The Bixography Discussion Group

A vehicle for Bixophiles and other interested individuals to ask questions, make comments and exchange information about Bix Beiderbecke and related subjects. Any views expressed in the Bixography Forum represent solely the opinions of those expressing them and are not necessarily endorsed or opposed by Albert Haim unless he has signed the message.

I started archiving some of the threads that have been inactive for some time. The archived threads can be found at http://ms.cc.sunysb.edu/~alhaim/archivesforum.htm

Albert Haim

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Before it housed the Cinderella Ballroom, 1600 Broadway ....

by

.... housed Rector's Restaurant, one of the  lobster palaces in New York City.

[linked image]

On Oct. 1 1914 Rector's agreed to pay $180 annually to ASCAP for the right to have ASCAP music played in the restaurant. One of the bands playing in Rector's in 1916-17 was Earl Fuller's. Here is an ad in Variety in Nov 1917.

[linked image]

What kind of dance music did Earl Fuller play in 1917 at Rector's. From Variety, Nov, 1916. Fox-trots, one-steps and waltzes:

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Jan 27, 2014, 4:26 PM

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With the successs of the ODJB, dance halls decided to jump on the wagon.

by

From Variety, March 1917.

"Rector's is preparing a Jazz (capital J in the original document) band for the ballroom floor. Earl Fuller is placing the combination together."

Albert



Posted on Jan 27, 2014, 4:55 PM

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In 1919, George Rector ....

by

.... sold his interest in the restaurant: it became the Cafe de Paris.

Albert



Posted on Jan 27, 2014, 5:42 PM

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Wow, a real palm court!

by Laura Demilio

That was so popular during the 19-teens and 1920's.

Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 7:03 AM

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Jean Goldkette cornered the music market in Detroit.

by

Goldkette had a petite symphony orchestra, a group of serenaders and the Victor recording orchestra.

From Radio Digest, Dec 12, 1925.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Jan 27, 2014, 2:09 PM

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More about Goldkette cornering the music market in Detroit.

by

From Variety, Sep 2, 1925.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Jan 27, 2014, 5:46 PM

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Are you familiar with Mel Thompson's drawings/posters?

by

Here are 21 images, most so-so to my taste.

http://fineartamerica.com/art/drawings/bix/posters

Albert

 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 27, 2014 1:05 PM

Posted on Jan 27, 2014, 12:33 PM

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Mel Thompson's artwork site

by

Thanks for the so-so endorsement! There are a lot of other things on my site besides the Bix items, including many sheet music covers from my collection. Also many things related to movies, fashion, baseball, advertising and the like - please take a look!

Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 5:24 PM

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Full Website

by

Here is a link to my full website that I omitted on the previous posting: www.mel-thompson.artistwebsites.com. Thanks!

Posted on Feb 3, 2014, 8:29 PM

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Dave Van Ronk

by Chris Day

Hello. I have enjoyed reading the Forum for years. Now I have a query. The latest Coen brothers film, "Inside Llewn Davis", is based loosely on the life of the folk musician Dave Van Ronk. This side of the Pond the Guardian ran a profile on him. He wrote an autobiography, "Mayor of MacDougal Street", in which, according to the Guardian, Van Ronk claimed that"Lessons came from a neighbour who had played with Jean Goldkette's band and knew Bix Beiderbecke".Who was this guitarist?

Posted on Jan 27, 2014, 4:07 AM

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Welcome to the Forum!

by

From The Mayor of MacDougal Street: A Memoir By Dave Van Ronk, Elijah Wald

"Jack Norton, or the old man, as we used to call him, had played with the Jean Goldkette band and known Bix Beiderbeck [sic] and Eddie Lang." Jack Norton lived in Briarwoods, Queens when he taught  Van Ronk.
 
This is the first time I heard about a Jack Norton playing with Goldkette, so I have to do a bit of research. I found an item with a mention of a Jack Norton. I don't know if it is the same Norton.
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TZ3bWueDhjM&index=2&list=PL2B6F82E69E2AACC3
 
I understand that Vince Giordano knew Dave Van Ronk. I wonder if Dave told Vince about Jack Norton. Vince, can you tell us anything?
 
Albert


Posted on Jan 27, 2014, 9:45 AM

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Dave Von Ronk

by vince giordano

Hi Albert..

my only time with Dave Von Ronk was a recording session ...near the end of his life. Sorry to say , I didn't get to talk with him that much. It was just casual chatter...I had NO idea he would know someone from the Bix / Goldkette crowd !

Posted on Jan 28, 2014, 10:28 PM

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Thanks, Vince.

by

It was worth a try.

Look forward to the Feb 12 concert. We have seats in the first row.

Albert



Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 7:31 AM

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There were several recordings of the song "Messin' Around" in the 1920s.

by

- Jimmy Blythe
- Cookie's Gingersnaps
- Joe Candullo
- King Oliver
- Freddie Keppard
- Fess Williams
- Bob Haring
- Jimmy Lytell

Composed by Johnny St. Cyr and Charles "Doc" Cook (also spelled Cooke; he had a Doctorate in Music, hence the nickname "Doc"), the name of the song came from the slow dance/rhythm "Messin' Around."

Perhaps my favorite rendition of this song is that by Cookie's Gingersnaps, a small band within the larger Doc Cook outfit.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuxndfTfD4o

Thanks to Professor Hot Stuff for telling me about this recording.

Albert

There was a Broadway musical titled "Messin' Around" that lasted only for on month in April/May 1929. I don't know if the Doc Cook/St. Cyr song was included in the show. I doubt it.



Posted on Jan 26, 2014, 1:12 PM

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Oliver's...

by Russell Davies

..Dixie Syncopators did have a go at "Messin' Around" in 1926 (on the "Tack Annie" session), but at the time, the attempt was rejected. Has it emerged since, as their "Doctor Jazz" did?
R.D.

Posted on Jan 26, 2014, 4:02 PM

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Never surfaced.

by

Recorded for Vocalion on  Jul 23, 1926, but unissued. Thanks, Russell, for pointing this out.

Another clarification: the recording by Jimmy Blythe and his Ragamuffins is not the tune composed by Cook and St. Cyr, but a different song composed by T. Smith and Jimmy Blythe.

Albert



Posted on Jan 26, 2014, 4:32 PM

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If you are in the Los Angeles area on Feb 9, 2014.

by

 
WHAT:   Brad Kay in Concert
WHERE:   Old Town Music Hall, 140 S. Richmond St.  El Segundo, CA.
WHEN:    Sunday, February 9th, 7:30 pm. 
HOW MUCH:  $20 at the box office

On Sunday evening, February 9th, at 7:30 pm, I will face off with the giant Boesendorfer piano at Old Town Music Hall, in El Segundo, for a solo concert, my first in several years. 

The first half will feature just me, in a brace of original songs and instrumental pieces (mood music and rags), improvisations and a certain amount of snappy patter. 

After intermission, Ill be joined successively by special guest vocalist DAVID BARLIA, for some rousing Vaudeville duets; and then special guest drummer BRION TAJIRI, for some of the hot speakeasy jazz weve been dispensing in a certain basement in Venice since July. 

All in all, this evening will be a random Mission Pak Sampler of the music Ive been creating and involved with for the last few years. If youve been spoiling for the chance to watch me make a spectacle of myself, mostly alone, on a concert stage, here it is. Mark your calendar! 

The Old Town Music Hall in El Segundo is one of the great, venerable (since 1968) venues for vintage music and entertainment. It is famous for its giant Wurlitzer pipe organ, which you should make a special trip to hear - - on some other evening, since I wont be using it. 

See you!  

Brad K


Posted on Jan 26, 2014, 7:33 AM

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The 92nd St. Y's Lyrics and Lyricists Series

by

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 22

8:00 p.m.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 23

2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 24

2:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.

 

The 92nd St. Y's Lyrics and Lyricists Series

presents

 

SWEEPIN' THE CLOUDS AWAY:

Boom, Bust and High Spirits

 

featuring

Vince Giordano's Nighthawks

Christine Andreas

Klea Blackhurst

Erin Dilly

John Treacy Egan

Jason Graae

 

Robert Kimball, artistic director and host

Peter Yarin and Vince Giordano, co-music directors

 

The Gershwins, Cole Porter, Duke Ellington, Eubie Blake - these and other star songwriters created the best toe-tapping, mood-busting, uplifting music ever written - in the heart of the Great Depression, just when people needed it most.

 

The 92nd St. Y

1395 Lexington Ave.

New York, NY

 

Tickets/Info: (212) Y-CHARGE or http://www.92y.org/Uptown/Event/L-L-Sweepin-the-Clouds-Away.aspx

 

 

I attended a couple of the Lyrics and Lyricists concerts in the past. Highly recommended.                                                                         

Albert                                                                                                                                                              

 

 

 



Posted on Jan 25, 2014, 3:40 PM

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How much was Annette Hanshaw making in 1934?

by

According to the Radio Mirror of November 1934:

"Annette Hanshaw is now one of the highest salaried girl vocalists on the air. She gets $1,400 a broadcast on her new cigarette program."

CPI Inflation Calculator

 $

in 19131914191519161917191819191920192119221923192419251926192719281929193019311932193319341935193619371938193919401941194219431944194519461947194819491950195119521953195419551956195719581959196019611962196319641965196619671968196919701971197219731974197519761977197819791980198119821983198419851986198719881989199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010201120122013

Has the same buying power as:

$24,338.79

in 19131914191519161917191819191920192119221923192419251926192719281929193019311932193319341935193619371938193919401941194219431944194519461947194819491950195119521953195419551956195719581959196019611962196319641965196619671968196919701971197219731974197519761977197819791980198119821983198419851986198719881989199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004200520062007200820092010201120122013

Lots of lettuce.

Albert



Posted on Jan 25, 2014, 2:13 PM

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Is this Frank Fay in ....

by

.... http://lantern.mediahist.org/catalog/photo42chic_0570

the same as the Frank Fay  here?

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Jan 25, 2014, 12:28 PM

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Frank Fay as a Mexican bandito!

by

http://lantern.mediahist.org/catalog/weeklyki10kgpu_0294

and singing "Nobody Cares If I'm Blue." From the Michael Curtiz film "Brighlights."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NGKqMgvcMrM

Albert



Posted on Jan 25, 2014, 12:56 PM

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Smith Ballew in 1931.

by

We know that Smith Ballew was in Saltzman's Restaurant in the summer of 1931, when Bix visited him. That was the time that Rex Gavitte took Bix to his apartment in Long Island where Rex's wife Alice could take care of Bix.

Smith Ballew's orchestra also played at White's Restaurant and at Rudy Valle's Villa Vallee (on East 60th Street; formerly known as Versailles, and later became the famous Copacabana Club). According to

http://www.classicjazzguitar.com/articles/article.jsp?article=34 (an excellent site about the Eps family)

Smith Ballew's orchestra "would work at White's restaurant from six to nine, have two hours off, then reassemble at singer Rudy Vallee's club; Villa Vallee, where the band would play from eleven until four in the morning." I understand that Rudy Vallee asked Smith Ballew to substitute Vallee in Villa Vallee while Vallee was abroad. 

