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Half of Living 900 Everest Summiters Expected in Nepal 50th Anniversary Celebration

January 16 2003 at 10:19 AM
roger  (no login)

 
The Nepalese authorities have announced that Everest climbers from across the world will gather in May to mark the 50th anniversary of the first ascent of the world's highest mountain.
They say they expect nearly half of the 900 people who have climbed Everest and are still living to attend the meeting in the capital, Kathmandu. More than 1,200 people have climbed the world's highest mountain since Hillary and his Sherpa guide, Tenzing Norgay, first scaled the 8,850-metre peak 50 years ago.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/2664323.stm


 
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Wi Fi Internet Cafe Planned for Everest Base Camp

January 23 2003, 12:54 PM 

This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
This year, just in time for the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's first ascent of Everest, climbers on the mountain will have the chance to connect with the world below by e-mail. That is because Tsering Gyaltsen, the grandson of the only surviving Sherpa to have accompanied Hillary on that famed climb, is planning to build the world's highest Internet cafe at base camp.
Jim Forster, an engineer at Cisco, eagerly donated three Wi-Fi radios on behalf of his company. Such radios enable the creation of wireless networks that can relay data within a couple of hundred feet or as far as several miles as the crow flies, much the way that local-area networks, or LAN's, work in offices.

From his base in Colorado Springs, Dave. Hughes, 74, is using a Web-based conferencing system as a long-distance tool to teach Mr. Gyaltsen and his colleagues how to set up the base-camp network. Mr. Gyaltsen is working with technicians on loan from two Internet service providers, Square Networks and Worldlink, based in Nepal's capital, Katmandu. Another friend of Mr. Cook's, Mike Trest, an independent consultant and satellite expert, is helping to teach the Nepalese about satellites.
The network will consist of a small satellite dish, planted about 1,500 feet above base camp, that can provide two-way communications. Because the dish must operate from firm ground, it cannot be used directly at base camp, which is on a moving glacier. The $10,000 satellite dish, which Mr. Gyaltsen purchased with a bank loan and funds from Square Networks, will connect to the cybercafe at base camp over the Wi-Fi radios. The dish will beam data to a satellite in orbit and to an Internet service provider in Israel.

Mr. Gyaltsen and the pollution committee, which will technically own the radios, are still deciding what to charge users. They are considering a flat fee of $2,000 to $5,000 per expedition, which can number 5 to 20 people. That price might sound steep, but Mr. Gyaltsen says it paled in comparison with the cost of the expedition itself, typically $65,000 a person.
The satellite link and Internet service will cost the operators less than $1,000 a month for the climbing season. Any profits will go to the pollution committee.

More: New York Times

 
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Base Camp Cafe

January 23 2003, 6:19 PM 

How will the set & the (expensive!) satellite dish be powered? Solar cells?

 
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The Internet on Mount Everest?

January 30 2003, 5:04 PM 

This greatly unnatural proposition shows just how severe the encroachment is of this modern society into a remote,difficultly reachable wilderness area.

 
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Wi-Fi Plans for Iraq

April 17 2003, 10:07 AM 

By using Wi-Fi, parts of Iraq could skip the build-out of traditional phone and cable networks altogether. The situation is similar to how cell phone technology enabled huge swaths of the Third World to avoid regular land-line phone systems. Wi-Fi equipment makers such as Cisco Systems, Proxim and Nomadix are talking to government agencies and non-profits about possibilities for Wi-Fi in Iraq. Humanitarian groups evaluating it include Oxfam International and CARE. Wi-Fi could "lower our overhead and increase our capability to do our jobs," says Bob MacPherson, a director with CARE.
A high-profile role in Iraq would give an added boost to Wi-Fi, already taking off in other parts of the world. Research firm Gartner expects there to be more than 24,000 public Wi-Fi access points worldwide by year's end. An access point is where users can go to get on a network. Starbucks, for example, is installing Wi-Fi networks in many of its stores.
http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/technology/2003-04-16-wifi_x.htm

 
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Wi-Fi?

April 17 2003, 11:50 AM 

What does "Wi-Fi" stand for? All I can think of is Wireless or Wide-Band Fidelity, which doesn't make that much sense.

 
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Wireless Fidelity

April 17 2003, 12:23 PM 

http://www.weca.net/OpenSection/why_Wi-Fi.asp?TID=2

As as type this message on a "Wi-Fi" connected laptop. . .

However, this isn't technology I really know much about, so can't say why elevation presents a problem.

-adam

 
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Overhyped (?) Starbucks Technology

April 17 2003, 1:04 PM 

Wi-Fi is the computer technology du jour and in my opinion is probably overhyped.

If you have a Wi-Fi receiver in your notebook you do not need wires to hook to the Internet as long as you are somewhere that is "broadcasting" the Internet.

Intel recently released its Centrino chip for notebooks that bundles it (you may have seen their ads with somebody using a computer on a diving board). If you have an earlier computer you will need a special card to receive the signal.

In the perfect Wi-Fi world, you will be able to access the Internet at airports, in coffee shops, etc., without having to hook into any wires.

One of the earliest adopters of this technology was Starbucks which broadcasts Wi-Fi at its shops. The only catch is that you have to have an account in order to pick up the signal ($30/month or $6/24 hours). This is over and above your regular Internet connections. Consequently you don't see a lot of folks at Starbucks surfing the net. Here's an article on the woes of this:
http://news.com.com/2100-1039-990487.html

In places like Iraq and Everest which don't have wires to begin with, the process may be the best way to go since they only have to install a series of dishes rather than wiring the entire place. However in wired America it's questionable whether it will take off because the "hot spots" where you can receive a broadcast signal is very tiny and limited. Plus you have to be fairly tech savvy to figure out how to get on.

