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Barry McGee's Custom 2300

Cothrane stainless tube, left handed breech, power adjuster,
Lothar 10" barrel, H.P.A.sports co2 cap, Clague ldc,1701 trigger group,
Stace trigger, Rick Andres grips and a Mueller quick shot reflex sight.

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anyone have video of casting pellets or any step in the process??nt

December 6 2011 at 9:01 PM

robny  (Login robnewyork)
Crosman Forum Member
from IP address 108.21.102.194


 
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AuthorReply

andy
(Login FortWarren)
Crosman Forum Member
24.218.244.126

no video, but there is this:

December 6 2011, 9:41 PM 


 
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john
(Login jct842)
Crosman Forum Member
216.134.239.168

?

December 6 2011, 10:48 PM 

looks like you would have close to 900 invested in it before you got to see if it works!
could buy a $*** load of good accurate pellets for that kind of money. john

 
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robny
(Login robnewyork)
Crosman Forum Member
108.21.102.194

didnt know it was that bad, wow~~~~~~!!!!! whats the complication??????

December 6 2011, 11:13 PM 


 
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Chris S.
(Login javagonzo)
Crosman Forum Member
12.231.44.66

because they're swaged, not cast -nt-

December 7 2011, 7:37 AM 


 
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scot laughlin
(Login classicalgas)
Crosman Forum Member
24.17.160.61

casting pellets in calibers below about .25 is a PITA

December 7 2011, 8:31 AM 

there is so little lead involved that getting a good consistent product is very tough...maintaining the temperature of the mold is the big issue, but there are others. A multi cavity ball mold might work ok though.

 
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ray carter
(Login raydj)
Crosman Forum Member
174.27.73.219

I should think it would be better and easier

December 7 2011, 8:38 AM 

to swage them.

 
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robny
(Login robnewyork)
Crosman Forum Member
108.21.102.194

and swagging them is done with pressure as opposed to heat??

December 7 2011, 9:02 AM 


 
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Ron
(Login oo7fuzz)
Crosman Forum Member
24.167.225.137

Heat is involved in swaging.

December 7 2011, 11:17 AM 

I dare say, with ideal conditions such as insulation and rapidity of the swaging process, the swaging dies would become red hot and eventually melt.

In order for the metal to actually be displaced, atomic bonds are broken and new bonds created.

So a question for the scientists:

Are the atoms heated by pressure prior to relinquishing their bond or is the heat produced as a result of the bonds breaking?

 
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Glover, Walter
(Login Voltar1)
Crosman Forum Member
72.25.192.4

melt? really?

December 8 2011, 8:08 AM 

don't buy that

 
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Ron
(Login oo7fuzz)
Crosman Forum Member
24.167.225.137

Re: melt? really?

December 8 2011, 9:12 AM 

The die would have a melting wouldn't it?
So if heat were continually induced which could not dissipate to atmosphere, things would heat up pretty fast. It is surely all theory though because I doubt that we could insulate and cycle fast enough. So take it with a grain of salt, Walter. I know I'm gettting a little nuts here, but it's what I do best.

Anyhoo, How about taking a crack at the last question of my post?

It is only meant as a point of discussion directed to Robny's question about heat being involved in casting and presumably not in swaging.

So I am thinking. Is not the flame under the melting pot pretty much on balance with the pressure involved in swaging? The flame and the pressure are really the same animal in that they are both energy which translates to heat. Is that not so?


 
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Glover, Walter
(Login Voltar1)
Crosman Forum Member
72.25.192.4

Don't buy it

December 8 2011, 9:35 AM 

A die with a 2,000 or so degree melting point swaging a material with a 700 degree melting point and you propose the 'heat' of swaging is to increase to the point of a melt down?

Carry on, makes zero sense to my simplistic thinking.

Walter....

 
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Ron
(Login oo7fuzz)
Crosman Forum Member
24.167.225.137

Consider the springer airgun

December 8 2011, 12:10 PM 

If the piston would move forward very slowly but carried with it the same force as a fast moving piston, the air volume which the spring compresses would recieve the same amount of energy as being compressed quickly. It is only that in the springer rifle the compression process is so fast that the heat is maintained in the air because there is not time for it to be dissipated.Likewise, I stated in my post that ideal conditions must be present and listed ideal insulating hoping such would be understood to mean no heat loss of the system.

On the other hand, would melting points be a limiting factor in the experiment? It might be for the steel die because that is the outcome of the experiment. But what if we worked with boiling point for the lead? Which is 3,164F.

 
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Glover, Walter
(Login Voltar1)
Crosman Forum Member
199.96.209.157

They won't melt either

December 8 2011, 6:54 PM 

see no point in this mental exercise that is making me mental happy.gif

sorry, cannot help you out on this brainstorming project happy.gif

 
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Steve in NC
(Login pneuguy)
Crosman Forum Member
74.242.252.49

Actually, Ron, that's an experiment I've (sort of) done. Many years ago...

December 8 2011, 10:18 AM 

...I was (unwisely - I don't do this anymore!) plinking at a target thumbtacked to an oak stump, and had a spent pellet rebound from the hard wood, return, and land near enough for me to immediately reach over and pick it up.

The lead of the pellet was heavily deformed, flattened, (i.e., swaged) and (the interesting part re: this thread) quite warm to the touch.

But hardly blistering hot and certainly not molten.

Steve


    
This message has been edited by pneuguy from IP address 74.242.252.49 on Dec 8, 2011 6:01 PM


 
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Art Deuel
(Login ADeuel)
Crosman Forum Member
4.174.248.36

Corbin makes dies to swage airgun pellets.....

December 7 2011, 12:00 PM 

that can be used in reloading presses or in his hydraulic presses.

ART

 
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Steve in NC
(Login pneuguy)
Crosman Forum Member
98.69.192.182

James Perotti made this beautiful rig for swaging .32 diabolos...

December 7 2011, 9:33 AM 

...for his custom-built air-conserving, 70fpe Uberpumper (my personal nominee for the most powerful pumper in the world).

http://www.network54.com/Forum/79537/message/1173582421/James+Perotti%27s+45-5gr+-32%26quot%3B+pellet+and+his+forming+tools+and+dies

Steve


    
This message has been edited by pneuguy from IP address 98.69.192.182 on Dec 7, 2011 9:33 AM


 
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robny
(Login robnewyork)
Crosman Forum Member
108.21.102.194

very cool! thats a serious pumper dumper too! nt

December 7 2011, 12:41 PM 


 
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Steve in NC
(Login pneuguy)
Crosman Forum Member
98.69.192.182

Serious? Yes! Pumper? Yes! Dumper? NO!!!

December 7 2011, 5:00 PM 

It would probably need 30, instead of only 12, pumps for each 69fpe shot if it were a dumper.

Steve

 
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robny
(Login robnewyork)
Crosman Forum Member
108.21.102.194

hahahahahahahah, yes thats insane

December 8 2011, 7:34 AM 

its an economical air conserving model , i get it .Steve, you should join the buildoff, make a 3000 psi indy like 1377@

 
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