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Half of Living 900 Everest Summiters Expected in Nepal 50th Anniversary Celebration

January 16 2003 at 10:19 AM
roger  (no login)

 
The Nepalese authorities have announced that Everest climbers from across the world will gather in May to mark the 50th anniversary of the first ascent of the world's highest mountain.
They say they expect nearly half of the 900 people who have climbed Everest and are still living to attend the meeting in the capital, Kathmandu. More than 1,200 people have climbed the world's highest mountain since Hillary and his Sherpa guide, Tenzing Norgay, first scaled the 8,850-metre peak 50 years ago.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/2664323.stm


 
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roger
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Wi Fi Internet Cafe Planned for Everest Base Camp

January 23 2003, 12:54 PM 

This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
Jim Forster, an engineer at Cisco, eagerly donated three Wi-Fi radios on behalf of his company. Such radios enable the creation of wireless networks that can relay data within a couple of hundred feet or as far as several miles as the crow flies, much the way that local-area networks, or LAN's, work in offices.

From his base in Colorado Springs, Dave. Hughes, 74, is using a Web-based conferencing system as a long-distance tool to teach Mr. Gyaltsen and his colleagues how to set up the base-camp network. Mr. Gyaltsen is working with technicians on loan from two Internet service providers, Square Networks and Worldlink, based in Nepal's capital, Katmandu. Another friend of Mr. Cook's, Mike Trest, an independent consultant and satellite expert, is helping to teach the Nepalese about satellites.
The network will consist of a small satellite dish, planted about 1,500 feet above base camp, that can provide two-way communications. Because the dish must operate from firm ground, it cannot be used directly at base camp, which is on a moving glacier. The $10,000 satellite dish, which Mr. Gyaltsen purchased with a bank loan and funds from Square Networks, will connect to the cybercafe at base camp over the Wi-Fi radios. The dish will beam data to a satellite in orbit and to an Internet service provider in Israel.

Mr. Gyaltsen and the pollution committee, which will technically own the radios, are still deciding what to charge users. They are considering a flat fee of $2,000 to $5,000 per expedition, which can number 5 to 20 people. That price might sound steep, but Mr. Gyaltsen says it paled in comparison with the cost of the expedition itself, typically $65,000 a person.
The satellite link and Internet service will cost the operators less than $1,000 a month for the climbing season. Any profits will go to the pollution committee.

More: New York Times

 
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Roger Williams
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Base Camp Cafe

January 23 2003, 6:19 PM 

How will the set & the (expensive!) satellite dish be powered? Solar cells?

 
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Anonymous
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The Internet on Mount Everest?

January 30 2003, 5:04 PM 

This greatly unnatural proposition shows just how severe the encroachment is of this modern society into a remote,difficultly reachable wilderness area.

 
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roger
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Wi-Fi Plans for Iraq

April 17 2003, 10:07 AM 

By using Wi-Fi, parts of Iraq could skip the build-out of traditional phone and cable networks altogether. The situation is similar to how cell phone technology enabled huge swaths of the Third World to avoid regular land-line phone systems. Wi-Fi equipment makers such as Cisco Systems, Proxim and Nomadix are talking to government agencies and non-profits about possibilities for Wi-Fi in Iraq. Humanitarian groups evaluating it include Oxfam International and CARE. Wi-Fi could "lower our overhead and increase our capability to do our jobs," says Bob MacPherson, a director with CARE.
A high-profile role in Iraq would give an added boost to Wi-Fi, already taking off in other parts of the world. Research firm Gartner expects there to be more than 24,000 public Wi-Fi access points worldwide by year's end. An access point is where users can go to get on a network. Starbucks, for example, is installing Wi-Fi networks in many of its stores.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/technology/2003-04-16-wifi_x.htm

 
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Roger Williams
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Wi-Fi?

April 17 2003, 11:50 AM 

What does "Wi-Fi" stand for? All I can think of is Wireless or Wide-Band Fidelity, which doesn't make that much sense.

 
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-adam
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Wireless Fidelity

April 17 2003, 12:23 PM 

http://www.weca.net/OpenSection/why_Wi-Fi.asp?TID=2

As as type this message on a "Wi-Fi" connected laptop. . .

However, this isn't technology I really know much about, so can't say why elevation presents a problem.

