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Middlesex photos

September 8 2017 at 8:08 PM

Dave Morton  (Login DaveMorton)

 

 
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sid
(Login sid-don)
Assistant Moderator

Re: Middlesex photos

September 8 2017, 8:29 PM 

Excellent to see Ray and Alan recognised on their likely final match at the football stand end.

In my 40+ years of attending Headingley, most things have been inefficient and of poor quality, these two are the exception. They understand the game, are effective in their work and unfailing friendly. I hope the club, or perhaps the football stand regulars, can mark their service during the final game in some way.

 
 
Former Country Member
(Login FormerlyCountryMember)

Middx Photos

September 9 2017, 8:50 AM 

Thanks, Dave. As always, great photos.

BTW, how do you take these pictures? - I never seem to see you (or your camera) around the ground!

Did 33-0 have a significance? Not the season's highest opening stand, surely?


 
 

Dave Morton
(Login DaveMorton)

Re: Middlesex photos

September 9 2017, 9:25 AM 

I have a couple of groups of mates, one which sits in north east upper, the other in the football stand. The NE group was not present at the Middlesex game, so I took all the photos from more or less the same place near the front at the football stand end. Sometimes I move around a bit, but in this game I didn't. I use a pretty big 400 mm lens, so I'm quite visible, but unlike the professionals I take my shots from a sitting position. I'm there primarily to watch cricket and socialise; the photography comes second.

I tend to take them in roughly 30 minute bursts, starting and finishing with a shot of the scoreboard, to remind me who is batting and the match situation, then I try to link them in the narrative. I also like to capture players who are new to me, which was only Shaun Marsh in this game, of the players on both teams.

Jack Leaning, by the way, is difficult to photograph batting - absolutely not a poser! - and I was pleased to get a good one of him. Lyth, Lees and Hodd are particularly easy; Ballance less easy. Tino Best was the best - batting or bowling! Matt Fisher is very expressive too, facially and body language. The hardest bowler to photograph was David Wainwright, I think.

 
 
Brian
(Login NewBrian)

Re: Middlesex photos

September 9 2017, 9:33 AM 

Can't remember if you've said this before Dave, but are you Canon or Nikon and if so which body?
I've switched from the Nikon d810 to the d5 recently with the massive 400 lens left in the car boot and a 300pf on with a x2 converter in good light, thus 600mm on full frame.
It's for wildlife but would be an excellent set up for sport.

 
 

Dave Morton
(Login DaveMorton)

Re: Middlesex photos

September 9 2017, 10:06 AM 

Canon 40D body, Brian - love it! Zoom lens is EF 100-400mm 1:4.5-5.6 IS USM, which I tried for birdwatching at Bempton last summer. Now that IS difficult! I have an EF 15-85mm 1:3.5-5.6 IS USM for my wider-angle stuff, landscapes, etc.

I tend to use HDR (Photomatix) for all but the action shots, the photo of Alan and Ray being an example.

I've also got a Sony HX60 which has a 30X zoom and fits into trouser pocket. Good for Test Matches where they won't let you in with big lens. Brilliant for landscapes, too, except I need to get sensor cleaned before I go to Oz in November.

 
 
Brian
(Login NewBrian)

Re: Middlesex photos

September 9 2017, 10:23 AM 

Bempton is rewarding when you get the gannets at eye level over the cliffs, but the puffins, in season, are normally at lower levels, which is tricky. And it's busy.
HDR (done in Lightroom rather than in camera) can be excellent for bird pictures too, not in flight but birds on twigs.
I recommend Blacktoft Sands near Goole for those getting into bird photography The hides can be restrictive, and the subjects are occasionally elusive, but this time of year there's a good chance of photogenic waders near the hides, marsh harriers, occasional hobby/merlin/barn owl, as well as smaller birds like the rare and engaging bearded reedlings and mammals like stoats, foxes and deer.
Many of my pics are on the rare bird alert gallery..


 
 
Former Country Member
(Login FormerlyCountryMember)

Middx Photos

September 11 2017, 8:42 AM 

Thanks, Dave, for the info about your location and kit. Am I right in thinking that the sensor size means your lens focal lengths are x1.6 in 35 mm terms?

I'll keep an eye out for you in the future. Will you be at the Oval?