In the early heady days of wi-fi for NYC tech heads, some folks set up antennas so they broadcast their broadband connections to anybody for free within a block known as "hot spots" (and published the log on codes on the web). This did not sit well with the broadband folks who promptly shut the websites down.

If you're lucky enough to be in a "hot spot" it's pretty cool to have the blazing speeds of broadband without wires. However, the achilles heel of the process is that the "hot spots" are so small (in a best case scenario the hot spot would be about a city block however it is usually ***much*** smaller than that -- e.g., the confines of a coffee shop).

If you subscribed to the service for logging on at Starbucks, that may not be the same service that would be available at airports, etc.


    
This message has been edited by dipper on Apr 17, 2003 3:29 PM


 
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Temporary Mobile Phone Text Message Network Planned for Everest

April 17 2003, 10:11 AM 

A climbing expedition on Everest will be able to send text messages to report their progress using a temporary wireless network
The last phone-free sanctuary has just been conquered: in a stunt to promote mobile messaging, three companies have joined hands to provide a mobile phone service up the world's highest mountain, Mount Everest.
China Mobile, one of the largest cellular operators in the mainland, has set up a temporary wireless network on the mountain to allow progress of an upcoming expedition to be documented via SMS (Short Messaging Service) and MMS (Multimedia Messaging Service).
Handset maker Motorola will provide its 388C MMS-enabled handset for message transmission while a third partner Sohu.com, a China-based Net firm, will provide content services such as exclusive reporting on its Web site.
Besides seasoned mountaineers, Charles Zhang, president and CEO of Sohu.com, will also participate in the company-sponsored climb in May, Sohu.com said in statement.
"Generally, wireless operating equipment can only work below a height of 4,000 metres. China Mobile is the first carrier to bring wireless applications to a level above 5,100 metres," claimed China mobile spokesman Wang Hongyu.
Future alpinists hoping to tap into the Everest mobile network will be disappointed as this is a temporary publicity stunt and will not be commercially launched.
http://news.zdnet.co.uk/story/0,,t269-s2133617,00.html

 
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Altitiude?

April 17 2003, 11:56 AM 

Shouldn't Wireless Fidelity, or ?ever it stands for, work better at higher altitudes? The higher, the better the chance of line-of-sight to a base station, which should be needed for AOS (Acquisition Of Signal).

 
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roger
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Lorenzo Gariano Phones His Blog from Everest

April 28 2003, 10:07 AM 

Weblogs are becoming increasingly popular as online diaries discuss every topic under the sun, including now one of the world's most ambitious climbs.
Lorenzo Gariano is one of an army of climbers who will be setting out to tackle the world's largest mountain in celebration of the 50th anniversary of Everest's conquest by Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay.
He has been recording every stage of his momentous journey via a satellite phone which beams live audio blogs to a website run by the Open University's Knowledge Media Institute, (KMI), based in Milton Keynes.
The blog proved immensely popular with the climbing world and Mr Gariano's latest blog is also attracting interest.
The technology needed for the Everest blog is much more low-tech, despite the fact that physically the journey is far more challenging than the Matterhorn climb.
Mr Gariano uses his satellite phone every couple of days to dial into the lab's phone service, logging a live report which is also recorded on the website as a regular blog.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/technology/2973735.stm

Lorenzo's Blog Page:
http://news.kmi.open.ac.uk/everest/sounds/list.php




If you are interested in joining the blog phenomenon (where one of the options is that you can phone in your comments). Blog is now owned by google.

http://www.blogger.com/

 
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NY Daily News Gives 4 Stars to National Geographic Everest Documentary

April 25 2003, 10:42 AM 

SURVIVING EVEREST. Sunday, 8 p.m., National Geographic Channel.
'Surviving Everest," a new documentary about climbers trying to reach the top of the world's highest peak, will face an uphill climb getting an audience.

But "Surviving Everest" is just too good to miss.

Writer-producer-director Liesl Clark created this this two-hour high-altitude thriller about second-generation mountaineers scaling dangerous heights.

But "Surviving Everest" is just too good to miss.

"Surviving Everest" marks the 50th anniversary of the first successful ascent of Mount Everest and the 40th anniversary of the first time American citizens stood at the top of the world.

Fifty years ago, New Zealander Edmund Hillary and his climbing partner, Nepalese Sherpa Tenzing Norgay, ascended to the summit of Mount Everest, via a southern ridge route. Ten years later, Barry Bishop was one of a group of United States climbers who braved the more rugged west face of the mountain and became the first Americans to plant the flag atop Everest.

To mark the respective anniversaries of their fathers' achievements, Hillary's son Peter and Norgay's son Jamling teamed to tackle Everest themselves. On the other side of the mountain, Bishop's son Brent set out to recreate his father's dangerous climb, teaming with veteran Everest mountaineer Pete Athans.

Do the math, and you realize even before seeing their faces that these climber's sons are not young men. But they are driven to bond with their fathers: to understand their achievements and send a message.

Peter wants to call his dad by cell phone from the top; Brent wants to literally follow in his late father's footsteps. And Jamling wants to honor his father, and all Sherpas, by asking for respect they richly deserve.

