who seeks to comfort the old negro.

Miss Sheridan, who deserted the concert stage recently for the newer field of radio, is making her third appearance on the Maxwell House program.

The program, which goes on the air at 9:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time, is as follows:

"Show Boat" Medley Full Ensemble

"Good Evening"Orchestra and Quartet

"Chained to My Rockin' Chair" Hoagy Carmichael and Orchestra

Danse Barbare Orchestra

To be selected Elizabeth. Sheridan and Orchestra

Give Yourself a Pat on the Back" Orchestra and Quartet

Lazy Weather" .Willard Robison and Deep River String Choir

Puttin' on the Ritz" Full Ensemble

 

A few comments:

 

1. WOAI was an NBC affiliate.

 

2. I remind you that three months earlier, on May 21, 1930, Hoagy Carmichael and His Orchestra with Bix recorded Rockin Chair with Bix playing an 8-bar solo on muted cornet. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FXLI3djQi_4&list=PLAF9A9E85DE3CF91D&index=32&feature=plpp_video

 

3. Interestingly, Hoagy is billed as the composer of Washboard Blues but there is no mention of Stardust. This can be understood because Stardust did not become a mega-hit until 1930-1931. The Isham Jones recording was made in mid-May 1930 and released a couple of months later.

 

4.An ad for the Maxwell House radio program from a 1930 issue of the Saturday Evening Post.

[linked image]

 

5. This was before the famous Maxwell House Showboat radio program, 1933-1935. In the 1933 recreation of the stage show for radio, Annette Hanshaw played the role of Magnolia. http://annettehanshaw.tripod.com/showboat.html  Here is Annette Hanshaw (audio only) singing Stringing Along On A Shoestring - Radio Show (Captain Henry's Show Boat, 1934). And here is Annette (audio and video) in 1933 singing We Just Couldn't Say Goodbye. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=px1PNz5ed30&feature=related

And here is an ad for Maxwell Coffee with Annette on the cover.
[linked image]

 

Albert

 

 

 



Posted on Nov 21, 2012, 9:12 AM

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I'm More than Satisfied

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I'm More Than Satisfied is a song written by Thomas Fats Waller (music) and Raymond Klages (lyrics). Fats Waller needs no introduction, but Raymond Klages might. From imdb.com,

Born on Jun 10, 1888 in Baltimore, MD, died on Mar 29, 1947 in Glendale, CA. Songwriter ("Just You, Just Me") and author, educated at BaltimoreCityCollege. He performed in vaudeville and in minstrel and road shows, and wrote special material. During World War I, he served in the 108th Field Artillery, then joined the staff of a New York music-publishing company, eventually writing the Broadway stage score for "Sally, Irene and Mary". Joining ASCAP in 1923, his chief musical collaborators included Louis Alter, Harry Carroll, Jesse Greer, Al Hoffman, Howard Quicksell, J. Fred Coots, Jimmy Monaco and Vincent Rose. His other popular-song compositions include "Doin' the Raccoon", "Blue Shadows", "Pardon Me, Pretty Baby", "Tonight or Never", "Had I But Known", ""$21 a Day - Once a Month", "What's Gonna Be With Ya and Me?", "I Wonder Why", "Time Will Tell", "Roll Up the Carpet", and more.

The song that Raymond Klages wrote with Howdy Quicksell is the immortal Sorry.

From Oct 15, 1927 to Oct 26, 1927, Bix was between jobs. The short-lived Adrian Rollini New Yorkers had folded, and Bix had not yet joined the Paul Whiteman organization. Bix and the other New Yorkers were scrambling for money, and one way to get by was via recordings. On Oct 20, 1927, Bix , several musicians from the defunct New Yorkers Frank Trumbauer (C-mel), Don Murray (cl), ?Eddie Lang (bj), and Frank Signorelli (p)- with Vic Berton (d) added, went to the Pathe Phonograph & Radio Corporation on E. 53rd St, New York where they met Willard Robison and the members of the Deep River Quintette.  They proceeded to record three numbers, Im More Than Satisfied, Clorinda and Three Blind Mice. The first number is the one of interest here.

Five takes were cut and were processed as follows.

Take 1. Mastered, Perfect 14905.

Take 2. Mastered, Perfect 14905, Pathe 36729.

Take 3. Never discovered.

Take 4. Never discovered.

Take 5. Mastered, Perfect 14905.

Take 1 is unique, takes 2 and 5 are the same. They were issued under the name of Willard Robison and His Orchestra. 

[linked image]

One version is available on youtube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ECO0awkR7os

 

Here is a description of the recording from The Bix Bands by Castelli, Kaleveld and Pusateri. Incidentally, these autors give Arthur Schutt on piano and Charles [sic] Kress on gt-bj.

 

I'm More Than Satisfied  (AABA 32)

Intro 2 gt, 1 xy, 1 gt, 4 band

(1) 32 Band

Verse 16 Band

(2) 30 ch, 1 ch & Tram, 1 Tram

(3) 32 Band

Coda 4 Band

 

The question of Eddie Lang being present in the recording of interest was discussed about a year ago.

 

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1295889705

 

Lord lists the following recordings of the tune in the 1920s.

 

Chicago Loopers

Bix Beiderbecke (cnt)Don Murray (cl,ts)Frankie Trumbauer (c-mel)Frank Signorelli (p)Eddie Lang (g) or unknown (g) Vic Berton (d, harpophone)Deep River Quintet (vcl)Willard Robison (ldr)

 

New York, ca. October 20-26, 1927

 

 

-1

I'm more than satisfied (drq vcl)

Per 14905, Audubon AAB, Hist Rec HLP28, Joker

 

 

 

 

(It)SM3562, WRC (E)SH413, Classics (F)778 [CD]

 

 

-2and-5

I'm more than satisfied (drq vcl)

Pathe Act 36724, Per 14905, Rarities (E)RA13,

 

 

 

 

Audubon AAB, WRC (E)SH413, Joker (It)SM3562,

 

 

 

 

Neatwork (Au)RP3060 [CD]

 

 

 

[D6970]Add   Rene Dumont

 

Berlin, November, 1927

 

1161bd

Saxophobia

Grammophon (G)21281

 

Rosy cheeks

           (G)21280

 

I'm always smiling

          -

1164bd

Nola

           (G)21281

 

Persian rosebud

           (G)21282

 

Positively, absolutely

          -

 

Smile

           (G)21283

 

Pork and beans

          -

 

I'm coming, Virginia

           (G)21284

 

I'm more than satisfied

          -

1181bd

Afraid of you

           (G)21285

1182bd

With all your faults

          -

 

Lovely lady

           (G)21286

 

One more night

          -

[A178]Add   Larry Abbott

Larry Abbott And His Orchestra : Larry Abbott (comb) Joe Venuti, Murray Kellner (vln) Bill Wirges (p) Tony Colucci (g,bj) prob Jimmy Johnston (b) Tom Stacks (d) Larry Abbott, Tom Stacks (vcl) duet

 

New York, November 15, 1927

 

