The Bixography Discussion Group

A vehicle for Bixophiles and other interested individuals to ask questions, make comments and exchange information about Bix Beiderbecke and related subjects. Any views expressed in the Bixography Forum represent solely the opinions of those expressing them and are not necessarily endorsed or opposed by Albert Haim unless he has signed the message.

I started archiving some of the threads that have been inactive for some time. The archived threads can be found at http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/archivesforum.htm

Albert Haim

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The musicians in the Oct 1924 Sam Lanin Band and Bix

by

The Oct 8, 1924 issue of Variety included a review of Sam Lanin's Roseland Orchestra.

http://ia601803.us.archive.org/BookReader/BookReaderImages.php?zip=/1/items/variety76-1924-10/variety76-1924-10_jp2.zip&file=variety76-1924-10_jp2/variety76-1924-10_0125.jp2

The musicians in the band are listed in the article. Note the number of guys with connections to Bix: Vic Berton, Ray Lodwig, Ed Sheasly [sic], Joe Tarto.

Another connection: in the review of  Jan Garber's band, there is mention of a "robust jovial chap." That is Harry "Goldie" Goldfield who was a member of Whiteman's orchestra at the same time as Bis.

Note also, in the right-hand bottom corner, an announcement of the

There is a review of  Benny Krueger's band. I did not know that Red Nichols was, at one time (Oct 1924), a member of Krueger's band. i wonder if Red Nichols is one the trumpet players in the Oct 28, 1924 Krueger recording of  "He's the Hottest Man in Town."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fu4dSPQEKUA

Red had recorded the tune with George Olsen a few months earlier.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=71PucbLoPbk

Note also on the bottom right-hand corner the announcement of the Oct 11, 1924 opening of  Harold Oxley's band at "Cinderella Dancing". That day was the last appearance of Bix with the Wolverines.

Just one page of Variety and look at all the connections to Bix. Bix was already quite an important presence in the jazz scene of 1924.

Albert



Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 9:39 AM

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Bix in "Jazz Standards on Record, 1900-1942, A Core Repertory" ....

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.... by Richard Crawford and Jeffrey Magee lists 21 Bix recordings in their list of "Jazz Standards." Only commercially issued recordings. Hence, the Wolverines' "Tiger Rag" is not included.

Margie - Bix and His Gang

Royal Garden Blues - Wolverine Orchestra

Royal Garden Blues - Bix and His Gang

The Jazz Me Blues - Wolverine Orchestra

The Jazz Me Blues - Bix and His Gang

Ol' Man River - Bix and His Gang

Ol' Man River - Paul Whiteman

Somebody Stole My Gal - Bix and His Gang

San - Paul Whiteman

Sugar - Paul Whiteman

Coquette - Paul Whiteman (Coquette, a jazz standard?)

Sweet Sue - Paul Whiteman

China Boy - Paul Whiteman

My Melancholy Baby - Paul Whiteman

Clarinet Marmalade - Frank Trumbauer

Way Down Yonder in New Orleans - Frank Trumbauer

A Good Man Is Hard To Find - Frank Trumbauer

Baby Won't You Please Come Home - Frank Trumbauer

I'm Coming Virginia - Frank Trumbauer

Rockin' Chair - Hoagy Carmichael

Georgia On My Mind - Hoagy Carmichael

Albert



Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 7:09 AM

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What?

by

No "Singin' the Blues"?

Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 7:24 AM

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Not a "Jazz Standard" in the opinion of ...

by

.... Crawford and Magee. As a matter of fact, Lord only lists about a dozen recordings of "Singin' the Blues" up to 1942.  Remember that the title of the book is "Jazz Standards on Record, 1900-1942: A Core Repertory."

Albert



Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 7:48 AM

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Idiots!

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"Singin' the Blues" not a jazz standard? Hasn't it paid its dues yet? Seems like SOMEBODY plays it at every jazz festival I've been to.

If "Baby Won't You Please Come Home" and "Way Down Yonder in New Orleans" qualify, then so does "STB." Case closed.

Ninety years in solitary for Crawford and Magee!

-Brad K

Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 10:00 AM

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still singin'

by hal smith

looks like singin' the blues will be singin' the blue until it becomes a standard

Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 1:03 PM

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"Singin' the Blues" not included either in ....

by

.... the website http://www.jazzstandards.com/ (I believe this is Chris Tyle's site; at least he has lots of contributions)

And Chris Tyle and Jeffrey McGee are certainly a well-respected jazz scholars, not idiots. At least, I have great admiration for their contributions to jazz history.

One of the two sources I cited restrict jazz recordings to 1900-1942. And perhaps, both restrict their attention to compositions that became jazz standards in the period ending with the beginning of World War II. There are about a dozen recordings of the tune in the 1920s and 1930s. Thus, maybe it does not fulfill one of the requirements for a "jazz standard," e.g., widely recorded in 1920-1940.

Albert

Albert



Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 1:56 PM

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"Singin' the Blues" not included either in ....

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.... American Popular Song: The Great Innovators by Alec Wilder. But one could argue that "Singin' the Blues" is not a popular song but a jazz number.

Albert


Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 2:14 PM

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Re: Popular Songs

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I agree with you Albert. American popular songs came our way from, very often, the great Hollywood musicals via Tin Pan Alley.
Jazz numbers are somewhat different. I have yet to pass by someone in the street whistling Bix's famous chorus from "Singin' the Blues". Although I have to admit I have done it myself once or twice.

Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 7:58 PM

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Standard definition

by Nick Dellow



"Singin' The Blues" seems to have fallen under some sort of numerical cut-off point! I counted 11 commercially issued recordings of the number up to 1940, while the majority of other titles in the list were recorded at least 20 times during the period under discussion. That's a shame, because I'm sure "Singin' The Blues" would have been regarded as a "jazz standard" by the mid-1930s, certainly amongst jazz musicians, both in the USA and elsewhere (Nat Gonella recorded a version in 1936 in London, though my favourite is Adrian Rollini's, recorded in New York in 1938).

The Wolverines' "Copenhagen" surely should be listed!! I counted at least 35 commercial recordings of the title within the period 1924-1940. There are a number of recordings made in 1924, at least 4 in 1925, 2 in 1929 and many more waxed in the mid to late 1930s after it was "revived", becoming a standard number within the repertoire of bands.

The term "jazz standard" is obviously a subjective (and dynamic) one!



Posted on Feb 24, 2014, 3:52 AM

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Beiderbecke- Armstrong

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I read the other day, in internet, that Beiderbecke & Armstrong played together, in a studio. As in that period of time , segregation, did not allow them to play together in public, they called on the studio, and played. No record, pics taken. Nothing at all?

I told a friend about that, she asked details..I cannot find the site anymore.
Can you help me?

Posted on Feb 22, 2014, 1:17 PM

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Welcome to the Bixography Forum.

by

I am afraid I don't know of any studio session of Bix and Louis. What is well-documented is a visit of Bix and other Whiteman musicians to the Sunset Cafe in Chicago in July 1928 for a jam session. See Evans and Evans, p. 384.

I would be skeptical of internet accounts unless they are confirmed by independent and reliable documentation. There is an incredible number of inaccuracies about Bix floating in the internet. I have tried to debunk some of these, but sometimes I feel it is a losing battle. Often I send a correction to the webmaster of a website and my mail is ignored.

Albert



Posted on Feb 22, 2014, 2:16 PM

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Game of "Gossip?"

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It seems that Bix and Armstrong recorded in Chicago for Okeh at different times on the same day. Bix recorded with Trumbauer in Chicago on July 5 and July 7, 1928, when Armstrong was in town. Perhaps in the way of humans, the story began with that factoid and grew from there.

In the way that Condon and Teagarden's "Knockin' a Jug" session came about at the time Armstrong was scheduled to record with Lang and Luis Russell's band (Louis did that session, the famous "Mahogany Hall Stomp" and "I Can't Give You Anything But Love" later that day), perhaps there was some wishful thinking that Bix and Louis could have done the same switch that day in Chicago.

Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 5:50 AM

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Sophie Tucker and Her Five Kings of Syncopation in a ....

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.... broadcasting studio in 1922.

Courtesy of Mark Berresford, with his permission. Thanks, Mark.

Albert



Posted on Feb 21, 2014, 10:25 AM

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The last of the Red Hot...

by Don House

Is that a young Richard Himber on Violin?

Posted on Feb 21, 2014, 3:57 PM

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Richard Himber did play violin as one of the ....

by

.... Five Kings of Syncopation with Sophie Tucker, but I believe it was earlier than 1922. Here is a photo of Himber

[linked image]

Doesn't look to me like the violinist in the photo in the broadcast studio, but that photo is of limited quality and it may be hard to say definitely.

Albert



Posted on Feb 22, 2014, 6:14 AM

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According to amazon.com, ....

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.... this photo was taken in 1922 at a radio station in Arlington, Virginia.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 22, 2014, 6:40 AM

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It's ALIVE! IT'S ALIVE!!!

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The scene in the top picture lacks only a few Tesla sparks and Boris Karloff stretched out on a table.

-Brad

Posted on Feb 22, 2014, 6:11 PM

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According to Mark ....

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.... this is the band in the Sophie Tucker picture - Eddie Richmond , trumpet, Bobby Jones, sax, Irving Rothschild, violin, Jules Buffano, piano and leader, Danny Alvin, drums, Al Beilan, vocal.

Albert



Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 6:27 AM

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My Review of the Giordano-Peress Recreation of "An Experiment in Modern American Music."

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http://bixbeiderbecke.com/ReviewRecreationAeolianHallConcert.html

Albert





Posted on Feb 21, 2014, 7:16 AM

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Reminder, Saturday to Monday, 92nd St Y.

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The 92nd St. Y's Lyrics and Lyricists SeriesbyAlbert Haim

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22

8:00 p.m.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23

2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24

2:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

 

The 92nd St. Y's Lyrics and Lyricists Series

presents

 

SWEEPIN' THE CLOUDS AWAY:

Boom, Bust and High Spirits

 

featuring

Vince Giordano's Nighthawks

Christine Andreas

Klea Blackhurst

Erin Dilly

John Treacy Egan

Jason Graae

 

Robert Kimball, artistic director and host

Peter Yarin and Vince Giordano, co-music directors

 

The Gershwins, Cole Porter, Duke Ellington, Eubie Blake - these and other star songwriters created the best toe-tapping, mood-busting, uplifting music ever written - in the heart of the Great Depression, just when people needed it most.

 

The 92nd St. Y

1395 Lexington Ave.

New York, NY

 

Tickets/Info: (212) Y-CHARGE or http://www.92y.org/Uptown/Event/L-L-Sweepin-the-Clouds-Away.aspx

 

 

I attended a couple of the Lyrics and Lyricists concerts in the past. Highly recommended.                                                                         

Albert                                                                                                                                                              

 



Posted on Feb 18, 2014, 2:52 PM

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Tomorrow, I'll be in the Big Apple.

by

Leaving mid morning and returning late evening.

Albert

Posted on Feb 23, 2014, 12:31 PM

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Back home.

by

I attended the 2 pm "Lyrics and Lyricists" concert at the 92nd St. Y. First-class show, excellent singers, great songs from the late 1920s and early 1930s and the incomparable Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks. Life is good.

I will write a review in the next few days.

Albert



Posted on Feb 24, 2014, 4:42 PM

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turntables

by hal smith

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LXNXJD5F0r4

Posted on Feb 17, 2014, 1:00 PM

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lp records

by hal smith

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hPkmgWlYps

Posted on Feb 17, 2014, 12:59 PM

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another look

by

This is a "Command Performance" wartime video on how 78 rpm shellac records were made. It's an interesting counterpoint to the above video on the manufacture of vinyl LP's.

https://archive.org/details/CommandP1942

Posted on Feb 18, 2014, 2:58 PM

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RE: Another Look

by

Marc Conlan, thanks for those very interesting films.

Except for the flashbacks the 1942 film engendered to the dozens of "Encylopaedia Britannica Educational Films" (announced in those stentorian tones they used to favor) that I watched in elementary school days, there were actually more similarities than I expected between the making of the shellac 78s and the LP vinyl records. The mastering process was similar, and both materials came to the stamping as "biscuits." Both films foster appreciation of those impressive technologies.

Posted on Feb 18, 2014, 4:14 PM

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player piano

by hal smith

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i3FTaGwfXPM&list=PL859927996B357787

Posted on Feb 17, 2014, 12:57 PM

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Thanks for posting

by

Very enlightening, especially how they got their name! Still in business, apparently.

Posted on Feb 18, 2014, 6:31 AM

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annie cousin fanny

by hal smith

Glenn Miller had to have a good sense of humor too write this http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cJDLsRpj5_I this is different then the brunswick

Posted on Feb 16, 2014, 11:07 AM

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An Addition to Don Rayno's Whiteman Chronology

by

According to The Collegian, University of Richmond, Vol XIV, No. 14, Jan 13, 1928, Paul Whiteman's orchestra provided music at the Jan 7, 1928 dance in the Westhampton Hotel, Richmond VA.

 http://collegian.richmond.edu/cgi-bin/richmond?a=d&d=COL19280113.2.5&srpos=1&dliv=none&e=-------id-20--1--txt-IN-%22paul+whiteman%22----

According to Rayno's chronology, Whiteman recorded for Victor on Jan 4, 1928 and attended a dinner in honor of William Morris at the Commodore Hotel in New York on Jan 9, 1928. Whiteman and his orchestra had time to go to Richmond after the Jan 4, 1928 recording session and be back in New York for the dinner on Jan 9, 1928.

Albert


Posted on Feb 15, 2014, 4:57 PM

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Re: Whiteman's 4th January 1928 session

by

One of the selections done on the 4th January 1928, "Lonely Melody" found Bix at the peak of his brilliant and creative best on record with Whiteman.
Of takes 1 and 3 kept from that day, it's impossible for the listener to say which is the preferred of the two. And Bix gets some great backing from Steve Brown on string bass. A great loss to the Orchestra when Steve left Whiteman a couple of month's later.
I first heard "Lonely Melody" nearly 60 years ago yet still never tire of listening to Bix's lovely improvisations on these two takes.

Posted on Feb 16, 2014, 8:13 AM

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Re: Whiteman's 4th January 1928 session

by David Sager

I agree, wholeheartedly. Also, we should not overlook the Trumbauer-inspired saxophone soli that follows.