The reference to Villa Vallee is also found in advertisements for the appearance of Smith Ballew's orchestra in the Piping Rock Restaurant, Saratoga Springs. Here is an ad from the Saratogian, Aug 28, 1931.

[linked image]

And a postcard from flickr
[linked image]

According to Joseph Cushall King in "The Burning of The Piping Rock,"

Piping Rock Casino was a vital part of Saratoga Springss mix of horse racing, illegal gambling, high society, and the mob. Stars of Broadway and Hollywood performed at Piping Rock, while millions changed hands over the gaming tables. The casino was fronted by mobsters Joe Adonis, Meyer Lansky and Frank Costello, whose silent partners were from the Oyster Bay/Locust Valley area of Long Islands Gold Coastthe original location of the Piping Rock name.

Musicians did not discriminate against mobsters. They had to make a living and played for whoever would pay them. Some enterprising young man should write a book or construct a website about bands playing in mobster-owned clubs.

Albert



Posted on Jan 25, 2014, 9:52 AM

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Smith Ballew had three recording sessions ....

by

.... under the name of "Smith Ballew and His Piping Rock Orchestra>"

New York, June 9, 1931.
Making Faces at the Man in the Moon - Col 2479-D
Under Your Window Tonight - Col 2479-D

New York, Jul 23, 1931.
I Love Louisa - Col 2503-D
What Is It? - Col 2503-D

New York, Sep 25, 1931
Yime On My Hands - Col 2544-D
You Call It Madness - Col 2544-D

I like "What Is It?" a lot. Composed by Harry Barris and Henry Tobias. Here is the youtube video. Nice and sweet.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bwrOwCnwhyo

Here is the cover of the sheet music with a photo of Bing.

[linked image]

And from the soundtrack of a movie (I can't remember which!), Bing and Loyce or Lois Whiteman with Gus Arnheim.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QDzO6AMnuq4

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 25, 2014 11:35 AM

Posted on Jan 25, 2014, 11:35 AM

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A Reminder: The Recreation of the Aeolian Hall Concert

by

From Vince:
 

Join us for this historic concert at the Town Hall in NYC on February 12th

Help us spread the word please forward this announcement to your friends!

 

[linked image]

Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks with Conductor Maurice Peress present the

90th Anniversary Celebration of Rhapsody in Blue

Paul Whitemans historic Aeolian Hall Concert will be recreated on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 at The Town Hall, NYC, on the same day and same block as the original concert 90 years ago

 

Program features solo pianists Ted Rosenthal, Jeb Patton, and the 22-piece Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks Orchestra, conducted by Maurice Peress;  Jazz Age concert will feature music of George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Victor Herbert, Jerome Kern and Zez Confrey

 

 

 

Wednesday, February 12th

 

The Town Hall

123 West 43rd Street, NYC

8:00pm

 

Tickets: Ticketmaster 800-982-2787 or

The Town Hall box office  212-997-1003  http://thetownhall.org/

 

 

Albert



Posted on Jan 24, 2014, 9:30 AM

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Bix and Bessie.

by

Did you read the article by Tom Buhmann in the last issue of the IAJRC Journal? Tom does an excellent job of researching all that is known about the story of Bix putting out all the money in his pockets when he was listening to Bessie Smith in Chicago. At the end, Tom  goes into speculation regarding Bessie going from New York to Chicago during the period May 6 to May 14, 1925 and appearing in the Paradise Gardens. Bix was in Chicago with Charley Straight's band and that is when Bix went to see Bessie.

The first part of the article is impeccable, what other musicians have reported. Then some facts: Bessie was on tour late in April 1925 in Kentucky and left abruptly. Bessie made recordings in New York City on May 5, 6, 14, 26. But here comes the speculation: Tom tells us that Bessie was not ready "to return to her home and  husband Jack Gee" and accepted an invitation form her friend Richard Morgan "to spend time in Chicago until the heat subsided."

Opinions?

Albert



Posted on Jan 24, 2014, 7:33 AM

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Re: Bix and Bessie

by Laura Demilio

I'll have to look through my Bessie Smith bios at home and see if there's any mention of it.

Laura

Posted on Jan 24, 2014, 10:15 AM

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Bix and Bessie

by Laura Demilio

Didn't find anything. The revised "definitive" bio of Bessie doesn't even mention Bix, nor "All Night Party" about 1920's women writers and jazz artists, and a couple of paperbacks just mention Bix tossing money to hear her sing.

Posted on Jan 25, 2014, 1:33 PM

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Re: Bix and Bessie

by

This story of Bix throwing money to hear Bessie sing some more is surely yet another one of those many far fetched myths that sprang up in the 1930's.

Posted on Jan 25, 2014, 3:06 PM

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In fairness to Tom, the author of the article about Bix and Bessie, ....

by

.... let me point out that there are several first hand accounts, very similar to each other in many details.

- Eddie Condon

- Bud Freeman

- Mezz Mezzrow

There is also information about the roster of musicians in the band consistent with the recollections of Bix's buddies.

Tom has the following sentence in the concluding section: " I find it difficult to dismiss totally the recollections of Eddie Condon, Bud Freeman and Mezz Mezzrow, so I think there is convincing evidence to support that Bix Beiderbecke saw and heard Bessie Smith perform at the Paradise Garden in Chicago."

I have difficulties myself:

- recollections of events years or decades after they took place are notoriously unreliable. Probably, Condon, Freeman and Mezzrow saw and heard Bessie Smith in Chicago. Was Bix with them? Condon's account would have been much weaker without Bix turning "his pockets inside out and putting all his dough on the table to keep her singing." Mezzrow does not mention Bix, but gives information about the band that accompanied Bessie Smith consistent with what Condon and Freeman give. I also note that Condon's "We Called It Music" was published in 1947 and Freeman's "Crazeology" in 1989. Is it possible that there was some "copying" of interesting Bix stories?

- my main difficulty is the asssumed trip of Bessie Smith to Chicago for a few days between recording dates in New York City. Bessie had a grueling tour beginning in February 1925 and had abruptly ended the tour in late April 1925. During the tour she was stabbed and there was an incident with her favorite dancer in the show, Eggie Smith. After months of traveling -and with serious problems- does it make sense that Bessie Smith would take a quick trip to Chicago between recording dates?

Albert

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 26, 2014 12:10 PM

Posted on Jan 26, 2014, 9:34 AM

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Re: "Turning Out His Pockets"

by

Several anecdotes mentioned that Bix often carried all his cash haphazardly crammed in his pockets, which would have made "turning them" inside out a good way to get at the various bills and change there regardless of the purpose. If that was true, it wasn't a necessarily a flamboyant gesture, just impatience to turn up enough money quickly to tempt Bessie to sing longer.

Posted on Jan 26, 2014, 3:34 PM

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Put Yourself in Bix's Shoes

by

PICTURE YOURSELF at a ringside table in 1925, taking in a set by "The Empress of the Blues." She's ten feet away from you. That voice - so compelling, so arresting on her records - would, live and up close, be a thousand times more vivid and majestic, with personality and moves to match. The band would be a lot hotter and less inhibited than what we hear on record. It would be a transcendental, mesmerizing, devastating experience, with people fainting, or blindly walking toward Bessie in a zombie-like trance, as many have reported.

Then imagine you are Bix Beiderbecke, gifted with the finest ear in jazz, allied with the most creative and composerly sensibilities, who in the presence of any great music (think N. O R. K.) customarily sits transfixed and goggle-eyed.

I have no trouble whatever seeing Bix in this situation, oblivious to everything but that voice, and probably juiced (make that DEFINITELY juiced if he was with Condon), committing a random act of fiscal largess. Even if it DIDN'T happen, that's exactly what WOULD have happened.


-Brad K



Posted on Jan 28, 2014, 11:47 AM

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Thanks, Brad!

by

Thanks, Brad! If there was a function of "thumbs up" here, you would have had plenty from me.

Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 1:51 AM

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I agree!

by Laura Demiliio

That's exactly how I'd see it too, Brad.

Laura

Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 7:02 AM

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I am afraid I do not.

by

I must come from another planet. I am interested in what did happen, not what could happen. I want facts about Bix, not mythology, even if it is romantic and captivating.

Albert

 



Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 7:53 AM

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Bix and Bessie

by

Albert, I did consider the possibility that Bud Freeman's account could have been inspired by Condon's. But Freeman does not copy Condon's recollection. He tells his own story. And I do not believe one second that Condon would take his inspiration from Mezzrow or vice versa.
It was the unanimity between Condon, Mezzrow and Freeman regarding the band personnel AND the venue, that made me go deeper into the research. I am not saying that there is rock solid proof that it did happen. My conclusion is just that if it happened then May 1925 in Chicago was the only time and place, that it could have happened.

Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 2:01 PM

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Thanks for your posting.

by

I just want to make a clarification. I did not use the word "copying" in its literal meaning; I put it between quotation marks to suggest that it was, as you put it, an inspiration.

Albert



Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 2:31 PM

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Can I Get a Witness?

by

Albert,

OF COURSE you disagree. I expected nothing less. I stick my head in a noose here whenever I veer even slightly off the path of True and Verifiable Fact.

Nevertheless, Bessie Smith hoodoo-ed the crap out of ordinary listeners (never mind Bix!) at all her appearances. Here's a first-person recollection of that, from N. O. guitar great Danny Barker:


"Bessie Smith was a fabulous deal to watch. She was a pretty, large woman and she could sing the blues. She had a church deal mixed up in it. She dominated a stage. You didnt turn your head when she went on. You just watched Bessie. You didnt read any newspapers in a night club when she went on. She just upset you. When you say Bessie - that was it. She was unconscious of her surroundings. She never paid anybody any mind. When you went to see Bessie and she came out, that was it. If you had any church background, like people who came from the South as I did, you would recognize a similarity between what she was doing and what those preachers and evangelists from there did, and how they moved people. The South had fabulous preachers and evangelists. Some would stand on corners and move the crowds from there. Bessie did the same thing on stage. She, in a sense, was like people like Billy Graham are today. Bessie was in a class with those people. She could bring bout mass hypnotism. When she was performing, you could hear a pin drop."

-from Hear Me Talkin' to Ya Nat Hentoff & Nat Shapiro, 1955


-Brad k


Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 3:03 PM

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I knew it.

by

Brad, you've got my number. I surrender.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 29, 2014 4:36 PM

Posted on Jan 29, 2014, 4:04 PM

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I Surrender Dear!

by

Thumbs up, Brad! You did it! Getting Dr. Haim to agree that something could have happened without a document notarized and signed by at least five sober witnesses is quite an achievement. I had to hit the invisible Like button, too!