81824-C

Mississippi mud

(unissued)

81825-D

I'm more than satisfied (la,ts vcl)

Okeh 41044,  Par R3501, Rivermont BSW1141 [CD]

 

 

 

[A2591]Add   All Star Orchestra

Jimmy McPartland,Ray Lodwig,Fuzzy Farrar (tp)Glenn Miller,Tommy Dorsey (tb)Benny Goodman (cl,?f)Fud Livingston (cl,ts)Max Farley (cl,as,fl,oboe)Joe Venuti,Lou Raderman (vln)Carl Kress (g)Joe Tarto (tu)Chauncey Morehouse (d,vib)Dudley Fosdick (mellophone)Scrappy Lambert (vcl)Nat Shilkret (dir)

 

New York, March 21, 1928

 

43384-2

I'm more than satisfied (sl vcl)

Vic 21605, Broadway 103

 

 

 

[L5212]Add   Guy Lombardo

 

Chicago, March 26, 1928

 

145839-2

I'm more than satisfied (vcl trio)

Col 1451-D, TOM 29

 

Note:

Both above titles also on Sensation (Can)026 [CD], Timeless (Du)CBC1-087 [CD].

[P6328]Add   Vic Price and his Orchestra

Leo McConville (tp) unknown (tp) Larry Abbott (cl,as,comb) unknown tb, as, ts, p, bj , tu and d. Arthur Fields (vcl)

 

New York, April 5, 1928

 

BEX-1184-A

I'm more than satisfied (af vcl)

Ge 6440, Champ 15494, Herwin 8059

 

Note:

Champion 15494 as "The Dixie Ramblers", Herwin 8059 as "Sherman Sun-Dodgers".
This selection is from fifteen issued under this name on Gennett during 1928 and is of some interest as hot dance music.

[O1447]Add   Original Memphis Five

Phil Napoleon (tp)Tommy Dorsey (tb)Jimmy Dorsey (cl,as)Frank Signorelli (p) poss. Hoagy Carmichael (p-1) poss. Eddie Lang (g-2)Vic Berton (d)

 

New York, June 13, 1928

 

E-7367

I'm more than satisfied

Voc 15712, IAJRC 26

 

Note:

Personnel from Timeless liner notes.
Historical HLP25 titled "Hot clarinets 1924-1929"; rest of LP by others.
All above titles also on Timeless (Du)CBC1-049 [CD] titled "The Original Memphis Five, Napoleon's Emperor's, The Cotton Pickers,1928-1929"; see flwg session and the other leaders for rest of CD.

[H898]Add   Jack Hamilton

Jack Hamilton And His Entertainers : Jack Hamilton (tp) Maceo Jefferson (bj,vcl) Rudy Bayfield Evans (vcl) + unknown as, ts and p

 

Paris, late 1928/early 1929

 

Some comments.

1. Bix, Tram and fellow musicians were the first to record the tune.

2. The second recording was by Rene Dumont in Berlin.

3. The last version in the 1920s was by Jack Hamilton in Paris.

4. There is a version by Ambrose on Jun 14, 1928.

 

Some of of the above are available. Note that each has a different intro, but the intros in the Capitolians and All Star Orchestra versions are very similar. I did not find the versions made in England, France and Germany.

 

Larry Abbott  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2cB54uyTS7c

All Star Orchestra   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vZdHZ7F6Xzk [Jimmy McPartland exhibiting Bixs influence; excellent vocal by Scrappy Lambert]

Guy Lombardo   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t__5PXxzp7w [Nice single string guitar solo a la Eddie Lang

Vic Price   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4yeZJ2sfqU8  [an unfortunate skip here; the trumpet player does his Bix]]

Original  Memphis Five   bixbeiderbecke.com/ImMoreThanSatisfiedOM5.mp3 [Possibly my favorite version; the intro reminds me of A Blue Serenade].]

And of course we could not forget the terrific Capitolians video.

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCLmfx_d4m8

Albert

 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 20, 2012 10:59 AM

Posted on Nov 20, 2012, 10:54 AM

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The Youtube version you link to has been removed, but...

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There is another one at
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-_I9Fn597cU

Posted on Nov 21, 2012, 9:16 PM

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Thanks, David.

by

The link you gave is still by Atticus, the youtube name of forumite Emrah. Incidentally, last night I watched To Kill a Mocking Bird on TCM. What a fantastic film, one of my "desert island" movies.. Every time I watch it I like it more. It is like a Bix recording.

Albert



Posted on Nov 22, 2012, 4:47 AM

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Jean Goldkette's all-time dance band.

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From The El Paso Herald Post, Oct 7, 1955.

Not a surprising list of musicians.

JEAN GOLDKETTE, the oldtime bandleader, picked his alltime dance band during a visit in Flint, Mich., and you might be interested in his selections:

Reed section: Jimmy Dorsey, Glen Gray, Frankle Trumbauer, Doc Ryker, Don Murray, Owen Bartlett.

Violins: George Bass and Joe Venuti.

Brass section: Tommy Dorsey, Speigel [sic]Wilcox, Bix Beiderbecke, Fuzzy Farrar. Bil Ranck [sic], Nat Natali [sic], Charles Margolis.

Guitar: Eddie Lange [sic].

Drums: Charles Jondro, Chauncey Morehouse.

Piano: Paul Merz, Billy Bergman, William Krenz.

Bass: Steve Brown.

And they all played, at one time or another, for Goldkette

*****************

Charles Jondro? I looked him up in Rust's Jazz Discography. Charlie Jondro recorded about a dozen sides with Phil Napoleon and his orchestra between Feb 7, 1927 and Nov 12, 1927.

Here is Five Pennies from the last recording session.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p4WjfAZBbiQ

Napoleon recorded Clarinet Marmalade three times in 1927, twice with Jondro on drums.

Feb 7, 1927. Vic 20647. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F4JJDN0wSpw

Mar 22, 1927. Ed 52021. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-wMe_3dJWY

There was an earlier recording without Jondro: Jan 21, 1927, The Emperors, Har 362-H with Eddie Schaaf on drums. I bought a copy of this record a few months ago. Very worn out. Sort of cleaned out.

bixography.com/ClarinetMarmaladeEmperorsCleaned.mp3

 

Albert

 



Posted on Nov 18, 2012, 1:02 PM

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I can't stop listening to Bethena,.composed by Scott Joplin in 1905.

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[linked image]

Listen http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BP69-iS4GzU

Read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bethena

Albert



Posted on Nov 18, 2012, 8:51 AM

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Joshua Rifkin's version.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWBUCmKg9uM

Albert



Posted on Nov 18, 2012, 9:00 AM

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Carl Kress with Paul Whiteman in 1926? Another myth to be demolished?

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Here is  a short biography of Carl Kress in Oxford Music online.