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/story/78160p-72065c.html

 
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National Geographic Reprises New Surviving Everest Show on May 29

May 1 2003, 7:34 PM 

NGC will encore "Surviving Everest on the 50th Anniversary of the first Summit on May 29 at 8 p.m. ET/PT

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/04/0424_030424_tveverest.html

High Speed Band Trailer:
http://everest-50.nationalgeographic.com/channel/everest/
http://everest-50.nationalgeographic.com/channel/highspeed/everest/

National Geographic's 50th Anniversary page;
http://everest-50.nationalgeographic.com/everest/

 
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Peter Hillary and Jamling Tenzig Summit Everest

April 28 2003, 10:14 AM 

On May 29, 1953, the names Edmund Hillary and Tenzig Norgay went down in history when they reached Everest's 29,028ft summit.

Fifty years on, Peter Hillary and Jamling Tenzig Norgay have reached the summit of the world's highest mountain.

Peter battled with vomiting and dehydration and was almost too sick to go on. And howling winds, extremely low temperatures, and poor visibility threatened to stop the expedition in its tracks.

Hiking through thick snow, the climbers were forced to wear oxygen masks as they neared the summit.

But with a resilience passed down to them by their fathers, Peter and Jamling's climb was a success, and they were able to celebrate their fathers' momentous feat from a position they conquered half a century ago.
http://www.sky.com/skynews/article/0,,30100-12300008,00.html

 
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Brits Issue Everest Stamp (and others on Explorers) for 50th Anniversary

April 29 2003, 10:19 AM 






That's what the Royal Mail Extreme Endeavours stamps attempt to do. Royal Mail has gone to its own extremes with these stamps which at 60mm x 21mm are the second biggest stamps ever to be published here.
The format has given designer Howard Brown a broad canvas to tell the explorers' stories vividly. So you don't just see round the world yachtsman Sir Francis Chichester, you also see Gypsy Moth, the boat on which he swept triumphantly into Plymouth in 1967, and the rolling oceans behind him.
Similarly pioneer aviatrix Amy Johnson is accompanied by her De Havilland DH60G plane while Middle East explorer Dame Freya Stark is set against the desert mountains where she wandered.
The other three stamps feature Sir Edmund Hillary, accompanied by Tenzing Norgay as they became the first men to conquer Everest 50 years ago, and Antarctic explorers Sir Ernest Shackleton and Robert Falcon Scott.
http://www.royalmail.com/portal/default/all/home?paf_dm=full&paf_gear_id=100002&paf_gear_state=con_content&xmlPath=/docContent/xml/01__Mail/10__Stamps_and_collectibles/035__2003_collection/03__Special_Stamps_Collection/09__Extreme_Endeavours.xml

 
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Non-Wrapping Version of Above Post

April 29 2003, 10:21 AM 






That's what the Royal Mail Extreme Endeavours stamps attempt to do. Royal Mail has gone to its own extremes with these stamps which at 60mm x 21mm are the second biggest stamps ever to be published here.
The format has given designer Howard Brown a broad canvas to tell the explorers' stories vividly. So you don't just see round the world yachtsman Sir Francis Chichester, you also see Gypsy Moth, the boat on which he swept triumphantly into Plymouth in 1967, and the rolling oceans behind him.
Similarly pioneer aviatrix Amy Johnson is accompanied by her De Havilland DH60G plane while Middle East explorer Dame Freya Stark is set against the desert mountains where she wandered.
The other three stamps feature Sir Edmund Hillary, accompanied by Tenzing Norgay as they became the first men to conquer Everest 50 years ago, and Antarctic explorers Sir Ernest Shackleton and Robert Falcon Scott.
 
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Asians Cancel Everest Climbs in SARS Scare

May 6 2003, 11:54 AM 

The SARS outbreak is keeping many Mount Everest climbers away from a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the conquest of the world’s highest mountain.

Organisers of the celebration say many Japanese, Chinese and South-east Asian climbers have cancelled their trips to Nepal to attend the anniversary later this month because of concerns about being infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome while travelling.Lama said mountaineers from Europe and the United States also have expressed concerns, but that no cancellations have been received from those regions.
http://breakingnews.iol.ie/news/story.asp?j=69105398&p=69yx6yx4

 
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China People's Daily Article on the Big Celerbation on Mount Qomolangma

May 12 2003, 11:07 AM 

Climbers Set out to Conquer Mount Qomolangma
To mark the 50th anniversary of the first successful ascent of Mount Qomolangma, climbers from all over the world started to climb the highest mountain in the world Sunday.
http://english.peopledaily.com.cn/200305/12/eng20030512_116554.shtml

http://www.network54.com/Hide/Forum/message?forumid=3897&messageid=1037797185

 
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Want to Climb Everest? $50,000 + 2 Weeks Training (no experience necessary)

May 12 2003, 11:09 AM 

Here's an Indian article critical of the commercial Everest climbs:

Buy your way to the top of Everest Monday, 12 May , 2003, 08:30


However, extensive mountaineering experience is not necessary. "We will put the person through a training course -- it may take a week it may take two weeks, depending on the client," Pandey said.
Climbers would need to set aside 75 days, from their arrival in Kathmandu until their return from their adventure to the capital. If they needed training in mountain skills, they should allow even more time.
For $50,000, he said, everything would be taken care of -- from the return air fares to Lukla, from where the trek to Everest Base Camp begins, to tents, food, porters, and Sherpa guides.
"For someone not experienced, we will provide at least four Sherpas," he said.
"We will provide all the support necessary -- it will be like helping someone who can't walk to walk."
There is no guarantee, however, he cautioned. "Everest is too unpredictable."
http://sify.com/news/offbeat/fullstory.php?id=13150772&vsv=39

 
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Chinese Broadcast First Live T.V. From Everest Summit

May 21 2003, 10:08 AM 


Excited Chinese climbers broadcast the first live television pictures from the summit of Mount Everest yesterday, 50 years after the first ascent of the world's highest mountain.

