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Variable Speed of Light Particles

September 13 2017 at 3:50 AM
Pentcho Valev 

 
Richard Feynman: "I want to emphasize that light comes in this form - particles. It is very important to know that light behaves like particles, especially for those of you who have gone to school, where you probably learned something about light behaving like waves. I'm telling you the way it does behave - like particles. You might say that it's just the photomultiplier that detects light as particles, but no, every instrument that has been designed to be sensitive enough to detect weak light has always ended up discovering the same thing: light is made of particles." QED: The Strange Theory of Light and Matter p. 15 https://www.amazon.com/QED-Strange-Theory-Light-Matter/dp/0691024170

Banesh Hoffmann: "Moreover, if light consists of particles, as Einstein had suggested in his paper submitted just thirteen weeks before this one, the second principle seems absurd: A stone thrown from a speeding train can do far more damage than one thrown from a train at rest; the speed of the particle is not independent of the motion of the object emitting it. And if we take light to consist of particles and assume that these particles obey Newton's laws, they will conform to Newtonian relativity and thus automatically account for the null result of the Michelson-Morley experiment without recourse to contracting lengths, local time, or Lorentz transformations. Yet, as we have seen, Einstein resisted the temptation to account for the null result in terms of particles of light and simple, familiar Newtonian ideas, and introduced as his second postulate something that was more or less obvious when thought of in terms of waves in an ether. If it was so obvious, though, why did he need to state it as a principle? Because, having taken from the idea of light waves in the ether the one aspect that he needed, he declared early in his paper, to quote his own words, that "the introduction of a 'luminiferous ether' will prove to be superfluous." Relativity and Its Roots, p.92 https://www.amazon.com/Relativity-Its-Roots-Banesh-Hoffmann/dp/0486406768

Note that the Michelson-Morley experiment refutes the constant (independent of the motion of the source) speed of light unless one introduces ad hoc miracles ("contracting lengths, local time, or Lorentz transformations").

Pentcho Valev

 
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Pentcho Valev

Re: Variable Speed of Light Particles

September 13 2017, 12:54 PM 

Einstein could have based his theory on the discontinuous particle concept of light - instead, he based it on the continuous field concept:

Banesh Hoffmann: "And if we take light to consist of particles and assume that these particles obey Newton's laws, they will conform to Newtonian relativity and thus automatically account for the null result of the Michelson-Morley experiment without recourse to contracting lengths, local time, or Lorentz transformations. Yet, as we have seen, Einstein resisted the temptation to account for the null result in terms of particles of light and simple, familiar Newtonian ideas, and introduced as his second postulate something that was more or less obvious when thought of in terms of waves in an ether."
Relativity and Its Roots, p.92 https://www.amazon.com/Relativity-Its-Roots-Banesh-Hoffmann/dp/0486406768

Albert Einstein: "...I introduced the principle of the constancy of the velocity of light, which I borrowed from H. A. Lorentz's theory of the stationary luminiferous ether..." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lorentz_ether_theory

"And then, in June, Einstein completes special relativity, which adds a twist to the story: Einstein's March paper treated light as particles, but special relativity sees light as a continuous field of waves." http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/einstein/genius/

"The two first articles (January and March) establish clearly a discontinuous structure of matter and light. The standard look of Einstein's SR is, on the contrary, essentially based on the continuous conception of the field." http://arxiv.org/ftp/physics/papers/0101/0101109.pdf

In 1954 Einstein realized what he had done:

Albert Einstein (1954): "I consider it entirely possible that physics cannot be based upon the field concept, that is on continuous structures. Then nothing will remain of my whole castle in the air, including the theory of gravitation, but also nothing of the rest of contemporary physics." John Stachel, Einstein from 'B' to 'Z', p. 151 https://www.amazon.com/Einstein-B-Z-John-Stachel/dp/0817641432

Pentcho Valev

 
 
Anonymous

Re: Variable Speed of Light Particles

September 13 2017, 3:16 PM 

The resident moron Pentcho is obviously unaware that Feynman talks about quantum particles, and that Einstein significantly contributed to the development on the theory.

 
 
Johannes Harder Andersen

Re: Variable Speed of Light Particles

September 13 2017, 3:59 PM 

Pentcho thinks for himself, that's excellent. Pencho provides lots of interesting linkls. Penctcho sometimes needs criticism - don't we all. As said Openheimer: You need an open mind, but not so open that your brains fall out. Everything is really up for review if your mind is sober enough.

 
 
Anonymous

Re: Variable Speed of Light Particles

September 13 2017, 5:53 PM 

--Pentcho thinks for himself, that's excellent.

And yet the results are disastrous.

--As said Openheimer: You need an open mind, but not so open that your brains fall out.

That is exactly what happened to him a long time ago as it is well-documentedhttp://bip.cnrs-mrs.fr/bip10/valevfaq.htm

--Everything is really up for review if your mind is sober enough.

Absolutely true. The key expression here being "if your mind is sober enough." That clearly does not apply to him. Actually even the word "mind" does not apply to him.

 
 
Pentcho Valev

Re: Variable Speed of Light Particles

September 14 2017, 9:16 AM 

The speed of light obviously varies relative to the moving observer (receiver), no matter whether light is considered as a particle or as a wave:

http://www.einstein-online.info/spotlights/doppler
Albert Einstein Institute: "The frequency of a wave-like signal - such as sound or light - depends on the movement of the sender and of the receiver. This is known as the Doppler effect. [...] Here is an animation of the receiver moving towards the source:

Stationary receiver: [linked image]

Moving receiver: [linked image]

By observing the two indicator lights, you can see for yourself that, once more, there is a blue-shift - the pulse frequency measured at the receiver is somewhat higher than the frequency with which the pulses are sent out. This time, the distances between subsequent pulses are not affected, but still there is a frequency shift: As the receiver moves towards each pulse, the time until pulse and receiver meet up is shortened. In this particular animation, which has the receiver moving towards the source at one third the speed of the pulses themselves, four pulses are received in the time it takes the source to emit three pulses." [END OF QUOTATION]

"Four pulses are received in the time it takes the source to emit three pulses" means that the speed of the pulses relative to the moving receiver is greater than their speed relative to the source, in violation of Einstein's relativity.

Pentcho Valev

 
 
 
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