Kress, Carl

(b Newark, NJ, 20 Oct 1907; d Reno, NV, 10 June 1965). American acoustic guitarist. Having first played piano, he took up banjo, then changed to guitar and worked initially with various groups in New York. He played with Paul Whiteman in 1926, then from the late 1920s became much sought after as a session musician, recording with numerous popular singers of the day as well as with such jazz groups and musicians as the Chicago Loopers (1927, including Bix Beiderbecke), Red Nichols (192731, under Nicholss own name and in 1928 as the Wabash Dance Orchestra), Miff Mole (1928, 1930), the Dorsey Brothers orchestra (1928, 1930), Frankie Trumbauer (1928, 1936), Boyd Senter (1929), Jimmy Dorsey (1932), and Adrian Rollini (1934). In the early 1930s he recorded duets with Eddie Lang and with Dick McDonough. He was one of the owners of the Onyx Club on 52nd Street. While from the late 1930s through the 1950s he continued to work as a session musician, his participation in jazz sessions was rare; among those with whom he did record were the Mills Swingphonic Orchestra (1937), the trio Threes a Crowd (1938), Toots Mondello (1939), and, far more significantly, Edmond Hall (1944). From 1961 to the time of his death, from a heart attack, he played in a duo with George Barnes. A pioneer rhythm guitarist in the 1920s, Kress matured into an important exponent of swing, using a specially lowered tuning (BFcgad) adapted to his unique chordal style. Numerous soloists were inspired by the rich harmonic support and joyous, buoyant drive that were characteristic of his playing.

Bibliography

F. Victor: Whos Who among Guitarists: This Time its Carl Kress, Metronome, xlix/10 (1933), 32

Norman Mongan/Barry Kernfeld

************

 

 

The bit about Cress with Whiteman in 1926 is repeated everywhere in the internet: Wikipedia, alljazz.com. red hot jazz site, etc. Don Rayno has no mention of Kress being with Whiteman in 1926. I go along with Don whose exhaustive research on Whiteman produced  highly reliable information.

 

In addition to a brief biography, Don Rayno's only mention of Kress is in connection with the recording of San. Here is what Don tells us.

 

"Violinist Matty Malneck and Carl Kress, a guest guitarist on the date, are featured in two duets of eight and thirty-two bars. "Matty Malneck brought Carl," said Challis. "They were making a record that same day. They had gotten together and figured out a chorus for themselves, which they 'woodshedded' out. I didn't have to write it out. Those guys had it all ready."

 

Richard Sudhalter has the following information in Lost Chords:

Interviewed years later, Whiteman described the scene" "We needed a guitar player [especially] to back up Matty Malneck hot fiddle chorus on San Kress fished out of a dilapidated box what looked to me like a ukelele. I called Roy Bargy aside and told him we couldn't use a ukelele in our big band. Bargy only smiled. He knew how Kress played, and I few minutes I realized too that this boy could make a four-string guitar sound like a harp."

 

Sudhalter points out that Whiteman's recollection must have been in error, since Bargy did not join Whiteman until three weeks after the recording of San. Whiteman's recollections are included in a 1940 Decca album of Kress solos and in the booklet that was included in the Time Life box set "The Guitarists." Sudhalter wonders if Whiteman menat Bill Challis who played piano in the recording. 

Listen to both takes of Whiteman's recording of San where he uses a ten-piece group: Bix, Tram, Bill Rank, Jimmy Dorsey, Matty Malneck, Bill Challis, Min Leibrook, Carl Kress and Harold McDonald.

 

Listen to takes 6 and 7.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LzAZBg2XTA4

 

At 45 sec I hear Bix doing something similar to what he does in From Monday On. He does not do it in take 7.

 

Compare with take 3 recorded on June 9, 1924.

 

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/9920

More about San from Don Rayno.

htp://bixbeiderbecke.com/SanRaynoAccount2.jpg

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 18, 2012 7:09 AM
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 18, 2012 7:06 AM

Posted on Nov 18, 2012, 6:59 AM

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Two Live Recordings of a Paul Whiteman Concert In England , 1926.

by

On March 31, 1926, the Paul Whiteman orchestra boarded the SS Berengaria, bound for its second European tour. The first had been in 1923.

[linked image] 

While in London , the band gave two highly successful concerts at the famous Royal Albert Hall, the first on April 11 and the second on April 25, 1926.

 [linked image]

[linked image]

Here is the program for the April 11. 1026 concert, taken from Page 558 of Don Rayno's Whiteman biography Paul Whiteman - Pioneer in American Music:

Mississippi Suite

St. Louis Blues

Tiger Rag

You Forgot to Remember

Castles in the Air

Meet the Boys, Parts 1 and 2

Valencia

Rhapsody in Blue, Parts 1 and 2

Nola Piano duet by Harry Perella and Ray Turner

Oh! Lady Be Good

Yes Sir! That's My Baby/If You Knew Susie/Kitten on the Keys

Untitled banjo solo by Mike Pingitore (possibly Linger Awhile)

This concert was recorded live by the Gramophone Company (HMV). The recordings that the HMV engineers made were never released, but according to Rayno, band members received test pressings of the fourteen sides waxed. Rumors have circulated for years that at least some of these survived and, indeed, two of them have been discovered. I am pleased to present these to you now:

 

Nola Courtesy of Vince Giordano

bixography.com/NolaWhitemanEngland.mp3

Linger Awhile Courtesy of Nick Dellow who recorded the number from one of Rich Conaty's Big Broadcast programs and carried out further restoration work; Rich received the recording from Michael Devecka.

bixography.com/LingerAwhileWhiotemanEngland.mp3

The quality of these rare tests is quite remarkable considering that they were "live" recordings taken directly from microphones positioned beneath the stage of the Royal Albert Hall, with the audio signal relayed to portable recording equipment set up by the HMV engineers. If you listen closely to the start of Linger Awhile, you can clearly discern voices amongst the 8000-strong audience.

Thanks to Nick and Vince.

Albert

 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 16, 2012 5:23 AM

Posted on Nov 16, 2012, 5:22 AM

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Re: Two Live Recordings of a Paul Whiteman Concert In England , 1926.

by Chris Barry

Thanks to Albert and all for sharing these historic audio clips. So rare to hear a live concert of this vintage, and Paul Whiteman no less. Perhaps because there was an audience, the guys seem to play with extra energy.

Posted on Nov 16, 2012, 12:35 PM

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Addendum

by

Nick sends a link to an announcement of the Royal Albert Hall Concert.

http://www.royalalberthall.com/about/history-and-archives/timeline-detail.aspx?search=19260411

After much fooling around, I was able to grab it and enlarge it.

[linked image]

Nick also found out that band had a cameo role in a short movie staring Dorothy Gish no less!

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0331558/
 
It is believed that the film is lost.
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_(1926_film)
 
Thank you very much, Nick. Everyday we learn something new.
 
Albert


Posted on Nov 16, 2012, 2:13 PM

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Re: Addendum

by

I am amazed at the great sound quality of these live recordings - HMV began recording live classical concerts around the same time and some of that material was issued on 78. I guess that the original matrices for the Whiteman sides no longer exist. What an amazing CD issue this complete concert would make!

Posted on Dec 6, 2012, 10:29 AM

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You Took Advantage of Me

by

 

Present Arms was a musical production by the fabulous team of Rodgers and Hart.