The broadcast, which started with the ascent of the north slope of the 8850-metre peak on May 11, beat a US cable station hoping to become the first to beam images live from the summit.

The pictures on state-run China Central Television, which reaches hundreds of millions of people, showed a group of jubilant but exhausted climbers, right, resting at the summit in yellow, red and purple parkas, some wearing oxygen masks and goggles.
http://www.theage.com.au/articles/2003/05/21/1053196645916.html

 
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Outdoor Life Network Live Summit Bid Scheduled Today (May 22)

May 22 2003, 4:20 PM 

Live coverage of Everest climb

If a carpenter, a registered nurse, a ski instructor and a teacher
reach the summit of Mount Everest today, they'll do it on live TV. The
Outdoor Life Network (Time Warner Ch. 122) plans to broadcast the last
leg of their ascent starting around 3:30 p.m. - as long as the weather
holds.

The broadcast is part of the adventure series "Global Extremes." Since
January, the show has followed an original 50 contestants, including
woodworker Jesse Rickert, through a series of endurance challenges
that included walking through Africa's Kalahari Desert and
rock-climbing in Iceland. Only four remain to attempt the final climb.
Each will get $50,000 for making it to the show's final challenge.

New York Daily News

 
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OLN Global Extremes Live Everest TV on May 27 (at earliest)

May 25 2003, 9:18 PM 

I was surprised to to tune into OLN's channel and see NASCAR racing instead of the Everest climb (as was flashing on my online program guide).

The reschedule has been some controversy.

This is from Outside online:

In other Everest news, the expedition team from the reality TV show, Global Extremes: Mt. Everest—4Runners of Adventure, postponed their summit bid last night and cancelled the live broadcast of their attempt that was scheduled to air on the Outdoor Life Network. In a brief statement posted on OLN's web site, the company's president and CEO, E. Roger Williams said, "Due to unforeseeable complications, the Global Extremes: Mt. Everest —4Runners of Adventure live broadcast of our team's summit attempt of Mt. Everest, scheduled for [Thursday], has been delayed. We will provide updated programming information as soon as we have confirmation of date and time."

According to The Aspen Times, the Global Extremes broadcast was called off when leader Chris Warner decided to dedicate the team's resources to a rescue operation instead of a summit push. A report on the Connecticut-based web site Mediapost.com stated that the team had come upon and treated a man with a broken fibula and two Japanese women with cerebral edemas.
http://web.outsideonline.com/news/headlines/20030523_1.html

OLN has this:
The Global Extremes summit attempt will be delayed for at least four days due to unfavorable weather on our climbing route. According to the OLN experts on site, the first window of opportunity could be on the afternoon of Tuesday, May 27th (ET). OLN will provide additional updates once they are available both on-air and right here on OLNTV.com. Colleen Ihnken has decided for personal reasons not to proceed as part of the 2003 OLN Global Extremes Mt. Everest Summit Expedition. Colleen has shown great courage coming this far and OLN wishes her well.
http://www.olntv.com/

 
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Interview with one of the finalists

June 11 2003, 11:42 AM 

Ihnken recounts tale of Global Extremes

ALMA - Now that her televised fame has reached its end, Alma resident Colleen Ihnken feels that being home is a little anticlimactic.

Ihnken, the 39-year-old Keystone ski patroller and Frisco Medical Center nurse, was one of the four finalists in the Outdoor Life Network's (OLN) Global Extremes, the five-month adventure series that crescendoed recently with a summit bid on Mount Everest.

. . .

As to her overall Global Extremes experience, Ihnken, who won last year's 24-hour Montezuma's Revenge mountain bike race and has a long history of extreme athletic successes, said the series wasn't the Toyota 4Runner (the key sponsor) promotional ploy it looked like it might be at the kickoff.

. . .

Now that Ihnken is safely at home and contemplating her next adventure, she regrets her decision to turn back. But she wouldn't trade her Global Extremes experience for anything.

http://www.summitdaily.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20030611/SPORTS/306110201

-adam

 
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Harry
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Not the first

May 23 2003, 2:30 PM 

Hey Roger,

The japanese beat the Chinese by at least 14 years as a huge Japanese team sent live pictures from the summit in 1988 or 1989.

If the OLN really sends out live images of climbing climbers than it is a world premiere...

Keep climbing,

Harry
http://7summits.com

 
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70-Year-Old Yuichiro Miura Oldest to Summit Everest (and first father/son to jointly)

May 22 2003, 10:10 AM 

Professional skier Yuichiro Miura reached the summit of the 8,850-meter Mt. Everest on Thursday, becoming the oldest climber to successfully make the ascent, his office said in Tokyo.
Before Miura, 70, Japan's Tomiyasu Ishikawa was the oldest person to have reached the Earth's highest mountain, achieving the feat during his climb in May last year at the age of 65.
Miura, his second son, Gota, and mountain photographer Noriyuki Muraguchi, left their base camp located at a height of 8,400 meters at 3 a.m. local time and reached the summit shortly after 12 noon, sources from his office said.
Yuichiro and Gota Miura are the first Japanese father and son team to jointly arrive at the top of Everest.
http://mdn.mainichi.co.jp/news/20030522p2a00m0fp025000c.html

Yuichiro Miura on web:
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=Yuichiro+Miura

 
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Congratulations to the summit team

May 22 2003, 6:10 PM 

Congratulations to Mr. Miura and the rest of his expeditionary team for a successful conquest of Everest. He also reached the summit with his son, Gota Miura, 33, and alpine photographer Noriyuki Muraguchi, 46. The expedition achieved two other records. Yuichiro and Gota became the Japanese father-and-son to reach the summit, and Muraguchi made his third successful ascent of Everest (also summiting in 1998 and 2000), making him the first Japanese citizen to reach the summit of Everest three times.