It is hard to believe that Bix Beiderbecke would not have gone to hear Bessie Smith in person if he could! Extensive witnesses put him in all the right places to hear the greats of the time. With three diverse witnesses telling similar stories of that occurrence, that certainly makes it seem likely that Bix went rummaging in his pockets for a tip to get her to sing a few more, and the independent story of how Bessie affected ordinary listeners similarly corroborates the high possibility that it did happen pretty much as told.

Posted on Feb 1, 2014, 6:00 AM

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Thanks, Dammit!

by

I will file this rare Professor Haim Provisional Speculation Acceptance Award along with my Boy Scout merit badges and Captain Midnight Ovaltine Secret Decoder Ring.

-Brad K

Posted on Feb 2, 2014, 8:58 AM

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Happy Birthday Django.

by

Belgian-Gypsy guitarist.

Born: January 23, 1910, Liberchies, Belgium
Died: May 16, 1953, Fontainebleau, France
Full name: Jean Reinhardt

For a change of pace in the music we discuss here (although it is also jazzy, in a French manner if you know what I mean), let me bring up a number of recordings of the French chansonnier Jean Sablon (one of my sister favorites) in which he is accompanied by Django and other members of the Quintette du Hot Club de France. The music of my childhood. I love this stuff.
 
 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qT5W7UdqFyw in Franglais before Franglais existed
 
 
Albert
 
 


Posted on Jan 23, 2014, 11:02 AM

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Debussy for the Record of the Week

by David Sager


http://www.loc.gov/rr/record/recordoftheweek.html



Posted on Jan 22, 2014, 1:00 PM

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Excellent.

by

Evidently, Achille-Claude Debussy was an influence on Bix's piano compositions. Not only the music, but maybe even the titles. Debussy, just like Bix, wrote several pieces with titles related to light and darkness: "Nocturne," "Clair de lune," "Fireworks." Compare with "In the Dark," "Candlelights," "Flashes."

Albert



Posted on Jan 22, 2014, 2:03 PM

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I forgot one.

by

Debussy: "Brouillards;" Bix: "In A Mist."

Albert



Posted on Jan 22, 2014, 2:07 PM

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According to a Face Book contributor, Bill Challis is ....

by

.... responsible for the titles of Bix's piano compositions. The source: Bill Challis told him.

Do any of you remember if Challis mentioned this in any of the interviews I have in the Bixography website? Or in any other source?

Albert

PS The various stories about naming "In A Mist" are available in http://ic.sunysb.edu/Faculty/alhaim/recordingsinamist.htm



Forum Owner

Posted on Jan 23, 2014, 5:33 PM

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That Debussy Recording was LOVELY.

by

It was sublime, and indeed, very nuanced for a 1911 acoustical recording. I'd love to think Mrs. Agnes Beiderbecke had that recording in her home and played it for Bickie (or played the piece on the piano for him, certainly, since she liked Debussy) -- somehow, I can't quiiiiiite buy the idea that the Beiderbeckes didn't purchase a Victrola until Burnie brought one home in 1918 when he got out of the service. A passionately musical family such as that, even owning two pianos, surely would have been collecting records and buying some sort of available gramophone earlier in the 1900's, as soon as they were commerically available.


But truly a gorgeous and delicate piece of music -- and you know, can any of you guess which passage seems to sound as if it might have at least slightly inspired Bix for In A Mist?

Laura

Posted on Jan 23, 2014, 10:31 AM

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Well I'd say..

by Russell Davies

.. two passages in that remarkable recording, the one around 1'30" for its "rumbling" quality, but then also the little whole-tone phrases around 2'13"/2'14" and onward. If you put it together with the Greig "Albumblatt" (Op. 42), which I've drawn attention to before:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Halj9CvGcA

-- you have a lot of the "mood" qualities, and some of the chordal preferences, of "In A Mist". I didn't know Debussy's "Brouillards", or "Mists", which suggests exciting similarities -- and it's a striking piece: but much more "painterly", like an attempt to reproduce a Whistler "nocturne" in music.

I do hope there was a music-player of some sort in the Beiderbecke household, early in his life. Clearly he was gifted with a wonderful ear, but you do need something the ear can get to work on.

R.D.

Posted on Jan 26, 2014, 3:47 PM

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Indeed, Bix's family was highly musical.

by

Bix's mother was a pianist and organist for the First Presbyterian Church. Bix's grandfather (Charles Beiderbecke) was the president of the German Musical Society and director of the German Choral Organization in Davenport. Charles died before Bix was born.

Albert

 



Posted on Jan 26, 2014, 4:43 PM

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A crappy winter

by

15 inches of snow; the actual temperature is 10F but with strong winds it feels like -8F. I had two sessions with my crack snow blower (Ariens, 205 cc, 24-inch) and cleared the driveway, all around my Jeep (4-wheel drive) and around the mailbox. And we are still in January!

And this is nothing compared to what is going on in the midwest or in New England.

Why did I ever live California after my post-doctoral year at Stanford Univeristy? What a dumb move! And why did I not take the offer from the University of California in San Diego in 1964, after having spent two years in the middle of Pennsylvania where the temperature reached -16F in the winter of 1963? What a dumb decision.

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 22, 2014 9:23 AM

Posted on Jan 22, 2014, 9:17 AM

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Deep Down South

by

It has indeed been a miserable winter. I actually have worn a winter coat (not a fleece hoodie, which usually suffices) more this winter that in the last ten years put together! If it makes you feel better, it's going to be in the single digits here tomorrow night. Still, it's much better than what you Midwest and Atlantic Coast dwellers have had to deal with.

I can see why the Sun Belt is looking better and better to you! Picking your own oranges beats snow blowing any day!! Best wishes!

There Ain't No Land Like Dixie Land to Me!

Posted on Jan 22, 2014, 7:16 PM

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Crappy Winters Deep Down South

by

They're not having much fun down in Dixieland, either. And here in Armpittsburgh -- wooooooooaaaaaah, it's -- around 7 degrees right now. I haven't been out for a walk on my lunch hour in over a week. Pitt campus looks like Siberia and the birds are so cold they cry; I sneak to the building doorways whenever I can with scraps of bread and steamed rice. Every morning at home the birds line up on the railing of our back deck until my husband or I run out to feed them -- there's nothing sadder than a shivering, bright red cardinal with his little square beak pursed in a heart-rending pout, peering into the window and fluttering his wings to beg. I wish we could bring all the outside birdies into the house. (But so does our cat.)

I USED to live through winters just like this in the 1970's -- Cleveland was slammed every year for the entire decade -- except 73/74/75 --- with bitterly cold, sub-zero, blizzardy winters, and even as a stringy little kid and later a teen, they were hard to take. I used to trudge to school and my after school job at the public library in snow up to my waist, often with sharp blizzard snowflakes and a bitter wind stinging my face.

But what seemed like a grisly adventure when we were kids now just seems like tiresome, frightening, obnoxiously difficult weather to deal with. Rick doesn't like driving our old car on the hilly roads and we always dread ice under the snow, which the salt truck plow can't keep up with. It's a chore to drag to work every day and our schools won't close, figuring students live on or close enough to campus to walk in the frigid wind and faculty live nearby. (they don't.) Or TV announces horrible, cruel ultimatums: "Classes cancelled, all staff report." (Translated: "Faculty and students are human beings! Adminstrative staff are disposable garbage and we don't care if they die!")

Waaaah. I wish I could just stay home and listen to records (without wishing unemployment on myself.) I envy our pet box turtles and cat, sprawled out snoozing the day away indoors.

Laura


Laura



Posted on Jan 23, 2014, 10:21 AM

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cd's

by catherine mauceri

with worlds records gone does anyone know where to go for the latest cd releases thanks

Posted on Jan 20, 2014, 8:39 PM

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I am afraid I don't have an answer

by

You can always go to the individual websites of companies that produce cds of vintage music: jazzoracle, frog, archeophone, vocalion, etc.

I am sure you know that the home page of worldsrecords.com makes the announcement "We'll Be Back Soon."

Welcome to the Bixography Forum.

Albert



Posted on Jan 21, 2014, 6:37 AM

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I transferred my...

by

...buying to these three sources years ago:
Footlight
Amazon
CD Universe





Posted on Jan 24, 2014, 2:36 PM

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Goldkette's Contradictions.

by

From Variety, Sep 24, 1924.

[linked image]

Goldkette has a jazz band (the Victor recording orchestra) but "absolutely bars all jazz musicians" from the Detroit College of Music: Goldkette is the manager and teaches. 

Lois Benson was a student at the Detroit College of Music

http://cimbura.com/misc/pianoteaching.php

but disagrees about jazz being barred from the curriculum of music students. She writes:
"I believe every student's musical education should include experiences in a variety of popular stylings, including jazz as a serious and recurring phase of his studies. The student should be encouraged, too, to deviate from the written notes with his own improvisations if he desires, for spontaneity is an essential ingredient of the jazz idiom. I encourage the student to make his own introduction and ending to the pieces and delete and change parts that he doesn't care for by adding notes, changing harmony and rhythms."

Albert



Posted on Jan 20, 2014, 3:46 PM

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From the article: "Goldkette jazz orchestra is the first ....

by

.... and only dance hall band to record for Victor."

Wrong!! Here are 1922-1924 Victor recordings.
http://www.78discography.com/vic19000.html

Get a load of the bands: Virginians, Paul Whiteman, Benson Orchestra of Chicago, Original; Memphis Five, Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake, Tennessee Ten (augmented OM5), Waring's Pennsylvanians, Ted Weems, Piron's New Orleans Orchestra, Coon Sanders, etc.

Albert


 



Posted on Jan 20, 2014, 4:04 PM

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Fletcher Henderson: Another Maligned Musician

by

From Variety, March 31, 1926.

A propos

of nothing. Fletcher Henderson, whose colored Jazzists are the aces at the Roseland ballroom in Times Square, is dragged in for comparison with his uptown contemporaries. Henderson's Jazzapatlon for the white man's consumption may be properly adulterated, but for red hot scorching Jazz that Harlem 7-and-ll team is the ultimate. [The 7 and 11 band is Fess Williams's band]

From Jeffrey Magee's "The Uncrowned King of Swing." Two pages, but please take the time to read them.

[linked image]

[linked image]

He was named "The Paul Whiteman of the Race" by Panassie who used Whiteman in a pejorative sense. Henderson's was not a "true" jazz band, but a "false" one. He played "adulterated" jazz.

I would add that the fact that the Goldkette's band creamed the African-american boys in Henderson's band could be viewed as further evidence that  Henderson's band played false jazz: white boys from the midwest could play closer to "true" jazz than Henderson's musicians. Of course, I am being facetious, of course.

Henderson was maligned by what I have called in the past "jazz snobs."  I don't care whether Henderson played "true" or "false" jazz, I think he had a terrific band and played excellent music. That is good enough for me.