 

[linked image]

 

It ran at Lew Fields Mansfield Theatre from April 26, 1928 to September 1, 1928. The choreography was by Busby Berkeley. Two of the songs in the show were recorded by Paul Whitemans Orchestra. Do I Hear You Saying Apr 24, 1928, and You Took Advantage of Me Apr 25, 1928.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PCqlsxAGces

It turns out that Apr 25, 1928 marked the last Whiteman recording session with Victor in the 1920s.  Three takes were made.

 

Take Date and Place

Take

Status

Label Name/Number

Format

Note

Show Issued Only

4/25/1928 (New York, New York. Liederkranz Hall)

1

Master

Victor 21398

10" disc

 

4/25/1928 (New York, New York. Liederkranz Hall)

[1]2R

Master

Victor 25369

10" disc

 

4/25/1928 (New York, New York. Liederkranz Hall)

1

Master

Sunbeam BX CD8

CD

 

4/25/1928 (New York, New York. Liederkranz Hall)

2

Destroy

 

 

4/25/1928 (New York, New York. Liederkranz Hall)

3

Hold

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It will be seen that only take 1 was released, first in 1928 and then in 1936.

 

Here are some record labels.

 

 [linked image]

 

[linked image]

 

[linked image]

 

There were several other recordings of You Took Advantage of Me in the 1920s.

 

Fred Rich

archive.org/download/FredRichOrch-01-07/FredRichOrchVjamesMelton-YouTookAdvantageOfMe1928.mp3

 

Miff Mole

www.jazz-on-line.com/download/index.php?id=276011&type=mp3

 

Lud Gluskin

bixography.com/YouTookAdvantageGluskin.mp3

 

Kaufman/DeLeath

bixography.com/YouTookAdvantageKaufmanDeLeath.mp3

 

Vincent Lopez

bixography.com/YouTookAdvantageLopez.mp3

 

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 15, 2012 5:14 AM

Posted on Nov 14, 2012, 1:11 PM

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From Professor Hot Stuff.

by

Can anyone identify the band and the tune?

https://www.box.com/s/e57tft3gv20zbl5qq7wb

Albert



Posted on Nov 12, 2012, 5:18 AM

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How's Your Folks And My Folks Down In Norfolk Town

by Enrico Borsetti

by Cal De Voll and Dudley Mecum
played by Dudley Mecum's Wolverines

Posted on Nov 12, 2012, 7:32 AM

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Thanks, Enrico.

by

Here is the version by Billy Jones and Ernest Hare.

http://archive.org/details/BillyJonesErnestHare-HowsYourFolksAndMyFolksDownInNorfolkTown

And the cover of the sheet music fom Mamluke on flickr.

[linked image]

Albert

 



Posted on Nov 12, 2012, 12:33 PM

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The other number recorded by Dudley Mecum.

by

Thanks to Professor Hot Stuff for the link to Angry, recorded by Dudlley Mecum's band in Chicago, Sep 1925.

https://www.box.com/s/0rfvfn3k2kz07d9pc3au

The band consisted of Frank Cotterel (c), Jimmy Lord (cl), George Johnson (ts), Dud Mecum (p), Joe O'Brien (bj).

In both recordings the band sounds great and, in particular, clarinetist Jimmy Lord sounds very advanced for the time.

The recordings were made by Dud in order to promote his compositions in record stores. They were not released commercially.

More about Dudley Mecum later.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 14, 2012 1:44 PM

Posted on Nov 14, 2012, 8:48 AM

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Mecum on vocal and piano.

by

Forty Second Street by Don Bestor and His Orchestra. Feb 26, 1933. Vic 24253.

http://mp3bear.com/don-bestor-and-his-orchestra-ft-dudley-mecum-forty-second-street

Dudley C. Mecum was born on May 20, 1896 in Hamilton, OH. Hamilton OH was also Min Leibrook's hometwon. Two Wolverines from the same town! Dudley died on Mar 6, 1978 in Hamilton OH.

Albert

[linked image]





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 14, 2012 3:24 PM

Posted on Nov 14, 2012, 3:05 PM

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That is a great side!

by

The radio-type effects on "Forty Second Street" make it very entertaining. It's also one of Bestor's few recordings with any kind of a good beat, let alone approaching hot music. (At one point his tenorman just stops playing in mid solo, apparently out of ideas.)

Posted on Jan 16, 2013, 8:45 PM

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What was Dudley Mecum doing in West Virginia on March 15, 1923?

by

He was getting married! From the Hamilton Evening Journal, March 30, 1923.

SOCIETY

NEWS

Miss Muriel Emerick and Dudley Mecum Married

A wedding- of much interest to their many Hamilton friends, occurred in Huntigton, West Virginia, on March fifteenth, when

Miss Muriel Kmerick, dnnghter of Charles Emerick, and Dudley Mecum, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Mecum

of

Koss Avenue, were married by the Methodist Ministry of that city.

Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Dixon, of Chilliroth werc the attendants, and all members of Mr. Mecum's orchestra and their

wives were present. The ceremony took place at the apartment where the bride and groom will reside.

The bride was formerly assistant bookkeeper of the Oak- Park Public Service company of Chicago. She was attractively

attired in a dark blue brocaded crepe suit with black hat and slippers. The groom, who until recently resided in this city,

is now  connected with the Baismcn Dancing Academy of Huntington. He is a talented musician, and has gained some

renown as a  song writer and entertainer.

The good wishes of a host of friends are extended to the happy couple.

Albert



Posted on Nov 18, 2012, 1:49 PM

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What was Dudley Mecum doing on Feb 18, 1928?

by

Opening a store and school of music. From the Hamilton Daily News, Feb 18, 1928.

 

MUSIC STUDIO OPENING TODAY

Dudley Mecum Announces Plans Including Sale of Wurlitzer Line.

An announcement published in the Daily Xcws earlier in the week noted the opening by Dudley Mecum of a

new studio at 226 Main street, between B and C streets. It was announced further that the Mecum Music Studio is to be an

authorized Wurlitzer Co. store.

Mr. Mecum plans to combine with poersonal instruction in music and musical instruments by himself and a staff of

competent instructors the sale of musical instruments, particularly the line of the Rudolph Wurlitzer Company, band and

orchestral instruments and the Orthophonic Vietrola.

The new studio is to be given its formal opening Saturday afternoon and evening. To this an invitation is given his friends

and the public generally.

Mr. Mecum is a native Hamilton

ian. After graduating from high school he studied music under Walter Hellers, one of the

most competen instructors of Chicago. He also spent three years at the University of Washington. More recently he has

been a mcmber of the Don Bestor Victor recording orchestra of Chicago. Not a few| of his  compositions have been

received with pronounced favor by the music-loving  public. "Angry" is perhaps that, one given thegreatest popular favor.

Mr. Mecum began composing before he left Hamilton. "If I Had My Way, Pretty Baby," was written in Hamilton and still

has  quite a vogue. Many others of his compositions have been well received.