Read about it here.

This successful ascent shows that you are never too old to ascend Everest.

 
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Oldest Everst Summiter and Longest Living Person (Hiroshima Survivor) Japan Highlights

January 2 2004, 8:20 PM 

From the fighter pilot who became a national hero to millions of Chinese to the aging Philippine matinee star who turned his hand to politics to the elderly Japanese man who climbed Mount Everest, a slew of previously unknown personalities have charmed Asia this year.

In Japan, Mitoyo Kawate was recognized by the Guinness Book of Records as the world's oldest living person. Less than two weeks after taking the title, Mrs. Kawate succumbed to pneumonia at age 114.
Mrs. Kawate had survived the 1945 atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and worked on a farm until she was 99 before spending the last decade of her life in a nursing home.
She is joined by fellow Japanese senior Yuichiro Miura as one the region's most notable personalities of the year. Mr. Miura, a skier and mountaineer, on May 22 became the oldest person to scale Everest, the world's highest mountain, at the age of 70 years and 222 days.
"What was really a dream came closer, step by step, and I was finally able to stand on Everest at the highest point in the world," he said.

http://washingtontimes.com/world/20040101-110808-4174r.htm

 
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Miura's DAD to Celebrate 100th Birthday Skiing at Snowbird, Utah

February 27 2004, 12:51 PM 

Japanese ski pioneer Keizo Miura will be celebrating his 100th birthday on Saturday, February 28th by skiing a run at Snowbird. He turned 100-years on February 15th.

Miura, a mountain cinematography pioneer, turned 100 Feb. 15 and is recognized as the oldest active skier in the world. He still skis more than 120 days a year and last year, at age 99, successfully accomplished a descent of Mont Blanc's Valle Blanche glacier in France with his son and grandson.

Miura will be joined by his son Yuichiro, age 71, who is internationally known for skiing down Mt. Everest and last year became the oldest person to climb Mt Everest; his grandchildren Yuta, age 37, and Gota, age 34, a freestyle mogul Olympian at the '94 and '98 Winter Games, who also climbed Mt. Everest with his father; and Yuta's daughter Rio, age 4, Keizo's great-granddaughter. In addition American businessman, adventurer and family friend Dick Bass, owner of Snowbird, will ski with the Miuras. Bass - the first person to climb the highest peaks on seven continents - jointly ascended Vinson Massif, the highest peak in Antarctica with Yuichiro Miura in 1983. K2 Skis is developing a special commemorative ski for Miura to use during the event.
http://www.snowjournal.com/article767.html

 
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Ben Clark Becomes Youngest American to Summit Chomolungma.

May 22 2003, 12:55 PM 

Ben Clark Summits Mt. Everest!

Everyone, it is with great pleasure and slightly misty eyes that I get to tell you that Ben Clark has made it to the top of Mount Everest and has safely descended to the comfort of his tent at Camp 6 (8300 meters)!!!!!

He finally did it! It has taken so long to tell you all of this because the three climbers forgot to bring the radio with them when they set out this morning!

I have just gotten off the radio with Ben and he is doing very well, they made the summit at around 11:45am Tibet time today (11:45pm EST)

The three of them (Ben, Lhawang and Lhakpa [all three summited]) are healthy and resting up for tomorrow's descent down to ABC.

Just so you know, I have informed Ben's parents of the great news!

I recorded the radio conversation and will send it out shortly.

Thank you, everyone for all of the emails, thoughts, and prayers.

Jon Miller (a much relieved Base Camp inhabitant!

EverestNews.com Article

 
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Jess Roskelley, age 20, Beats Ben Clark, age 23, for Youngest American on Everest

May 22 2003, 4:08 PM 

Wow! A post from Everest base camp!!!! My work here is done!

Unfortunately I have to make a correction. Jess Roskelley, age 20, from Spokane, WA, made it to the summit on Wednesday (May 21) in another father-son team to summit. Ben Clark, 23, from Clarksville, TN, summited later. Still, a major accomplishment in both cases and many, many, many, many thanks for the Everst base camp post!