Posted on Feb 16, 2014, 8:55 AM

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Paul Whiteman in the Grammy Hall of Fame

by

From http://www.grammy.org/recording-academy/awards/hall-of-fame

GERSHWIN: RHAPSODY IN BLUE
George Gershwin, Piano With Paul Whiteman, cond.
Victor (1927)
Traditional Pop (Single)
Inducted 1974

OL' MAN RIVER
Paul Robeson With Paul Whiteman & His Concert Orchestra
Victor (1928)
Traditional Pop (Single)
Inducted 2006

WHISPERING
Paul Whiteman And His Orchestra

Victor (1920)
Traditional Pop (Single)
Inducted 1998

Rhapsody in Blue (the 1924 arrangement) and Whispering were played by Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks at the Feb 12, 2014 recreation of Whiteman's Aeolian concert of Feb 12, 1924. It was a fantastic performance, authentic and fresh as if these numbers were brand new.

Albert



Posted on Feb 17, 2014, 5:52 PM

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Bix in the Grammy Hall of Fame.

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IN A MIST
Bix Beiderbecke
Okeh (1927)
Jazz (Single)
Inducted 1980

SINGIN' THE BLUES
Frankie Trumbauer And His Orchestra Featuring Bix Beiderbecke On Cornet

Okeh (1927)
Jazz (Single)
Inducted 1977

GEORGIA (ON MY MIND)
Hoagy Carmichael And His Orchestra
Victor (1930)
(Single)
Inducted 2014

Bix not explicitly cited in the latter, but he was one of the members of the orchestra.

Albert



Posted on Feb 18, 2014, 10:19 AM

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Speaking of Bix and "Singin' the Blues."

by

Warren Vache in the Washington Post of Jan 15, 1990.

"If Bix {Beiderbecke} was lyrical, Louis {Armstrong} was dynamite," said cornetist Warren Vache at Baird Auditorium last night. Along with clarinetist Ken Peplowski and a seasoned rhythm section, Vache illustrated the point by juxtaposing a languid version of "Singin' the Blues" and the brash "Struttin' With Some Barbecue." Later, the quintet hit upon something approaching a blend of the two styles with an easy arrangement of Armstrong's "Someday You'll Be Sorry."

Playing cornet throughout, Vache was better equipped to evoke Beiderbecke's generous tone and warmth than Armstrong's trumpet fireworks, even though the concert featured a bit of both. During the second half of the program, Beiderbecke's influence on Vache-specifically, keen attention to tone and phrasing-was unmistakable as the cornetist delivered an exquisitely tender reading of the Johnny Mandel reverie "A Time for Love."

The entire evening wasn't devoted to brass, however. Peplowski's neo-traditionalist flair on clarinet and tenor sax was displayed during neatly woven ensemble passages and tailor-made solo arrangements, along with the collaborative verve of pianist John Bunch, bassist Frank Tate and drummer John Paul Biagi.

Albert



Posted on Feb 18, 2014, 2:43 PM

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Bix, cool?

by

The Smithsonian Insitute came up with 100 American cool people. Bix is one of them. A few links.

- http://npg.si.edu/exhibit/cool/index.html  The home page

- http://npg.si.edu/exhibit/cool/American%20Cool%20Exhibition%20List.pdf  The list

- http://tinyurl.com/mpoh3gy The QC article

In my opinion, Bix was not cool. I disagree with the criteria that make a person cool listed by the Smithsonian. An incredibly long discussion about Bix being or not being cool took place in the forum several years ago. See the thread

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1261141547/WaPo+on+%26quot;The+Birth+(And+Death)+of+the+Cool%26quot;

Albert



Posted on Feb 15, 2014, 8:54 AM

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Cool means different things in the US

by

depending on when and where you grew up. Perhaps the people who put together the exhibition were using it in the sense of "having it all together, being confident and powerful without being overpowering, being somewhat laid-back while still commanding attention". That's sort of what I think of when I think of cool, but there are many MANY people on that list who do not fit that description. James Brown screaming "I feel good" at the top of his lungs doesn't fit that description to me. Nor does Jimi Hendrix or Gene Krupa or Elvis or Bessie Smith. Well, I guess Bessie had to shout because there were no microphones; on second thought she was cool.

I have no idea what I may have thought before, but I don't really know Bix enough to judge whether he was cool. Probably laid back, according to all accounts, but in command? I don't know. Certainly he was in command when he was playing in small groups, but he seems swimming upstream sometimes in those big arrangements where he only gets to be heard for 4 or 8 bars. (Sometimes I can't believe I spent all my babysitting money, even going into debt, to buy LPs where my hero could only be heard for a handful of notes at at time, if at all.)

The people who arranged the exhibit get high marks for diversity and for showing us a lot of good photos, but I'll have to check out the exhibit to see if it's any good. Luckily I'm in the neighborhood, and it's free.



Posted on Feb 15, 2014, 11:24 AM

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Re: What Is "Cool?"

by

I found some echoes of well-known descriptions of Bix's music in the statement by the Smithsonian:

"Someone cool has a charismatic edge and a dark side. Cool is an earned form of individuality.

Each generation has certain individuals who bring innovation and style to a field of endeavor while projecting a certain charismatic self-possession."


I keep hearing Johnny Wiggs' words: "Bix pulled his style right out of the sky." And "I'm sorry, folks, but the only one I ever heard who did not copy other people was Bix." Then there's Dave Frishberg's song, "Dear Bix," which says "You're no ordinary run-of-the-mill Bb kind of guy," and "You're one of the favored few, dear Bix. You're one of a kind." I see that uniqueness as the essence of cool.


Posted on Feb 15, 2014, 7:42 PM

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I disagree with the Smithsonian definition of what makes a person "cool."

by

In one of my postings in the long thread cited previously, I wrote:

"To me, a cool guy is supremely confident and gregarious, his life is focused in the external world, not in his internal life. A cool guy is not consumed by a passion for his chosen field of endeavor; on the contrary, his life is filled with superficial fun. My vision of a cool guy is Paul Newman in "Hud." Although Bix was friendly, I doubt that he was gregarious. Bix was consumed by his passion for music, almost to the exclusion of other activities - several people who knew Bix are witnesses of Bix's fascination, perhaps obsession, with music."

Albert



Posted on Feb 16, 2014, 11:10 AM

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Not Cool?

by

I never thought of "cool" as describing the "Hail fellow, well met" sort. I think it came to mean someone who pursues his own vision regardless of popular opinion and thereby does it so inventively that it becomes admired and perhaps ultimately acclaimed. It is the one who marches to that different drummer and winds up leading the parade.

Posted on Feb 16, 2014, 12:31 PM

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Re: not cool

by Laura Demilio

Beautifully said, Glenda!

Laura

Posted on Feb 16, 2014, 7:24 PM

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That's COLD, man.

by

Your definition of "cool" sounds more like Babbitt than Bix.

People who are focused on the external world, who lack real passion and thrive on superficial fun are the boosters, the high-school football heroes, the prom queens, the rat-racers, the targeted consumers of the world. They have nothing to be cool about. They have nothing to be cool WITH. They can all go to hell.

A truly cool person is one who has SOMETHING to be cool about, and he doesn't advertise. Imagine Bix carrying on like Cassius Clay:

I am the GREATEST! Float like a Butterfly! Sting like a bee! That Emmett Hardy? He's TOAST! McPartland? GET REAL! Secrest? That M************ toady who copies all my moves?? GIMMEE A BREAK! They can all kiss my Teutonic Toadstool! I! AM! THE! GREATEST!!!!"

My impression of the real Bix is the diametric opposite of the above. He didn't wear his talent on his sleeve. He kept it under wraps until it was called for, then he blindsided everybody. Nobody that knew him could peg him. He was a mystery. Bix was WAY cool.

-Brad K



Posted on Feb 16, 2014, 7:36 PM

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Re: Cool!

by

You nailed it, Brad Kay. Bix was an original, one of a kind.

Heck, Bix didn't even copy HIMSELF. (Listen to his solos on the two pressings of "Lonely Melody" for just one example.)

He created a unique pitch-perfect, sweet and hot style "right out of the sky" that became the benchmark. "Ain't nobody played like him yet," but not for lack of trying. He practically held the patent on the small band trad jazz ensemble form that became the benchmark to this day. He created the concept of the iconic incisive, hit-making solo for big bands, and up to his last days he was re-inventing himself as a composer. People are still being struck dumb hearing just a few of his notes.

WAY COOL!



Posted on Feb 17, 2014, 9:10 AM

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Cool not cold

by Nick Dellow


I rather like the late Richard Sudhalter's rationale as to why Bix might be considered "cool" as a musician, or at least why Bix's approach was to a certain degree empathetic with the post-War "cool school":-


"....Bix, by contrast, tended to strike his notes, hold them, almost without vibrato for much of their length, then add a slower (than Armstrong), also relatively narrow, pulsation at their end. The resultant feeling of cool, of great emotion held firmly in check behind a dam, found its echo in later years in the cool school of modern jazz soloists of the 1950s." Storyville Magazine, October-November 1971, issue 37.


Interestingly, Bix's approach echoes the approach of the neo-romantic and impressionist composers of the late 19th and early 20th century (who, as we know, Bix admired), especially those who drew inspiration from folk music. Dvorak absorbed folk influences and so did Delius (both were strongly influenced by Afro-American folk music), while Debussy found inspiration in Javanese gamelan music. Ravel too used folk-like melodies. Their interpretations redefined the visceral emotion of the original folk music, and through this process of interpretation their music could be defined as "cool". A generation later, Bix found inspiration through listening to Bessie Smith and Ethel Waters and reinterpreted their "folk" music.

Ultimately, it is difficult to define "cool", since the word in its vernacular sense means different things to different people, but it is, at its very least, the application of intelligence to redefine what are otherwise basic emotions. In doing so, the emotive message is not necessarily lost - sometimes, in fact, it is enhanced.




Posted on Feb 17, 2014, 2:30 PM

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Cool is in the eye of the beholder.

by

Therefore, we will never agree. The subject has attracted the attention of academics and here is an article published in the Journal of Individual Differences, 2012; Vol. 33(3):175185, available online.

http://www.academia.edu/1517960/Coolness_An_Empirical_Investigation

For current young people, the characteristics of "cool" are attractive, confident and successful. Not very different ofromwhat I wrote in one of my previous postings: "To me, a cool guy is supremely confident and gregarious, his life is focused in the external world, not in his internal life."

I insist, someone who has a passion in any endeavor cannot be cool by definition, in my book. Bix was consumed by his music and thus, as an individual, he was not a cool dude.

The other question addressed by several of you has to do with the question of Bix's music. Was Bix's jazz cool? That was discussed in such a vigorous and lengthy manner, that I refer you to the previous threads.

Albert

PS Where would you guys be if you did not have me to straighten you out? happy.gif



Posted on Feb 18, 2014, 9:40 AM

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Re: Cool is in the eye of the beholder.

by Nick Dellow


I'm sorry to say that I don't quite understand your assumption that someone who has a passion in any endeavour cannot be "cool".

In the article you cite, Dar-Nimrod et al. state that one common interpretation of a "cool" person is someone who is portrayed as "rebellious, rough, and emotionally controlled". Does "emotionally controlled" mean that someone thus defined as "cool" lacks passion? I don't think so. Such a person might not display emotion in an open, unconditional or uncontrolled way (except under provocation), but that certainly doesn't mean that he/she lacks underlying passion. As Sudhalter reiterates in "Lost Chords", when talking about Bix's "Singin' The Blues" solo: "Beiderbecke's restraint emphasizes the layered richness of emotions held in check". Yet Bix was still passionate about music.

Going back to your assertion that someone who has a passion in any endeavour cannot be "cool", I could cite several examples that would seem to contradict that viewpoint. For instance, Clint Eastwood is considered to be "cool" within the arbitrary boundaries of that fickle term, but he is intensely passionate about acting and movie-making. Charlie Parker, the subject of his movie "Bird", was also considered "cool" but again he was passionate about jazz and was certainly "consumed by his music" even though he was eventually consumed by substance abuse. So surely one can be passionate and still be "cool"; it's just that the expression of that passion tends to be "held in check", which goes back to Sudhalter's comment about Bix and why Bix's playing could be construed as being "cool". The label certainly doesn't make him less passionate.







Posted on Feb 19, 2014, 2:39 AM

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Bix and Louis, "hot" and "cool"

by

We can get into a lot of arguments about what constitutes "cool." I tend to think more about "hot" and "cool" as they've come to be used in the jazz world. A "hot" musician is one who plays in a directly emotional style and reaches for intensity. A "cool" musician is one who is gentler, more reflective, more playful, more inclined to dazzle you with wry comments than direct emotional statements. If those are the criteria, Louis Armstrong is the model of the "hot" jazz musician and Bix the model of the "cool" one.

I could certainly pick apart the Smithsonian's list (they seemed to be more interested in "cool" as an image projection; in musical terms, James Brown was "hot" and Marvin Gaye was "cool"), but they do remind us that the term "cool" was coined by Lester Young -- and it would be hard to find another jazz musician who didn't actually play with Bix that was more Bix-connected than Lester Young. Young took a copy of the Bix-Frank Trumbauer record of "Singin' the Blues" with him virtually everywhere he went (at least that's the legend) and he always named Trumbauer as his one and only influence.

Posted on Feb 19, 2014, 3:48 PM

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School of "Cool"

by

"Cool" is clearly one of those terms that has generational, gender, and cultural roots, and its meaning can vary is seriousness according to the speaker and situation, right down to its common use as a ubiquitous synonym for "good." Cool is like the Supreme Court justice's description of pornography, something that can't be defined in a few words, but we "know it when we see it."

But in the context of culturally significant people the salient factor is unique accomplishment with intensity of focus, without regard for the opinion of others. As Nick Dellow pointed out, all passion is not of the operatic death duet variety or the YOLO! daredevil display. Much passion is shown in persistence, unflagging creativity, and life-long dedication to a personal goal. A researcher can have a quiet passion for scholarship, a pursuit of truth, and to me that becomes "cool" when it leads to breakthroughs in knowledge or practice. Bix certainly had a passion for creating inimitable sounds. Nobody else could sound like Bix while playing what Randy Sandke described as "every note...spontaneous yet inevitable." That ability is magical enough to be called cool. His contemporaries knew Bix was cool, even though they used other words to voice it.