Let me add, that Ellington, universally (I think) acknowledged as playing "true" jazz, had good words to say about Whiteman and was stronly influenced by Henderson.

There, I did it: my rant for the day.

Albert



Posted on Jan 19, 2014, 3:25 PM

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Poison or Meat?

by

In 1924, to have one's music compared favorably to Paul Whiteman's was a high compliment, which any bandleader would have been proud to accept. These latter-day jazz critics got their briefs in a twist over this. Whiteman's band was the biggest thing in music since Sousa. It was the Beatles of the '20s. Absolutely every dance band in America took after Whiteman's in one way or another. Especially after 1924! So Fletcher and Duke were being accorded the highest possible praise, as was Jean Goldkette, "The Paul Whiteman of the West."

Goldkette, Henderson, Ellington and Whiteman all made music that featured ravishing, ever-shifting orchestral textures and timbres, intoxicating rhythms, hot solos of great originality, and impeccable presentation. They were the epitome of "Class" and set the tone for everyone else in the business. That tone extended even to the Great American Hinterlands, among the Territory bands like Bennie Moten's and Alphonse Trent's; even unto such humble practitioners as The Memphis Jug Band, who played with grace and great tonal depth. In the '20s, America - and Europe - were highly Orchestra Conscious, thanks in a great degree to Paul Whiteman, who compares favorably to Leopold Stokowski.


-Brad K

Posted on Jan 19, 2014, 9:29 PM

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"Paul Whiteman" used in a laudatory manner.

by

I am sure you all know about Jack Hylton being called "Britain's Answer to Paul Whiteman." Maybe you don't know about Alex Hyde, the "German Paul Whiteman."

From Variety, 26 Aug 1925
[linked image]

Here is a biography from http://www.allmusic.com/artist/alex-hyde-mn0000518389/biography

Born in Hamburg, Germany, on February 17, 1898, Alex Hyde became a U.S. citizen while still an infant, after emigrating with his parents. Tutored by a professional violinist, he performed in New York cafés and worked for a while with Mike Denzi's Red Devils. Hyde is said to have visited Germany immediately after WWI, entertaining U.S. military personnel in the occupied Rhineland. During the early '20s, Hyde led one of Paul Whiteman's numerous offshoot bands, the Romance of Rhythm Orchestra. Hyde's first recordings were made with this group in Montreal in 1923 and subsequently issued on the Victor label. His next move was to relocate to London, England, where from December 1923 throughout much of 1924, Hyde led a British jazz band at the Piccadilly Hotel, sharing the bill with Jack Hylton. On May 1, 1924, Alex Hyde's Orchestra made its debut at the Tivoli Variete in Hanover, Germany, but this engagement soon teetered on the brink of financial disaster. Just as the unpaid ensemble was about to dissolve, a Russian dancer by the name of Ivan Bankoff paid all of Hyde's debts and took the band under his wing. Alex Hyde's New York Orchestra now took Berlin by storm and stood the German public on its ear with a species of corny, "doo-wacka-doo" hot novelty dance music. Hyde's enormous popularity has been attributed to snappy arrangements and the introduction of buzzer mutes and Besson B flat trumpets in an environment where only rotary valve C trumpets had been regularly used. After playing Munich's Deutches Theater in June 1924, Hyde disbanded, sailed for the U.S., and returned to Germany in 1925 with a much better, more authentic hot jazz ensemble. This put him in Berlin at about the same time as Sam Wooding's Chocolate Dandies. By the end of the 1920s and throughout the 1930s, Hyde assembled and produced a series of all-female orchestras. He then retired from music to co-manage an insurance company with his brothers and passed away in Santa Monica, CA, on July 7, 1956.

Here are some recordings. Mike Danzi on banjo.

1925 Copenhagen (connection to Bix) 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7A0VDRFZnT4&list=PL6CD835EE70F8401D&index=1

1925 No One Knows What It's All About (connection to Bix)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpjojNNGnS0

1925 Shine
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=49zD8YTDY-k&list=PLuexIKFvlK8g07JQCyYcM_4AakCxyvp3T

A half-page ad in Variety 12 Nov, 1924.

http://lantern.mediahist.org/catalog/variety76-1924-11_0106

Albert



Posted on Jan 20, 2014, 9:57 AM

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Who was Hoagy's friend?

by

Pete Martin in Hollywood Without Make-up, published in 1948 by J. P. Lippincott Co.

[linked image]

I agree that several of Hoagy's compositions are "difficult." But I think that the "difficult" compositions are the great ones, not those between  "half-baked"  and complicated.

Albert



Posted on Jan 16, 2014, 5:30 PM

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A suggestion from ....

by

.... Debbie White in facebook.

"I leapt at the chance to write with Hoagy," he wrote in an unpublished biography. "He proved an understanding, sympathetic friend and teacher...When I say teacher, I mean just that; he broadened my ability with his knowledge and experience." Later in the same manuscript, however, he reveals that the "teacher" often proved a stern taskmaster. "He is such a gifted lyric writer on his own, that I felt intimidated much of the time and tightened up too much to do my best work."

(Johnny Mercer quoted from "Stardust Melody" by R. Sudhalter)

Albert, I'm thinking Mercer could be said to have been a friend of Hoagy, although I often get the feeling he (Hoagy) might've had more "acquaintances" than friends.
****************************

Mercer is indeed a possibility. I can think of at least two dozen songs they wrote together.

Oscar ceremonies, 1952. Best original song: "In the Cool Cool of the Evening" from the film "Here Comes the Groom" with Bing Crosby and Jane Wyman. Donald O'Connor was the presenter of the music awards.

[linked image]

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 18, 2014 9:21 AM

Posted on Jan 18, 2014, 9:21 AM

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Classical Musicians like Ray Miller White and Black Melody Boys.

by

In another thread, David mentioned the magazine "Musical Messenger." All 1921 issues of the magazine are available in google books.

http://books.google.com/books?id=tUk5AQAAMAAJ&pg=RA6-PA3&lpg=RA6-PA3&dq=%22Musical+Messenger%22+journal&source=bl&ots=tcTZi-K2s7&sig=wGeqnQDQbS-m1UGlvMUaN0XGarI&hl=en&sa=X&ei=H-7XUpTkOqu0sAS_k4GAAw&ved=0CCgQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=%22Musical%20Messenger%22%20journal&f=false

You can spend hours leafing through the pages. Here is one piece, among many others, that caught my attention.  July 1921.

[linked image]

With the forthcoming recreation of Whiteman's Aeolian Hall Concert of Feb 12, 1924, it is appropriate to mention here that Damsrosch attended the concert. He was a good friend of Whiteman's and was the first to applaud when the performance of "Rhapsody in Blue" ended. Also, Damrosch conducted the New York Symphony in Dec 1925 for the  premiere of Gershwin's Concerto in F.

Ray Miller has been discusssed extensively in the forum. Use the search function. Here is a full page cover of Ray Miller and His Black and White Melody Boys in the Dec 23, 1919 issue of the New York Clipper. Names of the boys in the early band included. In 1920, Earl Oliver and Tom Brown were in the band.

http://ia601207.us.archive.org/BookReader/BookReaderImages.php?zip=/31/items/Clipper67-1919-12/Clipper67-1919-12_jp2.zip&file=Clipper67-1919-12_jp2/Clipper67-1919-12_0213.jp2

Listen to an early (July 1920) recording

http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/miller/Whispering.ra

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 16, 2014 11:13 AM

Posted on Jan 16, 2014, 11:10 AM

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Speaking of Ray Miller.

by

He is one of the Kings of Jazz  according to the March 1926 issue of Cine Mundial, a magazine from Argentina.

http://ia800901.us.archive.org/BookReader/BookReaderImages.php?zip=/18/items/cinemundial11unse/cinemundial11unse_jp2.zip&file=cinemundial11unse_jp2/cinemundial11unse_0164.jp2

Albert



Posted on Jan 16, 2014, 12:38 PM

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Ray Miller's Black and White Melody Boys in Ed Wynn's Carnival.

by

From the IBDB website:

Ed Wynn's Carnival  
New Amsterdam Theatre , (4/05/1920 - circa. 6/1920)
Selwyn Theatre , (6/21/1920 - 8/14/1920)

Category: Musical, Revue, Original, Broadway
Description: A revue in two acts
Music by Ed Wynn; Book by Ed Wynn; Lyrics by Ed Wynn; Musical Director: Antonio Bafunno; Music orchestrated by Stephen Jones and Frank Saddler; Featuring songs by Alfred Bryan, Alex Sullivan, Walter Donaldson, William Eckstein, Chris Smith, Lou Handman, Ray Miller, Raymond Klages, Billy Fazioli, Ring Hager, Tom Brown and Clarence Seena; Featuring songs with lyrics by Alfred Bryan, Gene Buck, Grant Clarke, Alex Sullivan, Ray Miller, Fred Fisher, Raymond Klages, Billy Fazioli, Ring Hager and Clarence Seena

The cast included Ray Miller's Black and White Melody Boys.

The interior of the New Amsterdam Theatre.
[linked image]

And get a load of this photo with an ad for Ed Wynne's Carnival in the New Amsterdam Theatre.

[linked image]

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 16, 2014 2:11 PM

Posted on Jan 16, 2014, 2:10 PM

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Ray Miller B&W records

by David Sager

I have been sifting through Ray Miller's B&W records for years, hoping to find examples of Tom Brown's trombone. I have found a number of very good examples, ones that reveal him to have been a very relaxed, lithe, New Orleans-style trombonist, lacking the stiffness that permeates most of the early recording bands. He sounds a little like Kid Ory.

"Rose of Spain" and "Can you tell?" are both excellent, the Vocalion versions being about the best. I actually transcribed the music from these titles and recorded them, a decade+ ago, with Dan Levinson's Canary Cottage Orchestra/Roof Garden Jass Band. I never got close to sounding as cool as Tom Brown.

An interesting version of "Beale Street Blues," by Miller, features the trombone. However, it does not sound like Brown--at least not to me.



Posted on Jan 17, 2014, 11:09 AM

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Tom and Steve Brown were brothers.

by

Some nformation on Tom Brown in

http://www.redhotjazz.com/brown.html

According to John Chilton, Tom played trombone in the 1910s and 1920s, but later he also played string bass.

Albert



Posted on Jan 17, 2014, 3:30 PM

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A short report about Ray Miller in Variety, Oct 20, 1922.

by

"Ray Miller and Band has indefinitely been engaged for the Hotel Addison, Detroit."

I remind you that in May 1926, Bix, depositing his union card with Detroit Local 5, listed his address as the Addison Hotel.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Jan 16, 2014, 3:31 PM

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A spectacular dialogue between Sylvester Ahola and Arthur Lally.

by

From http://www.r2ok.co.uk/dancebandshow.htm

The latest of the excellent podcasts from John Wright. Thanks to John for permission to use his recording in the Forum.