SPOKANE, Wash. -- The youngest American to successfully scale Mount Everest and his father were making their way down the mountain Wednesday, a spokesman said.
Jess Roskelley, 20, and John Roskelley, 54, were among seven U.S. and Chinese climbers to make the summit of the 29,035-foot mountain early Wednesday, Nepal time.
Jess Roskelley is a University of Montana student and mountain guide. His father, a Spokane County commissioner, made his first successful climb in four tries on the world's tallest mountain.
http://seattlepi.nwsource.com/local/aplocal_story.asp?category=6420&slug=WA%20Generations%20on%20Everest


Jess Roskelley on web:
http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&edition=usa&q=jess+roskelley+everest

http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=Jess+Roskelley+Everest

Ben Clark on web:
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=ben+clark+everest&spell=1


http://news.google.com/news?hl=en&edition=usa&q=ben+clark+everest

 
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Sherpa Pemba Dorjie Summits Everest in Record 12 Hours 45 Minutes

May 23 2003, 9:49 AM 


A Sherpa scaled Mount Everest in 12 hours and 45 minutes on Friday setting a record for the fastest climb of the world's highest mountain, Nepalese tourism officials said.
Pemba Dorjie, a 25-year-old Nepalese Sherpa guide, reached the 8,850-metre summit at 5:45 a.m. local time Friday after leaving the base camp, located at 5,300 metres, at 5 p.m. on Thursday.
Mr. Dorjie, part of the Dream Everest 2003 Expedition led by Robert Huygn from Belgium, broke the record set by another Sherpa, Babu Chhiri, who climbed the peak in 16 hours and 56 minutes in May, 2000.
Mr. Chhiri died on the mountain in 2001, when he fell into a crevasse while trying to take a photograph.
The Nepalese Tourism Ministry said 43 climbers reached the summit on Thursday, all parties climbing the mountain to mark the 50th anniversary of Sir Edmund Hillary's conquest of the peak on May 29, 1953.
http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20030523.wedit0523/BNStory/Front/

 
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Sherpa Lhakpa Gela Summits Everest in Record 10 Hours 56 Minutes

May 26 2003, 8:23 PM 

Sherpa Lhakpa Gela, 36, clipped almost two hours off the Everest speed climbing record that was set just three days ago, reaching the summit from Base Camp in a time of 10 hours 56 minutes and 46 seconds, it said.
Lhakpa, making his tenth ascent of the world's highest peak, set out at 5:00 pm Sunday (2:15pm AEST) and reached the summit at 3:56 am Monday (12:56am AEST) with the entire climb taking place in darkness.
He descended to reach base camp safely at 11:20 am (8:20am AEST), the statement said.
http://www.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,4057,6500685%255E13780,00.html

 
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Dispute Over 10 Hour 56 Minute Everest Summit Claim

June 18 2003, 9:52 AM 


 
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Appa Sherpa Summits Everest Record 12th Time

May 26 2003, 8:25 PM 

Appa Sherpa, 42, reached the top of the world's highest mountain at 3:41 am (12:56am AEST Monday) to break his own record of 12 ascents, it said.
Already a legend, Appa has been to the top almost every year since 1990, doing the arduous trip twice in 1992.
http://www.news.com.au/common/story_page/0,4057,6500685%255E13780,00.html

 
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Sibusiso Vilane First Black South African to Summit Everest

May 26 2003, 8:26 PM 

President Thabo Mbeki was awash with praise for Sibusiso Vilane (32) who became the first black South African to reach the 8 848-metre peak of the world's highest mountain - Mount Everest - early on Monday morning.

"Today all Africans stand 8 848 metres tall," Mbeki said.
http://www.witness.co.za/content%5C2003_05%5C15597.htm

 
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Much Celebrating at the Rum Doodle Bar

May 27 2003, 9:35 AM 

There is also a striking climbing culture here. The most well known watering hole for climbers is the Rum Doodle restaurant, made famous in 1985 by Newsweek that called it "one of the world's best bars". It was set up in 1979 by a Japanese couple who ran a climbing and trekking agency.
"In those days, Thamel was not the tourist centre it is today and there was no restaurant and bar for climbers and trekkers to relax in when they returned from the mountains," explains their son, Takeshi Okawara, who is manager now. It is decorated with footprint-shaped placards signed by climbers. The footprints - even the tablemats are the same shape - are those of the yeti (the mysterious snowman), he explains. Tradition dictates that every ascent to the 8000-metre peak is celebrated here.
On one side is of the restaurant is a bar exclusively for the Everest summiteers. It is adorned with sketches and signatures of the heroes of Everest history such as Edmund Hillary, Reinhold Messner, Junko Tabei and a host of others. An Indian name on a placard close to the bar that catches the eye is that of Rajiv Sharma of Manali, who summitted Everest in 1993.
The restaurant is named after a hilarious novel by W.E. Bowman, published in 1956, on the ascent to an imaginary mountain in 'Yogistan' called Rum Doodle that is 40,000.5 feet in height. The cocktails are original - Yogistani Delight (rum, pineapple juice,
lemon, Fanta, soda), North Doodle Special (dry sherry, dry vermouth) and the lethal Pong's Revenge (tequila, vodka, rum, brandy, pineapple juice) named after the Yogistani cook in the novel. As for food, the Rum Doodle Steak (200 gm of meat marinated overnight and served with mushroom and red wine sauce) is exceedingly popular with tired and hungry expeditioners.
http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/181_263957,00130032.htm

Rum Doodle Bar on Web:
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&q=rum+doodle+bar+everest


 
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Hillary/Tabei/Messner Propose Drastic Restriction On Number of Everest Climbers

May 28 2003, 10:03 AM 

Katmandu, Nepal - Sir Edmund Hillary and other Mount Everest pioneers suggested yesterday that the world's tallest peak deserves a rest after a half century of more than 1,300 climbers scaling its slopes.
I have suggested to the Nepal government that they should stop giving permission and give the mountain a rest for a few years," Hillary said.
Other veteran climbers suggested limiting the number of expeditions.
"Only two or three teams should be allowed in a season to climb Everest," said Junko Tabei, 64, of Japan, the first woman to reach the summit.
Reinhold Messner, an Italian who was the first to climb Everest without bottled oxygen, pleaded at a news conference yesterday for the government to allow only one expedition per route each season.
http://www.cleveland.com/news/plaindealer/index.ssf?/base/news/105411450875840.xml