-adam

 
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roger
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Overhyped (?) Starbucks Technology

April 17 2003, 1:04 PM 

Wi-Fi is the computer technology du jour and in my opinion is probably overhyped.

If you have a Wi-Fi receiver in your notebook you do not need wires to hook to the Internet as long as you are somewhere that is "broadcasting" the Internet.

Intel recently released its Centrino chip for notebooks that bundles it (you may have seen their ads with somebody using a computer on a diving board). If you have an earlier computer you will need a special card to receive the signal.

In the perfect Wi-Fi world, you will be able to access the Internet at airports, in coffee shops, etc., without having to hook into any wires.

One of the earliest adopters of this technology was Starbucks which broadcasts Wi-Fi at its shops. The only catch is that you have to have an account in order to pick up the signal ($30/month or $6/24 hours). This is over and above your regular Internet connections. Consequently you don't see a lot of folks at Starbucks surfing the net. Here's an article on the woes of this:
http://news.com.com/2100-1039-990487.html

In places like Iraq and Everest which don't have wires to begin with, the process may be the best way to go since they only have to install a series of dishes rather than wiring the entire place. However in wired America it's questionable whether it will take off because the "hot spots" where you can receive a broadcast signal is very tiny and limited. Plus you have to be fairly tech savvy to figure out how to get on.

In the early heady days of wi-fi for NYC tech heads, some folks set up antennas so they broadcast their broadband connections to anybody for free within a block known as "hot spots" (and published the log on codes on the web). This did not sit well with the broadband folks who promptly shut the websites down.

If you're lucky enough to be in a "hot spot" it's pretty cool to have the blazing speeds of broadband without wires. However, the achilles heel of the process is that the "hot spots" are so small (in a best case scenario the hot spot would be about a city block however it is usually ***much*** smaller than that -- e.g., the confines of a coffee shop).

If you subscribed to the service for logging on at Starbucks, that may not be the same service that would be available at airports, etc.


    
This message has been edited by dipper on Apr 17, 2003 3:29 PM


 
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roger
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Temporary Mobile Phone Text Message Network Planned for Everest

April 17 2003, 10:11 AM 

A climbing expedition on Everest will be able to send text messages to report their progress using a temporary wireless network
The last phone-free sanctuary has just been conquered: in a stunt to promote mobile messaging, three companies have joined hands to provide a mobile phone service up the world's highest mountain, Mount Everest.
China Mobile, one of the largest cellular operators in the mainland, has set up a temporary wireless network on the mountain to allow progress of an upcoming expedition to be documented via SMS (Short Messaging Service) and MMS (Multimedia Messaging Service).
Handset maker Motorola will provide its 388C MMS-enabled handset for message transmission while a third partner Sohu.com, a China-based Net firm, will provide content services such as exclusive reporting on its Web site.
Besides seasoned mountaineers, Charles Zhang, president and CEO of Sohu.com, will also participate in the company-sponsored climb in May, Sohu.com said in statement.
"Generally, wireless operating equipment can only work below a height of 4,000 metres. China Mobile is the first carrier to bring wireless applications to a level above 5,100 metres," claimed China mobile spokesman Wang Hongyu.
Future alpinists hoping to tap into the Everest mobile network will be disappointed as this is a temporary publicity stunt and will not be commercially launched.
http://news.zdnet.co.uk/story/0,,t269-s2133617,00.html

 
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Roger Williams
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Altitiude?

April 17 2003, 11:56 AM 

Shouldn't Wireless Fidelity, or ?ever it stands for, work better at higher altitudes? The higher, the better the chance of line-of-sight to a base station, which should be needed for AOS (Acquisition Of Signal).

 
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roger
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Lorenzo Gariano Phones His Blog from Everest

April 28 2003, 10:07 AM 

Weblogs are becoming increasingly popular as online diaries discuss every topic under the sun, including now one of the world's most ambitious climbs.
Lorenzo Gariano is one of an army of climbers who will be setting out to tackle the world's largest mountain in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Everest's conquest by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay.
He has been recording every stage of his momentous journey via a satellite phone which beams live audio blogs to a website run by the Open University's Knowledge Media Institute, (KMI), based in Milton Keynes.
The blog proved immensely popular with the climbing world and Mr Gariano's latest blog is also attracting interest.
The technology needed for the Everest blog is much more low-tech, despite the fact that physically the journey is far more challenging than the Matterhorn climb.
Mr Gariano uses his satellite phone every couple of days to dial into the lab's phone service, logging a live report which is also recorded on the website as a regular blog.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/2973735.stm