Mr. Mecum has been engaged to broadcast from station WJJK, the Green Lantern station, next Wednesday evening and

on  subsequent Wednesdays. His next program will be the Humbach program. He is also taking bookings

for entertainmcnt and orchestras.

 

Albert



Posted on Nov 18, 2012, 2:40 PM

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Who is Gretchen Beiderbecke?

by

Hello!

I came into a year book from Davenport High School from 1918. I know it "just" misses Bix attending, but it does have a senior by the name of Gretchen Beiderbecke. I would assume she's related to Bix. Would this be an older sister? Or a Cousin?? Just curious.

--Mike C


Posted on Nov 10, 2012, 2:30 PM

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Genealogy

by

Charles and Louise Beiderbecke (Bix's grandparents) had four children that made it into adulthood:Carl Thomas,  Ottilie, Bismark Herman (Bix's father), and Lutie.

Carl Thomas (1865-1933) married Adele Seiffert in 1895. They had four daughters: Lutie, Gretchen, Gertrude and Helen.

Thus, Gretchen was Bix's cousin. The children of Carl and of Bismark were very close. The following photo includes Gretchen.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Nov 10, 2012, 3:41 PM

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Re: Who is Gretchen Beiderbecke?

by Gerri Bowers

Gretchen "Gay" Seiffert Beiderbecke is a cousin of Bix's. Born March 21, 1901, died October 15, 1983, Alameda, Ca. She married George Murdoch, they had one daughter. After she died, her daughter Katherine brought her ashes and buried her at Oakdale Cemetery in the family plot.

Posted on Nov 10, 2012, 3:47 PM

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Bix mentioned in "The Wonderful World of Jazz."

by

"The Wonderful World of Jazz" is the title of an article by Richard Gehman published in the Aug 11, 1957 issue of  the American Weekly. Nothing to write home about, but I present here for the sake of completion. An interesting caricature of Bix is included.

 [linked image]

You probably know the name of Richard Gehman: he collaborated with Eddie Condon in Eddie Condon's Treasury of Jazz.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 10, 2012 12:49 PM

Posted on Nov 10, 2012, 11:09 AM

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Jazz Juxtaposition Bix ...Tesch is the title of an article authored by ....

by

.... Bill Esposito and published in the Oct 1972 issue of Jazz Journal.

[linked image]

[linked image]

[linked image]

I must say I did not like several sections of the article. A correction: the name of the bassist mentioned in the article was not George Kraslow (Kraslow was the rental agent for Bix's apartment in Sunnyside), it was Rex Gavitte.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Nov 10, 2012 11:47 AM

Posted on Nov 10, 2012, 11:35 AM

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Bix died of everything.

by

According to the first article in this thread, Frank Norris (I believe a Bix classmate at Lake Forest Academy) is the source of the statement in the title of this posting. According to the second article in this thread, Eddie Condon is the source. I remember Richard Basehart (narator of Berman's documentary on Bix) also said the words in the title, but I don't remember if there was an attribution. Anyone remembers?

Albert



Posted on Nov 10, 2012, 12:57 PM

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Copying Bix

by

Get a load of this  

http://www.historicfilms.com/search/?type=all&q=%22bix+beiderbecke%22#p1t17374i0o4748&year=1928-1944

The video of what we discussed earlier.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1346081369

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1348423274/

Albert



Posted on Nov 9, 2012, 12:37 PM

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And a bit of Paul Whiteman playing violin

by

http://www.historicfilms.com/search/?type=all&q=%22paul+whiteman%22#p1

Albert



Posted on Nov 9, 2012, 12:47 PM

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Vic Berton

by

A forum reader asks if there is anyone still alive who knew Vic Berton personally. I you know of anyone, please let me know. Thanks.

Albert



Posted on Nov 8, 2012, 5:44 AM

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Re: Vic Berton

by Professor Hot Stuff

I don't know, but did Bea Wain record with any Jazz bands in the 30's? This is pretty Jazzy:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7zMm_KjQkTY Wikipedia says she's 95 now. She might be a really interesting person to interview.


Posted on Nov 12, 2012, 8:50 PM

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Still Praying for everyone

by Gerri Bowers

Albert, I heard from Rob today. Both him & Bob are ok for now, The car needs gas. No trees hit the house or car. We will continue to keep everyone in our prayers. Be safe.

Posted on Nov 6, 2012, 4:59 PM

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Thanks, Gerri.

by

I also heard from Rob. Good thing they had no damage.

I am spending most of my time on lines trying to buy gas and it is costing more than $40 a day to keep the generator going. But it is worth it, it keeps the house warm and the refrigerator cold. The miracles of electricity.

Another storm today and predictions of more outages!!!

Albert



Posted on Nov 7, 2012, 5:04 AM

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Paul Whiteman / Paul McCartney

by DavenportChad

Probably a repost, but I heard this snippet on npr several months back during an interview with Paul McCartney...


McCartney's father was an amateur musician, but there weren't many records around the house when he was growing up.

"We listened to the radio and he played piano in the house," he says. "But in actual fact, I can't remember him having one record, let alone lots. "

He says the songs that he grew up with that his father played, or that he listened to on the radio, affected his sense of song structure particularly the kind of chords he'd use in a song.

"I loved listening, as a kid, to him play the piano," McCartney says. "I can still remember now, sort of lying on the floor with my chin cupped in my hands, listening to him play. He played from another era songs from another era. One of my favorites he played was a song called 'Lullaby of the Leaves.' He used to play things by Paul Whiteman and his orchestra.

"So I loved all those songs," he says. "You know, I loved hearing him. And he would actually take me and my brother, and he would educate us in his own primitive way, because he didn't know how to read or write music. He'd learned by ear, but he was very musical. And so we'd be listening to the radio and he'd say, 'Can you hear that deep noise there?' He'd say, 'That's the bass.' So he'd pick out things for us to listen to. And he would sometimes show us how to do a harmony. He'd say, 'Now, here's a tune and this is the harmony to it.' So in The Beatles... In the early days of The Beatles, I was very keen on us doing harmonies, and I would have to put that down to him.

"I would always encourage The Beatles to do harmonies or, if John had a song, I would immediately harmonize to it. And you can hear that right the way through The Beatles' career," McCartney says. "I'm often harmonizing a third above John, or we're often harmonizing as a group. So I think my love of harmony came from him actually sitting my brother Mike and I down and saying, 'This is how it goes.'"


source:http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=1122234

Posted on Oct 31, 2012, 11:32 AM

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Lady Madonna and Bad Penny Blues

by Andy Vaaler

They say the piano part on McCartney's Lady Madonna was borrowed from a 1956 jazz record by Humphrey Lyttleton.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dY1O8YYjY2A

McCartney later said he was channeling Fats Domino on Madonna. Others say it was George Martin's doing because he was involved with both records.

Bad Penny Blues was one of those occasional jazz pop hits, thanks in part to Joe Meek's innovative work as recording engineer. Meek messed with the sound, and I guess that was very unorthodox for jazz recordings. And Joe Meek's story is interesting.

