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Cavendish Experiment Failure With Umbrella Test

July 15 2017 at 12:22 PM
jaquecusto 

 
Cavendish Balance

Demonstration of Principle of Equivalence Failure with Umbrella Test

As he had proposed, I hope that the distance of the violet spheres would not change with the radial expansion hypothesis.

[linked image]

Looking at the figure above, I expected the radial expansion of the stems (in red), but the conservation of the parallel dashed lines (in yellow), in order to obtain the illusion of attraction between the violet spheres.

I perfected the test proposal using an umbrella, because in this way I would have in the experiment the expansion component of the terrestrial radius, as shown below:

[linked image]

I hope the red and blue lead balls would keep their way close to each other during the opening of the umbrella.

But, it was not what happened ...

I filmed the experiment with a computer camera. I selected the images contained at the time of opening the frame of an automatic spring-opening umbrellas.

At the four-corner ends of the umbrella mechanism were lead spheres and fishing buoys to facilitate the capture of the images:

[linked image]

By observing the sequence of the film frames (above), from top to bottom, as well as from left to right, one sees a seemingly straight trajectory on the part of all the spheres.

The expected conservation of the distance between the twin spheres did not occur.

Two Possible Conclusions:

1 - The Cavendish Experiment is a fraud, or;

2 - The Principle of Equivalence is false.

 
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jaquecusto

Re: Cavendish Experiment Failure With Umbrella Test

July 16 2017, 9:20 AM 

>>> Two Possible Conclusions:

1 - The Cavendish Experiment is a fraud, or;

2 - The Principle of Equivalence is false.

A third conclusion was missing: the experiment went wrong!

[linked image]

I used an inverted umbrella frame, that is: the lead balls go down (fall) while the mechanism is open.

This goes against the sense of terrestrial radial expansion.

As a consolation prize, I retraced the experiment with just two sticks of umbrellas (The mechanism of the original experiment was broken when it carried the balls).

The sequence is below:

[linked image]

In the passage from photo III to IV, the bending of the rods is clearly evident. This effect creates the illusion that lead spheres are attracting each other.

In this way, the principle of equivalence, the Cavendish experiment and the hypothesis of radial terrestrial expansion continue to be valid.

More:

Http://fisica2100.forumeiros.com/t1237p220-gravidade-acao-ou-reacao#11096

 
 
jaquecusto

Re: Cavendish Experiment Failure With Umbrella Test

July 17 2017, 5:51 AM 

Now all you need to do is the hard part:
Measure gravity, in fact, on lunar soil.

 
 
jaquecusto

Re: Cavendish Experiment Failure With Umbrella Test

July 17 2017, 6:01 AM 

[linked image]

In the passage from photo III to IV, the bending of the rods is clearly evident. This effect creates the illusion that lead spheres are attracting each other.

Errata:
In the passage from photo II to III, the bending of the rods is clearly evident. This effect creates the illusion that lead spheres are attracting each other.


 
 
jaquecusto

Cavendish and Equivalence Principle

July 25 2017, 5:31 AM 

How to understand why the scales, suspended by pivoted bars, keep the starting distance of the experiment and give the impression of attraction among themselves:

In the figure below, according to previous posts, the balls of the balance are seen from above:

[linked image]

Distances in red increase. The distance in green is preserved.

In the situation below, the spheres (only two) of the scale are viewed from the front under different conditions.

[linked image]

In condition I, the spheres are in contact with the ground and are pushed by two expanding spokes of the earth. Therefore, it is not possible to notice a change in the distance between the spheres.

In condition II, the balls and their bars are supported on the pivot. Thus, the spheres may retain the initial condition of the test by inertia. To the observers of the experiment, there will be the illusion that the spheres are attracting each other.

 
 
 
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