Lorenzo's Blog Page:
http://news.kmi.open.ac.uk/everest/sounds/list.php




If you are interested in joining the blog phenomenon (where one of the options is that you can phone in your comments). Blog is now owned by google.

http://www.blogger.com/

 
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roger
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NY Daily News Gives 4 Stars to National Geographic Everest Documentary

April 25 2003, 10:42 AM 

SURVIVING EVEREST. Sunday, 8 p.m., National Geographic Channel.
'Surviving Everest," a new documentary about climbers trying to reach the top of the world's highest peak, will face an uphill climb getting an audience.

But "Surviving Everest" is just too good to miss.

Writer-producer-director Liesl Clark created this this two-hour high-altitude thriller about second-generation mountaineers scaling dangerous heights.

But "Surviving Everest" is just too good to miss.

"Surviving Everest" marks the 50th anniversary of the first successful ascent of Mount Everest and the 40th anniversary of the first time American citizens stood at the top of the world.

Fifty years ago, New Zealander Edmund Hillary and his climbing partner, Nepalese Sherpa Tenzing Norgay, ascended to the summit of Mount Everest, via a southern ridge route. Ten years later, Barry Bishop was one of a group of United States climbers who braved the more rugged west face of the mountain and became the first Americans to plant the flag atop Everest.

To mark the respective anniversaries of their fathers' achievements, Hillary's son Peter and Norgay's son Jamling teamed to tackle Everest themselves. On the other side of the mountain, Bishop's son Brent set out to recreate his father's dangerous climb, teaming with veteran Everest mountaineer Pete Athans.

Do the math, and you realize even before seeing their faces that these climber's sons are not young men. But they are driven to bond with their fathers: to understand their achievements and send a message.

Peter wants to call his dad by cell phone from the top; Brent wants to literally follow in his late father's footsteps. And Jamling wants to honor his father, and all Sherpas, by asking for respect they richly deserve.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/story/78160p-72065c.html

 
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roger
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National Geographic Reprises New Surviving Everest Show on May 29

May 1 2003, 7:34 PM 

NGC will encore "Surviving Everest on the 50th Anniversary of the first Summit on May 29 at 8 p.m. ET/PT

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/04/0424_030424_tveverest.html

High Speed Band Trailer:
http://everest-50.nationalgeographic.com/channel/everest/
http://everest-50.nationalgeographic.com/channel/highspeed/everest/

National Geographic's 50th Anniversary page;
http://everest-50.nationalgeographic.com/everest/

 
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roger
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Peter Hillary and Jamling Tenzig Summit Everest

April 28 2003, 10:14 AM 

On May 29, 1953, the names Edmund Hillary and Tenzig Norgay went down in history when they reached Everest's 29,028ft summit.

Fifty years on, Peter Hillary and Jamling Tenzig Norgay have reached the summit of the world's highest mountain.

Peter battled with vomiting and dehydration and was almost too sick to go on. And howling winds, extremely low temperatures, and poor visibility threatened to stop the expedition in its tracks.

Hiking through thick snow, the climbers were forced to wear oxygen masks as they neared the summit.

But with a resilience passed down to them by their fathers, Peter and Jamling's climb was a success, and they were able to celebrate their fathers' momentous feat from a position they conquered half a century ago.
http://www.sky.com/skynews/article/0,,30100-12300008,00.html

 
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roger
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Brits Issue Everest Stamp (and others on Explorers) for 50th Anniversary

April 29 2003, 10:19 AM 






That's what the Royal Mail Extreme Endeavours stamps attempt to do. Royal Mail has gone to its own extremes with these stamps which at 60mm x 21mm are the second biggest stamps ever to be published here.
The format has given designer Howard Brown a broad canvas to tell the explorers' stories vividly. So you don't just see round the world yachtsman Sir Francis Chichester, you also see Gypsy Moth, the boat on which he swept triumphantly into Plymouth in 1967, and the rolling oceans behind him.
Similarly pioneer aviatrix Amy Johnson is accompanied by her De Havilland DH60G plane while Middle East explorer Dame Freya Stark is set against the desert mountains where she wandered.
The other three stamps feature Sir Edmund Hillary, accompanied by Tenzing Norgay as they became the first men to conquer Everest 50 years ago, and Antarctic explorers Sir Ernest Shackleton and Robert Falcon Scott.
http://www.royalmail.com/portal/default/all/home?paf_dm=full&paf_gear_id=100002&paf_gear_state=con_content&xmlPath=/docContent/xml/01__Mail/10__Stamps_and_collectibles/035__2003_collection/03__Special_Stamps_Collection/09__Extreme_Endeavours.xml