Posted on Feb 19, 2014, 4:32 PM

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Cool

by David Logue

When I think of the term "cool" other phrases like "cool it" (simmer down) or "playing it cool" (keeping a low profile) or "keeping your cool" (not getting riled up) come to mind, which seem to be on the opposite side of being gregarious.

I think a good case can be made that Bix was the originator--or at least one of the originators--of cool jazz, even though he didn't always play in that style.

Another early cool musician is Count Basie, who with an economy of notes, could make a fantastic piano solo, as opposed to Fats Waller or Art Tatum, who seemed to be everywhere on the keyboard at the same time. Of course, economy of notes isn't necessarily Bix's M.O. But like Basie, he certainly could say a lot without being showy.

Posted on Feb 20, 2014, 2:02 PM

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Bix and William Grant Still

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William Grant Still was a composer arranger and performer. Here he is in the 1921 "Shuffle Along" band.

From http://songbook1.wordpress.com/pp/fx/african-american-musical-theater-1896-1926/shuffle-along1921-mills-hall-galleries/
[linked image]

He was hired by Whiteman as an arranger in Feb 1929 for the Old Gold radio program and left in Feb 1930. Here he is around that time.
[linked image]

Only two of the arrangements Still made for the Old Gold program were recorded: After You've Gone and Coquette. Bix was absent in both. But Bix must have played these and other arrangements in the radio broadcasts. Coquette was played on Mar 26 and Apr 30, 1929. After You've Gone was played on Sep 10, 1929, just a few days before Bix left the Whiteman orchestra.

I think Whiteman's After You've Gone is a fantastic recording. I imagine it is neglected because Bix was absent. Recorded on Oc 18, 1929, about a month after Bix had left. Excellent solos by Secrest and Venuti-Lang and a great Bing vocal with Lang doing his thing. A coda by Trumbauer.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=TSc2LMD-rWU

Albert



Posted on Feb 15, 2014, 7:10 AM

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In A Mist

by

I always presumed In A Mist came into being in 1927, when it was recorded on OKeh. Imagine my surprise to read Bix performed it in 1925! (In fact, I never knew he performed it twice--and in a piano trio, no less. I apologize for thinking that I had found a misprint.

Posted on Feb 14, 2014, 1:14 PM

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Not 1925, but 1928.

by

Hello Warren,

First experiment: Feb 1924.

Second Experiement: Dec 1925.

Third experiment: Oct 1928.

Bix played In A Mist in the third experiment with Lennie Hayton and Roy Bargy. The image I posted in fb is from the 1928 Carnegie Hall concert.

Albert





Posted on Feb 14, 2014, 4:29 PM

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Vindicated

by Warren Kilbourne

I was right; the guy in Facebook was wrong! Warren

Posted on Feb 14, 2014, 5:47 PM

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The guy in facebook is ....

by

.... yours truly! What I wrote there is substantially the same as what I wrote here. From facebook:

"An Experiment in Modern Music." Aeolian Hall, Feb 12, 1924.
The recreation of the concert by Vince Giordano, Maurice Peress, the Nighthawks and the added musicians was fabulous. Congratulations to all and my most profound thanks. A "Concert To Remember" for the rest of my life.

That was the first experiment. The second Experiment in Modern Music took place on Dec 29, 1925 in Carnegie Hall.

The third experiment in Modern Music took place on Oct 7, 1928 in Carnegie Hall and had Bix playing his own composition "In A Mist" with Lennie Hayton and Roy Bargy.

I hope it is not too presumptuous of me to suggest to Vince Giordano and Maurice Peress to do a recreation of the third Experiment in Modern Music. It would be a highly appropriate tribute to Bix, who certainly deserves a concert in New York City in the 21st century in recognition of his genius. There would be two bonuses: Gershwin's Concerto in F and Grofe's Metropolis were played at the concert.

Albert



Posted on Feb 14, 2014, 7:48 PM

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Facebook: From here to eternity

by Warren Kilbourne

Sometimes so many items accumulate in Facebook (like snow in 2014!) that it is difficult to go back and confirm who said what. The "guy in Facebook" was the person who condescendingly responded to my initial comment, but neglected to mention that "In a Mist" was not performed in 1925--which would have prevented all this.

Posted on Feb 15, 2014, 5:42 AM

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Now I understand.

by

I reread the thread in facebook and realize that I was not the "guy in facebook." I am so preoccupied about keeping up with the interminable amount of snow that keeps on falling that I am losing track of all other issues. Six more inches expected later today, and that's on top of the over a foot that fell on Thursday. And ice and snow coming on Monday night. I had a new roof and gutters installed last October and am crossing my fingers that they will resist all the weight of the snow and ice.

Albert



Posted on Feb 15, 2014, 6:00 AM

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Robert M Bennett's Master of Music Thesis.

by

California State University, Long Beach, CA August 2004.

Title: An Examination of the Lineage of the Sweet Trumpet Solo Style from Bix Beiderbecke, Through Five Important Jazz Trumpet Soloists.

Abstract: This project report examines a lineage of the sweet trumpet style, starting with Bix Beiderbecke adn continuing through Jimmy McPartland, Bunny Berigan, Bobby Hackett, Harry "Sweets" Edison, and Kenny Dorham. In particular, it focuses on the influence of Bix Beiderbecke on these five jazz trumpet soloists. Each soloist is discussed using a particular solo that highlights a line of influence, starting with Bix Beiderbecke and continuing to Kenny Dorham. Each solo is analyzed using a set of five criteria: tone, range, trumpet devices, swing feel, and melodic considerations.

List of the Recordings Analyzed in the Thesis:

Bix Beiderbecke - Singin' the Blues
Jimmy McPartland - How High the Moon
Bunny Berigan - Black Bottom
Bobby Hackett - Jada 
Harry "Sweets" Edison - Four
Kenny Dorham - Woody 'n' You

I listened to some of these; I don't hear much Bix.

Albert




Posted on Feb 11, 2014, 12:54 PM

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Re: Robert M Bennett's Master of Music Thesis.

by

I agree with you, Albert. Even the McPartland and Hackett choices are odd in terms of looking for examples that support the author's thesis. I love Kenny Dorham, Harry Edison and Berigan but really don't hear a significant "Bix" influence in their playing. I'm surprised that the author didn't listen to Rex Stewart (especially "Kissing My Baby Goodnight" with Ellington), Chet Baker (may Bix wasn't a direct influence here but Chet's tonal quality and approach is similar to Bix's) and even Miles Davis (as most of our forum members may know, the English author Burnett James made a good case for hearing some Bix in Miles' playing particularly on the album "Miles Ahead"-as Miles said, he himself didn't listen to much Bix but Miles did like Bobby Hackett's playing).
As well, some of the mid-western players like Ed Lewis (with the Bennie Moten band) and John Nesbitt (with McKinney's Cotton Pickers) display a Bix/Red Nichols influence their solos.
I think the thesis author needed a better advising on this paper...

Posted on Feb 16, 2014, 11:51 AM

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90th ANNIVERSARY George Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue"

by

Feb 12, 2014 at 8 pm. I think it is sold out.

VINCE GIORDANO and the NIGHTHAWKS ORCHESTRA
Pianists TED ROSENTHAL and JEB PATTEN
Reconstructed and Conducted by MAURICE PERESS

SAME DAY - SAME BLOCK - 90 YEARS LATER

An authentic all-star Jazz Band augmented by violins and horns playing the landmark 1924 program including Gershwinâs A Rhapsody In Blue, Victor Herbertâs A Suite of Serenades, Zez Confreyâs Kitten On The Keys, Whitemanâs specialties Whispering, Limehouse Blues, and Chansonette, Music by George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Jerome Kern and others.

Albert

[linked image]




Posted on Feb 10, 2014, 12:12 PM

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An Interview of Vince Giordano and Maurice Peress.

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Jeff Spurgeon interviews Vince Giordano and Maurice Peress on WQXR.

http://www.wqxr.org/#!/story/concert-recreate-rhapsody-blue-premiere-90th-anniversary/

Albert



Posted on Feb 11, 2014, 6:35 AM

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A couple of days in the Big Apple.

by

We are leaving tomorrow morning and will attend the Whiteman recreation concert at Town Hall in the evening. Probably back on Thursday, although a monster snow storm is coming this way and we may be stranded.

Will report on the concert a day or two after we come back.

Our seats are on the left handside of the first row. If you go to the concert stop by and say hello!

Albert



Posted on Feb 11, 2014, 2:30 PM

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Re: A couple of days in the Big Apple.

by

Albert,

I was going to take the remaining seat in that aisle last week, but was dissuaded by preliminary reports of the snow.

So sorry that I couldn't have had the chance to meet you.

I hope that you enjoy the concert!

Posted on Feb 12, 2014, 9:51 AM

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You were wise to listen to the weather forecast.

by

It was a mess. So far we have had four times more snow than the average.

Albert



Posted on Feb 13, 2014, 1:08 PM

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A concert to remember , ....

by

.... in more than one way! The concert was fantastic.

We stayed overnight in New York City and came back this morning. The trip turned out to be a five-hour odissey. No problem leaving Penn Station and changing trains in Jamaica. The problem arose as we were approaching Huntington which is about 20 miles west of Stony Brook. As we approached Huntington, the train stopped and after about a 15-minute delay, it was announced that the train would not go farther than Huntington and buses would take passengers the rest of the way. It turns out that a train had hit a car in the next LIRR train station. The bus trip would not have been a problem except for the snow. It was so thick that the buses could not approach the train station and all passengers had to walk what felt like one mile (but was really a few hundred yards) in a blizzard. One of the buses was stuck in the snow, so we had to wait  there for a replacement. The roads were horrendous and the bus driver had to go very slowly. We finally made it to Stony Brook. A short walk from the station to the parking lot led me to find my 1987 Jeep buried under about 8 inches of snow. Fortunately, I had a shovel  and a brush, and I dug around the Jeep and cleared the windshield and the rear window. Thank car engineers for four-wheel drive. I was able to extricate the Jeep from its parking spot and drove home where I found about 8 inches of snow blocking the driveway and on the driveway. I managed to walk to the garage, get the snowblower out and clear the driveway. My dear wife was very worried that I would collapse with all that work. Fortunately, and to the regret of some -I am sure- I managed to get through the whole ordeal unscathed.

The son who lives in Georgia called to tell me about the misery they are experiencing down there and asked: was the concert really worth all the problems during the journey back? The answer, a resounding YES! I would do it all over again. Vince Giordano, Maurice Peress, the Nighthawks and the added musicians did a fantastic recreation of what transpired in the legendary Feb 12, 1924 Concert in Aeolian Hall, "An Experiment in Modern Music."

My review of the concert will be published in a couple of days.

Albert

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 13, 2014, 12:54 PM

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I look forward to reading your review

by

I saw a performance of the same program when I used to live in NYC, I think it was late 1970s. Same venue too, I think. I no longer remember who the performers were, but it was a surprise to me how little of the program was what today would be called jazz, enjoyable though it was. I seem to recall I spent the entire evening in tears. I felt like I had been transported to another age. Like in that Jack Finney book.

As for snow, I'm definitely not impressed. In DC we got around 8 inches last night, though the city would have come to a dead halt with far less. I think it's great. Americans work far too much and far too hard, and if a few inches of snow interrupts that, so much the better!

Looking forward to your review.

Posted on Feb 13, 2014, 5:48 PM

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The Late Cornell University Professor Arthur Mizener Created a Myth About Bix.

by

In his Oct 4, 1960 lecture titled "Jazz of Roaring Twenties," Professor Mizener described Bix as the "Quiet Dutchman." There is a lot more crap in the account of the lecture.

http://cdsun.library.cornell.edu/cgi-bin/cornell?a=d&d=CDS19601005.2.8&srpos=1&dliv=none&e=--------20--1---txIN-Bix+beiderbecke-----

You have to watch these professors.happy.gif

Albert



Posted on Feb 8, 2014, 11:21 AM

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Dutchman

by

Growing up in the Midwest (right across the river fron Davenport), I remember that "Dutchman" was a common term used by older folks to describe a person of German extraction. See definition 2b:

http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Dutchman

Posted on Feb 9, 2014, 9:15 PM

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dutch/deutsch

by a.l heenan

Esten Spurrier described his friend Bix as being "one stubborn Dutchman" (Sudhalter/Evans)

Posted on Feb 10, 2014, 7:18 AM

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Welcome to the Bixography Forum

by

Thanks. The problem I see is that the professor provides quotation marks for the reference to the "Quiet Dutchman" as if this was a common way to refer to Bix. The combination of Quiet and Dutchman is what caught my attention. From what I have read, I would agree that Bix was "quiet" and from the usage of the word, he would also be referred to as Dutchman. But then, wouldn't he be the quiet Dutchman without quotation marks and no upper case "q"? English being my third language, I am not too confident about understanding subtleties in usage of quotation marks and upper case letters.

I emigrated from France to Uruguay in the late 1930s. I remember being surprised by some ways to refer to immigrants in that small Southamerican country: all immigrants from central Europe were know as "rusos" (russians) and all immigrants from arab countries were knows as "turcos" (turks). I was known as "el francesito," the little French boy. I am still little, and my wife tells me that I still behave like a boy. happy.gif

Albert



Posted on Feb 10, 2014, 7:26 AM

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Re: Behave like a boy

by

Albert, it has always been my view that listening to jazz over the years keeps one "Young at Heart".
I'm sure that's what your good lady was trying to tell you.

Posted on Feb 11, 2014, 6:11 AM

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Spiegle Willcox said: "Jazz Keeps You Young."

by

[linked image]

Thanks, Ken. You and Spiegle are right. But there is more to it: my opinion is that a passion to learn more about any subject -jazz, chemistry, archeology, etc.- is what keeps you young. Of course, the genes and healthy habits help a lot.

Albert



Posted on Feb 11, 2014, 7:46 AM

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And all Italians were known as ....

by

.... "tanos," short for napolitanos, regardless of the region in Italy they came from.

Albert



Posted on Feb 12, 2014, 7:06 AM

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...As Pope is to Dryden

by Andy V.

The article you cited contains the assertion "Beiderbeck (sic) is to Armstrong as Pope is to Dryden". Just what does he mean by that?

John Dryden (1631-1700) preceded Alexander Pope (1688-1744) by a good number of years, and apparently was influential on those who followed after. Does the comparison go any deeper?