 
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Two Killed in Helicopter Crash at Everst Base Camp

May 28 2003, 10:04 AM 

Kathmandu - A helicopter carrying porters for the 50th anniversary celebrations of Mount Everest's conquest crashed on Wednesday near Base Camp, killing two and injuring seven others.
The privately owned Mi-17 from Kathmandu veered off course within sight of Base Camp's tents, hurling debris into the air.
The Simrik Air chopper carried five porters, a mountain guide and four crew members and was to have picked up summiters fresh from their climb of the world's tallest mountain.
http://www.news24.com/News24/World/News/0,,2-10-1462_1365666,00.html

 
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15-year old Sherpa girl climbs Everest

May 28 2003, 1:20 PM 

Here's another article that I found on the above link. If this climber is not the youngest ever to climb Everest, then she is surely the youngest female to reach the summit of Everest.

KATHMANDU - A Sherpa girl of about 15 years old may have broken the record for the youngest successful climber of Mount Everest, a Nepal Mountaineering Association official said on Saturday.

Ming Kipa Sherpa reached the world's highest summit on Thursday along with her 30-year-old sister, Lhakpa Sherpa, and her 24-year-old brother, Mingma Gyalu Sherpa, as part of a Romanian expedition, the official told AFP.

The standing record for the youngest Everest summitter was set by Temba Chheri, who lost several of his fingers to frostbite when he summitted in 2001. He was 15 years 18 days at the time.

The mountaineering official said Ming Kipa Sherpa was around 15 but did not immediately know her exact date of birth to verify whether she had broken the record.

Click here to read the article.

 
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Record 109+ Stood on Everst Summit on May 22 (238+ summits this spring)

June 2 2003, 10:27 AM 

In 2001, there were 182 summits, and on May 23 of that year 88 people summited. This spring, there were 238+ summits and on May 22, 109+ people stood atop Everest.

http://www.mounteverest.net/story/RecordEversetseasonJun22003.shtml

http://www.adventurestats.com/

 
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Brown University Prof Uses Handhelds to Study Speech Pattern Warnings at High Altitude

June 11 2003, 10:31 AM 

Brown University's Professor Philip Lieberman and his team of researchers completed last week using Palm(TM) Tungsten(TM) T handhelds to test the thinking abilities of climbers.

In his third consecutive year of his one-of-a-kind study, Lieberman, a professor of cognitive and linguistic sciences, and four research assistants studied the effect of the lack of oxygen -- a condition called hypoxia -- on Everest climbers' abilities to think clearly and understand the meaning of a sentence. Funded by the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), through NASA, the research has developed a method that can detect impaired decision-making ability by means of computer-implemented analysis of a person's speech. This will allow remote monitoring of crew members' performance in deep-space missions where exposure to cosmic rays could cause brain dysfunction similar to that resulting from hypoxia. The Everest research points to voice-monitoring techniques that could be used to alert people to life-threatening breakdowns in decision-making in other critical situations. The present technique developed by Lieberman and his colleagues already has proven useful in evaluating new methods for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease, in which similar, more extreme and permanent brain damage occurs.

http://www.pdalive.com/showarticle.php?threadid=3726

 
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Fifty years later, we're still awed by Hillary and Norgay

June 11 2003, 5:28 PM 

Click here to read this column by Frank Deford in Sports Illustrated.

 
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Brit Walks Down Everest With Broken Leg

June 13 2003, 9:44 AM 

Conan Harrod never made it to the top of Mount Everest, but he could make the record books as the first climber to crawl down the face of the world's highest peak.
The 34-year-old British com­ puter expert returned recently to tell the remarkable story of how he inched his way down the moun­ tain on his hands and knees for two days after breaking his left leg just 250 metres short of the summit.
The accident happened on May 21, just below 8,600 metres, as Mr. Harrod and teammates Walid Abuhaidar of the United States and Peter Madew of Australia were within three hours of the peak.
He was traversing the main ridge and stepped on a fixed rope laid to help climbers get up the moun­ tain. At the same time, another climber on his way down fell on the rope, catapulting Mr. Harrod off the ledge.
"I fell about five metres and landed straight on my ankle, and hence, it broke," he said. "I tried to stand on it and suddenly felt ex­ treme pain and fell over."
Mr. Harrod said the other climber and his Sherpa guide helped him back to the ledge, but after about 45 minutes they had disappeared. "The first thing I knew they were disappearing down the mountain in front of me. I was quite angry because they had caused the accident."
He said he was briefly alone before his two teammates were there to help him. Because he was unable to stand up on his leg, he made his way down on his side, holding the fixed line and some­ times travelling on his knees.
http://www.globeandmail.com/servlet/story/RTGAM.20030613.uclimb0613/BNStory/International/

 
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Dispute Over 10 Hour 56 Minute Everest Summit Claim

June 18 2003, 9:51 AM 

KATHMANDU - A Nepalese Sherpa who last month broke the record for the fastest ascent of Everest has been accused of cheating - by the man who made the second quickest climb.

Lakpa Gelu Sherpa reached the summit of the 8,848 metre peak from Base Camp in a time of 10 hours 56 minutes on May 26.

He clipped almost two hours off the record of 12 hours 45 minutes that had been set just three days before by Pemba Dorje Sherpa, 25.