 
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roger
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Non-Wrapping Version of Above Post

April 29 2003, 10:21 AM 






That's what the Royal Mail Extreme Endeavours stamps attempt to do. Royal Mail has gone to its own extremes with these stamps which at 60mm x 21mm are the second biggest stamps ever to be published here.
The format has given designer Howard Brown a broad canvas to tell the explorers' stories vividly. So you don't just see round the world yachtsman Sir Francis Chichester, you also see Gypsy Moth, the boat on which he swept triumphantly into Plymouth in 1967, and the rolling oceans behind him.
Similarly pioneer aviatrix Amy Johnson is accompanied by her De Havilland DH60G plane while Middle East explorer Dame Freya Stark is set against the desert mountains where she wandered.
The other three stamps feature Sir Edmund Hillary, accompanied by Tenzing Norgay as they became the first men to conquer Everest 50 years ago, and Antarctic explorers Sir Ernest Shackleton and Robert Falcon Scott.
 
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roger
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Asians Cancel Everest Climbs in SARS Scare

May 6 2003, 11:54 AM 

The SARS outbreak is keeping many Mount Everest climbers away from a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the conquest of the worldÂ’s highest mountain.

Organisers of the celebration say many Japanese, Chinese and South-east Asian climbers have cancelled their trips to Nepal to attend the anniversary later this month because of concerns about being infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome while travelling.Lama said mountaineers from Europe and the United States also have expressed concerns, but that no cancellations have been received from those regions.
http://breakingnews.iol.ie/news/story.asp?j=69105398&p=69yx6yx4

 
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roger
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China People's Daily Article on the Big Celerbation on Mount Qomolangma

May 12 2003, 11:07 AM 

Climbers Set out to Conquer Mount Qomolangma
To mark the 50th anniversary of the first successful ascent of Mount Qomolangma, climbers from all over the world started to climb the highest mountain in the world Sunday.
http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/200305/12/eng20030512_116554.shtml

http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/message?forumid=3897&messageid=1037797185

 
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Want to Climb Everest? $50,000 + 2 Weeks Training (no experience necessary)

May 12 2003, 11:09 AM 

Here's an Indian article critical of the commercial Everest climbs:

Buy your way to the top of Everest Monday, 12 May , 2003, 08:30


However, extensive mountaineering experience is not necessary. "We will put the person through a training course -- it may take a week it may take two weeks, depending on the client," Pandey said.
Climbers would need to set aside 75 days, from their arrival in Kathmandu until their return from their adventure to the capital. If they needed training in mountain skills, they should allow even more time.
For $50,000, he said, everything would be taken care of -- from the return air fares to Lukla, from where the trek to Everest Base Camp begins, to tents, food, porters, and Sherpa guides.
"For someone not experienced, we will provide at least four Sherpas," he said.
"We will provide all the support necessary -- it will be like helping someone who can't walk to walk."
There is no guarantee, however, he cautioned. "Everest is too unpredictable."
http://sify.com/news/offbeat/fullstory.php?id=13150772&vsv=39

 
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roger
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Chinese Broadcast First Live T.V. From Everest Summit

May 21 2003, 10:08 AM 


Excited Chinese climbers broadcast the first live television pictures from the summit of Mount Everest yesterday, 50 years after the first ascent of the world's highest mountain.

The broadcast, which started with the ascent of the north slope of the 8850-metre peak on May 11, beat a US cable station hoping to become the first to beam images live from the summit.

The pictures on state-run China Central Television, which reaches hundreds of millions of people, showed a group of jubilant but exhausted climbers, right, resting at the summit in yellow, red and purple parkas, some wearing oxygen masks and goggles.
http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/05/21/1053196645916.html

 
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