 
 
Idle man
(Login Idle_man)

Re: Middlesex photos

September 11 2017, 8:59 AM 

Interested by that FCMember. I too have often cast my eye around to identify DM., expecting to see a paparazzo like figure rushing from third man to fine leg, huge bag of equipment flapping behind. Never happened. Took the publication and sale of his excellent book to finally put a face to him.

 
 

Dave Morton
(Login DaveMorton)

Re: Middlesex photos

September 11 2017, 11:45 AM 

FCM - I never quite got my head round the sensor-size issue. I merely checked that the lens was right for the camera.

 
 
FCM
(Login FormerlyCountryMember)

Middx Photos (or Dave Morton's camera)

September 11 2017, 1:54 PM 

I think it's because the sensor in your camera (and my 30D) is smaller (for cost reasons, at least at the time of design of the camera) than the 24x36 mm frame size of a 35 mm film camera. This makes the apparent focal length of the lens bigger by a factor of 1.6 compared with the same lens on a 35 mm film camera body. Thus your telephoto is more telephoto (160 - 640 mm) but wide angle lenses are less wide angle (a fisheye becomes a very wide angle, etc.). Hope not to bore.

FCM

 
 

Dave Morton
(Login DaveMorton)

Re: Middlesex photos

September 11 2017, 2:17 PM 

Right, thanks for that, though it makes my brain hurt. I presume there's a corresponding loss of definition to go with the increased magnification.

I'll just continue to push the buttons, but I won't be doing that at the Oval. I like the ground and the people, more than Lord's, which I also like, but the whole faff of staying and travelling in London puts me off. I am booked in for Chelmsford, however.

 
 
Brian
(Login NewBrian)

Re: Middlesex photos

September 11 2017, 2:37 PM 

"I presume there's a corresponding loss of definition to go with the increased magnification"

Yes, that's correct, because you're only using the central portion of the available pixels, although if you're not cropping the final image too much you may not notice.
Huge megapixel counts are now available but my 24megapixels are more than enough in normal circumstances, although I try to resist huge crops. Full-frame cameras will also do crop mode if you wish to give extra reach, but I've never felt the need.
Your picture quality looks excellent with the 40d to my eye.

 
 

Dave Morton
(Login DaveMorton)

Re: Middlesex photos

September 11 2017, 5:56 PM 

With apologies to all other cricket fans, this is specifically for Brian regarding my one serious attempt at bird photography.

Bempton Cliffs, late August 2016, and I was told that really only gannets remained, though there were some puffins. I reckon that to photograph a puffin in flight you would need to have the reactions of a slip-fieldsman and the strength of a weight-lifter. They are so small and so fast. I found the herring gulls at Scarborough CC difficult enough.

I concentrated on the gannets, therefore, while a helpful twitcher told me about the different plumage of the one, two and three year olds, etc. They are seriously handsome birds and I got a couple of shots that pleased me. There was also a board with the same info, which I photographed for future reference.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/forwarddefensive/albums/72157671913812440/with/28689641374/

Brian, I note that the lenses marketed for birding are different in appearance to the ones used for sport, with a bend in them, it seems. What's that all about?

Again, apologies for off-topic.

 
 
Brian
(Login NewBrian)

Re: Middlesex photos

September 11 2017, 6:18 PM 

Think they're pretty respectable, Dave. Like the one with the nesting material particularly.
Not sure about the lenses with the bend, but I suspect they're actually spotting scopes which come in two sorts, straight and with an angled eyepiece for watching comfort. They're also used for pictures with a simple point and shoot compact camera attached, but to my mind it's not as much fun as shooting with a DSLR and normal lens, and generally the results aren't as good.
Birds in flight is a whole subject in itself, but if you persevere you'll find with bit of practice you can pan at the same speed as the bird while crucially not stopping the sweep as you press the shutter, thus allowing you to use lower speeds (say a 1,000th sec at F8 or 11, depending on lens, obviously - that's slowish for birds in flight anyway). It's a bit harder to do than it sounds.
That gives a nice blurry background and a sharp bird.
Some of mine here, if the link works

http://www.rarebirdalert.co.uk/RealData/gallery.asp?SpeciesID=0&L1=0&L2=&L3=&level=0&From=&To=&TakenFrom=&TakenTo=&PhotoBy=34582

Often the rarity of the bird trumps the quality of the picture'; other times it's a comon species (spellcheck wants me to call it a communist species) with nice light, etc.

 
 
 
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