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.22 rimfire barrel

January 3 2010 at 8:38 PM
  (Login Toolmaker94)
Crosman Forum Member
from IP address 74.177.121.207

Do .22 rimfire barrels make good .22 airgun barrels?

 
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Mark
(Login Specman)
Crosman Forum Member
88.109.40.44

Not for Low Power Weapons...

January 4 2010, 6:11 AM 

I wouldn't have thought so. I have tried shooting a .22 bullet head through a standard 12 foot pound air weapon. It jammed and took two shots to clear it. The bullets are so much heavier as well than a .22 14 grain pellet. I think a .22 bullet is available between 30-60 grain.
Now you guys in the US don't have all the power restrictions we have. You could use it on a weapon knocking out 25-30+ ft lbs no problem.

However what would be the point? Get a rimfire .22 and shoot sub-sonics. All the power, non of the hassle. I think a standard .22 rifle barrel is a little slack for a pellet. I've noticed that the rifleing is shallower on an air rifle.

I'm sure somebody on here will come up with technical data, measurements and an actual size for you. Sorry I'm not technical. But what I can say is that all .22's are not equal.

Hope this helps.

 
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Phil
(Login Duane30)
Crosman Forum Member
69.136.7.125

Diameters...

January 4 2010, 7:58 AM 

.22 bullets are around .223" in diameter and .22 cal pellets range from .220-.222" in diameter. This is my experience using a caliper for various brands.

I have shot Eunjin 30 grain pellets out of an old .22 beater with blanks! Open the bolt, load a pellet and then the blank... One mean 'pellet' gun!

Tried firing .22 rounds (just the lead!) out of an air rifle but they appear to be too big to even load.

Resistance in the bore is equal to minimal needed pressure to dislodge the projectile...

"Well, I thought it was a rabbit but it turned out to be Bear Grylls in a rabbit hide."

[linked image]

 
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(Login saddlemountain)
Crosman Forum Member
69.36.214.82

With the cost of Crosman bbls and with proper prep

January 5 2010, 7:18 PM 

they shoot well I don't see much incentive for RF bbls. But, has anyone cast a plug and lapped a RF barrel just for RF application? I have a bunch of RF takeoffs from rebarrel jobs.

 
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(Login dt45acp)
Crosman Forum Member
70.58.204.226

I have made several with Marlin .22 barrels

January 4 2010, 8:30 AM 


I used to use Marlin Micro Groove stainless steel barrels, they work very well.

But because of the initial cost and the hours of machine time, I discontinued that practice.

 
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RedFeather
(Login RedFeather)
Crosman Forum Member
173.73.168.124

IIRC, a .22 long rifle barrel is .218"

January 4 2010, 2:29 PM 

.223 is for, well, .223 Remington, .22 Hornet (might be .224), and .22 Magnum. The .22 LR is actually smaller.


 
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(Login Voltar1)
Crosman Forum Member
72.25.192.4

Should be perfect then

January 4 2010, 3:21 PM 

maybe a Ruger takeoff would be sweet

 
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Doug Owen
(Login DKOwen)
Crosman Forum Member
24.130.132.23

IMO far from "perfect"

January 4 2010, 5:03 PM 

.22 LR barrels (even if the right size for your pellets) are designed for much higher engraving pressures than PCPs can hope to deliver. By ten times or more. Even Marlin 'microgrove' rifling is going to be more radical than we'd want I think.

Power loss and blowby are the likely results....neither of which are usually goals.

Unless you're building a real bruser where the pellets are stripping (I don't think really possible with HPA) I suspect you're far better off with the traditional offerings from folks like LW and HW. For sure if the .22 LR barrel was "perfect" in configuration those makers would use that instead of what they do. I think it's far to assume they considered it.

Doug Owen

 
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(Login classicalgas)
Crosman Forum Member
24.17.161.219

.22 RF barrels work ok for airguns.....not the absolute best option

January 4 2010, 5:16 PM 

for many of the reasons stated, but they can give decent accuracy for a good price. Crosman barrels are often cheaper for better results, but not always.RF barrels are often cheaper than premium AG (LW orHW) barrels, but will rarely give as good a result.Depends on what you want...

 
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(Login abbababbaccc)
Crosman Forum Member
88.193.218.213

Re: .22 RF barrels work ok for airguns.....not the absolute best option

January 4 2010, 11:53 PM 

Does it work the other way around? If you ream a .22 air rifle barrel to accept .22lr cartridge can you use it for shooting them?

 
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(Login classicalgas)
Crosman Forum Member
24.17.161.219

I'd doubt it. A friend found a source of RF slugs,

January 5 2010, 8:38 AM 

for a black powder pistol, I think. He had to swage them down a bunch to get them to even shoot out of a RWS 52.

 
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Doug Owen
(Login DKOwen)
Crosman Forum Member
24.130.132.23

The other way about?

January 5 2010, 11:02 AM 

Yes, they can. Poachers in Africa convert .22 airguns to RF. Neither accurate nor safe, but it's done.

I suspect the bullets strip the rifling real quick and kinda rattle down the bore and out the end.

Doug Owen

 
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(Login abbababbaccc)
Crosman Forum Member
88.193.218.213

Re: The other way about?

January 5 2010, 11:36 AM 

The barrel hardens after it has been shot for a while and the velocities are relatively close (subsonic 22lr vs. good magnum springer) so in principle stripping and safety should not be concerns as far as barrel goes.

 
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Doug Owen
(Login DKOwen)
Crosman Forum Member
24.130.132.23

No, no.....

January 6 2010, 10:25 PM 

First off, the barrel doesn't harden "after it has been shot for a while", it never sees temperatures remotely close enough for that. It's as hard as it's ever going to be when it leaves the factory. That's not what work hardening is about....if steel work hardened that is.

Stripping is going to be an issue most likely as the breech pressure on .22 LR is like ten times the maximum available in serious PCPs. The average MV may be the same, but the pressure profile is differnt in firearms. Once you start to lead up the bore, all hope of useful accuracy is lost. Every bullet after that will get fouled.

Safety is an issue in the gun conversion I described, they are known to blow out due to bad support to the case.

Doug Owen


 
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Matt
(Login Toolmaker94)
Crosman Forum Member
74.177.109.44

Thanks...

January 4 2010, 5:53 PM 

I have a .22 rimfire barrel laying here, I was wondering how it would do on an airgun. Now I know, thanks!

 
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Charles Mellon
(Login bil601)
Crosman Forum Member
74.45.15.61

Bore diameters

January 6 2010, 3:17 PM 

A 22 rim fire bore is .223, 22 mag is .224, 22 airgun is .217-218. So your looking at .005 or more slop in a 22 rim fire barrel

 
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(Login Voltar1)
Crosman Forum Member
72.25.192.4

I just slugged a piece of a remington barrel at 0.219" and 0.216" bore

January 6 2010, 3:57 PM 

pushed a EunJin through and it completely sealed off the bore.
So I don't buy the pellets won't fit .22RF barrel at all.

Walter....

 
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Charles Mellon
(Login bil601)
Crosman Forum Member
74.45.15.61

Pellet size

January 6 2010, 9:21 PM 

I dont think youll get an accurate size using a pellet. I think you need to pull a solid lead slug through it. It doesnt make sense that a 22 barrel would be that small. Unless the inside has grown from rust.

 
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RedFeather
(Login RedFeather)
Crosman Forum Member
173.73.168.124

I stand corrected

January 8 2010, 10:23 PM 

.222 bore and about .216 land. I got the .218 from Ruger talking about their Bisley revolver barrels (why they don't offer a .22 WMR cylinder for those guns.)


 
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