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Einstein's Relativity: the Madness of the Civilization

September 8 2017 at 8:17 AM
Pentcho Valev 

 
David Morin, Introduction to Classical Mechanics With Problems and Solutions, Chapter 11, p. 14: "Twin A stays on the earth, while twin B flies quickly to a distant star and back. [...] For the entire outward and return parts of the trip, B does observe A's clock running slow, but enough strangeness occurs during the turning-around period to make A end up older. Note, however, that a discussion of acceleration is not required to quantitatively understand the paradox..." http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~djmorin/chap11.pdf

Physics Girl (4:30): "One last question. What's happening to the clocks during the period of acceleration? We still get time dilation, but we have to use a different set of rules from the general relativity. General relativity states that clocks runs slower in accelerated reference frames. So while your twin is turning around, her clock runs slower, and she sees the same thing. She sees your clock running faster than hers, so you're aging quicker. It's during this period of acceleration that you become the older twin."
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERgwVm9qWKA

"At the same time, the twin in the spaceship considers himself to be the stationary twin, and therefore as he looks back towards Earth he sees his brother ageing more slowly than himself. [...] When the twin in the spaceship turns around to make his journey home, the shift in his frame of reference causes his perception of his brother's age to change rapidly: he sees his brother getting suddenly older. This means that when the twins are finally reunited, the stay-at-home twin is the older of the two." https://hubpages.com/education/Twin-Paradox

John Norton: "Moments after the turn-around, when the travelers clock reads just after 2 days, the traveler will judge the stay-at-home twin's clock to read just after 7 days. That is, the traveler will judge the stay-at-home twin's clock to have jumped suddenly from reading 1 day to reading 7 days. This huge jump puts the stay-at-home twin's clock so far ahead of the traveler's that it is now possible for the stay-at-home twin's clock to be ahead of the travelers when they reunite." http://www.pitt.edu/~jdnorton/teaching/HPS_0410/chapters/spacetime_tachyon/index.html

Pentcho Valev

 
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Pentcho Valev

Re: Einstein's Relativity: the Madness of the Civilization

September 8 2017, 11:48 AM 

Einstein's relativity predicts that unlimitedly long objects can gloriously be trapped, "in a compressed state", inside unlimitedly short containers:

John Baez: "These are the props. You own a barn, 40m long, with automatic doors at either end, that can be opened and closed simultaneously by a switch. You also have a pole, 80m long, which of course won't fit in the barn. [...] So, as the pole passes through the barn, there is an instant when it is completely within the barn. At that instant, you close both doors simultaneously, with your switch. [...] If it does not explode under the strain and it is sufficiently elastic it will come to rest and start to spring back to its natural shape but since it is too big for the barn the other end is now going to crash into the back door and the rod will be trapped in a compressed state inside the barn." http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/SR/barn_pole.html

"If it does not explode..." - can it explode? Yes, the effect deserves to be called "Einstein explosion" - it can only occur in Einstein's schizophrenic world:

"In a more complicated version of the paradox, we can physically trap the ladder once it is fully inside the garage. This could be done, for instance, by not opening the exit door again after we close it. In the frame of the garage, we assume the exit door is immovable, and so when the ladder hits it, we say that it instantaneously stops. By this time, the entrance door has also closed, and so the ladder is stuck inside the garage. As its relative velocity is now zero, it is not length contracted, and is now longer than the garage; it will have to bend, snap, or explode."
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ladder_paradox

That is, Divine Albert's Divine Theory allows a scenario in which the volume of the trapped object is reduced, say, one million times, and then the object explodes and restores its original volume! What kind of explosion is this, Einsteinians? Just an idiotic consequence of Einstein's 1905 false constant-speed-of-light postulate? No? The postulate cannot be false? The Einsteinian lunacy should remain an inherent feature of our civilization forever?

See, at 7:12 in the video below, how the train is trapped "in a compressed state" inside the tunnel:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xrqj88zQZJg
"Einstein's Relativistic Train in a Tunnel Paradox: Special Relativity"

It is not difficult to realize that trapping unlimitedly long objects inside unlimitedly short containers implies unlimited compressibility and drastically violates the law of conservation of energy. The compressed object, in trying to restore its original volume, would produce an enormous amount of work the energy for which comes from nowhere.

