News | Summit Trip Reports | Partners | Low Point Reports | Dogs
Summary Topics: E-News Archive | Club News | Accidents | Obituaries | Books | Advisories | Site News
 

 Go to Forum Home  

Wi Fi Internet Cafe Planned for Everest Base Camp

January 23 2003 at 12:54 PM
roger  (no login)


Response to Half of Living 900 Everest Summiters Expected in Nepal 50th Anniversary Celebration

 
This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
Jim Forster, an engineer at Cisco, eagerly donated three Wi-Fi radios on behalf of his company. Such radios enable the creation of wireless networks that can relay data within a couple of hundred feet or as far as several miles as the crow flies, much the way that local-area networks, or LAN's, work in offices.

From his base in Colorado Springs, Dave. Hughes, 74, is using a Web-based conferencing system as a long-distance tool to teach Mr. Gyaltsen and his colleagues how to set up the base-camp network. Mr. Gyaltsen is working with technicians on loan from two Internet service providers, Square Networks and Worldlink, based in Nepal's capital, Katmandu. Another friend of Mr. Cook's, Mike Trest, an independent consultant and satellite expert, is helping to teach the Nepalese about satellites.
The network will consist of a small satellite dish, planted about 1,500 feet above base camp, that can provide two-way communications. Because the dish must operate from firm ground, it cannot be used directly at base camp, which is on a moving glacier. The $10,000 satellite dish, which Mr. Gyaltsen purchased with a bank loan and funds from Square Networks, will connect to the cybercafe at base camp over the Wi-Fi radios. The dish will beam data to a satellite in orbit and to an Internet service provider in Israel.

Mr. Gyaltsen and the pollution committee, which will technically own the radios, are still deciding what to charge users. They are considering a flat fee of $2,000 to $5,000 per expedition, which can number 5 to 20 people. That price might sound steep, but Mr. Gyaltsen says it paled in comparison with the cost of the expedition itself, typically $65,000 a person.
The satellite link and Internet service will cost the operators less than $1,000 a month for the climbing season. Any profits will go to the pollution committee.

More: New York Times

 
 Respond to this message   
Responses

 Copyright © 1999-2014 Network54. All rights reserved.   Terms of Use   Privacy Statement  
RSS Feed For This Forum
Privacy Statement | Network54 Terms and Conditions