Here's Samuel Johnson (1709-84) comparing Pope and Dryden (from The Lives of the Poets, found here: http://www.ourcivilisation.com/smartboard/shop/johnsons/lives/popedryd.htm)

Do you think it says anything profound about Bix vs Louis? I doubt it, but it's fun to cogitate on the subject. Judge for yourself:

"He (Pope) professed to have learned his poetry from Dryden, whom, whenever an opportunity was presented, he praised through his whole life with unvaried liberality; and perhaps his character may receive some illustration if he be compared with his master.

Integrity of understanding and nicety of discernment were not allotted in a less proportion to Dryden than to Pope. The rectitude of Dryden's mind was sufficiently shown by the dismission of his poetical prejudices, and the rejection of unnatural thoughts and rugged numbers. But Dryden never desired to apply all the judgement that he had. He wrote, and professed to write, merely for the people; and when he pleased others, he contented himself. He spent no time in struggles to rouse latent powers; he never attempted to make that better which was already good, nor often to mend what he must have known to be faulty. He wrote, as he tells us, with very little consideration; when occasion or necessity called upon him, he poured out what the present moment happened to supply, and, when once it had passed the press, ejected it from his mind; for when he had no pecuniary interest, he had no further solicitude.

Pope was not content to satisfy; he desired to excel, and therefore always endeavoured to do his best: he did not court the candour, but dared the judgement of his reader, and, expecting no indulgence from others, he showed none to himself. He examined lines and words with minute and punctilious observation, and retouched every part with indefatigable diligence, till he had left nothing to be forgiven. . .

Of genius, that power which constitutes a poet; that quality without which judgement is cold and knowledge is inert; that energy which collects, combines, amplifies, and animatesthe superiority must, with some hesitation, be allowed to Dryden. It is not to be inferred that of this poetical vigour Pope had only a little, because Dryden had more; for every other writer since Milton must give place to Pope; and even of Dryden it must be said that if he has brighter paragraphs, he has not better poems. Dryden's performances were always hasty, either excited by some external occasion, or extorted by domestic necessity; he composed without consideration, and published without correction. What his mind could supply at call, or gather in one excursion, was all that he sought, and all that he gave. The dilatory caution of Pope enabled him to condense his sentiments, to multiply his images, and to accumulate all that study might produce, or chance might supply. If the flights of Dryden therefore are higher, Pope continues longer on the wing. If of Dryden's fire the blaze is brighter, of Pope's the heat is more regular and constant. Dryden often surpasses expectation, and Pope never falls below it. Dryden is read with frequent astonishment, and Pope with perpetual delight."

Posted on Feb 14, 2014, 4:54 PM

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An intriguing comparison.

by

However, the phrase you quote is preceded by "Although Biederbecke [sic] learned all he knew from Louis Armstrong." I would say by the time Bix heard Louis with King Oliver's band, Bix's unique style had already developed. I imagine that Bix could have been inspired by Louis's total commitment to jazz, but the sweeping assertion that Bix learned all he knew from Louis is clearly incorrect. I am also puzzled by the statement "the opinion has been expressed" preceding the assertion you quoted. Who would be sufficiently familiar simultaneously with Dryden, Pope, Louis and Bix to make the comparison? Surely not a jazz musician or a jazz historian, perhaps an academic in professor Mizener's circle?

The most fascinating comparison that you transcribed comes at the end: If of Dryden's fire the blaze is brighter, of Pope's the heat is more regular and constant. Dryden often surpasses expectation, and Pope never falls below it. Dryden is read with frequent astonishment, and Pope with perpetual delight. That could be said when comparing Louis and Bix. Louis produces fireworks, Bix gives us a steady luminosity. Louis amazes us with his histrionics, Bix gives us an enduring enchantment.

Albert



Posted on Feb 15, 2014, 5:44 AM

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Jazz in Iowa.

by

A PBS program on Iowa Public Radio. With Josh Duffee and John Benoit..

http://iowapublicradio.org/post/hot-swinging-big-band-jazz

Albert



Posted on Feb 5, 2014, 4:28 PM

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Paul Fejos, King of Jazz, and Lonesome

by Andy V.

Jan 27th marked the 117th birthday of Hungarian-born director Paul Fejos (pronounced Fay-osh). The Bix connection is that he assisted in the direction of King of Jazz (1930).

His contribution goes uncredited. Apparently the project was his to direct at one time, but at some point in the tumultuous evolution of King of Jazz, John Murray Anderson was named director, and it is Anderson who gets the screen credit. Fejos stayed with the project for some time, but left before the film was completed. The extent of his contribution is unclear. Anderson came from a theatrical background, with little film experience. Fejos on the other hand had directed a handful of films, all of them somewhat daring. It seems likely that the imprint Fejos on King of Jazz is considerable.

Best of all Fejos' surviving films is "Lonesome" from 1928. It is worth checking out if you love the 1920's, especially life in NYC. It's mostly silent, with three "talking" segments. It's strange how the silent parts move so fluidly, while the "talking" parts just grind to a halt. Fortunately, the talking bits are short. Here is Criterion's advert on youtube for the film:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tykxAt0UY8Y



Posted on Feb 5, 2014, 11:20 AM

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Wesley Ruggles before Paul Fejos.

by

From Don Rayno, "Universal assigned a director, Wesley Ruggles, and a writer, Paul Schofield, to the picture and tentatively engaged the crack songwriting team of L. Wolfe Gilbert (words) and Mabel Wayne (music) to write the score."

Ruggles was replaced by Fejos who in turn was replaced by John Murray Anderson.

Wesley Ruggles (brother of actor Charles) directed movies such as Cimarron Richard Dix and Irene Dunne), College Humor Bing), I'm No Angel (Cary Grant and Mae West), Arizona (Jean Arthur and a young William Holden), etc.

Albert



Posted on Feb 5, 2014, 4:23 PM

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A photo of Wesley Ruggles.

by

Exhibitors Daily Review

2 Jul 1928 - 29 Dec 1928

exhibi01exhi_0629.jp2&scale=4&rotate=0

Note that he is preparing "King of Jazz" with Paul Whiteman.





Posted on Feb 6, 2014, 3:53 PM

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And seasons greetings from Paul Scofield.

by

Writing an original screen story for "King of Jazz."

exhibi01exhi_0633.jp2&scale=4&rotate=0

 

Albert



Posted on Feb 6, 2014, 3:58 PM

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Photos taken during filming of King of Jazz.

by

http://ia600806.us.archive.org/BookReader/BookReaderImages.php?zip=/2/items/picturepl32stre/picturepl32stre_jp2.zip&file=picturepl32stre_jp2/picturepl32stre_0693.jp2

Once the link opens, yo can click on the image to enlarge it. To me, the most exciting photo is that of the Whiteman orchestra on the huge piano. Too bad that the photo is chopped and the violinists who are on the left are not seen.

Albert



Posted on Feb 6, 2014, 4:32 PM

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When agreement in the script for "King of Jazz" could not be reached ....

by

.... in the summer of 1929, the Whiteman band wnet back to New York. At this point the projected name for the film became "King of Jazzz Revue." Nell O'Day and the Tommy Atkins sextet were signed up by Universal. From Universal Weekly, Nov 9, 1929.

Albert



Posted on Feb 6, 2014, 4:40 PM

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The Sisters G.and Paul Fejos.

by

http://ia601206.us.archive.org/BookReader/BookReaderImages.php?zip=/33/items/universal2438univ/universal2438univ_jp2.zip&file=universal2438univ_jp2/universal2438univ_0530.jp2

Albert



Posted on Feb 6, 2014, 5:14 PM

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The Several Lives of Paul Fejos...

by Andy V.

...is the name of his biography. Very interesting guy. There's a nice wikipedia article on him.

Actor, med school grad, research scientist, film-maker, anthropologist, all-around smart guy.

How he learned all stylized techniques in Lonsemose is a bit of a mystery. He hated Hollywood, thought the whole place was phoney. Left Universal Studios abruptly in the early 30's. Traveled all over the place. Made some good films in Europe until he tired of it all. He told film execs at Nordisk (Denmark) he would only make films in one country, and somewhat arbitrarily named Madagascar. To his surprise they said yes. He lived with and filmed natives, although the material had zero commerical value. Later on he went to South America and discovered 18 lost Incan cities. Traveled up the Amazon, on and on. Devoted the last decades of his life to Anthropological studies and was active in professional societies, though only an autodidact. He said the best scientific ideas at the international meetings came out at the bar, after a few cocktails and plenty of talk.

Pretty cool.




Posted on Feb 7, 2014, 9:54 AM

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In page 2 we have a thread about chase sequences.

by

In that thread Mark Berresford reminds us of the June 1922 lovely split chorus by Frank Guarente and Johnny O'Donnell on the Specht's Society Serenaders 'Hot Lips'. I am giving the link to an mp3 of the recording here because most forumites don't go back to page 2 to read postings.

http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/m3u/Ban1101-2.m3u

Thanks, Mark for calling our attention to this excellent recording.

Albert





Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 8:18 AM

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They predicted 2 to 4 inches.

by

It looks more like a foot. Standing on the porch, looking toward the street.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 1:05 PM

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The Flute in Jazz.

by

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3usDmsqkdb0

Albert



Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 7:16 AM

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From Brad: "Song of the Wanderer"

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Brad writes:

"Just to show that jazz flute was a known quantity even to white musicians in New York in 1927,  Here's "Song of the Wanderer," by Duke Yellman and his Parody Club boys, on Edison Diamond Disc 51927.  It's one of those extra-long playing performances, just a few seconds short of five minutes.   There's a chorus of hot mellophone - sounds like Dudley Fosdick - and in the eight-bar bridge (at 2:37), unmistakable jazz flute. Don't know who this his, but he sure had the hot flute idea well in hand.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/aqaysts74y6i6pi/51927__Song_of_the_Wanderer__Duke_Yellman_%26_his_Parody_Club_Boys.mp3   This is an 11.2 MB file.

Recorded on Dec 24, 1926. Beautiful song, kind of bitttersweet. Composed by Neil Moret.

[linked image]

Here is the version with vocal refrain by Al Bowlly with Arthur Briggs; recorded in Berlin in Oct-Nov 1927. You get to hear Al Bowlly on vocal and on guitar. Note also a clarinet solo with some similariy to the one in Yellman's version.

[linked image]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bft5RGgqn7U

Paul Whiteman recorded the song on Mar 29, 1927. The first time that Hazlett uses subtone clarinet.

Thanks, Brad, for all your contributions to the forum.

Albert



Posted on Feb 6, 2014, 6:56 AM

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Annette's version.

by

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rQbP9pT912o

Fantastic voice and style! You get to hear the verse.

Albert



Posted on Feb 6, 2014, 8:34 AM

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Songology by Coletta Ryan and Duke Yellman

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A Warner Bros short from 1929 info from imdb. Vitaphone # 874.

Technical Specs

Runtime: 9 min

Sound Mix: Mono (Vitaphone)

Color: Black and White

Mistakes
(uncredited)
Music by Edgar Leslie
Lyrics by Horatio Nicholls
Performed by Coletta Ryan (vocal) and Duke Yellman (piano)
Yankee Rose
(uncredited)
Music by Abe Frankl
Performed by Duke Yellman (piano)
In the Hush of the Night
(uncredited)
Music by Al Hoffman
Lyrics by Samuel Lerner (as Sammy Lerner)
Performed by Coletta Ryan (vocal) and Duke Yellman (piano)
 
Included in one of the volumes of Vitaphone Varieties.
 
Albert


Posted on Feb 6, 2014, 9:20 AM

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"Song of the Wanderer"

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There's also a marvelous swing version of "Song of the Wanderer" by Count Basie and His Orchestra, vocal by Helen Humes, from a July 9, 1938 "America Dances" broadcast from the Famous Door in New York City. Some issues of that performance title the song "Where Shall I Go?"

Posted on Feb 8, 2014, 7:36 AM

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Duke Yellman and Irene Castle.

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From Wikipedia: "

Vernon and Irene Castle were a husband-and-wife team of ballroom dancers of the early 20th century. They are credited with invigorating the popularity of modern dancing. Vernon Castle (2 May 1887 15 February 1918) was born William Vernon Blyth in Norwich, Norfolk, England. Irene Castle (17 April 1893 25 January 1969) was born Irene Foote in New Rochelle, New York.
The couple reached the peak of their popularity in Irving Berlin's first Broadway show, Watch Your Step (1914), in which they refined and popularized the Foxtrot. They also helped to popularize ragtime, jazz rhythms African-American music for dance. Irene became a fashion icon, and the two were in demand as teachers and writers on dance.
After serving with distinction as a pilot in the Royal Flying Corps during World War I, Vernon died in a plane crash in 1918. Irene continued to perform and made silent films over the next decade. She remarried, had children and became an animal-rights activist."

In 1922, Irene Castle had a revue, "Dances and Fashions" where she danced with Billy Reardon accompanied by Duke Yellman's orchestra. This ad from the April 26, 1923 Cornell Daily Sun refers to the band as "The Famous Duke Yellman Orchestra."

Article image

By 1924 Duke was getting top billing. Look at this ad from Variety, April 9. 1924.

[linked image]

Between May 19 and Sep 18, 1924, Duke Yellman and His Irene Castle Orchestra cut nine sides for Gennett in New York. Four were released. Here is the label of one of them:

https://www.vmauctions.com/files/members/0/59/products/large/GENN_5522A.jpg

Between Jan 1926 and Dec 1928, Duke Yellman and His Orchestra made about 70 recordings for Edison. Hee is one of them from Dec 6, 1928, his last recording ever. Great tune, music and lyrics.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DrvNdOehqNw

And here is one that Bix recorded.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UA5-FDKnJG8

And one more from Enrico. I like this tune a lot. I wonder if Abel Green is the editor of Variety. Probably.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8zIq_V6gbeE

Duke Yellman arranged the music and played in the first musical comedy ever produced for a radio station. Here is some information:

http://www.google.com/books?id=crsdwoNsZDEC&pg=PA76&lpg=PP1#v=onepage&q&f=false

I don't have anything after 1930.

