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Guest
(Login BrickyardBoy)

Re: a sad day

March 1 2017, 8:03 PM 

I was surprised when I received the AGM papers to see that John was nominated for a second year, and therefore, assumed incorrectly that his health was better than anticipated. I was delighted at the prospect of being able to cast my vote in his favour, so it was something of a shock when I heard the news on Radio Leeds at 3.00p.m. this afternoon.

He first came to my attention when he scored the 100 in his first Test Match; in an England innings in which the other batting performances came from Alan Knott and Ray Illingworth, which as it suggests, means that most of those who were selected to bat, actually failed. I recall that there was a lot of media criticism of Hampshire's innings because some of the more pompous commentators felt that he played and missed too often for a front-line batsman. (It appeared to my youthful awareness that he was not considered, at the time, to be establishment enough. My father put it differently, "The'd uh sed it wer faultless if id come from south of't Trent!)

Perhaps, he did not score as many runs as a player with his talent should done, but then with one acclaimed exception, he always put the needs of the team first. Very much a team player, his period as YCCC Captain unfortunately coincided with the worst period of civil war in Yorkshire's turbulent history, for which he was as far as I could see blameless, and it was a saddened figure who left to go to Derbyshire.

After retirement, his many years as one of the best umpires in the world, benefited the game enormously. He was highly regarded as a good man; well done him!

As for future presidents:

Ken Taylor or Doug Padgett, not to mention Brian Stott, would all seem acceptable candidates to me.


    
This message has been edited by BrickyardBoy on Mar 1, 2017 8:17 PM


 
 
Sid
(Login sid-don)
Assistant Moderator

Re: a sad day

March 1 2017, 9:53 PM 

I first watched Yorkshire in 1976, John (never 'Jackie') made 90+ in a Sunday league win at home to Glamorgan. I thought he was good and he was, although my start was towards the end of his time and perhaps I didn't realise how good he was.

Coming from Doncaster, I've always rooted for the South Yorkshire players. One of our own...

Decent very factual tribute from the Guardian site:

https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/mar/01/john-hampshire-former-england-and-yorkshire-batsman-dies-aged-76

 
 
Guest
(Login ThirdUmpire)

Re: a sad day

March 2 2017, 7:18 AM 

It's getting to the stage where I can nearly pick a team of sadly departed players I first started to watch in the 70s when I began to follow Yorkshire.

Bairstow, Carrick, Stevenson, Tony Nick, Don Wilson, Phil Sharpe, plus Fred and Closey from the late 60s who I saw without understanding things aged under 5 at the Scarborough festival and now John Hampshire.

I have his autobiography on my bookshelf titled Family Argument which said it all at the time and I felt sorry for John as he was dragged into the whole Boycott saga probably without wanting to be but as senior pro and vice captain he was presented by the anti Boycott brigade as the alternative.

A more pleasing batsman than Boycott on the eye in my view, but a determined cricketer who I remember best for some of his battling innings in a poor 70s team when Boycott was away with England or injured. I sensed the absence of Boycott in the team gave him more responsibility but also a sense of relief too which took pressure off him and made him perform better.

A true cricket servant who enjoyed success with Tasmania alongside Flat Jack as well as coaching and umpiring. A bit like our version of Bumble without the tomfoolery. Glad he got to be President and enjoy the recent successes of the team.

As for who takes over, it has to be too soon for the next generation of former players mentioned above with exception of Geoff Cope who is still a regular attendee and former committeeman so clearly dedicated to the club.

RIP John Hampshire. I still love the tale about when he took 7 wickets v Glamorgan with his underrated leggies


    
This message has been edited by ThirdUmpire on Mar 2, 2017 2:14 PM


 
 
Fraisse10
(Login Fraisse10)

Re: a sad day

March 2 2017, 9:15 AM 

BrickyardBoy; you may have thought the commentators of the day 'pompous' for not being effusive about Hampshire's debut Test century, but Mike Atherton's 'Times' piece of today suggests JH may have agreed with them!

"He once said of his hundred on his Test debut at Lord’s: 'I’ve never been so embarrassed in all my life. Nicked my way to a hundred in four hours. God it was terrible.'”


Still, a hundred on debut is quite something.

 
 
Idle Man
(Login Idle_man)

Re: a sad day

March 2 2017, 9:19 AM 

Typical of JH to play down the innings. I was there and I don't remember many spectators complaining as he led a fightback from 30odd for 4 and 60odd for 5.

 
 
Guest
(Login ThirdUmpire)

Re: a sad day

March 2 2017, 11:22 AM 

I've skimmed through his book which must be over 25 years old and it also reminded me of him hardly ever getting a nights sleep after being hit on the head by a bumper from Charlie Griffith who allegedly chucked it but also from what today would be classed as a no ball that would raise suspicions and monitor betting patterns as it was that far over the line.

 
 
Saltburn senior
(Login Saltburnsenior)

Re: a sad day

March 2 2017, 12:39 PM 

Third Ump.- Probably mentioned in the book but that particular game was at Acklam Park, Middlesbrough against the West Indies touring team in 1963. I was there for the first day and JH, after retiring hurt, bravely resumed his innings after the 3rd or 4th wicket fell. Yorkshire won the game quite comfortably.