Posted on Nov 1, 2012, 4:52 PM

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Re: Paul Whiteman / Paul McCartney

by David Logue

My love of music can be initially traced to The Beatles as a toddler, but also my mom, who sadly passed away about two weeks ago.

She played piano and grew up during the big band era. Like McCartney, as I child I would sit at my mom's feet as she played everything from Gershwin to The Beatles.

She had a huge collection of sheet music dating back to the early 1900s that she acquired from her aunt. So I had an early exposure to a lot of wonderful music and it made me more receptive to the music of an earlier time than a lot of my friends.

Posted on Nov 2, 2012, 9:23 AM

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Signing off.

by

We already had a couple of short power outages. I am turning the computer off. I may be out for a couple of days, at least. I have never seen a storm of this magnitude. We survived Gloria, Irene and few others, but this one is something else. Our house is on the north shore of Suffolk County (a a mile and a half from the water), about 60 miles east of New York City.

Albert



Posted on Oct 29, 2012, 11:21 AM

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Electric power off.

by

Briefly firing up the generator, the hot water furnace and the computer. I have to economize on gas. All gas stations around here closed. 80 % of LIPA costumers (the company  that supplies electricity on Long Island) have lost power, about a million costumers are in the dark. Our neighborhood looks like several bombs hit it. One of my next door neighbors had a tree falling on the roof of his house which resulted in a huge hole. An enormous tree fell down the street about 50 yards from my home and brought down electric lines and transformers. Lots of huge branches came down in the front and back yards, but fortunately the house was spared. Power will not be restored for 10 days or more.

Will be checking in every few days.

Albert



Posted on Oct 31, 2012, 11:18 AM

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My Prayers Are With You

by

Albert, where I live in Philadelphia, lost power for about 15 hours. I walked the neighborhood and some trees down with
power lines taken down too. Worst storm I've seen in the 30 years I've lived in this neighborhood.

I hope you and yours will remain safe.

May God be with you.

Posted on Oct 31, 2012, 4:34 PM

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We are thinking of You

by Gerri Bowers

Albert, Rob and all our friends, we are thinking of you. Our prayers are with each of you. Stay safe.

Posted on Oct 31, 2012, 8:12 PM

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Glad you are ok, Albert...

by David Logue

I've been thinking about you and all the unfortunate people up and down the East Coast--particularly in the NY/NJ area--that were hard hit by Sandy. My thoughts and prayers are with all of you.



Posted on Nov 1, 2012, 5:40 AM

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Thanks to all for the kind words.

by

Things are getting worse. Most stores in the neighborhood closed, running out of supplies. One gas station open and the lines are amazing.

Manage to run the generator a couple of hours a day to get the furnace going to heat water for showers. The Coleman stove going and we can cook some hot meals. I have been cleaning back and front gardens for 5-6 hours every day and I have barely done 20 % of what is needed. Luckily, I bought a chain saw two weeks ago and I have used that with great success.  It is also getting cold and the weather man predicts temperatures in the 40s for the next few days.

My wife and I are fine. Thanks, fellow forumites. We appreciate the thoughts.

Albert 



Posted on Nov 1, 2012, 1:24 PM

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RE: Thanks

by

Albert, you are handling all this amazingly well. Our thoughts go out to you and your wife, but you are coping with it all well in such a way as to inspire us. After Irene you became an experienced hurricaner. They should now make you and all the Long Islanders honorary citizens of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast!

We can contribute to the Red Cross, but wish we could be there to lend an actual hand. Be careful, stay safe, and take care of yourself first and foremost.

Posted on Nov 2, 2012, 5:09 AM

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Thanks.

by

The generator conked out yesterday afternoon. It was an old thing I had bought when Gloria hit us in 1985. This morning I was in front of Home Depot at 6 am and was able to buy a new one. Brought it home and installed it. Fortunately, as a chemist who used a lot of modern instrumentation (not just test tubes and beakers), I am an expert electrician and I have the generator wired into the main of the house. So I get the furnace going, a light or two, charge the phone and turn on the computer. I have a couple of propane heaters and yesterday I bought a whole box of the chubby cylinders. It is getting cold around here. The problem is gasoline. No problem with food. As a chemist, I can cook good stuff on the Coleman stove.

Thanks, Glenda for the kind words. For a couple of octogenarians, my wife and I are doing reasonably well. Not to worry.

Albert



Posted on Nov 2, 2012, 2:34 PM

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Thinking of you

by

Albert, I was so relieved to see your communication to the forumites. So sorry you have to go through this and much heartfelt sympathy for all enduring on the east coast. I, too, wish I could be there to help. I do hope by next week's end you'll have the power on, and that you are getting needed supplies. With kindest wishes to you and your wife to stay safe and see this through --

Laura

Posted on Nov 2, 2012, 6:24 PM

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Please be careful!

by

Like many others here, I have been keeping you in my prayers! I like your attitude about it all BUT take it easy with that chainsaw! They can be dangerous, especially when one gets tired and it is hard work, so please pace yourself!
With concern,
Jim Petersen

Posted on Nov 2, 2012, 7:32 PM

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Hang In There, Professor

by

Glad your house was spared, but everything else that happened sounds scary enough. Nothing like a Storm of the Century to put one's priorities in order.

I hope life returns to normal very soon.

I checked with several New York friends: Vince G. said he was high and dry (not "Barbaric"!), with his thousands of stock arrangements all safe. We discussed the idea of bringing hurricane protection into the 21st century by Glad-Bagging whole buildings. Other NYC friends reported no major damage. Mews Small, who sings with me in Los Angeles, was in Newark, and spent four days in her power-outed hotel with no light but a hotel-supplied candle, to help navigate the stairs! With the elevators out, it must have been Halloween-surreal in those stairwells, with scores of candle-toting guests clambering up and down. You came closest to the edge of disaster of anyone I know.

persevere,

Brad K



Posted on Nov 2, 2012, 8:34 PM

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Thanks to all for your concern.

by

Considering what happened to other people on Long Island, we were very lucky: no personal or property damage. Still, things are difficult. This morning, beginning at 6:30 am, I drove around looking for a gas station that pumped gas. 80% were closed (no gas or no power) and the remaining had unbelievably long lines. I finally tried an out of the way station in Stony Brook Village and got on line. After three hours I came out with a tank full of gas and 10 gallons in cans for the generator. Food and water are not a problem around here. Almost 500,000 customers of LIPA (Long Island Power Authority) are still without electricity. My guess is another week without power. The new generator is aces, easy to start and fuel efficient.

The other big problem, in addition to gas  being scarce, is the weather. Getting really cold This morning, the thermometer outside the kitchen window read 30 F. I run the generator only two to three hours a day to conserve gas. When the generator is off, I heat a couple of rooms with the propane heaters. But these, although they provide a lot of heat, go the use propane tanks like if it was water.

Thanks, Jim, for the warning about chain saws. Indeed, I am extremely careful.  I learned safety as a chemistry researcher with lots of graduate students and postdocs in my labs: they were my responsibility. We only had one explosion in my 40-year research career, and ever since, I have been extremely careful with chemicals, electric equipment and power tools.