Albert



Posted on Feb 8, 2014, 10:29 AM

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Annette's and Basie's are the best

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A nice sequence of recordings of "Song of the Wanderer." My favorite version remains the 1938 Count Basie swing recording with Helen Humes singing. Annette Hanshaw's record is also beautiful, and if I can dare suggest that a white musician ever influenced a Black one (it's often true but remains a bozo no-no among "politically correct" jazz critics) I have a feeling Humes must have heard Annette's version; they get a similar (and marvelous) lightness in their voices. I also really liked the "Duke Yellman & his Parody Club Boys" record on Edison; what a pity so few major jazz musicians recorded for the Edison label (Red Nichols is the only one I can think of who did) because at nearly five minutes the Edison format would have allowed them to stretch out longer. The Arthur Briggs-Al Bowlly version I thought was too fast, though it was nice to hear Bowlly's guitar solo. I'd thought of him exclusively as a rhythm player and didn't think he was capable of a solo this hot!

Also, Vernon Castle never actually served in combat in World War I because he died before he could do so. He was assigned to train other pilots and was killed in a training accident. The Castles also deserve credit for hiring African-American bandleaders James Reese Europe and Ford Dabney (the latter after Europe was killed and Dabney took over his band). And it's worth noting that a highly fictionalized version of the Castles' life story was filmed at RKO in 1939 with (who else?) Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

Posted on Feb 8, 2014, 6:23 PM

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Helen Humes recorded "Song of the Wanderer" twice.

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First, on Jan 5, 1938 with Harry James.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vP9qtWVlinc

Second, on Jun 3, 1938 with Count Basie.

There is also the radio broadcast "America Dances" of Jul 9, 1938 mentioned by Mark.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ActpilkOf0

A few more versions for good measure.

Earl Burnett - http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/m3u/1927_100.m3u

Vincent Lopez - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iA2oVv1PSu0

Bob Crosby - http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/m3u/DEC64931.m3u

Albert



Posted on Feb 9, 2014, 9:04 AM

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What a Pity, Indeed

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Yea, Mr. Conlon:

The subject of the five-minute Edisons was covered earlier on the Forum, but I think one point is worth re-iterating: All the major labels had five-minute records - as 12-inch discs. However, to the industry barons, something about about a big record meant that the music on it had to be a Big Deal - operatic, symphonic, or in the case of a dance band, a high-falutin' "Concert Arrangement." You couldn't just BLOW for five minutes at Victor, Columbia, Brunswick or even OKeh. But this mindset had to do with SIZE, not duration. Edison Diamond Discs also could play for five minutes, but since they were ten-inch records, there was no hoodoo about content. Just compare Red Nichols' pretentious five-minute productions on Brunswick ("Poor Butterfly," "Dear Old Southland" etc.) with the straight-ahead, hot five-minute Red and Miff's Stompers sides on Edison ("Stampede," "Alabama Stomp" etc.). What a difference!

The truly pitiful part is that while five-minute performances flew under the radar at Edison, its corporate music policy was the most conservative and stodgy of ALL the major labels, reflecting the aesthetic priorities of its Founder (n.b., born 1847). Some good jazz did sneak through at Edison, but those hot records are the exceptions. I think most of them were made when Mr. Edison was out of town. Imagine if in 1920, after a Scrooge-like epiphany, Tom Edison had hired a hip and far-sighted A&R man to supervise the music on his label. O, the humanity!

-Brad Kay




Posted on Feb 9, 2014, 12:17 PM

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Frank Guarente's Trumpet at the Metropolitan Museum.

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From Anthony in trumpetmasters.com

"Frank Guarente's Trumpet
Hi anyone interested on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in Musical Instruments is a Besson trumpet that belonged to famous Italian trumpet player Frank Guarente. Mr.Guarente was in America in the early 1920s and it is said he was an influence on Bix! If your in N.Y.please come and see this fine musicians horn. "

From the Met website:

Valve Trumpet in B-flat

F. Besson (French)

Date:
1930s Geography: Paris, France Medium: Gold-plated brass, mother-of-pearl Dimensions: Overall height: 44.4 cm (17 1/2 in.) Bell diameter: 11cm (4 5/16 in.) Classification: Aerophone-Lip Vibrated-trumpet / trombone Credit Line: Purchase, Robert Alonzo Lehman Bequest, 2009 Accession Number: 2009.309ad

This artwork is not on display

  • This instrument was made for Frank Gaurente [sic], an important early [unfinished in orgianal]
     
    After the death of Frank Guarente in 1942, the trumpet was handed down in the family with two other instruments, recordings and images, last owned by Dennis Aimetti, who offered the instruments to the Museum together with some other items (see VII).

    I am trying to get a photo. If and when successful, I will post it.

Albert



Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 4:38 PM

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The Image.

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Posted in the trumpetmaster website. By the way, one on my classmates in elementary school was named Marc Besson. For a while he was my best friend. I can't believe I remember. I am talking about 3/4 of a century ago. I wonder now if he was related to the Besson who started the company. From besson.com, "In 1837, Gustave-Auguste Besson (1820-1874), a genius in acoustic science, created the Besson brand in Paris. His new cornet revolutionized the instrument and continues to influence ears, hearts and minds even today. His instruments became famous in Europe, and he has been accredited with over fifty inventions."

[linked image]

The lower label reads:

Trumpet
F. Besson, made for Frank Guarente
Paris France
ca 1936

I hate to argue with the Metropolitan. But isn't Guarente's horn a cornet? Please let me know.

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 11:41 AM

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Guarante's Cornet?

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I'm no expert, but I can tell a cone from a cylinder. This one looks conical to me.

Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 1:37 PM

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That's what I thought.

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But look at this Besson Brevete trumpet serial number 135425 indicating 1929-30 as the year of manufacture.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 2:40 PM

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Re: Trumpet or Cornet

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I want to quote the saying, "A difference which makes no difference is no difference," but for that we need a report from someone who knows how they sound.

Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 5:19 AM

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Possibly a trumpet

by Malcolm Walton

With old instruments from the 1920s/30s, it is not always possible to determine from a photograph whether an instrument is a trumpet or a cornet.
For example, the Conn Vocabell Cornet looks like a trumpet ; but it is not ! This instrument could be either, but I rather think that it is a trumpet because of the thickness of the mouthpiece shank.Cornet mouthpieces are of course narrower where they enter the instrument.

Posted on Feb 5, 2014, 11:17 AM

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Cornets and Trumpets

by David Sager

As I understand it, the conception of conical vs. cylindrical bore, dates back to the standard orchestral trumpet of the 19th century, both natural and with valves. These were much longer instruments than trumpets in use today and the bore was in fact far more cylindrical.
Have a look:

http://www.robbstewart.com/Museum/19thCentury/BrownTrumpet.html

Modern trumpets, even ones from the 1920s, are really cornet-trumpet hybrids.

DS



Posted on Feb 5, 2014, 1:52 PM

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Trumpet or cornet: risque anecdote warning

by Russell Davies

Many British radio listeners (of a certain age) remember the BBC Jazz Club radio broadcast -- either Christmas or New Year, decades ago -- where the MC Humphrey Lyttelton closed the show by giving namechecks to the excellent Alex Welsh Band. Humph announced that, following the style set by the many discographies he'd been reading, he would name the personnel according to the standard discographical abbreviations. So he itemized the instruments in their familiar ugly, stunted forms, as follows (can't remember the exact personnel):
"So, it's thanks to Johnny Barnes, CLT, ALT & BAR [laughter]; Roy Williams, TB; Jim Douglas, GTR and BJ; Fred Hunt, PNO; Harvey Weston, BS; Lennie Hastings, DMS; and Alex Welsh [long pause]... CORNET." [much hilarity].
The instrument Alex played at the time was technically a trumpet-cornet (recommended by Wild Bill Davison) but Humph wasn't going to let that spoil his joke.
The Bix connection of course has nothing to do with language, but with the lovely pno-cnt version of "Davenport Blues" which Alex and Fred Hunt kept as a perennial fixture in their repertoire.
R.D.

Posted on Feb 7, 2014, 3:41 PM

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Trumpet or cornet

by

The trumpet has ONE BEND in the main tubing before entering the THIRD valve.
The cornet has TWO BENDS in the main tubing before entering the FIRST valve!

Björn Englund

Solna
Sweden

Posted on Feb 9, 2014, 9:50 AM

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Valve Order

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Hi Bjorn,

Possibly I don't understand your description fully.

However, disregarding the number of bends in the tubing, both trumpet and cornet
main tubes enter the third (outermost from the player) valve.

From the third valve initially, both flow next to second valve, and finally to first
valve, before proceeding down main tube out the bell.

Into mouthpiece, through 3rd valve, through 2nd valve, through 1st, then out to bell, both in trumpet and cornet.

Posted on Feb 10, 2014, 9:19 PM

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My Favorite Tribute To Bix..."Keko"

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I have often thought the greatest recorded tribute to Bix Beiderbecke was "Keko" by, of all
groups, an Hawaiian jazz ensemble led by Andy Iona, recorded in Los Angeles in 1929.

I have wondered how or why this record came about--and was it intended as a Bix Tribute?
(Past forum posts c2005 indicate Bix was with Whiteman in Cincinnati at the time.)

The alleged cornetist, K. A. Theck, was supposed to be an admirer of Louis Armstrong. Yet to me,
his tone has all the wonderful mix of humor, melancholy, wit and restraint--of Bix.

Does anyone in the forum have any new ideas on this record, and Theck? I asked Rich Conaty to play it Sunday night
in the requests portion of his Big Broadcast show (yes, after the Super Bowl is over.) Maybe he'll have something
to add.



Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 12:51 PM

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I was about to write a little something about Keko!!!

by

What a coincidence. Yesterday, Professor Hot Stuff sent me an mp3 of "Keko" and asked about the identity of the trumpet soloist. My response:

Keko (the title of the tune you sent) was discussed in the forum . Here are some links.
http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/989324728/Bix+sound+alike-
http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1090166751/Merle+Johnston's+Saxophone+Quartet
http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1133888531/Two+recordings+with+two+trumpet+obbligatos%2C+----
Included in Bix Restored, Vol 5. I can't find my copy, but my recollection is that the trumpet player was not identified, but I may be mistaken. Rust identifies the trumpet player as K. A. Theck.
To me, it is a tribute to "Singin' the Blues." Sax solo followed by trumpet solo and with a similar sensibility. Composed by AIONA-KOKI-THOMAS-THECK
I don't have ancestry.com. I use the local library, they have access to ancestry. Next time I go, I will take a look. I think K stands for Karl.
Albert
***************************************************
I just finished looking at ancestry.com in the local library and came home. My findings:
 
Karl or Carl Albert Theck was born in Ohio on Jan 14, 1905 and died in Los Angeles on Aug 11, 1963. Buried in Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale, CA.
US Census 1920 - Lived with father, mother, two sisters (the older married and had a child in the household) and a brother. Carl was the youngest.
US Census 1930 - Lived with wife May; they were married when Carl was 22 (May was 21). HeHis ocupation is musician with a dance band and has steady employment.
1933 Directory - He lives in Santa Moniac and is a musician.
1940 US Census - He lives with his wife and a son (Dennis, born in 1936, died in 1994) and is an orchestra musician.
 
A couple of comments. "Keko" was recorded by Andrew Aiona Novelty Four (Rust gives: Aiona, cl, as, dir; K. A. Theck, c; unknown as, bar; ?Sam Koki g, stg)  in Jan 1929, months before Bix with Whiteman went to Los Angeles to film "The King of Jazz." So Andrew Aiona and Carl Theck were under the spell of Bix and Tram before they had a chance to see Whiteman with Bix in LA. As I told Professor Hot Stuff, the composers of "Keko" are AIONA-KOKI-THOMAS-THECK. It is reasonable to assume that these were also the musicians in the recording ; therefore, I propose that the unknown as/bar is Thomas. Could he be Eddie Thomas who recorded in LA in 1925 with Owen Fallon and His Californians?
I can't find my copy of Bix Restored, Vol 5, which includes "Keko." What does Sudhalter tell us about "Keko'?
 
Albert


Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 1:32 PM

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"Hula Girl" was recorded on the same day.

by

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Schjyw-kgcw

Another recording with a sax solo and a Bixian trumpet solo. Also a violin, maybe Thomas or Aiona double on violin? Pahaana recorded the same day and That Lovin' Hula (available on Spotify)  recorded the next day have echoes of Bix and Tram.

Albert



Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 1:52 PM

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I forgot to mention that "Hula Girl" is ....

by

.... one of the tracks in Nick Dellow's double CD "The Inluence of Bix Beiderbecke." Our friend Rob Rothberg describes this recording as "which will have you imagining Trumbauer's band transplanted to the beach at Waikiki." Indeed!

Albert



Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 3:40 PM

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Andrew Aiona

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Andy Iona

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Andrew Aiona Long[1]
Born (1902-01-01)January 1, 1902
 Waimea, Kauai County, Hawaii, U.S.[2]
Died November 9, 1966(1966-11-09) (aged 64)
Santa Anita, California, U.S.
Spouse(s) Leimomi Woodds
Children Lanette, Edra, Andrea[3]

Andy Iona (born Andrew Aiona Long, January 1, 1902 November 9, 1966) was an American musician and one of Hawaii's most influential musicians. He was a composer, songwriter, conductor, saxophonist, and steel guitarist.[4] He went to the Kamehameha School for Boys. He was also educated at Henri Berger's Private School of Music in Honolulu.

He was a member of the radio station KHS staff orchestra. He went on to form his own group called Andy Iona and his Islanders, which mixed traditional Hawaiian melodies with American swing; the band appeared in films, hotels, and theatres, and on records. He composed songs for the American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers after joining in 1940, and recorded the music for two Soundies in 1941. Long toured with Sonja Henie for 12 years.

He married Leimomi Woodds and had three children.



Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 3:52 PM

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RE: "Keko"

by

Sudhalter's liner notes to Bix Restored V. 5 (which could be subtitled "Bix and the Bixians") don't add much to your excellent memory. Following his discussion of "Dream Child" by Carl Webster's Yale Collegians, he writes, "Also, the cornet player (possibly K. A. Theck) on Andrew Aiona's 1929 'Keko,' shows beyond question that Bix and his conception had become perhaps a universal standard in approaching 'hot' material. These solos show beyond doubt that melodic material could be delivered without raising the voice, in such a way as to charm and invite thought about an emotional mixture.

'Keko' shows, too, that the 'elegant-hot' sound pioneered on Trumbauer's records could be just as influential on an entire band as the sound of Bix's horn was to soloists. Using only four musicians, Aiona's group achieves a remarkably full emulation of the breezy, relaxed sound of such Trumbauer gems as "Crying All Day.'"



Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 5:53 PM

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Thank you.

by

The late Richard Sudhalter certainly had a way with words. What a great writer! His prose was impeccable.

