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 photo americlps_zpsavfgvdau.jpg

Dag Evert's "American Classic"

As mentioned on the forum, heres a picture I took some time back, with natural winter daylight. A 2100, and a 1377, both guns have been recrowned, and had their trigger parts shimmed for play, contact surfaces stoned, and trigger springs somewhat reduced within safe limits. The 2100 has had its barrel shimmed with tape to remove play.
Both guns give great accuracy for the money if they are given good pellets!
The combination of pellets and guns in the picture represents something close to my boyhood dreams:-)


-- Dag Evert

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If we're picturing the same thing

August 13 2012 at 9:23 PM
Chris  (Login Hudson12tum)
Crosman Forum Member
from IP address 24.212.153.167


Response to I don't think so

then the spring could only make second stage pumping harder. Here's what I think we're talking about.

[IMG][linked image][/IMG]

So the spring preload takes the place of the ball detents, and once the 1st-stage piston bottoms out the spring begins to compress and the second-stage piston keeps moving. The problem is that the spring can only increase the force needed to compress the second stage, and there's no way to get the energy back.


    
This message has been edited by Hudson12tum from IP address 24.212.153.167 on Aug 13, 2012 9:24 PM


 
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