But Pemba has written to Nepal's Ministry of Tourism, which verifies Everest records, complaining that Lakpa's claim is false because he was seen climbing towards Hillarys Step, which is several hundred metres (yards) below the summit, when he had said he was at the top.

Lakpa, 36, defended his record, saying he had witnesses who saw him at the peak at the time he was supposed to be there.
http://www.sundaytimes.co.za/zones/sundaytimes/newsst/newsst1055938283.asp

 
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Nepal Says 10 Hour 56 Minute Record Stands

July 31 2003, 8:50 AM 

Katmandu - Settling a dispute over who holds the record as the fastest climber of Mount Everest, Nepalese mountaineering authorities announced on Thursday that it's still Sherpa guide Lakpa Gyelu, whose record had been challenged by another Sherpa.
The Nepalese Tourism Ministry said Gyelu remains the fastest climber of the world's highest mountain, racing from the 5 300-metre base camp to the 8 850-metre summit in 10 hours and 56 minutes on May 26.
The 35-year-old Gyelu's record had been challenged by a fellow Sherpa guide - Pemba Dorjee, also 35 - who scrambled up the summit in 12 hours and 45 minutes just three days earlier. But after interviewing eyewitnesses, reviewing photographs and checking a report by the government official stationed at the base camp, the ministry has no doubt Gyelu holds the record, said Shanker Koirala, an official at the tourism ministry.

http://www.news24.com/News24/Technology/News/0,,2-13-1443_1395463,00.html

 
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Woman Seeks to Ride Motorcycle to Advanced Everest Base Camp at 6400m

July 11 2003, 9:53 AM 

Young Swedish motocross rider Annie Seel might look like Heidi but she's one tough lady and, to prove it, she's going to ride a motorcycle up Mount Everest.

In August she'll attempt to set an official record for the world's highest motorcycle ride by taking a Honda XL250 trail bike up the world's highest mountain.

Seel was invited to join a Danish team that will make the ascent up to the Northern base camp on the Rongbuk glacier, 5150m above sea level.

Still, base camp wasn't enough for the 34-year-old from Täby in Sweden so she’s decided to strap on an oxygen tank, wrap up in thermal kit to keep out the -10C temperatures, and take the bike up to the advanced base camp at 6400m.

Young Swedish motocross rider Annie Seel might look like Heidi but she's one tough lady and, to prove it, she's going to ride a motorcycle up Mount Everest.

In August she'll attempt to set an official record for the world's highest motorcycle ride by taking a Honda XL250 trail bike up the world's highest mountain.

Seel was invited to join a Danish team that will make the ascent up to the Northern base camp on the Rongbuk glacier, 5150m above sea level.

Still, base camp wasn't enough for the 34-year-old from Täby in Sweden so she’s decided to strap on an oxygen tank, wrap up in thermal kit to keep out the -10C temperatures, and take the bike up to the advanced base camp at 6400m.
While doing some research for the trip Seel discovered that there was an unofficial record held by a Japanese rider who claims to have taken his bike up to 5250m, just higher than they would get to at base camp.
She decided to carry on up the hill.

The Nepalese government has had a ban on imports of new motorcycles for more than a decade so the team will be using a fleet of Honda XL250 trail bikes borrowed from a local tour organiser.
The bikes are already set up for use at altitude but Seel plans to put on studded ice tyres for the trip.

http://www.iol.co.za/index.php?click_id=126&art_id=iol1057813631257E162&set_id=4


 
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Brit Marine Receives Humane Society Award for Everest Rescue

August 29 2003, 9:13 AM 

A Westcountry Royal Marine has been awarded one of the world's highest civilian bravery honours by Royal approval for his courage in a life-and-death drama on the North Ridge of Mount Everest in May this year.

Royal Marine Darren Swift, 30, of Springfield Road, Elburton, Plymouth, is to receive a Royal Humane Society Silver medal which has been personally approved by the society's president, Princess Alexandra, for his role in the perilous rescue of a climber suffering from frostbite and snow blindness.

At many times during the rescue Mr Swift, and the man he rescued - Australian climber Peter Madew - were in danger of falling down sheer precipices. One false step could have resulted in them plummeting to certain death.

The horror incident leading to the award happened on 22 May this year. Swift was a member of a Royal Navy Everest North Ridge expedition which was preparing for an attempt on the summit.

The Humane Society citation says that the expedition was aware that a British climber had broken his leg high on the North East Ridge the previous day, but with the help of colleagues had managed to descend to a lower camp.

Mr Madew was one of the colleagues who had helped the injured man, but when the Royal Navy expedition reached them the citation says he had serious frostbite and snow blindness and was in a poor state.

http://www.westernmorningnews.co.uk/displayNode.jsp?nodeId=103354&command=displayContent&sourceNode=103331&contentPK=6840278

 
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Man With No Hands Plans Everest Expedition

December 1 2003, 7:46 PM 

The "man with no hands", Kim Hong Bin, will attempt to climb Mt Everest again in Spring 2004. You might recall Kim Hong Bin from EverestNews.com previous coverage of him. Kim Hong Bin (38) who lost both of his hands to frostbite during a climb of the West Buttress of Mt. McKinley a few years ago. He is the man who would climb Everest with no hands!
He has climbed Mt. McKinley, Mt. Elbrus, Kilimanjaro, Aconcagua and many other mountain. In Spring 2004 he will be back on Everest on the South side ridge after reaching 7300 meter on his Autumn 2000 Everest Expedition...
http://www.everestnews.com/4002expcoverage/manwithnohandseverest2004spring1212003.htm

 
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