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 7:47 AM

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Step Back a Pace, Everyone.

by

Sure, this record and its session-mates feature a cornetist with strong Bixian leanings. I daresay Mr. Theck got the Bix Thing in his playing better than anyone at the time, with the possible exception of Mystery Guy on "Cradle of Love."

HOWEVER, this focus on Bix and his influence obfuscates (love that word!) the most remarkable quality of these records: This is a quartet, creating the illusion of a full orchestra. With merely three horns and one guitar, Andy Aiona and company produce a sound texture that makes us think we're hearing twice that many players. I've heard this stunt pulled off successfully by a six-piece group (Joseph Robichaux and his New Orleans Rhythm Boys; the John Kirby Sextet), but never by a quartet. We just take the orchestral sound for granted, and only later do we do the double-take and say, "Waitaminit! - that's only FOUR GUYS??"

The key member of the foursome is the guitarist. The whole rhythm support stands or falls with him. His playing is unhurried, incisive, rock-steady in tempo, harmonically flawless and big-toned. He's right by the mike, making his individual sound as big as the three horns playing together.

The three horns blend with perfect intonation and phrasing, making a formidable tutti. They are as tight a unit as any Benny Carter sax section. Individually, they give full expression to each note, and leave telling rhythmic silences between them. Each plays with a decided "bigness" that enhances their sound, both in solos and collectively. When one horn solos, the other two riff or lay down a two-part organ harmony behind him, for a three-layered effect. When one horn plays a break, with the other three players silent, he perfectly sustains the rhythmic continuity. You, the listener, or the dancer, never are troubled by dropped or hurried beats. No one ever drops the ball. The total effect is mesmerizing.

The real secret weapon, and the fifth and sixth members of the quartet, are the recording engineer and the acoustically rich ROOM where all this gorgeousness took place. That guy knew exactly where to place the players for a perfect, satisfying balance. His weighting of the guitar sound to equal the three horns is sheer genius. The horns are close enough to the mike to be heard directly, but far enough away to take advantage of this big, resonant space, where the sounds bouncing off the walls enhance the effect tremendously. These sides would never have sounded as well in a "dry," unresonant room.

Altogether, Andy Aiona and associates pulled off an aural illusion worthy of Houdini.

-Brad Kay

Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 9:54 AM

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Excellent analysis.

by

Sudhalter also was impressed by the recreation of the sound of the Trumbauer's orchestra by a mere quartet. I agree that the guitarist deserves a lot of credit. But so does Andrew Aiona: he hired the musicians, was the director and probably arranger (he was a mutli-instrumentalist), got the contract for two recording sessions and surely was the driving force behind the recreation of the Bix and Tram sound.

And let's not forget that Andrew Aiona was a member of Sol Hoopi's Novelty Trio in April 1928 and that the Trio (without Aiona, granted) had recorded "Singin' the Blues" one month earlier, in March 1928. 

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 1:32 PM

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Speaking of Sol Hoopi, why did he throw in sucn a long interpolation ....

by

.... of Gershwin's "Fascinating Rhythm" in his recording of "12th Street Rag"?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uxyxiTtW8c

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 1:54 PM

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Re: "Keko"

by

Brad is right to speak up for the recording engineer (and perhaps the room) as one of the stars here. For this period this record creates a strong feeling of that "separation" between the instruments, presumably without any kind of stereo equipment available, sought in later years.

Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 1:56 PM

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Andy Aiona, the arranger.

by

From "The Hawaiian Steel Guitar and Its Great Hawaiian Musicians" edited by Lorene Ruymar:

"He [Andy Aiona] could do an entire orchestra arrangement without working on an instrument, and then turn it over to the band and they would play it with no hitch."

Albert



Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 3:00 PM

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Ai - Ai - Ai - Aiona!!

by

Andy gets full marks and oak leaf clusters for these records. He's truly the mastermind here. He created and sustained, over three sessions producing four issued and two unissued sides, a unique, breath-taking musical environment. Every hair is in place, everyone does their job superbly. There is complete unanimity of expression. You can't ask for better in music, or art in general.

These records should win a special Grammy award for "Performance Greater Than the Sum of its Parts."

Another one-off session I would nominate for such an award is the astounding September 23, 1929 date by The Dixie Rhythm Kings, directed by Omer Simeon.

DIXIE RHYTHM KINGS
Chicago, September 23, 1929.
Omer Simeon, cl, as, dir: Shirley Clay, George Mitchell, c / Cecil Irwin, cl, ts / William Barbee, p / Claude Roberts, bj / Hayes Alvis, bb / Wallace Bishop, d.

C-4391-A Story Book Ball Br 7127, 4967 (Canadian)
C-4392-A Easy Rider Br 7127, 4967 (Canadian)
C-4393-B The Chant Br 7115
C-4394-B Congo Love Song Br 7115

You just gotta hear these...

Brad K

Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 8:00 PM

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Agree about Dixie Rhythm Kings...

by Russell Davies

...but what you're looking at is pretty much Earl Hines's Orchestra of that moment; so these guys were not only used to playing together, but might even have been relieved to be free of Hines's rhythmic stunts at the piano. Band recordings under Hines's name at the time were ragged compared with these.
R.D.

Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 12:49 PM

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Hines vs. Simeon

by

True - the Earl Hines band's 1929 Victor records are not all they could have been, given the talent. The difference in musical greatness between those sides and the Dixie Rhythm Kings is large. The DRK is one trombone and one sax short of being the full Hines band; five of the eight players are from Hines, and William Barbee on piano might as well be Earl Hines himself for all I can tell. BUT the real difference is in Omer Simeon's take-charge direction, not to mention his immaculate clarinet playing. He must have drilled these guys to a crispy turn before they all showed up at Brunswick, and the hard work paid off.

Omer Simeon did a fair amount of recording in the 20s and 30s, always as a sideman. The Dixie Rhythm Kings date was the one chance he got to show what kind of a leader he was. He ran with it as if his life depended on it! I wish Omer could have had more opportunities like this. He deserved them.

-Brad Kay



Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 10:54 PM

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And there is a Bix connection.......

by Steve Robins

Simion was Pee Wee's favourite Clarinetist.

Steve

Posted on Feb 6, 2014, 6:31 AM

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Excellent transfers of all four issued recordings of ....

by

.... Andrew Aiona's Novelty Four thanks to the generosity of Nick.

The Novelty Four had three recording sessions in Los Angeles on Jan 14, 15 and 22, 1929. Six recordings were cut, but only four issued, two each on Col 1728-D and 1788-D.

Jan 14 - Hula Girl 147806-3  https://www.dropbox.com/s/rlyiw36hjy8ffw6/AionaNoveltyFourHulaGirl.mp3
Jan 14 - Pahaana 147807-2  https://www.dropbox.com/s/bdk9astbirnhob8/AionaNoveltyFourPaAhana.mp3
Jan 14 - Keko 147808-2  https://www.dropbox.com/s/al6deeka0x89hzp/AionaNoveltyFourKeko.mp3
Jan 22 -That Lovin' Hula 147820-3  https://www.dropbox.com/s/ujoma8iuengfe5z/AionaNoveltyFourThatLovinHula.mp3

The listings in the 78 online website:

1728D ANDY IONA'S NOVELTY FOUR HULA GIRL W147806=3 - (LA) 1/14/29 SONNY CUNHA
1728D ANDY IONA'S NOVELTY FOUR KEKO W147808=2 - (LA) 1/14/29 AIONA-KOKI-THOMAS-THECK

1788D ANDY IONA'S NOVELTY FOUR PAAHANA W147807=2 - (LA) 1/14/29 -
1788D ANDY IONA'S NOVELTY FOUR THAT LOVIN' HULA W147820=3 - - 1/22/29 -

Thanks very much, Nick. Excellent sound quality and great recordings. Bix and Tram all over the place. All recordings end kind of abruptly. The intro to "That Lovin' Hula" is "inspired" by that in Bix and Tram's "Im Coming Virginia."

If the trumpet player is Karl/Carl Albert Theck, what happened to him after he made these recordings? We know from the US Census that he continued being a musician at least until 1940. I have done a lot of searching, but have not found any information. If anyone has access to Los Angeles Times archives, that is a place worth searching. I don't have access to these.

Albert



Forum Owner

Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 11:54 AM

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Image of One of the Record Labels.

by

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 12:09 PM

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Alert about Keko

by

There is something wrong with the mp3 file of Keko. I asked Nick for another copy and will replace the one I uploaded.

Albert



Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 12:11 PM

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Problem fixed.

by

Thanks to Nick for his prompt response to my request for a new mp3 file.

Albert



Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 12:44 PM

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Some Great Insights

by

Some wonderful comments and observations on "Keko." Thanks all.

Rich Conaty did indeed play it for me on his "Big Broadcast" show Sunday night (wfuv.org),
though he didn't say too much about the record.

Just one amplification of my own. It's not very common in 1929 for a jazz
record to create such a mood as Keko. Am I right? Louis in those days was wonderfully sad, or happy--a tour de force,
but easier to pin down. Bix's moods are more elusive, harder to categorize with other jazz records.

Keko. How often do we hear romantic longing, humor, sadness, all so unhurried and in such a carefully
constructed way? Truly a salute to Bix.

Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 5:11 PM

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I am wondering...

by John Leifert

...if Keck was possibly a member of Vic Meyers' Music in the late 20s, who recorded for Columbia in 1928 and 1929. (Some of these tracks say recorded in "New York", ie the 1929 sides, but I have my doubts - albeit not having seen what the new ADBD books say about that!). Several of the Meyers' sides have that same wonderful "empty ballroom" sound and that warm West Coast openness, and the alto sax soloist (who can be heard on "Congratulations" and several other sides) bears somewhat of a resemblance to the wonderful alto sax we hear on these Iona sides. Of course I have nothing to back this up with at all, but just something to think about.

John L

Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 12:05 PM

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Spiegle Willcox and Meyers' Congratulations.

by

From http://www.vjm.biz/articles3.htm

"Only a few weeks before his recent death, Goldkette alumnus Spiegle Willcox, listening to Col 2026-D, said he thought the bass player to be Steve Brown."

Col 2026-D by Vic Meyers has Congratulations on one side and Melancholy on the other. Recorded on Oct 25 and 28, 1929. All discographies place the recording sessions in New York City.

From http://www.angelfire.com/music5/tony2003/html/tt.html  Get a load of this, John!!

VIC MEYERS' MUSIC (1929)
14.  Congratulations (Columbia 2026-D, mx. 149186-1)
15.  Melancholy (Columbia 2026-D, mx. 149451-1) sounds like same alto player as on Iona's "Keko"

I am pretty sure the alto sax player in Keko was Andy Aiona himself. As far as I know Aiona spent all his professional career in California.

Albert



Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 3:02 PM

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Melancholy by Vic Meyers.

by

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wgxAeAArVQ

Albert



Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 3:22 PM

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Amazing photos of the Vic Meyers band!

by John Leifert

From a blog. Enjoy !!
http://www.home.earthlink.net/~cdmsea/cdmsea@earthlink.net/photo.htm

John L

Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 3:36 PM

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I think "Congratulations"..

by John Leifert

Thanks for this Albert - These are actually track lists of privately distributed CDR's that I (and Dan Levinson) had a hand in compiling, believe it or not! There isn't an alto sax solo on "Melancholy", but there is on "Congratulations".

This is basically the same Meyers band that recorded for Columbia in 1928 (which WERE West Coast-recorded); perhaps he brought the band to New York for recording purposes, or tied the recording dates in with a dance engagement in NY. I wonder if there is an itinerary for this band at the time? It would clear up the recording location, for sure.

Here's "Melancholy" by Vic Meyers - notice the great BIXIAN arranged chorus for trombone and brass after the vocal!:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3wgxAeAArVQ

I don't have a link to "Congratulations" (available on Timeless Historical as a compilation of the West Coast Vic MEYERS band along with the other VIC MYERS', an Atlanta band) - but there is a nice alto sax solo which has the relaxed feel of Iona...yet probably isn't.

John L

Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 3:34 PM

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We were writing at the same time.

by

Congratulations is available in Spotify. Very good alto solo. If you guys are desperate to hear it, I'll upload it.

Albert



Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 3:44 PM

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Vic Meyers before he became a politician.

by

[linked image]

From http://www.historylink.org/index.cfm?DisplayPage=output.cfm&File_Id=8392

He [Victor Aloysius Meyer] wsas born on September 7, 1897, in Little Falls, Minnesota, the 15th of 16 children. His mother, a pianist, inspired his pursuit of music. He played several instruments, specializing in drums. His father, a longtime Morrison County Treasurer, gave him a model for a life of elected public service. (Deviney)

His family moved to Oregon, and Victor embarked on a fast-rising musical career, playing drums professionally at a Seaside, Oregon, resort while still a teenager. He went on to tour the country with his own 10-piece band and was contracted by Brunswick Records.

The Meyers Band played at Seattle's Trianon at 3rd Avenue and Wall Street; did coast-wide radio broadcasts, and landed a long-term engagement in the Rose Room in Seattle's posh Butler Hotel at 114 James Street. He later built his own Club Victor in a former garage on 4th Avenue in the Denny Regrade.

He often told the story of auditioning a jug-eared, young tenor with a peculiar singing style that prompted Meyers to counsel the singer to seek another profession. The aspiring songster turned out to be none other than the later-to-be-one-of-the-most-acclaimed entertainers of a generation, Harry Lillis (Bing) Crosby.

Albert

The Butler Hotel, Seattle.

[linked image]

Vic Meyers and His Orchestra

[linked image]



Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 3:39 PM

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Vic Meyers from Dance Hall to City Hall by Ate van Delden.

by

http://www.vjm.biz/articles3.htm

Albert



Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 4:09 PM

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Another jazz musician who went into politics

by

Noni Bernardi, who led the sax section in Tommy Dorsey's first band as a leader on his own (without his brother Jimmy) and arranged Dorsey's trademark recording of "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You," later ran for the Los Angeles City Council (under his original name, Ernani Bernardi), was elected and served for decades.