 
 
Guest
(Login ThirdUmpire)

Re: a sad day

March 2 2017, 1:22 PM 

Correct.

It also says when he staggered off the field having been hit on the temple he was greeted by Closey who told him that next time it happened to make sure he fell over into his crease so as not to be run out!

I wonder if Closey was at the Pearly Gates to welcome him again yesterday....

 
 
Guest
(Login BrickyardBoy)

Re: a sad day

March 2 2017, 2:45 PM 

Fraisse10:

I was not stating that John did not play and miss rather a lot during that innings. He certainly did and, typical of the man, said so in no uncertain terms in his autobiography.

What I was trying to bring out was the interpretation that was put upon his performance by the commentators at the time.

Despite the fact that it was not the most polished innings from a technical point of view, it was the only innings of any note played by anyone in the team who had been chosen for his batting ability alone; all the others failed.

It was also his first Test innings and it was at Lord's, so I think that he could have been given some leeway for nervousness.

A more gracious assessment would have celebrated his achievement rather than highlighted the shortcomings. What incensed me at the time, and it still does, was that he was criticised for getting scratchy, but vital, runs for his team, in his first Test Match when the other, older and more experienced batsmen had contributed very little. They had played so badly, or been outplayed so completely, that they were back in the pavilion.

Hampshire gritted it out and contributed importantly, but instead of receiving praise, he received what could only be described as "moderated rapture".

This was not unusual at the time, when those who bitterly resented the abolition of the amateur/professional divide, still held sway in the echelons of power, and in some cases in the media.

The issue, was most clearly demonstrated for me, when a close of play summary, assessing the early departure for another low score by a favourite ex-amateur batsman, concluded with the immortal words, "Although, he was out caught in the slips, playing at a ball which pitched outside his off-stump, it has to be recognised that he was the only batsman on either side good enough to get a touch on the ball".

 
 
Guest
(Login ThirdUmpire)

Re: a sad day

March 2 2017, 3:03 PM 

Surely not referring to Dexter or Cowdrey?

 
 
Geoff B
(Login Coastalview)

If we do need a president!

March 2 2017, 4:47 PM 

A good few suggestions earlier on players who could assume the mantle of president in light of the sad death of John.

I think the honour might be somewhat devalued by the circumstances and it might be better if one of these former players is chosen in the normal way over the normal timescale to be president in 2018.

This season perhaps the club could prevail on a former president, I would suggest Dickie Bird, to hold the fort.

 
 
Tyke1950
(Login Tyke1950)

Re: If we do need a president!

March 2 2017, 6:02 PM 

I was at Bradford watching Yorkshire on the day of Hampshire's hundred.
The news of his achievement reached those of us sat close to the football stand, via a loud and spontaneous round of applause from the Member's Enclosure.
The sense of pride and pleasure was palpable.

 
 
Guest
(Login BrickyardBoy)

Re: a sad day

March 2 2017, 6:39 PM 

ThirdUnpire

"You, might think so. I, could not possibly say!"

 
 
Tyke1950
(Login Tyke1950)

Re: a sad day

March 2 2017, 11:18 PM 

Perhaps a bit premature but, with reference to who might succeed JH as President, there are a few others from the sixties generation not yet mentioned - Doug Padgett; Brian Scott for example - both of whom have had roles within the Club since retirement as players.

 
 
Sid
(Login sid-don)
Assistant Moderator

Re: a sad day

March 3 2017, 9:35 PM 

Listening to TMS coverage of the one day international. Charlie Dagnell gave a very heart felt tribute to JH. Told a nice little antidote about JH umpiring him bowling in a second team game and helping set his field.

 
 
Saltaire
(Login Saltaire)

Re: a sad day

March 4 2017, 12:41 PM 

In 1970, I went with my dad to a Scarborough Festival fixture between England and England Under 25s – a game designated as first class, so there was plenty to play for on both sides. I recall the young Bob Willis bowling extremely quickly, only for John Hampshire to flick his wrists at one delivery and despatch the ball several rows back into the crowd at square leg. Absolutely thrilling.

That said, his trademark stroke was undoubtedly the straight drive. How many times did I sit on the Western Terrace and see that wonderful combination of power and grace, with the shotgun crack of bat-on-ball echoing back from the Football Stand as the ball whistled down the hill?

We should also not forget that, in 1975, after Lillee and Thomson had destroyed the English batting over several tests here and in Australia, it was John Hampshire – along with David Steele and Barry Wood – to whom the selectors turned. As it turned out, he made two low scores at Headingley (his final test). However, I always thought that his mere selection said a great deal about his peers viewed his experience, courage and skill.

John Hampshire RIP.

 
 
spanishnick
(Login Spanishnick)

Re: a sad day

March 5 2017, 12:43 AM 

Sad news. Like,I suspect, many on here, he was amongst the first Yorkshire cricketers i got to see play in the flesh. Doubt I saw the best of his playing days but he always struck me as a very talented and proper cricketer.
I remember being really chuffed for him when he was named as Club President.

 
 
 
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