At 9:01 in the above video Sarah sees the train falling through the hole, and in order to save Einstein's relativity, the authors of the video inform the gullible world that Adam as well sees the train falling through the hole. However Adam can only see this if the train undergoes an absurd bending first, as shown at 9:53 in the video and in this picture:

[linked image]

Clearly we have reductio ad absurdum: An absurd bending is required - it does occur in Adam's reference frame but doesn't in Sarah's. Conclusion: The underlying premise, Einstein's 1905 constant-speed-of-light postulate, is false.

Pentcho Valev

 
 
Pentcho Valev

Re: Einstein's Relativity: the Madness of the Civilization

September 9 2017, 3:21 AM 

Brian Cox teaches idiotic non sequitur:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-O8lBIcHre0
Brian Cox: 2:25 "Moving clocks run slowly"; 3:56 "Time travel into the future is possible"

According to special relativity, moving clocks run slowly as judged from the stationary system, but they run FAST as judged from the moving system:

http://www.people.fas.harvard.edu/~djmorin/chap11.pdf
David Morin, Introduction to Classical Mechanics With Problems and Solutions, Chapter 11, p. 14: "Twin A stays on the earth, while twin B flies quickly to a distant star and back. [...] For the entire outward and return parts of the trip, B does observe A's clock running slow..."

http://topquark.hubpages.com/hub/Twin-Paradox
"The situation is that a man sets off in a rocket travelling at high speed away from Earth, whilst his twin brother stays on Earth. [...] ...the twin in the spaceship considers himself to be the stationary twin, and therefore as he looks back towards Earth he sees his brother ageing more slowly than himself."

That is,

"Moving clocks run slowly as judged from the stationary system"

is a validly deduced prediction of special relativity (does follow from Einstein's 1905 postulates) whereas

"Moving clocks run slowly"

is non sequitur (does NOT follow from Einstein's 1905 postulates). Accordingly,

"Time travel into the future is possible"

is also non sequitur (does NOT follow from Einstein's 1905 postulates).

Pentcho Valev

 
 
Pentcho Valev

Re: Einstein's Relativity: the Madness of the Civilization

September 9 2017, 11:36 AM 

In Einstein's schizophrenic world, in order to save Divine Albert's Divine Theory, objects get longer than themselves. Consider the famous bug-rivet paradox:

http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/Relativ/bugrivet.html
The Bug-Rivet Paradox

The bug is squashed in the rivet's frame and alive in the bug's frame. This is reductio ad absurdum. Conclusion: The underlying premise, Einstein's 1905 constant-speed-of-light postulate, is false.

Einsteinians resolve the absurdity by superimposing an idiocy - the rivet gets longer than itself:

http://math.ucr.edu/~jdp/Relativity/Bug_Rivet.html
Professor John de Pillis, University of California Riverside: "In fact, special relativity requires that after collision, the rivet shank length increases beyond its at-rest length d."

http://brianclegg.blogspot.bg/2011/11/relativity-can-be-riveting.html
Brian Clegg: "Unfortunately, though, the rivet is fired towards the table at a fair percentage of the speed of light. It's somewhat typical of this book that all it tells us about the speed is that γ is 2, which doesn't really give you an idea of how fast the rivet is going, but if my back of an envelope calculations are right, this is around 0.87 times the speed of light. Quite a fast rivet, then. [...] But here's the thing. Just because the head of the rivet has come to a sudden stop doesn't mean the whole rivet does. A wave has to pass along the rivet to its end saying 'Stop!' The end of the rivet will just keep on going until this wave, typically travelling at the speed of sound, reaches it. That fast-moving end will crash into the beetle long before the wave arrives. [...] Isn't physics great?"

Note that, according to Brian Clegg, the end of the rivet keeps on going at 87% the speed of light and a wave traveling at the speed of sound is chasing it in order to stop it! We all live in Einstein's schizophrenic world, don't we? "Einstein's oligophrenic world" sounds much better.

Pentcho Valev

 
 
 
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