Thanks again to all. Not to worry. We are doing reasonably well. I fel sorry for those who lost their homes and don't have the resources that we have.

Until next time.

Albert



Posted on Nov 3, 2012, 1:36 PM

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Happy to hear from you

by Gerri Bowers

Albert, I'm so happy you are OK, and Vince is doing well. I'm worried about Rob. Have you heard from him?. I'm praying for everyone out on the east Coast. Heard from my niece and they are fine also. Just feel helpless here. Take care.

Posted on Nov 3, 2012, 5:53 PM

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Thank you for the good words, Gerri.

by

I have not heard from Rob. I got back electric power about two hours ago. Almost everything is  back to normal in my home. But many parts of Long Island are still in a very sorry state. I just talked to one of my neighbors around the corner, and he still has no power.

Take a look at the power situation for LIPA costumers as of Nov 3, 2012.

[linked image]

As of 10 minures ago, there were 320,000 customers without power. We were lucky again.

Albert



Posted on Nov 4, 2012, 2:09 PM

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I spoke too soon.

by

The power went out again. I am back on generator. This looks like a very limited problem. Only about five houses in the neighborhood, including ours, are out of power. The rest are on. It may take days for a service truck to come around for just a few houses. So things are not back to normal.

Albert



Posted on Nov 4, 2012, 4:00 PM

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Still on generator power.

by

I think it may be even next week befor powere is restored. Tomorrow, anothe Northeaster is visiting Long Island: gusts of 50-60 miles an hour predicted. I spend a lot of time on lines to get gas for the generator and refilling its tank. Jim, I turn it off before refilling. 

Albert

 



Posted on Nov 6, 2012, 11:15 AM

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Things are getting worse

by

40,000 additional costumers lost power as a consequence of the nor'easter that hit the area yesterday. Here in Stony Brook, we had a couple of inches of snow and strong winds. More down trees and electric wires.

Our life has become very primitive, one of survival. Since the house is all-electric (with an oil burner; no natural gas) and the temperature is around 32 F in the morning, I must keep the generator going 24/7. I spend two hours a day on lines getting gasoline for the generator. Another hour servicing the generator - changing oil, turning the power to the house off, filling the tank, reconnecting the output of the generator to the mains of the house. I used an old knife switch (I'll take a photo later today or tomorrow, something out of a Frankenstein movie).  Cooking is not much of a problem. All our appliances are electric so I do not use the electric stove to save on gasoline for the generator. I manage with a Coleman stove. But without an oven, my culinary skills are somewhat limited. I am not much into take out, prepared food or fast food restaurants. So we go out a few times to some of the good restaurants we have in the area, but the rest of the time it is back to the old Coleman stove.

With yesterday's strom and an additional 40,000 outages, the prospect of getting the power restored has gone down considerably. The priorities of LIPA are to make repairs to damaged equipment that will bring electricity back to large numbers of customers. The outage in my neighborhood affects only seven homes. With 200,000 LIPA costumers affected, what are the chances that power to seven littel homes will to be restored? There was a short in the electric line and the relay of the transformer that powers the seven homes tripped. The whole circuit that serves the seven homes is isolated from the rest of the neighborhood. A crew has to come to fix the short and reset the relay. A 15 minute job. But there is a huge branch hanging on the power line and protocol calls for the tree crew to come and remove the branch before the electric crew can do the repair.

I am in the middle of writing several articles, but I have been unable to concentrate. I listen to the news on the radio a lot and read a lot. So there is a bit more than just surviving, but not  much more. 

Albert



Posted on Nov 8, 2012, 5:42 AM

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Re: Things are getting worse

by Gerri Bowers

Oh Albert I'm so sorry. There isn't much we can do here but pray. All the people out East our in our prayers. Stay strong & safe.

Posted on Nov 8, 2012, 7:00 AM

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Re: Things....

by

Whatever you do, Albert, don't climb up that pole and reset that relay yourself.

I'm sure you could, but don't!

We're thinking of you and all those people in your area who are in even worse situations.

We all have too little appreciation of the joy of just plain ole' normal life!

Posted on Nov 8, 2012, 9:05 AM

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If travel weren't so difficult --

by

or impossible? from there right now, surely people (myself included) would be inviting you and your wife to stay with them until this awful thing is over with. Of course the important thing is to try to stay warm and not over-exert. We're so concerned sbout you, Albert. I wish there was some way to magically spirit you two to a comfortable place away from all that -- even our creaky old book-filled digs here in Pittsburgh -- but I assume you want to stay put even if the weather weren't so dangerous, to protect and heat the house for preventing water pipe damage.

Praying this will be fixed for you soon (one would think that fixing power for a mere seven residences would be such a simple and quick thing to do before going on to all the others --)

Please stay safe and think Zen, to keep the stress minimal.

Laura

Posted on Nov 8, 2012, 9:08 AM

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Hang in there, Albert!

by Rob Rothberg

There are no more storms in the immediate future and the tri-state area is packed with power crews from all over, so I am hopeful you'll get restored soon. Regards to Mima.

We just got power back last night. Thanks to both of you and Gerri for thinking of us.

Posted on Nov 8, 2012, 1:39 PM

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Praying for Power

by Chris Barry

Albert, hope your situation improves quickly. This is a time when the phrase "warm wishes" has new meaning. Hang in there!

Posted on Nov 8, 2012, 8:44 PM

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Thanks to all for the good wishes.

by

Not to worry. I am a tough old bird, and as long as the house is warm and the refrigerator cold, we are fine.

Today gas stations will implement a rule of odd/even plate numbers to distribute gas. Both my cars end with even numbers! I believe people who fill gas cans are not included. As long as I can get my two 5-gallon cans filled every day, I am on easy street.

Time to go out and refill the generator.

Thanks again to all.

Albert

 



Posted on Nov 9, 2012, 5:17 AM

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Again, I spoke too soon!

by

As I was going out the door to get gas,  a service truck pulled in. The service men were from Buffalo, helping out the local guys. Within 15 minutes, they took care of the short, added a piece of wire to the connection from the pole to my house and reset the relay.

We are in business.

Thanks again to all who wrote.

Albert



Posted on Nov 9, 2012, 6:46 AM

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Glad you're back!

by John Leifert

Hi Albert - on Staten Island, my neighborhood lost electricity for 36 hours, but we never had a drop of water in the basement! (Unlike the unfortunate folks who live in places like Midland Beach, South Beach, etc. on Staten Island - I am sure you've seen their plight on television and the internet..) We still do not have Time Warner cable tv or land-line telephone - after two weeks! It took me a week to get back to the office, as we are in the "blackout" zone of Lower Manhattan (Tribeca, on the Lower West Side by the Holland Tunnel, which was closed for nearly a week and a half). Trying times, but we're all getting through it as best we can.

John L

Posted on Nov 13, 2012, 11:02 AM

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Nightmare

by

Thanks, John.