Posted on Feb 19, 2014, 3:30 PM

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Another West Coast band with a string bassist that plays like Steve Brown.

by

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1285947583/%26quot%3BPretty+Little+Thing%26quot%3B+by++Herman+Kenin+and+his+Multnomah+Hotel+Orchestra

Albert

 



Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 4:04 PM

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A great photo of Herman Kenin's Multinomah Hotel Orchestra

by

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 4:06 PM

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Andy [A]iona and Louis Armstrong

by

The complete Mosaic Records boxed set of Louis Armstrong's 1935-1946 recordings for Decca features these two tracks: "On a Little Bamboo Bridge" and "Hawai'ian Hospitality." The personnel are listed as follows:

Louis Armstrong (t, vcl) with Andy Iona and His Islanders: Sam Koki (steel g), George Archer, Harry Baty (g, vcl), Andy Iona (uk), Joe Nawahi (b) N.Y.C., 3/24/37

Notice the New York recording location and that Iona is credited with playing ukulele only. If this is indeed the same Andy [A]iona who made "Keko," this connects him with both the jazz cornet/trumpet giants of the 1920's!

Posted on Feb 19, 2014, 3:29 PM

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Time to vote ....

by

.... to determine this year's inductees into the Nesuhi Ertegun Hall of Fame

http://academy.jalc.org/hall-of-fame/

Bix was inducted in 2004. See (some of the links to the images are no longer operational)

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/ertegunjazzhalloffame.html

Albert



Posted on Jan 31, 2014, 10:21 AM

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Rollini and Whiteman.

by

It just occurred to me that Whiteman did not try to hire Rollini (at least, I believe this to be the case). It is surprising, isn't it? Whiteman was always on the lookout to hire great jazz musicians. The dissolution of the New Yorkers was a good chance for Whiteman to get Rollini. Here are the 11 musicians (note 1)  in the New Yorkers band:

[linked image]

Bix, Hooley, Rank, Murray, Tram, Davis, Rollini, Venuti, Lang, Signorelli, Morehouse. When the New Yorkers folded, Bix and Tram joined Whiteman. A couple of months later, Rank followed. A year and a half later, Lang and Venuti joined Whiteman. Signorelli had been with Whiteman just before joining the New Yorkers. 6 of the 11 were with Whiteman at one point or another.  How come Rollini was not hired by Whiteman when the New Yorkers folded. Did Rollini already have his job with Elizalde lined up? Perhaps. But when Rollini returned permanently to New York in 1930, is it not surprising that Whiteman did not try to hire Rollini? Or did he? They knew each other from way back. According to Don Rayno, Whiteman went to the Ramblers Inn in the summer of 1925 and said, "I need a touch of jazz in my band. But he's got to be a real musician to play with me." Adrian Rollini recommended Ted Bartell.

Whiteman hired Art Rollini , Adrian's younger brother, in 1933 (just for one month!)

Albert

Note 1. Vince Giordano's Nighthawks also consist of 11 musicians and the instrumentation is identical to that of the New Yorkers: 2 trumpets, 1 trombone, 3 reeds, 1 bass sax, 1 piano, 1 violin, 1 guitar, 1 traps. Coincidence or a deliberate choice? I would guess the latter.

 



Posted on Jan 30, 2014, 2:59 PM

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Speaking of Rollini.

by

Take a look at this record label: Fred Elizalde's Rhythmusicians  - Directed by Adrian Rollini.

[linked image]

Read the story and listen to the recording in http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1301491258/A+Beautiful+and+Rare+Record-

Albert



Posted on Jan 31, 2014, 4:31 PM

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Another label of an Elizalde recording with Rollini's name.

by

Twice: as composer and as player. Note also that the tune is described as a "Yale Blues," a popular dance and song in England in the 1920s.

[linked image]

Also Chelsea Quealey and the underrated Bobby Davis on the label. Elizalde and His "Hot" Music was a band within the band: it consisted of Quealey, Davis, Rollini, Elizalde, Fillis and Gubertini.

Albert



Posted on Jan 31, 2014, 5:27 PM

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Re: Another label of an Elizalde recording with Rollini's name.

by Nick Dellow


Another "Yale Blues" - at least, described as such!



Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 4:56 AM

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From the Mouth of Miff Mole

by

"Vic Berton, Arthur Schutt, Bix Beiderbecke, Jimmy Dorsey and I decided that we were going to make the greatest records evere made. We took along two quarts of gin and went up to the Gennett studios. Well, we drank for an hour and a half, played about half an hour, and were then told, not too politely, to leave. We hadn't cut any records, but we didn't mind. We climbed to the top of a Fifth Avenue bus and played there, all the way home."


- also from Hear Me Talkin' to Ya. I can't stop reading it...


BK

Posted on Jan 30, 2014, 11:08 AM

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A memorable quote.

by

Note that the five guys played the same instruments as the guys in the ODJB. Were they going to recreate the ODJB? I read that Bix could play all the parts in ODJB recordings.

Brad, I don't want to throw cold water on your posting; it is worth revisiting every few years. The quote or parts of it have been transcribed in the forum several times.

2003  http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1055184103/
2007  http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1182944365/
2012  http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1346684539/

Albert



Posted on Jan 30, 2014, 1:08 PM

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WBIX # 219.

by

Radio Program # 219. (loaded on 01/30/2014) Fred Elizalde Plays Tunes that Bix Recorded. 57.3 min

Real Audio
Streaming File   http://bixography.com/WBIX219.ram
Download File   http://bixography.com/WBIX219.rm   14.1 MB


mp3 files
Streaming mp3 file   http://bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX219.m3u
     
Download file    
        bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX219.mp3   55.3 MB

All recordings by Fred Elizalde's bands or piano solos where noted..

Clarinet Marmalade. Aug-Sep 1927.
Sugar. Jan 15, 1928.
Coquette. Jul 2-11, 1928.
Smile. Apr, 1928.
Can't Help Lovin' That Man.. May 1928. Piano solo.
Ol' Man River. Jul 2-11, 1928. Piano solo.
Somebody Stole My Girl [sic]. May 1928.
Tiger Rag. Jan 15, 1928.
The Man I Love. May 1928. Piano solo.
My Pet. May 1928. Vocal by Dick Maxwell.
Bomeyard Shuffle. Jun 1926.
Hurricane. Mar 28, 1927.

WBIX # 229 will be uploaded on Feb 28, 2014.

Enjoy!

Albert





Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 12:46 PM

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Re: WBIX #218

by

Very enjoyable!

Posted on Jan 30, 2014, 6:53 AM

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Thank you!.

by

Elizalde had a great band all the time, but the Anglo-American band with Rollini, Quealey and Davis was something else. At least as good, if not better, than the best hot dance bands in the US in the second half of the 1920s. "Clarinet Marmalade" is a real hot number, isn't it?

Albert



Posted on Jan 30, 2014, 9:24 AM

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Two additional Bix tunes recorded by Fred Elizalde.

by

At the end of WBIX #219, I mentioned that there were other Bix tunes recorded by Elizalde that I didn't have. In fact, there are, as far as I know, two. Now, thanks to the generosity of Nick, we can listen to the two recordings. Both piano solos.

Baltimore - Mar 11, 1928.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/ju07f1inaj7ftxn/FredElizaldeBaltimore2.mp3

Way Down Yonder in New Orleans - Aug 1927.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/ic6sn8xjb7xbnnw/FredElizaldeWayDownYonder2.mp3

A bonus from Nick: a photo of Fred Elizalde with Adrian Rollini's wife Dixie (Dorothy), somewhere  on a ship in the Atlantic Ocean.
[linked image]

Thanks, Nick, for all your contributions.

Albert

PS An old posting about Elizalde's recording of "Dixie."
http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1195073545/Dixie,+a+composition+by+the+great+Adrian+Rollini,+and+an+interpretation+by++.....

If you don't have real player, here is an mp3 file of "Dixie." Excellent sound and sight by our friend Enrico.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MwrRV9r9HyQ



Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 7:20 AM

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An unissued alternate take of "Dance, Little Lady" by Fred Elizalde and his Music,

by

This comes from Nick. He writes, "This contains different solos to the issued take, most noticeably Adrian Rollini has a solo whereas he doesn't on the issued take. The original test pressing is on a flexible plastic disc that Duophone, who owned British Brunswick at the time, must have been experimenting with, though as far as I am aware they never issued a flexible recording. It is for this reason that the start is a bit "jumpy" as the disc is warped on the outer part of the grooves (due to slight shrinkage)."

https://www.dropbox.com/s/i7qjw942ayvb18w/FredElizaldeDanceLittleLady%28alttk%29.mp3

Thanks a lot Nick. Nice dialogue between Adrian Rollini and a Bixian Chelsea Quealey.

Albert

PS The photo of Dixie and Fred in the previous posting was unlikely to have been taken on a ship in the Atlantic Ocean. More likely in La Manche, known in the English-speaking world as the English Channel.



Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 8:08 AM

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English Channel

by Nick Dellow


The official designation "English Channel" can be traced back to the second-century geographer Ptolemy, who called it the Oceanus Britannicus. Manche, on the other hand, is a department in Lower Normandy where it rains a lot.


Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 2:27 PM

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Re: La Manche.

by

The map below shows Northern France, Southern England and the body of water that separates them, La Manche. This is how I learned it in elementary school. And the narrow section between Calais and Douvres (Dover) is "Le Pas de Calais," known in the English-speaking world as the "Strait of Dover." The islands in La Manche are the "Iles anglo-normandes," known in the English-speaking world as the "Channel Islands." "Cap Lizard" in Cornouailles in French maps becomes Lizard Point in Cornwall in English maps. I think that the names in French are so much more romantic. happy.gif

Albert

Carte_de_la_Manche.png



Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 5:57 PM

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Re: La Manche.

by Nick Dellow


I do so agree with you about French being the most romantic language. It is epitomised for me in the singing of that great "chanteur" Jean Sablon, especially when accompanied by Django ( such ashttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6eZpHPg0ZY ). Then I think of the excellent times I have had cycling in and around Paris, stopping off at little cafes and bistros at regular intervals in order to maintain the expanding waistline. And I agree that La Manche certainly sounds more romantic than the English translation "The Sleeve".

The entente cordiale is maintained!



Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 2:46 AM

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Jean Sablon was my sister's second favorite French singer.

by

This is one she likes a lot (and so do I).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFRIVH3vYj0

Albert



Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 2:17 PM

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Re: English Channel? La Manche?

by

There you have it--the on-going love-hate relationship between the English and the French language. I had to chuckle. This discussion sent me to look up the definition of "manche," which according to the Oxford Dictionaries means "sleeve" or "handle." If you visualize Lands End as the armpit, the Channel does look a bit like a sleeve. "Handle" also works as a long extension of the sea, so both descriptives make sense as names for this body of water, as does "channel" as a narrow strip of deep water. Since "channel" is itself derived from French, I guess ze Frogs win either way!

I don't think Dr. Haim is guilty of this bit of English predilection for the French version over the Anglo-Saxon, which dates back to the days following William the Conqueror's imposition of French as the English court language and firmly entrenched to this day in native English speakers. His ancestors had no part in that little cousins' coup, but when we Anglophones are trying to sound a bit snooty, we go for the Frenchified word every time. We don't eat a big roast of cow; it's always beef, And the English language is much the richer for it!

Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 5:53 AM

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A lovely program

by

Wow! I hadn't known until I heard this how good Fred Elizalde was, both as bandleader and pianist. It makes me lament his departure of the world of jazz for classical music, and also makes me curious to hear his work (if any of it survives) as a classical composer and conductor. What I find most interesting about this is how relaxed the Elizalde band played, how they were able to make fine and swinging music without rushing the tempi or using obvious "hot" mannerisms. A lot of groups that covered Original Dixieland Jazz Band standards like "Clarinet Marmalade" and "Tiger Rag" in the 1920's raced through them to little effect; Elizalde and his musicians play both songs in a light, swinging groove that projects them at their best and gives them a tasteful updating for late-1920's listeners and record buyers.

There have been debates back and forth on the forum before as to just how close the Elizalde versions of "Sugar" and "My Pet" are to Bix's versions, to the point where they almost count as tribute records! It's obvious Elizalde must have access to written scores of the Bill Challis arrangements of these songs; how else could he have reproduced them so accurately when the U.S. recordings had either not been made at all yet or hadn't been issued in the U.K.? I must say, though, that when Chelsea Quealey (usually an excellent musician) hits a few wrong notes at the start of his solo on "Sugar" there's a bit of a bringdown, especially compared to Bix's perfection on both issued takes of the Whiteman version.

Also, as much as I like the sound of Elizalde's band, the tracks here I liked best are the piano solos (which makes me glad you later added two more of them, "The Baltimore" and "Way Down Yonder in New Orleans"). Elizalde, both on his solo records and playing piano solos with his band, is an excellent, surprisingly modern musician. His solo records remind me of the way George Gershwin played when he recorded his own songs. Next to Elizalde, his best soloist seems to have been Bobby Davis, though the reedman sounds less like Frank Trumbauer than he does like Jimmy Dorsey (not a bad model either!).

And just to clarify the connection between "Hurricane" and "Waiting at the End of the Road": "Waiting at the End of the Road" was written by Irving Berlin in 1929 for the all-Black MGM musical film "Hallelujah!," where it's heard at a giant revival ceremony on a riverbank. The film's star, Daniel Haynes (Paul Robeson's understudy in "Show Boat," cast by director King Vidor after Robeson was unavailable), starts by preaching a sermon, then goes into a kind of half-spoken, half-sung style similar to the way actual African-American preachers speak (and also an ancestor to today's "rap" or "hip-hop" style), and finally ends up fully singing the Berlin song. So Paul Mertz's piece came first and Berlin's came later, though there may be an African-American spiritual or folk tune that contains this melody and which they both copied.

Just one glitch this time: a portion of the final announcement (in which you discuss "Waiting at the End of the Road" just before the outro music) is heard twice.

Posted on Feb 8, 2014, 7:12 PM

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No glitch

by

My mistake this time, not yours. The glitch I referred to above was introduced by me. I copied that last announcement twice when I put the show on CD.

Posted on Feb 9, 2014, 7:45 AM

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You made my day!

by

Thanks for the detailed, thoughtful and favorable review. Mark, I appreciate the time you take to comment on the WBIX programs.

Albert



Posted on Feb 9, 2014, 9:06 AM

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Radio Transmission of Sheet Music.

by

I believe that radio transmission of documents was first carried out in 1921 or 22. Contracts and official documents were pohoto-radioed throughout the 1920s (and later, of course).

A fascinating application in subjects relevant to this forum is the the radio transmission of sheet music.

The Dec 22, 1928 issue of the Buffalo Evening News carried a story titled "New Song is Photo-radioed to London." Here is a facsimile of the story in the newspaper:

[linked image]

One of the exciting features of the story is that the great dance band/jazz/ director Fred Elizalde was present at the receiving end of the transmission.

