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spot the sun

March 11 2012 at 7:34 PM
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  (Login weatherproof)

No, not sun spots, but a spot of sun. I don't know if most of the UK was basking in sunshine today, but we had a fair bit of 'murk'.
Taken while travelling by the northern fringe of the Lakeland Fells, near Caldbeck.

[linked image]

Anita, North Cumbria, UK

 
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GWW/Granny Weatherwitch
(Login imaweatherwitch)

stratus!

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March 12 2012, 11:04 PM 

Your 'murk' is stratus, of course, a cloud which gets especially bad publicity when it is so thick that the sun cannot be seen at all. In your picture, the cloud is not very thick and there is at least a glimmer of sunlight. The roll of thicker, dark stratocumulus lower down is intriguing, probably caused by the airflow over the ridge of low hills. Personally, I am quite fond of stratus, even though it often makes the air below it misty and damp and therefore has less gaseous oxygen for me to breathe. Anyone who has asthma or any other lung disease will know what I mean! Stratus clouds are gentle and we should not underestimate their importance in times when the lack of proper rain creates drought conditions, such as England and Spain have experienced this Spring. England has had only 50% of the normal rainfall for months. Critics of Climate Change - take note ! GWW

 
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(Login MikeLerch)

Sun spot sun

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March 14 2012, 2:33 AM 

Anita,I like the picture. I don't see hardly any stratus just filling space around here. Its always on the move , usually in quick fashion. Life span is usually counted in hours.

And GWW..don't get me started on Climate Change nay sayers. We got at least one who is running for President...the same one who says colleges are where young people get sent to be indoctrinated bythe lefties. Being educated has become anti-american in some peoples eyes. Perhaps these unfortunate and challenged types have always been there. Its just now with the Web and media for every and any one..every nut job gets a world wide audience any time he or she wants.

 
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(Login weatherproof)

Re: spot the sun

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March 14 2012, 10:45 PM 

GWW - I sometimes think this is the worst - so tantalising when you know all that sunshine is just a thin layer away, but it shows no sign of shifting. The stratus in my photo was so low I thought we were going to travel into it, but we didn't go quite high enough.
Our weather forecast for the last view days has been white cloud, white cloud, white cloud....
Mike, I'm pleased for you that your stratus keeps on the move happy.gif

Anita, North Cumbria, UK

 
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(Login MikeLerch)

how slow was it?

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March 15 2012, 1:07 AM 

A pic of a rarity for me anyway, really slow stratus..It was so slow that it sunk to the ground...In any case some rare fog amongst the hills of the Ft McDowell Indian Reservation this past December.

By noon of that day the winds had picked up and moved the whole deal along to the east. By sunset another system had begun to move in from the west.
[IMG][linked image][/IMG]

 
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(Login weatherproof)

Re: spot the sun

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March 15 2012, 8:59 PM 

I do like that photo. Is that an inversion, or some other force at work?
I was travelling home across the pennines in the late afternoon today, east to west. After spending the day in brilliant sunshine over in the east, the layer of stratus was still waiting for me in almost the exact same spot I left it on my journey out in the morning.
In the event, I was grateful for it as it saved me having to drive home squinting into bright low sunshine. So even stratus is welcome sometimes.

Anita, North Cumbria, UK

 
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(Login MikeLerch)

Memory

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March 16 2012, 1:34 AM 

Anita,,The best I can recall of the conditions during that photo is,,winds no more than 1000 ft higher were going west to east at a good clip but as you may see,,the fog is going east to west at what looks like a good rate on its own. What isn't visible is that the fog is coming up from a even lower elevation which is river bed, the Verde River, which again, is east of those hills. Of course in the back ground is the mostly uniform gray of a quick moving stratus. So, its quite possible a micro inversion existed near ground level , condensing the moisture out of the atmosphere near river bed and then it being pulled by the rolling wind up into the hills where it sublimated back into the atmosphere..? Not more than five miles or so west ofthis shot ,I took the shot of the McDowell Mtn (hills) banner cloud posted over a month ago. That shot clearly shows a strong breeze west to east . That shot and this one were taken during the same shoot. So..a wet system blew into the desert with clouds at apprx 1000 or so feet and patchy fog in the
morning ..Because of the winds, any inversion would have to be on a micro scale or a very local scale. With the river's warm water/air, a cold snap comes in , put them together and and a small scale inversion is quite possible IMHO.

 
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