Considering what other folks had to go through, our plight seems a piece of cake. Fortunately, neither you nor we suffered personal and property damage. Others lost their homes and dear ones. Close to home, Long Island was devastated. And there are still homes without electric power.

Albert



Posted on Nov 13, 2012, 11:32 AM

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The Generator and the Knife Switch

by

The Generator kept us nice and warm.

[linked image]

The knife switch saved me several trips from the garden shed where I keep the generator to the basement of my house where the main electric panel with connections to the rest of the house and circuit breakers is located. The three connections at the top of the switch are the output (240 volts) of the generator. The three connections at the bottom go to an underground cable that goes from the shed to the basement of the house. It is curious that the 240 volt output of the generator does not come with a cable and switch. I guess every installation is different and they just provide a receptacle.

[linked image]

It all worked like a charm, except for the daily two-hour lines in search of gasoline.

That's it. I will not bore you any longer with my difficulties during the power outage.

Albert



Posted on Nov 9, 2012, 11:42 AM

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Gil Evans' "Davenport Blues"

by

This is my favorite "modernist" version of this great Bix composition. Beautiful trumpet solo by Johnny Coles.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYnal9m50xo

Posted on Oct 28, 2012, 9:11 AM

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Davenport Blues

by Laura Demilio

That's terrific! Usuallly I get glum about the affectations of 50's-style jazz, but I like the panache of this.

Laura

Posted on Oct 29, 2012, 7:32 AM

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I like this modern version as well

by

I like this version and the way they sprinkled in the phrase from "I'm Coming (Home) Virginia". The visual part is also interesting and thanks again to my friend Lisa Ryan (who is no doubt thrilled with her baseball Giants World series win!) who put it all together.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpIZde7lVoY&feature=channel

Jim Petersen

Posted on Oct 29, 2012, 10:50 AM

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Re: I like this modern version as well

by alex revell

Alex and Fred. Much missed.

Posted on Oct 31, 2012, 2:37 AM

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WBIX # 204

by

 
Radio Program # 204. (loaded on 10/26/2012) Paul Whiteman's Commercial Recordings of Numbers He Played at the Feb 12, 1924 Aeolian Hall Concert, "An Experiment in Modern Music." 76 min 10 sec

Real Audio Streaming audio file.  Download file.   18.7 M  

mp3 files  
Streaming file     http://bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX204.m3u     
Download file     
bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX204.mp3     34.8 MB

All recordings by Paul Whiteman, except Kitten on the Keys and To A Wild Rose..

Mamma Loves Papa.  Oct 29, 1923..
Whispering.  Aug 23, 1920.
Limehouse Blues. Jan 22, 1924.
I Love You. Sep 20, 1923.
Raggedy Ann. Oct 30, 1923.
Kitten On the Keys. Zez Confrey. May 4, 1922.
A Suite of Serenades. Parts 1 and 2. Jun 12, 1924.
Pale Moon. Apr 8, 1924.
To A Wild Rose. Chester Hazlett, May 9, 1929.
Chansonette. Paul Whiteman. Apr 29, 1927.
Rhapsody in Blue.  Jun 10, 1924..

WBIX # 205 will be uploaded on Nov 30, 2012.

Enjoy!

Albert



Posted on Oct 26, 2012, 11:01 AM

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I hate to do this to you again …

by Mark Gabrish Conlan

but there are some glitches in your latest WBIX post. The opening of the "Rhapsody in Blue" cuts off and then the piece starts again, and there's an awfully long gap of silence between the two parts of the "Rhapsody" recording. Other than that, this is an excellent compilation and you must have worked hard on it. Many of the pieces (especially "A Suite of Serenades" and "Raggedy Ann") are played considerably better on these original recordings than they were on Maurice Peress's re-creation of the concert (which you mentioned in your announcement and which I have on the original cassettes). Thank you once again for another great WBIX program!

Posted on Oct 27, 2012, 2:14 PM

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Thank you.

by

I don't mind at all. On the contrary: I am glad to see that at least one person listens to the WBIX programs. I will fix the Rhapsody in Blue file and re-upload the rm and mp3 files. Give me one day.  If I can't do it tomorrow, it may be several days. Sandy is visiting Long Island and the power company predicts that we may be one week without electricity.

Albert



Posted on Oct 27, 2012, 2:56 PM

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The original wave file was fixed.

by

I then created new rm and mp3 files and uploaded them.

Let me know if there are any other glitches that need repair.

Albert



Posted on Oct 28, 2012, 7:57 AM

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Thanks once again!

by

Thank you again for this fascinating WBIX episode, and I'm really glad you made it through Sandy O.K. Now, just one question: why did you include the Whiteman recording of "I Love You," a song he didn't play at the Aeolian Hall concert (at least according to Maurice Peress's reconstruction), and not his recording of "Linger Awhile," which he DID play at the concert?

Posted on Nov 4, 2012, 11:15 AM

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Hazel Green and Company - Great!!

by

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOowo896HLw

From the imdb website

Hazel Green & Company (1927)
8 min  -  Short | Music  -   September 1927 (USA)
 
Cast overview:
  Hazel Green ...
Herself
  Joe Lacurta ...
Himself - Tap Dancer
  The Vitaphone Symphony Orchestra ...
Themselves
  Arthur Kay ...
Himself - Conductor of Vitaphone Orchestra

 



Posted on Oct 25, 2012, 5:49 AM

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This is on the 2007 "The Jazz Singer" deluxe box set

by

I love these Vitaphone shorts! The deluxe box set of 1927's the Jazz Singer, released as an 80th anniversary tribute, includes some other Jolson talkie shorts, instructional films current to those days of how talkie movies were made, and these fabulous Vitaphones with vivacious Hazel Green and her cute musicians, playing with such verve -- she just exudes so much cheerfulness and joy, proving how attractive a plump lady could be, even in those stringbean-thin flapper days of fashion. Very enjoyable!


Spend the dough on the deluxe box set -- it's worth every penny, honest, despite the cringingly mawkish aspects of the Jazz Singer film itself -- all the "bells and whistles" which are included in this package make for a week's worth of entertainment, selecting something to watch every evening. It's truly like being drawn into a 1926-27 time capsule.

Laura

Posted on Oct 25, 2012, 10:05 AM

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More comments on Hazel Green

by

A while ago I checked out the "Jazz Singer" boxed set from the local library and watched some of the shorts included as bonus items, including the one featuring Hazel Green. Here's what I had to say about it at the time (notice I was particularly impressed with her dancing):

Hazel Green and Company turned out to feature Hazel Green (who knew?), a zaftig performer who proved to be a surprisingly agile dancer for someone of her weight, even though I suspect her voice was considerably bigger than it appeared here. I suspect the Vitaphone technicians told her to suppress it and sing more softly than usual to avoid either overloading the recording or blowing the microphones, with the result that her band frequently drowned her out. (Remember that these Vitaphone shorts, essentially the first music videos, were films of on-the-spot live performances, with no pre-recording or post-production remixing possible; what went on the Vitaphone record during filming was what the audience heard.)

Posted on Oct 27, 2012, 2:51 PM

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