Click Here For
WiredPatrol Site
"You Are a Child of the Universe, No Less than the Trees or the Stars"
  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>RETURN TO MESSAGES INDEX  

GSK will NOT chage dependence wording provided SPC to GP'S

March 25 2010 at 11:32 PM
Anonymous 

The company will not change the wording provided to GPs in the summary of product characteristics. A statement said: 'We acknowledge that patients may get symptoms on stopping Seroxat. Although we maintain Seroxat is not addictive, we have proposed to take out that specific wording as we realised on talking to patients it did not add to their understanding of what to expect when they stop taking the product.

 

http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=23&storycode=4001122

 

Seroxat firm to drop dependence claim

18 May 03

GlaxoSmithKline will change the wording on the patient information leaflet for Seroxat (paroxetine) to remove the claim that the drug is 'not addictive'.

GSK made its decision after considering 1,400 e-mails from patients about their experiences of taking Seroxat, which were featured on BBC TV's Panorama earlier this month.

The company will not change the wording provided to GPs in the summary of product characteristics. A statement said: 'We acknowledge that patients may get symptoms on stopping Seroxat. Although we maintain Seroxat is not addictive, we have proposed to take out that specific wording as we realised on talking to patients it did not add to their understanding of what to expect when they stop taking the product.

'We are not proposing to change the wording to doctors on the SPC. The statement that Seroxat does not cause dependence will remain because this terminology is clearly understood by health care professionals.'




 
 Respond to this message   
Current Topic - GSK will NOT chage dependence wording provided SPC to GP'S
  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>RETURN TO MESSAGES INDEX  


Visit RxISK ORG from Data Based Medicine
'the first free website (not sponsored by big pharma or advertising) for patients
and their doctors to research, and more importantly, easily report drug side effects'.