There's Happiness Ahead (Flynn, Burns) Maurice Elwin singing, accompanied by band directed by John Firman. Sylvester Ahola trumpet, Arthur Lally baritone sax. Recorded 16 April 1929. Zonophone 5335.

It is the first track heard by clicking on the link "the latest podcast British Dance Band Show, No. 258 in the above page."

Hooley was certainly influenced by Bix. Enjoy!

Albert

 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 15, 2014 4:07 PM
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 15, 2014 12:49 PM

Posted on Jan 15, 2014, 12:46 PM

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What is the earliest example of a chase sequence?

by

This has been discussed in the forum several times. The first time in 2003. See the thread:

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1061555893/Bless+You%21+And+A+O-T+Question

Another time in 2005:

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1105974678/An+Early+Chase+Chorus

The earliest example so far was brought up by Enrico:
The Varsity Eight, Doddle Doo Doo, May 14, 1924. Rollini and Davis.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IjdPoFfV3V0

Another early example comes from Fredrik:
Vincent Rose and His Montmartre Orchestra. String Beans (Victor 19379-B), June 10, 1924.
Available in the LOC jukebox.
http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/7219

A further early example was just sent by Nick.
California Ramblers, A Little Old Clock on The Mantel, September 9th, 1924, Bobby Davis and Adrian Rollini.
https://www.dropbox.com/s/ra4b55hss4cfip7/ChaseSequenceLittleClockCR.wav

In addition, Nick discusses a chase sequence between Adrian Rollini and Bill Moore from the California Ramblers' Sittin' In A Corner, recorded for Columbia in New York on September 18th, 1923.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/dnnak78m9tml9tc/ChaseSequenceSittinInACornerCR.wav

Nick writes: "This is a sort of "proto" chase sequence. When I say that "Sittin' In A Corner" is a "proto" chase sequence, I mean because Bill Moore is playing fairly straight and Rollini is answering him in improvised breaks. Later examples were between two musicians both improvising - often "trading fours" (four bars) - as in the case of Bix and Tram.
The earliest examples of chase sequences are on California Ramblers sides, so I think there may be something in my theory that Rollini was an early instigator - perhaps even the originator. It's impossible to say for certain, but Rollini was one of those totally original geniuses , so it wouldn't altogether surprise me."

Thanks Nick, for the wave files and for revisiting this fascinating subject.

Albert

 



Posted on Jan 18, 2014, 3:33 PM

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An earlier chase chorus, also with Adrian.

by

If I Can't Get the Sweetie I Want. California Ramblers. Sep 4, 1923. So far the earliest chase. Some parts of the melody remind me of T'ain't So, Honey, T'ain't So.

http://redhotjazz.com/Songs/caramblers/IfIcantGettheSweetieIWant.ra

Again, Rollini as one of the two partners in crime, the other Bobby Davis. Nick's suggestion that Rollini may be the inventor of the chase chorus finds further support.

Albert

 



Posted on Jan 19, 2014, 10:22 AM

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Re: An earlier chase chorus, also with Adrian.

by Nick Dellow


Here is a link to yet another nice chase sequence on an early California Ramblers side, this time with Rollini (again) and Bill Moore:-


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-wI1-H_YM5A


One of Moore's breaks has some pretty fast tonguing (during which he slightly slips up) and Rollini imitates him in response on the bass sax (and doesn't slip up)!

Your example is the earliest found so far though, as this is from over a year later.



Posted on Jan 19, 2014, 3:33 PM

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Another earlier chase chorus

by Mark Berresford

We're forgetting the lovely split chorus by Frank Guarente and Johnny O'Donnell on the Specht's Society Serenaders 'Hot Lips'from June 1922.

Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 7:31 AM

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Re: What is the earliest example of a chase sequence?

by Mark Berresford

We're forgetting the lovely split chorus by Frank Guarente and Johnny O'Donnell on the Specht's Society Serenaders 'Hot Lips'from June 1922.

Posted on Feb 4, 2014, 7:33 AM

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More Ahola and Lally.

by

Nick writes, ""Here is another example of Hooley and Arthur Lally jumping out from their otherwise mild mannered roles as accompanying musicians to play a precious few hot bars. I didn't copy the whole side because the rest of it is as soporific as the title suggests! And it isn't in the best of condition either."

http://soundcloud.com/albert-haim/maurice

Thanks, Nick. I am very impressed by Arthur Lally's sax playing. Of course, Hooley is always great.

Albert



Posted on Jan 19, 2014, 8:55 AM

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Red Nichols: The Grand-Uncle of Cool is the title of ....

by

.... an article in

http://yestercenturypop.com/2012/05/11/red-nichols-the-grand-uncle-of-cool/

The recording used as an archetypal example of the Five Pennies "cool" style is Hoagy's Washboard Blues.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aJgFdbCUUvU

See http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1356988527/My+Treat+to+you+for+the+New+Year.+A+1927+letter+from+Hoagy+to+....

for aditional information about this recording.

Albert



Posted on Jan 14, 2014, 3:37 PM

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From the digital library of USC, my alma mater.

by

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/compoundobject/collection/p15799coll170/id/9777/rec/2

A De Barron Studio photograph of Red Nichols taken in New York City. George De Barron specialized in risque photos of female subjects. For example:

[linked image]

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 15, 2014 5:25 AM

Posted on Jan 14, 2014, 3:47 PM

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It's obvious which inspired DeBarron more

by

That shot of Red Nichols from the above link looks more like a passport photo than anything else. It's clear that scantily clad women inspired George DeBarron more than fully dressed male jazz musicians!

Posted on Jan 18, 2014, 10:41 AM

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Cool Red

by

I agree completely with this blog. The music of Nichols and company between '25 and '28 was a watershed of modernism, and in many ways, the "birth of the cool."

Comparisons of Red to Bix as a soloist only cloud the issue. On Bix's records, we listen often, mostly, for him alone. He stands apart from his colleagues. The Nichols-Mole-Dorsey-Lang-Schutt-Berton-Livingston combine, OTOH, was a close-knit artistic entity, with an entirely new collective aesthetic. Anyone with a brain listens to it in toto, not just for Nichols' solos.

If nothing else, Red was producing cutting-edge original jazz records that also were popular best-sellers. I wish Bix could have done something similar, producing his own sessions and bringing his vision more consciously to a group setting. He did this now and then ("Ostrich Walk" - "Riverboat Shuffle"; the first batch of "Bix and his Gang"), but not with the consistency of Nichols.

When Red Nichols and Miff Mole broke up their partnership in 1929, that modernist collective evaporated, and Red lost his artistic grace.

Brad

Posted on Jan 19, 2014, 2:51 AM

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Bands for the 2014 Bix Festival in Davenport.

by

Band Lineup
2014 Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Festival
July 31 Aug. 3, 2014 - Davenport, Iowa
Adler Theater RiverCenter LeClaire Park

Jim Cullum Jazz Band
Banu Gibsons New Orleans Hot Jazz
The Fat Babies
Dave Bennett Quartet
Dan Levinsons Roof Garden Jass Band
Anderson Twins Sextet
Josh Duffee & His Graystone Monarchs
River City 6
The Jimmy Valentine Quintet
Five Bridges Jazz Band
The Tony Hamilton Orchestra
Rock River Jazz Band
Jim Buennig & Friends, Western Illinois University
Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Youth Jazz Band

 





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 12, 2014 5:54 PM

Posted on Jan 12, 2014, 5:32 PM

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Part Two of Nick Dellow's article about Eddie Lang is available online.

by

Here is the link to the announcement.

http://www.vjm.biz/articles.html

For the convenience of readers I also give direct links to:

Part Two: http://www.vjm.biz/168-eddie-lang-part-two-web.pdf

The music files: http://www.vjm.biz/sounds.html

And in case you have not read Part One:
http://www.vjm.biz/167-eddie-lang-web-layout-1.pdf

Lots of fascinating material.

Albert



Posted on Jan 12, 2014, 12:29 PM

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A recreation of the Feb 12, 1924 Aeolian Whiteman Concert!

by

From Vince's facebook page:

Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks with Conductor Maurice Peress present the 90th Anniversary Celebration of Rhapsody in Blue

Paul Whitemans historic Aeolian Hall Concert will be recreated on Wednesday, February 12, 2014 at The Town Hall, NYC, on the same day and same block as the original concert 90 years ago

Program features solo pianists Ted Rosenthal, Jeb Patton, and the 22-piece Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks Orchestra, conducted by Maurice Peress; Jazz Age concert will feature music of George Gershwin, Irving Berlin, Victor Herbert, Jerome Kern and Zez Confrey

Bandleader Vince Giordano and Conductor Maurice Peress, who share a love for American music, have joined forces to honor the 90th Anniversary of Paul Whitemans historic Aeolian Hall concert that introduced George Gershwins Rhapsody In Blue.

This concert will be on Wednesday, February 12th, at The Town Hall, 123 West 43rd Street, NYC, at 8:00pm for a one-time-only performance. Tickets are modestly price ranging from $25 to $40 and will be available soon at ticketmaster or at The Town Hall box office.

The program will recreate the authentic Whiteman concert Experiment in Modern Music.
In recognition of the "first jazz band recording," Whiteman opened with Livery Stable Blues, complete with mock horse whinnies and chicken squawks in the raucous hokum-style of the Original Dixieland Jazz Band. Whiteman then played his most-favored Palais Royal arrangements, which included solo turns for virtuoso banjo player Mike Pingatore, multiple-reed wizard Ross Gorman and trumpet player Henry Busse. Nighthawk virtuosos Ken Salvo, Dan Block, Michael Ponella, Dan Levinson and Jon-Erik Kellso will recreate solos and exact renderings from Whitemans hit records: Whispering, Limehouse Blues and Mama Loves Papa. Crowd-pleasing "knuckle busters" performed by the dashing novelty piano virtuoso Zez Confrey, will be recreated by brilliant jazz pianist Jeb Patton. Andy Stein (known for his work on A Prairie Home Companion) will be featured in Paul Whitemans role on violin.

When the audience returns for the evenings second half, they will be greeted by an augmented Nighthawk orchestra. The three reeds, four brass and five rhythm pieces will be joined by eight violins, two French horns and an extra bass.

For the first time in his dance-band career, Whiteman put down his violin and took up a baton to lead special arrangements of selections including MacDowells To a Wild Rose and Rudolf Frimls Chansonette, later known as the Donkey Serenade. Whiteman concluded the Experiment with Gershwins masterful Rhapsody in Blue, which had been commissioned especially for the occasion.

On February 12th, 2014, Rhapsody in Blue will feature the first winner of the Thelonious Monk competition, jazz piano virtuoso Ted Rosenthal.

