<< Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to Index  

Percy Holmes

November 5 2017 at 5:05 PM
Stu  (Login StuartRA)
Assistant Moderator

 
JollyD
(Login JollyD)
Lancashire youth policy
November 3 2017, 5:29 PM

I believe Percy Holmes' share of the record breaking stand of 555, was his last century. No doubt some statistics guru can either confirm or refute that.

 
 Respond to this message   
AuthorReply
Stu
(Login StuartRA)
Assistant Moderator

Re: Percy Holmes

November 5 2017, 5:05 PM 

Guest
(Login BrickyardBoy)
Re: Lancashire youth policy
November 4 2017, 11:54 AM

JolyD wrote,

"I believe Percy Holmes' share of the record breaking stand of 555, was his last century. No doubt some
statistics guru can either confirm or refute that."

You are quite correct. Percy Holmes scored 60 centuries for Yorkshire. Of course, his career was interrupted by the Great War; having first played for the County in 1913; when he would have been at the height of his powers.

The first century (exactly, 100) was against Notts in 1919 and his last (224 not out) was his share of the 555 against Essex in what was to be his final season (1932). (There is a similarity with Lehmann here, in that in some sense, both went out on a "high"). After that he was in and out of the side (presumably due to the "injury" which ultimately finished his career) with a series of scores in the 60's, 70's and 80's, of which 87 against Surrey at Bramall Lane was the highest. In his last game at the beginning of August, against Leicestershire at the old Aylestone Road Ground, he scored 4 in the first innings and Yorkshire won by an innings and 169 runs, so he did not get a chance to improve on his first innings performance.

Of the 60 centuries, he had eight scores of over 200, of which two progressed to over 300.

His highest (315 not out) was against Middlesex in 1925. This was an unusual score as no-one else got over 61 runs for YCCC.

The link ihttp://cricketarchive.com/Yorkshire/Scorecards/11/11512.html

 
 
Stu
(Login StuartRA)
Assistant Moderator

Re: Percy Holmes

November 5 2017, 5:07 PM 

JollyD
(Login JollyD)
Lancashire youth policy
November 4 2017, 1:57 PM

Thank you, BrickyardBoy for your most interesting development of the Percy Holmes theme. There is no sport like cricket for fascinating statistics and the stories which often accompany them.

 
 
Stu
(Login StuartRA)
Assistant Moderator

Re: Percy Holmes

November 5 2017, 5:07 PM 

Guest
(Login BrickyardBoy)
Regarding Percy Holmes
November 4 2017, 3:10 PM

Continuing my researches about Percy Holmes I have, this afternoon, come across a cricketing oddity. Not only did Percy Holmes share with Herbert Sutcliffe, the highest partnership in English domestic first class cricket (i.e. 555) he also played in 555 First Class Matches during his career. An interesting numerical co-incidence!

I came across this titbit whilst trying to discover what part he played in hostilities between 1914 and 1918. So far I have found nothing definitive, except that there was a Private Percy Holmes in the West Yorkshire Regiment. Whether this was our Percy, or some other Percy, I have been unable to arrive at a conclusive position.

Does anyone have knowledge about this?


 
 
Stu
(Login StuartRA)
Assistant Moderator

Re: Percy Holmes

November 5 2017, 5:09 PM 

JollyD
(Login JollyD)
Lancashire youth policy
November 5 2017, 11:25 AM

I believe BrickyardBoy and I may have inadvertently hijacked this 'Lancashire youth policy' thread with our interpolations about Percy Holmes. If so, perhaps the moderators can weave their technological magic to move the material to a different thread (?).
Meanwhile, Percy was a Huddersfield man who lived, I believe, in Oakes. His 'local' (about two miles away) was the Wappy Spring Inn. Indeed, one of his nicknames in the dressing room is rumoured to have been 'Wappy'. He would occasionally take other Yorkshire players there, including Herbert Sutcliffe. At one time the inn was half in Huddersfield and half in Halifax. It still exists but is now entirely on the Huddersfield side of the M62.

 
 
Guest
(Login BrickyardBoy)

Re: Percy Holmes

November 5 2017, 8:56 PM 

Great work Stu!

 
 

Dave Morton
(Login DaveMorton)

Re: Percy Holmes

November 5 2017, 10:06 PM 

I'm embarrassed to know so little about Holmes, his record-setting partnerships with Sutcliffe apart. I know he played for England, just one Test, I believe, or one series - need to check.

