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Ghille suit question

March 29 2007 at 7:02 PM
Kevin J. 

G`Day, During WW2 were there any manuals issued on how to make a Ghillie suit? Thanks for any help. ~Kevin

 
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AuthorReply

Sniper Suits

March 29 2007, 8:14 PM 

Yes, many of the period manuals on Sniping discuss how to make a suit as do the early editions of the Canadian Army Training Memorandums. If you have access to lots of hessian, you can easily make one out of that material.


 
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2 gentlemen from 1 can para

March 30 2007, 5:43 AM 

where i got the picture i cant remember for the life of me.....

cheers

Ted


 
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Kevin J.

Re: 2 gentlemen from 1 can para

March 30 2007, 6:31 AM 

Yep, I got those great photos..Thanks Ted! ~Kevin

 
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Kevin J.

Instructions?

March 30 2007, 6:30 AM 

That`s exactly what I need Ed, Thanks.
Does it give instructions in the manual? "i.e. attach netting to blouse, hang strips of hessian from netting" Or are they more vague?
I`d like to make one in the WW2 style to go with my display.. Thanks, Kevin

 
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Re: Sniper Suits

March 31 2007, 7:11 PM 

Are any of the "period manuals on Sniping" or "Canadian Army Training Memorandums" reprinted anywhere?

 
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Kevin J.

Anyone?

April 2 2007, 9:04 AM 

Anyone have a source for this information?


"period manuals on Sniping" or "Canadian Army Training Memorandums"

 
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Mike d

Spotting scope

April 2 2007, 10:11 AM 

What was the name of the spotting scope they used.

 
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Rick Randall

Spotting Scope

April 2 2007, 10:18 AM 

It was called the Scout Regiment Telescope.

 
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Scout Regiment Telescope

April 2 2007, 2:37 PM 

Here are a couple of photographs of one of mine.

ED




 
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Mike D

spotting scope

April 2 2007, 4:42 PM 

i have a lead on a spotting scope but have never seen this type before, it is smaller than yours and is marked.
TELESCOPE ,SIGHTING NO. 22C M.K. II R.E.L. CANADA 1942 7856-C



 
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Rick Randall

WWII Ghillie Suits

April 2 2007, 10:13 AM 

There was a base garment (factory made and Crown issue), basically like a baggy hooded smock made from OD netting material - large ennough to fit over BD AND a Denison and still be a hair loose. You would then sew strips of scrim to the suit to match the environment. Examples of actual sniper Ghillies run from guys who look like the Swamp Thing like modern ghillies tend to be, down to guys who have less scrim on their ghillie than I have on my helmet.

I do not recall the wartime manuals giving specifics on the construction of the suit -- there are MAJOR differences between the wartime sniping manual and even the 1946 manual. Unfortnately, my wartime manual is on loan right now. But Ghillies are ALWAYS assembled by teh sniper, from a base garment and scrim. Use long strips of scrim, and comb out the last 2-3". This will result in the softening of edges you want without having you look like a walking Afro.

 
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Kevin J.

Re: WWII Ghillie Suits

April 2 2007, 10:26 AM 

Thanks Rick. I`ve seen the "net smock" but it seems very few of those were actually used, at least from the photos I`ve seen.
What I`m really after is what wartime construction techniques were recommended. i.e. did they advise you to cut netting to fit over the shoulders and chest? More netting to legs?
From looking at period photos, they seem to have a lot of scrim on the leg area..few modern suits have this.

Any help further help appreciated...

 
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Rick Randall

Another option

April 2 2007, 10:53 AM 

I saw a bit of wartime film on teh History Channel some time ago, showing Canadian infantrymen in Normandy. One of the chaps was carrying a No4(T) rifle, and had a bit of scrimmed hessian (frankly, it looked like a large potato sack) done up as a hooded shoulder-length cape and apparantly attached to his epaulettes.

Which led me to some "experimental archaeology:. . .

I worked a little with this consept out of curiosity -- if you split one side out of a large burlap sack (readily available to a soldier), stitch two fore and aft straps (or strings) that can have teh BD (or Denison) epaulettes run through them, and scrim the hessian well, you have a VERY useable ghillie "suit" that is functional for a sniper providing supporting fire, but doesn't significantly obstruct movement.

You end up swapping the ability to operate behind enemy lines as a "wandering bush" (a fairly rare occurance for most people equipeed with No4(T)'s, actually), but retain a get-up that will provide concealment for you on a 120 degree arc to your front -- provided you are firing from a supported position or prone (as you SHOULD be, as a sniper).

Keep in mind there are two types of snipers (even in organizations that don;t officially diffierenciate, the difference DOES exist). Even where all snipers go through the same training, and get issued exactly the same kit, the differences exist. It's not even necessarily a differenciation in individual snipers -- if all of them are good enough, it can merely be a differeciation in sniper MISSIONS.

There is the guy who uses his sniper rifle as a unit support weapon. These guys need mobility more than absolute concealment. They have to be able to keep up, and NOT look tremendously out of place (and identified as "significant targets") if they get attacked while marching down the road with the rest of their battalion. They can afford to swap out a little concealment, as they are NOT operating alone, and have the chaos of a large unit's small arms fire and such to hide in. They are also NOT doing that "Enemy at the Gates" style sniper duels. These snipers (often referred to by the US as "designated marksmen") make up at least 90% of your sniper force.

Then there are the guys who go out alone, or with a 1-2 man security/spotter element, and hide in one place for hours or days, waiting for very specific targets -- like other snipers, or "field grade and above" officers. These guys are the ones who absolutely need the "Swamp Thing" ghillie.

Rick

 
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Mike D

Spotting scope

April 2 2007, 4:43 PM 

I have a lead on a spotting scope but have never seen this type before, it is smaller than yours and is marked.
TELESCOPE ,SIGHTING NO. 22C M.K. II R.E.L. CANADA 1942 7856-C


 
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Scope

April 2 2007, 7:45 PM 

The 22C spotting scope is for the 6-pdr A/Tk gun and is not for sniper rifles. At the risk of sounding like I am pushing my own books (again) you might want to invest in "Without Warning - Canadian Sniper Equipment of the 20th Century".
http://www.servicepub.com/sniper.html

 
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Mike D

book

April 2 2007, 8:21 PM 

I have your book, but I thought this scope may have been missed. I have several of the books that are flogged on this fourm but is there something wrong with posting a question?

 
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Questions

April 6 2007, 12:42 PM 

No problem at all with asking questions. I can't guess the contents of your library therefore the suggestion was made.

 
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Kevin J.

Detailed instructions?

April 3 2007, 7:54 AM 

Does "Without warning" have the ghillie suit instructions?

 
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Anyone?

April 6 2007, 11:12 AM 

Can anyone answer this?

 
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Ghillie suit

April 6 2007, 12:41 PM 

No instructions for the Ghillie suit but I did reproduce the CATM 'sniper suit' in sufficient detail that you could make this up. Then just add Hessian strips and you have a pretty decent Ghillie.

 
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Kevin J.

Re: Ghillie suit

April 8 2007, 9:32 AM 

Thanks Clive. Not quite what I`m looking for, but I appreciate the response. Cheers! ~Kevin

 
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