Whitemans idea that Gershwin compose a jazz piece for solo piano and orchestra turned out to be inspired. Gershwin artfully transforms the same ragtime and blues harmonies, the fiddle, brass and sax colors, and the banjo and tuba rhythms that the audience had been listening and toe-tapping to throughout the evening, into a masterwork with immediate appeal, says Peress. With his Rhapsody in Blue for solo piano and jazz band, Gershwin took a giant step for American music. It is indisputably the first American orchestral work shaped from blues and ragtime that crossed over and found a welcome place in the standard orchestral repertoire.

The original performance of Rhapsody In Blue in 1924 established George Gershwin as one of the truly unique voices in American music, and solidified Paul Whitemans reputation as Americas leading bandleader, said Giordano. By recreating this historic event, we honor Whiteman and Gershwin, and commemorate the 90th anniversary of the piece and the event that changed music forever.

About the Artists:
During his long career as an American symphony conductor maestro, Maurice Peresss work with Leonard Bernstein (assistant conductor of the NY Philharmonic, world premiere of Mass), and Duke Ellington (world premiere of Queenie Pie, orchestrator Suite from Black Brown and Beige, editor of the symphonic works) underscores his life-long commitment to create concerts that reconstruct delicious mixed marriages of music, black and white, Jazz and classical, folk and concert, Native American and European; works that bring people together, that urge us to love one another, (from his forthcoming memoire, A Conductors Manifesto Paradigm Publishers). In his earlier book, Dvorak to Duke Ellington (Oxford UP) he writes: In preparation for my reconstruction of the Aeolian Hall Concert, I consulted several original sources of the Rhapsody in Blue; Gershwins pencil holograph in the Library of Congress (the two-piano score he prepared for Grofe), Milton Rettenbergs 1924 manuscript copy of the same, a photocopy of Grofés original score in the Whiteman Collection at Williams College, and the June 10, 1924 recording by Whiteman with Gershwin as piano soloist. The recording and our performance is chock-a-block with details never written down in the score or parts. I have to assume that during the road tour, which immediately preceded the recording sessions, some of the jazz embellishments added by the players, or Gershwin, became frozen such as the little bundles of turning notes (gruppetti) that flavor a phrase, and klezmer-like whoops and hollars that clarinetist Ross Gorman introduced here and there, not only into the familiar opening.

Grammy-winners Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks have played in New York nightclubs, appeared in films: The Cotton Club, The Aviator and HBOs Boardwalk Empire, and for concerts at Jazz At Lincoln Center and the Newport Jazz Festival. Born in Brooklyn, Giordanos passion for this music and the people that made it began at age 5. He has amassed an amazing collection of over 60,000 band arrangements, 1920s and 30s films, 78 recordings and jazz-age memorabilia. Giordano sought out and studied with important survivors from the period; Whitemans hot arranger Bill Challis and drummer Chauncey Morehouse, and bassist Joe Tarto. Giordanos passion, commitment to authenticity, and knowledge led him to create a sensational band of like-minded players the Nighthawks. Vince Giordano has single handedly kept alive an amazing genre of American music that continues to spread the joy and pathos of an era that shaped our nation.

Ted Rosenthal first achieved international recognition by winning first prize in the 2nd annual Thelonious Monk International Jazz Piano Competition. Since that time he has performed with many jazz greats, including Gerry Mulligan, Art Farmer, Phil Woods, Bob Brookmeyer and James Moody. Ted has released 14 CDs as a leader, featuring new treatments and derangements of jazz standards as well as his original compositions. A faculty member of Manhattan School of Music and The Juilliard School, Ted is very active in jazz education. He teaches courses on a variety of topics and presents jazz clinics throughout the world.

# # #

MEDIA CONTACT: John Bianchi, jnobianchi@gmail.com 917-693-4290


Posted on Jan 10, 2014, 1:56 PM

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The announcement of Paul Whiteman's Spring 1924 tour.

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The program was the same as in the Aeolian Hall concert.

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Jan 10, 2014, 5:21 PM

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The New York Times Review of the Feb 12, 1924 Aeolian Hall Concert.

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https://www.dropbox.com/s/hsozxs0nh6abknr/ReviewAeolianConcertNYTimes13Feb1924.pdf

Albert



Posted on Jan 10, 2014, 5:32 PM

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My Pitiful Attempt at Recreating the Feb 12, 1924 Aeolian Hall Concert

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Radio Program # 204. (loaded on 10/26/2012) Paul Whiteman's Commercial Recordings of Numbers He Played at the Feb 12, 1924 Aeolian Hall Concert, "An Experiment in Modern Music." 76 min 10 sec

Real Audio Streaming audio file.  Download file.   18.7 M  

mp3 files  
Streaming file     http://bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX204.m3u     
Download file     
bixography.com/wbixmp3/WBIX204.mp3     34.8 MB

All recordings by Paul Whiteman, except Kitten on the Keys and To A Wild Rose..
Mamma Loves Papa.  Oct 29, 1923.
Whispering.  Aug 23, 1920.
Limehouse Blues. Jan 22, 1924.
I Love You. Sep 20, 1923.
Raggedy Ann. Oct 30, 1923.
Kitten On the Keys. Zez Confrey. May 4, 1922.
A Suite of Serenades. Parts 1 and 2. Jun 12, 1924.
Pale Moon. Apr 8, 1924.
To A Wild Rose. Chester Hazlett, May 9, 1929.
Chansonette. Paul Whiteman. Apr 29, 1927.
Rhapsody in Blue.  Jun 10, 1924.




    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 10, 2014 6:19 PM

Posted on Jan 10, 2014, 6:18 PM

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Re: My Pitiful Attempt at Recreating the Feb 12, 1924 Aeolian Hall Concert

by David Sager

Albert, do you kow the Smithsonian LP that attempts to reconstruct the Aeolian Hall concert? It is quite excellent and with excellent notes.

Posted on Jan 11, 2014, 12:25 PM

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Thank, you. Yes, I have.

by

See http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1379853760/I+had+not+heard+about+this+concert.

There is also a partial recreation in England by Keith Nichols.

http://bixography.com/KeithNichols2003ConcertWhitemanBix.html

Albert



Posted on Jan 11, 2014, 1:44 PM

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Speaking of "Rhapsody In Blue."

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Here are two items directly connected to the conception and birth of Rhapsody in Blue.   

George Gershwin didn't realize he was expected to compose anything at all until shortly after New Years' day 1924.  Hew was playing billiards with Buddy De Silva, while Ira, sitting nearby, read aloud from Variety.  Ira found an article under Paul Whiteman's byline, containing the startling (to George) news that "George Gershwin is working on a Jazz Concerto."  Attached is the actual piece Ira was reading, from the Jan. 3, 1924 issue of Variety:

[linked image]
 
********************
Sometime in the '50s, Ferde Grofé was interviewed on radio, and told some of the inside story about the creation of the Rhapsody.  Here is a transcription - I've never read this story anywhere:  

Ferde Grofé:
... Thinking of the Rhapsody in Blue now ... That means a lot to me. At the time we were writing it , Gershwin lived in an apartment house in New York , and I called on him every day to pick up whatever music he had written, and I'd take it home and score it.   And that was a close association over oh, I guess about ten days two weeks time.   In the first place, George never knew he was going to write a piece of music - he read about it in the paper!  That's the whole  - - he started it, and I worked with him, and well, I have a lot of fond memories connected with that  -  and his home life his people were Russian, they taught me how to drink Russian tea and gave me Russian food to eat I was practically a member of the family!  So that brings a lot of nice, fine memories back to me.  
When it comes to the E-major, the [sings the big andante tune from RIB] you know, part of it when he had gotten to that point he had written something else, had nothing to do with the piece at all.  Well, I didn't say much, but he saw that I wasn't exactly pleased, so he started he always liked to improvise at the piano so he happened to play this melody.  And I asked him, I said, "What is that?"  He said, "I wrote it about five years ago when I was demonstrating piano sheet music to the theatrical trade.  I was paid about twenty-five dollars a week to do this."  So he says:  "I happened to write it then-  aw, it's just another..." I said, "It sounds pretty good to me!  Would you mind playing it again?  I'd like to make a lead sheet of it, take it home."   
 
So he did.   And I wrote it down, took it home, and I couldn't sleep that night.  And I started playing it on the piano myself.  The idea just wouldn't let me rest.  I went back the next day and I said, "Why dont you write something like this instead of what you have there now?"  "Aw," he says, "It's too trite!  it's too sentimental!"  I said, "It's the most haunting thing I ever heard!"   I said, "I wish you'd consider it." 
 
By that time, Ira "Izzy" we called him "Izzy" then he was probably known [by then] as a lyric writer happened to come in the room, and he was wondering what we were talking about, and we told him, and he said, "George, I don't remember that tune play it..."  George played it for him -  "Oh yes!  I think Ferde's got a point, there."  I said, "Why don't you use it?  The classicists say they keep borrowing from their own tunes they keep using them over and over.  Because you wrote it five years ago wouldnt make any difference!  You should use it!"  So between Ira and I, we convinced him that he should use it.  
 
So that's the story - the behind the scenes story of the Rhapsody in Blue. 
 
 
- Brad K





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 12, 2014 6:21 AM

Posted on Jan 12, 2014, 6:02 AM

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Bix must have played "Rhapsody in Blue" with Jean Goldkette.

by

According to Evans and Evans, p. 239, on Dec 11, 1926, Goldkette's orchestra had a special appearance at the Detroit Athletic Club. Here is the program.

I. A. Adoration .... Borowski
   B. Transcription of Indian Melodies
   C. Hurricane .... Mertz
   D. Waltz Selection of Popular Melodies
   E. Excerpt of Rhapsody in Blue .... Gershwin
   F. On the Road to Mandalay .... Speaks-Kipling
II. The Revelers
III. American Concerto [Goldkette himself at the piano]
     Lento .... Scott 
     Andante and Presto .... MacDowell [I wonder if this is from his piano concerto no.1 in A. See note 1.]
IV. The Revelers
V. Valencia
VI. The Revelers

Bix had been in Davenport for the wedding of his sister Marie Louise Nov 8-11, 1926, but was back in Detroit for the rest of 1926.

Albert

Samples of several compositions by McDowell are available in http://www.classicalarchives.com/work/291249.html





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 12, 2014 7:19 AM

Posted on Jan 12, 2014, 7:18 AM

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Speaking of Goldkette.

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A brief biography by Josh Duffee and Alann Krivor.

http://www.impulsebrass.com/duffee/files/goldkettebio.pdf

Albert



Posted on Jan 12, 2014, 1:35 PM

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Bix not mentioned.

by

????????????????????

And the Ellis Island records show that he was going to join his uncle in La Paz, Indiana and that he was 1m 58 cm tall (5ft 2in) and had dark hair and blue eyes.

Albert



Posted on Jan 13, 2014, 6:27 AM

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Correction.

by

From my posting: Bix had been in Davenport for the wedding of his sister Marie Louise Nov 8-11, 1926, but was back in Detroit for the rest of 1926.