Here are some photos. of the custom ball.

1926 - [linked image]

1925 - [linked image]

And a fantastic movie (silent, of course) from 1921:
http://www.britishpathe.com/video/three-arts-ball/query/01102400

Can you guess what is the dance. I can state with certainty that it is not a waltz. happy.gif

Albert



Posted on Jan 28, 2014, 1:08 PM

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"My Pet"

by

Last October, after the release of WBIX show 216, there was an intriguing discussion of the similarities between the Frank Trumbauer and Fred Elizalde recordings of "My Pet" and a lot of bizarre conjecturing about how Elizalde might have heard or got hold of Bill Challis' arrangement of the song before the Trumbauer record was released in the U.K. Could this provide the explanation -- could it be that the Challis arrangement was radio-transmitted to Elizalde before he made his record?

Posted on Jan 28, 2014, 5:55 PM

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It is possible.

by

But Nick's suggestion is more plausible:  Rollini picked up the Challis arrangement of the tune when he visited the US in April 1928.

Albert



Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 7:38 AM

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my pet

by al heenan

Is it possible that Rollini was actually present in th OK studio when this number was recorded?

Posted on Jan 30, 2014, 6:20 AM

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It is possible.

by

Frank Trumbauer and His Orchestra. Apr 10, 1928. Ok 41039 (take C, released Jun 5, 1928).

Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra. Apr 22, 1928. Vic 21389 (take 2, released Jun 8, 1928). Arranged by Bill Challis (Apr 1928, # 1743, Williams College Whiteman Collection).

The Trumbauer recording is the important one because both intro and coda were used in Elizalde' recording.

Here is information about Adrian Rollini's itinerary in April 1928.

Adrian Rollini came back to the US twice during the tenure of his contract with Elizalde. The first trip was in April 1928. Arthur Rollini writes: "We were now into 1928. Dad had taken a turn for the worse the previous fall and could no longer work. By Christmas he was confined to his bed and Dr. Cantle came daily to give him relief with an opiate. Mom stayed by his bedside constantly in order to respond to his every little wish. Dr. Cantle sometimes came twice a day. Finally Mom cabled Adrian, telling him to return immediately. Adrian took the first ship out of England and arrived home on April 3rd [1928]. Dad was in a terribly weakened condition by now. Adrian phoned Dixie, his fiancée, and she was ready when he arrived to pick her up. He drove her back to our house and they both entered Dad's room. Adrian asked, "Dad, can you hear me?" Dad nodded affirmatively. Adrian said,"Dad this is Dixie. I want to marry her, do I have your blessing?" Dad put out his hand. Adrian bent down and Dad's hand brushed his face and he nodded in the affirmative again. Adrian kissed his father on the cheek and departed with Dixie. They had a lot to talk about. It had been such a long time. Adrian and Dixie were married on 6 April 1928. During the night of April 14th Dad grew weaker and we kept a steady vigil. The nest morning, Sunday, the Baron was dead. After the funeral Adrian and Dixie took the Homeric to England." [4] Before returning to England, Adrian Rollini recorded two sides, on April 24, 1928, with the Dorsey Brothers -My Melancholy Baby and Indian Cradle Song.

In summary: Adrian was back in the States on Apr 3. He got married on Apr 6. His dad died on Apr 15. So Adrian was in New York when Trumbauer recorded "My Pet" on Apr 10. But with his marriage and his dad very ill and dying, it seems unlikely to me, but possible, that Adrian would have been in the OKeh studio on Apr 10. Would Adrian remember note for note the intro and coda in May 1928 when he was back in England and record "My Pet" with Elizalde? Possible, but unlikely in my opinion. It seems more plausible to me that he had a copy of Challis's arrangement.

Albert

Albert



Posted on Jan 30, 2014, 9:21 AM

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Dorsey Brothers My Melancholy Baby

by Nick Dellow



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9n7rum4WDh8




Posted on Jan 30, 2014, 10:31 AM

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The coda in the Dorsey Brothers' "My Melancholy Baby" ....

by

.... was used, unless I'm dreaming, in another recording, but I can't think of  the band or of the actual recording. Anyone?

Albert



Posted on Jan 30, 2014, 11:05 AM

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melancholy baby

by al heenan

This is the performance where the drummer arrives late, i.e., does nothing until half-way through!

Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 6:10 AM

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Dorsey's "Melancholy Baby"

by

I can't help with the coda question, but I am moved to say that almost every song I hear with Jimmy Dorsey raises my opinion of his musical abilities. He really steals the show on this one. As Bix usually did, Jimmy has a way of fitting his playing, particularly his improvisations, to that tune, bringing out its essence somehow and taking the song over the top!

I always knew he was an important bandleader and sax player in the swing era, but his work in the 1920s is so fine that I think he deserves more attention than he gets as one of the real clarinet masters of that era.

Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 5:44 AM

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Come to me, but hurry up baby

by Steve Robins

Hello Nick. This is a nice clean record which enabled me to hear one or two things I had not previously noticed. But - and here I go again riding my old hobby horse - this is not how the musicians played it. Here we have a sonic equivalent to the films of the same period where people could be seen moving around at accelerated speed. Someone at some point, perhaps during transciption, has changed the speed of the recording and this one is consequently running much too fast, a full half tone too fast. So for anyone who wishes to copy this recording and who likes to here how the musicians were really playing I would suggest using some retuning software to bring it down half a tone. Sorry about the niggle, but yes, "les humeurs noirs" do get me a bit when I hear originals adulterated.

While we are on the subject of Rollini, Nick, you once posted a question,which remaind unanswered, a good few years back, concerning Rollini and his use of multiphonics, in relation to a specific recording if I remember correctly. The question was, more or less, was it a mistake or was it intentional. I intended to reply but the subject needed a little reflection and I was short of time, so I made a note of it and the piece of paper stayed by the computer for a while before it got misslayed in a house move.If ever you could find the original question, I would still have a shot at it.

cheers
Steve

Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 8:04 AM

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Re: Come to me, but hurry up baby

by Nick Dellow


Hi Steve,

Nice to hear from you.

I think you may possibly have assumed that I am responsible for this transfer. Just to be 100% clear, this is not my transfer - I just noticed it on YouTube and copied the link!

As to the Rollini question, I'm sorry but the mists of time have rolled across to add to the general fog. But I can imagine that it's the sort of question I would pose. Rollini certainly deliberately "over-blows" when he solos (if that's what you mean by "multiphonics") and I think the effect is excellent when not over-done. He does it at the start of Venuti's "Beating The Dog". Of course, it's relatively easy to over-blow on the bass sax - I haven't heard anyone do it on the soprano sax! Jimmy Dorsey did it to good effect on alto sax in the 1920s.

I'll try and dig out the original question.

Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 10:34 AM

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The Rollinophone - or how one man reinvented a sax

by Steve Robins

No, not for one minute did I think it was your transfer. I understood what you had done. So my criticisms were in no way aimed at you, or anyone else. I just wanted to say that speeding up a recording, especially if by as much as a half tone, transforms the sound. Its the beginning of the chipmunk effect, even if that, to be accurate, is achieved by changing the frequency and formants while leaving the speed alone. It may seem finicky, but for a musician, hearing things out of tune can be annoying even if you don't have perfect pitch.

Recordings, right from the beginning and up to the present day were a means of discovery and learning for musicians, jazz musicians perhaps more particularly. It was a tool they could use at home, to emulate and play along with their heroes. They all did it. Bix was no exception. It helps a great deal if what you hear plays in tune. Most 78s issued were to some degree out of tune. Some were way out. Having a player with which you could vary the turntable speed made things a lot easier. I'm pretty sure that I read somewhere on this site that Bix did just that at home.

The question concerning Rollini I more or less remember. It was whether a sound he made, overblown or otherwise, was a slip up or intentional. At the time, for that particular example, I was not at all sure, which is why I needed a bit of time. It sounded to me like it could have been either.

My personal interest in the bass sax started on hearing the "gang" recordings and notably certain, to me, very interesting sounds, of the type we talk, which I took at the time to be clinkers, and which may well they have been considering how easily the sound can break up when blowing hard on that instrument. In any case in those sounds (and all the others Rollini was making) I heard a potential, a depth, a harmonic richness which fascinated me. So maybe you can see why the subject interests me.

After listening to many Rollini recordings, it soon became clear that his use of what I will still call multiphonics for the moment, something he did througout his bass sax career, was indeed intended and controlled. I use the term multiphonics, because, the trick here, is to bring out individual notes of the harmonic series, from the fundamental note you are fingering and have more than one of them sounding distinctly at once. You can introduce notes not in that series using various techniques but Rollini was already well ahead of his time with what he did. You can call it overblowing too, which is also about playing a higher note, usually the octave. Rollini however, often fingers and plays a high note and lets the octave below (and its harmonics) sound. Almost a sort of underblowing. This he may do by leaving the octave key closed, although on some basses the efficacy of that key is questionable. I have played, for example, the bass you mentioned recently, Nick, a Beuscher, which once belonged to Harry Gold. You could put a bit of chewing gum in the octave key hole and it wouldn't make much diference. Also to produce these sounds it is often neccessary to blow much less, although overblowing is of course not just about blowing harder. Trying to explain how it is done is about as easy as explainig circular breathing.

You can play all the notes in the harmonic series individually on any saxophone (including the soprano) without moving your fingers from the fundamental note, although it is much easier in the lower register. Then you can bring out two or more, favouring one in relation to the others, for example.

I have forgotten how to insert a sound file into these messages so I am sending an mp3 of Tell Me, Rollini with The Louisiana Rhythm Kings, to Albert, which I think contains some good examples apropos. The pertinent bits are at about 1:53 and 2:53 A wonderfull control of the instrument.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/14h1j0sdhfwwe0q/TellMeLouisianaRhythmKings.mp3

Seen the enormous worldwide following that a site like this must have, and our discussing some saxophonist from the 1920s/30s nobody has ever heard of and who played an even more obscure instrument, and now me going on about the technicalities of playing that rare insrument, it has occured to me, that I might not be addressing a vast audience here, and I'm wondering if apart from Nick (if he's still awake) and myself, there are any other bass sax nutters who might just be interested. Come on Russell, I know your out there.

Steve




Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 3:15 PM

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Sorry, I was asleep...

by Russell Davies

...but I believe I'm probably the bass-sax nut referred to by Steve, the previous poster...
In some ways it's a wonderfully small world, the bsx. Harry Gold's Buescher, for example, was referred to -- I saw him play it many times. But eventually it was stolen, leaving Harry bass-less. So he borrowed my PanAmerican, an ancient beast, until a year later, his own sax was spotted in the window of a shop in, I think, Germany. He was able to prove paternity, and got it back -- so I got my PanAmerican back, too. Harry gave me 50 Rico reeds (two-and-a-half strength) in recompense. I'm still using them. If ever my bsx is stolen, it will always be identifiable from a mistake the engraver made -- where he meant to incise "Elkhart" [Indiana], he put "Elkart" instead. (I just hope he didn't do it every time.)
As for the multiphonics, I can't help thinking there's one example we haven't found yet -- it's a two-bar break where every note Rollini plays is ambiguous: you can read the whole thing two ways. It's similar in downward motion to the one at 1'06" in Bix's "At The Jazz Band Ball". I'm still looking.
R.D.

Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 3:08 PM

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Is this the two-bar break?"

by Nick Dellow

Dear Russell,

Could it be that Rollini's two-bar break at the start of Beatin' The Dog by Joe Venuti's Blue Four is the multiphonic phrase you are searching for? Here is a link to the break, followed by the two-bar break in At The Jazz Band Ball:-

https://www.dropbox.com/s/cy25hkfeg51hmbv/RollinBeatinTheDogAtTheJazzBandBall.wav

If you listen closely, you can hear the bass sax key work clattering away on Beatin' The Dog.
Nick




Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 8:31 AM

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Re: Sorry, I was asleep

by Steve Robins

The "At The Jazz Band Ball" example you give is exactly what made my ears prick up and sparked my early interest in Adolf's first born (in that family).
In the phrase in question, the first two notes Rollini brings out the 4th harmonic (3rd overtone), two octaves obove the fingered fundamental, low C, followed by three chromatically descending normal, full blown notes, E, Eflat and D in the low register. Then he plays D again but this time accenting the 3rd harmonic, high A, followed by three times low C, again with the 3rd harmonic dominant, high G.

I tried the Buescher at the home of the musician who bought it from Harry Gold and the naughty man (Gold) claimed that it had belonged to Rollini and that it was the instrument he had used while in England. Or maybe he bought it from someone who had convinced him of that. To suply all the musicians I have met over the years who claim to have, or to have had instruments belonging to Rollini, the guy would have had to be buying a new one every year. I think, however it is now recognised that Vince Giordano has the Conn once owned by Rollini .

I would really prefer to avoid the risky subject of reeds, where nuttiness can become coloured with obsessional overtones, but I am puzzeled as to how 50 reeds can be made to last so long. Is there some longevity trick I don't Know about? do you bake them in the oven, or soak them in vinegar as per conkers? (apologies to those unfamilier with this other nut and its uses)

Steve


Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 2:37 PM

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Before it housed the Cinderella Ballroom, 1600 Broadway ....

by

.... housed Rector's Restaurant, one of the  lobster palaces in New York City.

[linked image]

On Oct. 1 1914 Rector's agreed to pay $180 annually to ASCAP for the right to have ASCAP music played in the restaurant. One of the bands playing in Rector's in 1916-17 was Earl Fuller's. Here is an ad in Variety in Nov 1917.

[linked image]

What kind of dance music did Earl Fuller play in 1917 at Rector's. From Variety, Nov, 1916. Fox-trots, one-steps and waltzes:

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Jan 27, 2014, 4:26 PM

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With the successs of the ODJB, dance halls decided to jump on the wagon.

by

From Variety, March 1917.

"Rector's is preparing a Jazz (capital J in the original document) band for the ballroom floor. Earl Fuller is placing the combination together."

Albert



Posted on Jan 27, 2014, 4:55 PM

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In 1919, George Rector ....

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.... sold his interest in the restaurant: it became the Cafe de Paris.

Albert



Posted on Jan 27, 2014, 5:42 PM

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Wow, a real palm court!

by Laura Demilio

That was so popular during the 19-teens and 1920's.

Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 7:03 AM

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