I did read somewhere - perhaps here or on t' Corridor - that he queered his own pitch by responding aggressively to Lord Hawke's use of his surname ("Come here, Holmes!") and was never selected for England again.

Anyone know this story?

And are there any descriptions of his batting? Cardus wrote extensively about Herbert, but I don't remember any purple prose on Percy.

 
 
Idle man
(Login Idle_man)

Re: Percy Holmes

November 5 2017, 10:14 PM 

I suppose there was a bloke called Hobbs getting in his way for much of his career. Worse players have had full England carers though.

 
 

Dave Morton
(Login DaveMorton)

Re: Percy Holmes

November 5 2017, 11:36 PM 

Hobbs, Sandham, Sutcliffe, Holmes - just like England's current opening batsman riches. I'm hopeful for Cook & Stoneman, though. Cook has nothing to prove, and I've been going on about Stoneman for years. How clever of Surrey to turn him into an International player!

Who are the other great England opening partners? Hobbs & Sutcliffe, obviously. Hutton & Washbrook? Boycott & Edrich? Gooch & Atherton? Strauss & Cook?

I'm not sure there have been many. Am I forgetting an obvious pair? Boycott & Barber, Richardson & Cowdrey, Broad & Athey, Gooch & Robinson were all Ashes winners, I think.

 
 
Idle man
(Login Idle_man)

Re: Percy Holmes

November 6 2017, 7:16 AM 

Hobbs and Rhodes.

 
 

Dave Morton
(Login DaveMorton)

Re: Percy Holmes

November 6 2017, 10:01 AM 

Yes!

 
 
Guest
(Login BrickyardBoy)

Non-selection of Percy Holmes

November 6 2017, 11:24 AM 

From the Epilogue to "Lord Hawke; A Cricketing Legend", by James Coldham (Tauris Parke Paperbacks 2003) p.187

"When Percy Holmes was asked at his Bakisland home, near Halifax, why he thought he had never been to Australia he explained: "It was that bugger, 'Awke. 'E said to me one day, "Olmes", and I said, "Yes, 'Awke, Wot?" And that's why I nivver went to Australia".

 
 
Guest
(Login BrickyardBoy)

Re: Percy Holmes

November 6 2017, 11:29 AM 

Other successful opening partnerships for England would include Boycott and Luckhurst, Boycott and Amiss and Boycott and Gooch.

 
 
Saltaire
(Login Saltaire)

Re: Percy Holmes

November 11 2017, 6:57 PM 

The Wikipedia entry for Percy Holmes states that Neville Cardus wrote his obituary for the 1972 Wisden. A brief quote is given: “Holmes was a jaunty, restless character who believed cricket should be fun. He tended to score quickly and to play shots, such as cuts and pulls, that "more correct" batsmen such as Sutcliffe rarely used”.

I don’t have a copy of this edition, but would be very interested if anyone is able to expand on the Cardus prose.

In his “Headingley” (1970), John Marshall made a similar comparison. In contrast with Herbert Sutcliffe’s “businesslike approach and profound concentration”, Holmes was “a jauntily jocund figure”. He quotes the writer RC Robertson-Glasgow’s depiction of the pair: “one like an alderman about to lay a foundation stone, the other a perky punter off to the races”. For all that, Marshall is also clear that Holmes was one of the most attractive – as well as prolific – batsmen of his or any other era.

 
 
Anthony Bradbury
(Login buckhursthill1)

Percy Holmes

November 12 2017, 1:01 PM 

The Cardus Obituary runs to four full pages - but here is a sample:
"He was volatile, unpredictable of mood, always alive by instinct, so to say, intent on enjoyment on the cricket field, or off it. He was always first to admit, like the rest of humans, he was fallible.

Holmes often appeared to improvise; he could change stroke whenever his first glance at a ball's length had deceived him. He might move forward anticipating a half-volley; if the ball dropped shorter than its first flight advertised, he would on swift feet, move back and cut late exquisitely. There was a certain light-footedness in his batsmanship; he could defend as obstinately as most Yorkshiremen, but even then, he gave the impression that he was defending by choice, not compulsion. He was an artist, as I say, expressing himself through cricket."


 
 
 
  Respond to this message   
  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Return to Index  
 Copyright © 1999-2017 Network54. All rights reserved.   Terms of Use   Privacy Statement  
All IP addresses are recorded. We reserve the right to remove personal attacks, sexist, racist, homophobic, defamatory or abusive comments, comments likely to incite religious hatred, those disposed to wind others up, and unapproved advertising.

Email us: Whiterosecricket@hotmail.co.uk