Thanks to Phil Schaap for pointing out that Bix's sister had her wedding in November 1924, not 1926.. Bix's brother wedding took place in November 1926.

Albert



Posted on Jan 13, 2014, 3:57 PM

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I saw the preview in September...

by David Logue

...in St. Augustine, FL and it was one of the best concerts I've ever seen.

If you get a chance, by all means, GO.

Posted on Jan 12, 2014, 2:14 PM

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A colorful announcement of the concert, Feb 12, 2014.

by

 

1525442_731575533521894_1438865480_n.jpg

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 13, 2014 4:11 PM

Posted on Jan 13, 2014, 4:10 PM

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A bit of information about Town Hall

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From http://thetownhall.org/history/the-opening-of-town-hall

123 West 43rd Street
(between 6th Avenue & Broadway)

The Opening of Town Hall
January 12, 1921

Founded by a group of suffragists (The League for Political Education) seeking to build a space where the people could be educated, The Town Hall was built in 1921, designed by renowned architects McKim, Mead & White to reflect the democratic principles of the League. Box seats were eliminated and no seats had an obstructed view giving birth to the term "Not a bad seat in the house."

[linked image]

Albert



Posted on Jan 15, 2014, 8:25 AM

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The Recreation of the Aeolian Hall Concert Cited in the New York Times

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http://tinyurl.com/mmxq9ja


Albert



Posted on Jan 17, 2014, 4:13 PM

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We are all set!

by

We have reservations for a hotel on Wed night Feb 12 and tickets for the concert. I will report on Feb 13 or 14.

Albert



Posted on Jan 17, 2014, 4:15 PM

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Fascinating, and I hope you enjoy it!

by

It was fascinating to read the advance article by Allan Kozinn in the New York Times about the upcoming re-creation of the Aeolian Hall concert, and also Olin Downes' review of the original concert in 1924. I'm quite familiar with the Maurice Peress recording of his 1984 recreation of the concert (I have it on Musical Heritage Society cassettes), which I thought was excellent except for an oddly disappointing performance of "Rhapsody in Blue." I think Peress made a mistake in recruiting Ivan Davis as piano soloist for the "Rhapsody," since though Davis was a fine musician he had played the "Rhapsody" too often in the standard "symphonic" version to loosen up enough to play the band version. Every time I hear this album I can't help wishing Peress would have got Dick Hyman, his piano soloist in the rest of the program, to do the "Rhapsody" as well, though the original 1924 Gershwin-Whiteman recording remains my all-time favorite (despite the cuts).

I'm hoping that Vince Giordano's participation will result in a livelier performance this time around, and I'm also hoping this version, too, will be recorded. One thing I hadn't realized until I read Allan Kozinn's article was that Aeolian Hall still exists, even though it's no longer a concert hall. I'd assumed it had been torn down decades ago!

Posted on Jan 18, 2014, 10:34 AM

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Thanks!

by

I am pretty sure I will. Two days in the Big Apple are always a lot of fun, and with the recreation of  the Aeolian Hall concert featuring Vince Giordano and the Nighthawks, we can't ask for more.

Albert

The Aeolian Hall.

[linked image]

Town Hall, down the street.

[linked image]

 



Posted on Jan 18, 2014, 12:47 PM

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Two remarkable pieces in Variety, Aug 13, 1924.

by

http://ia801806.us.archive.org/BookReader/BookReaderImages.php?zip=/11/items/variety75-1924-08/variety75-1924-08_jp2.zip&file=variety75-1924-08_jp2/variety75-1924-08_0086.jp2&scale=4&rotate=0

- Two mMany Dance Orchestras!!

- Most Popular Tunes in Atlantic City Cabarets. Get a load of the bands you could dance to in Atlantic City in the summer of 1924!

Albert



Posted on Jan 10, 2014, 1:32 PM

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Also a piece about ....

by

.... Roger Wolfe Kahn and Arthur Hand, two kids with rich fathers!

Albert



Posted on Jan 10, 2014, 1:46 PM

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Did you notice that last line in the RW Kahn / Ramblers write-up at the bottom of page?

by John Leifert

"The Ramblers have just acquired Jimmie Dorsey, who plays a family of saxes"

That may be the very first write-up about Jimmy Dorsey in an entertainment paper or magazine!

John L

Posted on Jan 10, 2014, 7:15 PM

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yes, and it helps with discographical information.

by

According to Robert Stockdale, the Jimmy amd Tommy Dorsey specialist, " Some discographers continue to cite Jimmy as present in on several Varsity Eight Sessions in September and October, but the author discounts this in the firm belief that Jimmy did not join the Ramblers until November 1924."

Stockdale then lists the first recording of Jimmy Dorsey with the California Ramblers as "I've Got A Garden in Sweden," Nov 18, 1924, Edison 9853. Available on youtube from our friend Enrico.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lj7YBD-DIvY

However, the Variety article of Aug 1924 tells us that Jimmie [sic] Dorsey joined the California Ramblers "recently." So the first recordings of Jimmy Dorsey with the California Ramblers is probably "Them Ramblin' Blues," recorded on Sep 10, 1924 and issued on Cameo 605 as by the Varsity Eight and Lin 2279 as by The Statler Hotel Dance Orchestra. MP3 available in

http://78records.wordpress.com/2012/06/21/california-ramblers-1925-cameo-record-catalog-page/

The California Ramblers must have liked this tune composed by Bill Moore and Irving Brodsky. Under various names they made several recordings of "Them Rambin' Blues." In the middle, the song sounds a tiny bit Klezmerish to me.

Jul 3, 1924. The Little Ramblers. Col 175-D. Jimmy Dorsey not present. Credited to W. Moore
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vBNhdtZjojg

Jul 24, 1924. Golden Gate Orchestra. PA 036128, Per 14309. "Ramblin' Blues," not "Them Ramblin' Blues." Jimmy Dorsey not present.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4JOoG-Dejg From our friend Emrah. Credited to Brodsky, Moore.

Aug 11, 1924. The Goofus Five. OK 40175. Jimmy Dorsey not present. Credited to Ed. Kirkeby, William Moore, I. Brodsky.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MQmwQgiypw

Albert

 

 

 

 



Posted on Jan 11, 2014, 10:16 AM

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Columbia 223-D

by

Independently, about a month ago, I acquired a copy of Columbia 223-D, a California Ramblers disc recorded in early October 1924 with the titles I Want to See My Tennessee and Eliza.

I forget which tune it was, because I have loaned it to a friend to copy, but I was struck by a very Dorsey-sounding alto solo on one of the sides. My ears perked up, and when I looked up the date, seeing that it pre-dated Mr. Stockdale's supposition as to November 1924 being Dorsey's first recordings with the organization, I became more skeptical of that.

Thank you for confirming that Jimmy Dorsey could be present on two more months' worth of Ramblers' titles.

I admit, though, that I still have some problems distinguishing between he and Bobby Davis on 1924/early 1925 titles. I'd like to think that the latter was a bit more stilted in his playing at this point, and that Dorsey's note range was greater on his solos, but he wasn't quite a veteran yet, either.

Posted on Jan 11, 2014, 10:01 PM

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Jimmy Dorsey in the Press

by David Sager

Both Dorsey's were featured in the Musical Messenger in 1915 or 16. It was a long article with a photo.

Posted on Jan 11, 2014, 9:20 PM

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Re: Jimmy Dorsey in the Press

by

Dave Sager, you must mean 1925 or 1926. Jimmy was only 11 in 1915! Pretty precocious!

Posted on Jan 13, 2014, 8:02 AM

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Re: Jimmy Dorsey in the Press

by David Sager

No -- Really 1915 or maybe '16 at the latest. It was common for these musical presses to feature stories about small town talent.

Posted on Jan 15, 2014, 8:40 PM

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AMAZING!

by John Leifert

That's really amazing to hear about that, David! By any chance do you have a scan of that article? I'm sure I wouldn't be alone in wanting to see and read that!

John L

Posted on Jan 13, 2014, 9:26 AM

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Re: AMAZING!

by David Sager

I will scan it when I find the darned thing -- soon.

DS

Posted on Jan 15, 2014, 8:39 PM

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I imagine as musical prodigies.

by

Tommy started at age 5 and Jimmy at age 6. At 10, Jimmy was a soloist when John Philip Sousa's band made a local appearance.

Albert 



Posted on Jan 13, 2014, 11:04 AM

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Ate van Delden's Progress Report in the Adrian Rollini Project.

by

 

Dear friends and supporters of the ADRIAN ROLLINI PROJECT

 

First of all let me thank you for the great support that I got from you in past years and wish you a very happy, prosperous and healthy 2014!

 

What follows now is my annual progress letter. There is still a long way to go..

 

Adrian Rollinis biography.                                  

 

At the start of the year I was ready to work on the period after Rollinis return from London and Elizalde in December 1929. After the Wall street Crash of October 1929 the US were in an economic depression, but Rollini immediately had a job with Bert Lowns new dance band at the posh Hotel Biltmore in New York. He also got back into free lance recording and here he produced some of his best work.

 

Information about Lown has been quite fragmented but I was lucky to find much data in digitized publications. Even annual volumes of the Talking Machine World and of Variety have now been digitized. However, retrieving this data and filing it into my Adrian Rollini Archive took much time and also had an effect in earlier chapters, which required editing again.

Finally last summer I really started on the 1930 chapters. In order to bring some structure into the story I had to decide to write two parallel chapters, one about Rollinis free lance recordings (made from January till August 1930) and one about his work for Bert Lown (which ended in April 1931). These two chapters were completed only a few days ago, so in 2014 I will continue with Rollinis following engagements in 1931 and later.

Although there are several sources for information about Rollinis various jobs during the middle Thirties, including Tom Fabers interviews, it is tough to get a detailed picture. I wonder if someone somewhere has a scrapbook, diaries, or other documentation that Bert Lown might have left when he passed away in 1959?


Discography and music

 

Work on the discography recently got an extra impulse when I dedided to support Guido van Rijn and Alex van der Tuuk. These Dutchmen are  working on the history and discography of the legendary Paramount record label. The history of the label has been published as well as   three volumes of discography . Volume 4 of the discography should be completed in 2014 and contains many sessions by the California Ramblers with (and without) Rollini. This contact has a reciprocal positive effect on our work.

As for label pictures, one German collector, with a magnificient 78 rpm jazz collection, has helped me to a large quantity of additional record labels and to several rare recordings as well, the greatest addition to my archive in recent years.

The total number of known Rollini 78 rpm issues also increased[1], and as a result the share of label pictures in my collection still is about two-third of what is known. Rollinis music, over 2000 titles, appeared on 170 different 78 rpm labels world-wide. There are still the following Rollini records that nobody seems to have, which means 30 missing label types in my Rollini archive (I have given only one Rollini issue in each case, but most of these labels have more than one). Are they really that rare?

