Return to Forum  

MOVING OBSERVER TOPPLES SPECIAL RELATIVITY

June 17 2012 at 3:05 PM
Pentcho Valev 

 
http://www.einstein-online.info/spotlights/doppler
Albert Einstein Institute: "In the above paragraphs, we have only considered moving sources. In fact, a closer look at cases where it is the receiver that is in motion will show that this kind of motion leads to a very similar kind of Doppler effect. Here is an animation of the receiver moving towards the source: (...) By observing the two indicator lights, you can see for yourself that, once more, there is a blue-shift - the pulse frequency measured at the receiver is somewhat higher than the frequency with which the pulses are sent out. This time, the distances between subsequent pulses are not affected, but still there is a frequency shift: As the receiver moves towards each pulse, the time until pulse and receiver meet up is shortened."

That is, the frequency measured at the receiver, f', is higher than f, the frequency measured at the source. The wavelength measured at the receiver, L', is equal to L, the wavelength measured at the source. Therefore, the speed of light measured at the receiver, c', is higher than c, the speed of light measured at the source:

c' = L'f' > Lf = c

See also:

http://a-levelphysicstutor.com/wav-doppler.php
"vO is the velocity of an observer moving towards the source. This velocity is independent of the motion of the source. Hence, the velocity of waves relative to the observer is c + vO. (...) The motion of an observer does not alter the wavelength. The increase in frequency is a result of the observer encountering more wavelengths in a given time."

http://www.expo-db.be/ExposPrecedentes/Expo/Ondes/fichiers%20son/Effet%20Doppler.pdf
"La variation de la fréquence observée lorsqu'il y a mouvement relatif entre la source et l'observateur est appelée effet Doppler. (...) 6. Source immobile - Observateur en mouvement: La distance entre les crêtes, la longueur d'onde lambda ne change pas. Mais la vitesse des crêtes par rapport à l'observateur change !"

http://www.usna.edu/Users/physics/mungan/Scholarship/DopplerEffect.pdf
Carl Mungan: "Consider the case where the observer moves toward the source. In this case, the observer is rushing head-long into the wavefronts... (...) In fact, the wave speed is simply increased by the observer speed, as we can see by jumping into the observer's frame of reference."

http://www.hep.man.ac.uk/u/roger/PHYS10302/lecture18.pdf
Roger Barlow, Professor of Particle Physics: "Moving Observer. Now suppose the source is fixed but the observer is moving towards the source, with speed v. In time t, ct/(lambda) waves pass a fixed point. A moving point adds another vt/(lambda). So f'=(c+v)/(lambda)."

http://www.cmmp.ucl.ac.uk/~ahh/teaching/1B24n/lect19.pdf
Tony Harker, University College London: "If the observer moves with a speed Vo away from the source (...), then in a time t the number of waves which reach the observer are those in a distance (c-Vo)t, so the number of waves observed is (c-Vo)t/lambda, giving an observed frequency f'=f((c-Vo)/c) when the observer is moving away from the source at a speed Vo."

Pentcho Valev
pvalev@yahoo.com

 
 Respond to this message   
Response TitleAuthorDate
 Re: MOVING OBSERVER TOPPLES SPECIAL RELATIVITYPentcho ValevJun 18, 2012, 2:22 PM
 Re: MOVING OBSERVER TOPPLES SPECIAL RELATIVITYPentcho ValevJun 19, 2012, 6:57 PM
 Re: MOVING OBSERVER TOPPLES SPECIAL RELATIVITYanonJun 19, 2012, 7:13 PM
 Re: MOVING OBSERVER TOPPLES SPECIAL RELATIVITYPentcho ValevJun 20, 2012, 1:42 AM
 Re: MOVING OBSERVER TOPPLES SPECIAL RELATIVITYPentcho ValevJun 21, 2012, 10:18 AM
 Copyright © 1999-2014 Network54. All rights reserved.   Terms of Use   Privacy Statement