 

Ace 351024

Hudson 11421

Palings 19001

Ansonia H191

Hytone K191

Peacock P105

Beltona 1113

Kadewelt 2032

Polydor A165

Carnival 11382

Lucky 5077

Publix 2005-P

Chantal 1334

Lucky Strike 24120

Scala 594

Citizen 686

Master Tone 116

Sterling 23032

Embassy 9223

National 12117

Stradivari G5144

Emerson 10541

Nipponophone 17389

Sunrise 3150

Federal 5405

Octacros 307

Variety 5003

Gamage G641

Olympic 2239

Victor Junior JR78

 

 

Next steps

 

The emphasis continues to be on the biography, but additional discographical data is very welcome, not to forget rare recordings. Complete wants lists are available.

 

Another year to come and I hope that I can count on your help again!

 

Greetings from The Netherlands

 

Ate van Delden

 



[1] Unknown unlisted Rollini 78-issues still show up. The year opened with two more that I noted in an auction list, a Lincoln and a HMV!

 

Please help as much as you can.

 

Albert



Posted on Jan 9, 2014, 11:38 AM

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On July 20, 2004, I mentioned that ....

by

.... the January 9, 1927 issue of the Detroit Free Press has the listings of Jean Goldkette ensemble, Joseph Gorner directing. I did not know who Joseph Gorner was. I just found that Gorner was a violinist in the Detroit Symphony orchestra. See

 http://lantern.mediahist.org/catalog/radi19251131519251926radi_0665

Albert



Posted on Jan 8, 2014, 1:29 PM

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Isham Jones in Variety, Mar 18, 1925

by

http://ia801809.us.archive.org/BookReader/BookReaderImages.php?zip=/9/items/variety78-1925-03/variety78-1925-03_jp2.zip&file=variety78-1925-03_jp2/variety78-1925-03_0172.jp2&scale=4&rotate=0

Albert



Posted on Jan 8, 2014, 8:29 AM

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As seen in the Variety article, ....

by

.... in his second visit to New York, Isham Jones appeared in "Rue de la Paix," Lew Leslie's nightclub on West 54th Street. Rue de la Paix became "Casa Lopez", Vincent Lopez's club.

Lew Leslie was a producer and writer. He was famous for his shows in the Cotton Club and for his Blackbirds revues. As an agent he had Bee Palmer as one of his clients. Another connection to Bix: Leslie's production of the 1922 Broadway show "Plantation Revue" had music written by Roy Turk and J. Russel Robinson .

Albert



Posted on Jan 8, 2014, 11:49 AM

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If you like Vincent Lopez's music, take a listen to ....

by

.... one of his videos.

http://www.musicade.net/videos-de-musica-de-vincent-lopez-and-his-orchestra_1/

Albert





    
This message has been edited by ahaim on Jan 8, 2014 12:24 PM

Posted on Jan 8, 2014, 11:55 AM

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Abel reviews the California Ramblers in Variety, ....

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.... Dec 10, 1924.

http://lantern.mediahist.org/?page=2&q=+%22arthur+hand%22&utf8=%E2%9C%93

Abel mentions two trumpets, four saxes, trombone, piano and drums. He forgot banjo. The musicians were, at the time:

trumpets: Frank Cush, Bill Moore.
Saxes: Jimmy Dorsey, Arnold Brilhardt, Freddie Cusick, Adrian Rollini.
Trombone: Lloyd "Ole" Olsen.
Piano: Irving Brodsky.
Drums: Stan King.
Banjo: Tommy Felline.

Albert



Posted on Jan 8, 2014, 2:39 PM

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An interesting article about the California Ramblers....

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.... in the Yonkers Statesman of Dec 18, 1924,

https://www.dropbox.com/s/5nv94flpnawy311/YonkersNYStatesman18Dec1924CaliforniaRamblers.pdf

There is a listing of the numbers played by the Orchestra in the Strand Theatre for that particular engagement. Let's pretend we were in the theatre and listen to a few of the numbers that the California Ramblers played on that day.

Tea for Two. (Varsity Eight)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wvottrdxz6A

Everybody Loves My Baby. (Goofus Five)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Are3rKjYRew

Me and the Boyfriend. (California Ramblers)
http://redhotjazz.com/Songs/caramblers/MeAndTheBoyFriend.ra

Albert



Posted on Jan 9, 2014, 8:48 AM

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Bird Sounds in the California Ramblers' Recording of "Dawning."

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Dawning is a composition by Abner Silver and Maceo Pinkard. [See Note 1.]

[linked image]

The California Ramblers as the Golden Gate Orchestra recorded this tune on Sep 19, 1927. Nick kindly sent an mp3 of the Edison record.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/gbinygy6s9qcrns/GoldenGateOrchDawning.mp3

Nick writes,"I thought you might like to hear the attached version of Dawning by the California Ramblers (as the Golden Gate Orchestra), which I recently obtained. As it's on Edison Diamond Disc there's more room for solos, though the recording suffers somewhat from the usual boxy Edison electrical sound. Still, it's an excellent hot side. Soloists are Pete Pumiglio on alto sax (one of my favourite soloists), Chelsea Quealey, Jack Russin, Tommy Dorsey, and Pumiglio again briefly.
There is another take I have heard that has a Spencer Clark bass sax solo in place of Dorsey's trombone, and what's more Pumiglio's and Quealey's solos are totally different , so there is a lot of on-the-spot improvising going on!"

I enjoyed the recording very much. Thanks a lot, Nick.

Albert

Note 1. Maceo Pinkard also composed I'll Be A Friend With Pleasure, just to mention a song connected to Bix.



Posted on Jan 11, 2014, 11:22 AM

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The first mention of Bing Crosby in the New York Times

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Aug 18, 1929.

[linked image]

The radio broadcast took place in Los Angeles on Aug 20, 1929, the Old Gold Hour. The three numbers wiht vocal by Bing Satisfied, Vagabond Lover and Good Little, Bad Little You are listed in Evans and Evans, with one difference: the vocal in Good Little, Bad Little You is assigned to Mildred Bailey, not Bing.

Note that the New York Times piece mentions that the "Cheer Leader's [sic] Quartet will furnish a vocal refrain for many of the orchestral offerings."

I have heard of the Rhythm Boys and the Sweet Trio as vocalists for Whiteman, but not of the Cheeer Leader's Quartet. As a matter of fact, the Cheer Leader's Quartet is not mentioned in Don Rayno's Whiteman biography. However, Dennis Pereyra cites several times the Cheerleaders Quartet (as well as a quartet) in his listing of Old Gold Broadcasts.

http://www.redhotjazz.com/oldgold.html

The Cheerleaders Quartet is also mentioned in

https://archive.org/stream/OldRadioTimes_2008_01Jan/2008_01Jan_djvu.txt

and in http://www.bingmagazine.co.uk/bingmagazine/Old%20Gold.htm

I transcribe a relevant section:

"there are also allusions to "Bing Crosby and the Old Gold Trio" and I found myself with a deal of  extra work when Philip Evans pointed out that Frank Trumbauer's personal diary of the time, stated that Bing Crosby was a member of the "Old Gold Trio". Once again, who am I to refute the words of a musician who was there? In consequence, as in the case of the Rhythm Boys, I have been obliged to shew all titles which featured the Old Gold Trio, as Crosby items. We have only to discover that he was also part of the Cheerleaders Quartet to consider re-titling the series, "The Bing Crosby Show" ! ! ! "

Dennis also mentions the Old Gold Trio in his listing; he tells us that the debut of the Old Gold Trio was on Sep 17, 1929 and that it consisted of Bing Crosby, Al Rinker and Jack Fulton. I did not search Rayno's Whiteman biography in detail, but the Old Gold Trio is not found in the index.

The Old Gold Trio is also mentioned in the Oct 8, 1929 issue of the Decatur Herald. Here is the quote: "Mildred Bailey, Bing Crosby, Jack Fulton, The Old Gold Trio and the Rhythm Boys will be heard  during the Old Gold-Paul Whiteman Hour to be broadcast over the Columbia Broadcasting System at 8 o'clock tonight." Also in the Galveston DailyNews of Nov 10, 1929: "PAUL WHITEMAN HOUR TUESDAY, Opening with "Pomp and Circumstance, "the Old Gold-Paul Whiteman hour will again be broadcast from 8 to 9 p. m., Galveston time, Tuesday night. The new French waltz "Love Me'' will be among the featured tunes of the hour and will be sung by Jack Fulton, tenor. Mildred Bailey, the popular blues singer, will be heard in "More Than You Know" from the Broadway musical success "Great Day," and the ballad "If You Believed In Me." The Old. Gold Trio and the famous Rhythm Boys will also offer a number of vocal interpolations throughout the program. The complete program follows:.
1. Pomp and Circumstance; Don't Get Collegiate, trio.
2. Won't You Give In?, Crosby; Bottoms Up, from "Scandals;" More Than You Know, from "Great Day," Bailey.
3. Love Me, waltz, Fulton.
4. Here We Are; Just You and Me; Bigger, and Better Than Ever.
5. Rhythm King, Rhythm Boys; I'd Do Anything for You.
6. Liza, from "Show Girl; "Ain't Misbehavln," from "Hot Chocolates;" Wake Up Chillun.
7. High-Ho Everybody; If You Believed In Me, Bailey.
8. Alabamy Bound, trio; Made a Habit of You; China Boy.

Who were the members of the Cheerleaders Quartet?

Albert



Posted on Jan 7, 2014, 10:46 AM

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Good Little, Bad Little You was not recorded by ....

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.... Whiteman. Here is an excellent version by Cliff Edwards with a great roster of musicians: according to Ray Mitchell, Andy Sannella, Eddie Lang, Joe Venuti, Joe Tarto. Do you agree?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkJeg135mfk

Albert



Posted on Jan 7, 2014, 12:41 PM

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Well, maybe half of them!

by John Leifert

I'm willing to go with Eddie Lang and Joe Tarto - but that doesn't sound like Andy Sannella on alto sax to me, and the "attack" on the violin isn't really 100% Joe Venuti. Was this recorded in NY? If so, we can rule out another possibility that I won't reveal lest stones be thrown (!!)

John L

Posted on Jan 8, 2014, 5:15 PM

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I'm throwing rocks.

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Recorded in New York on Sep 21, 1928.

Albert



Posted on Jan 8, 2014, 5:28 PM

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OK then!

by John L

So I've thrown out the fantasy ID, in favor of : ??, alto sax; definitely Eddie Lang - g; ?? Joe Venuti (or a Venuti-inspired individual) - violin; ? Joe Tarto-sb.

John L

Posted on Jan 8, 2014, 5:57 PM

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The reason I asked about the identity of the musicians ....

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.... is because I also had my doubts.  I agree with you: The only one that is certain is Eddie. I would put question marks, as you do, on all the others. Rust and Mitchell list a cello, but I don't hear one.

Albert



Posted on Jan 9, 2014, 6:12 AM

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