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Third Quarter 2004 Accidents/Rescues

July 5 2004 at 4:23 PM
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July 2004 Accidents/Rescues

July 5 2004, 4:24 PM 

I am posting July 2004 accidents/rescues here.

 
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Günter Jung -- Oldest Climber of Nanga Parbat (65) Missing on Descent

July 5 2004, 4:25 PM 

A German mountaineer in his 60s was feared dead after a fall while descending Pakistan's second highest peak, Nanga Parbat, expedition officials said on Monday.
The man was part of a six-member German expedition that set off in May to climb the 26,658-foot (8,125-m) peak, whose name in Urdu means "Naked Mountain."
The accident happened last week ahead of the 51th anniversary of the peak's conquest by a German climber.
"He slipped when he was descending along with his colleagues," said Esar Karim, the tour operator who organized the trip, adding that the team had successfully reached the summit.
The remaining members of the expedition returned safely, added Karim, who identified the missing man as Gunter Jung.
A German embassy spokesman confirmed a national was feared dead, but declined to give his name.
"We are still waiting for information from the Pakistani authorities," he said.
Nanga Parbat, also known as "Killer Mountain" for the risks associated with ascents, is the ninth highest mountain in the world and the westernmost mountain of the Himalayas.
Hermann Buhl, a German, was the first climber to reach the peak of Nanga Parbat on July 3, 1953, climbing Web sites say.
Pakistan's remote north boasts five of world's 14 peaks higher than 8,000 meters.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=peopleNews&storyID=5588694


At 65, Günter Jung was the oldest person to climb Nanga Parbat when he fell and went missing on descent.

Expedition leader Christian Walter led AlpinClub's first 8,000m expedition to Nanga Parbat in 1993. The team attempted the classical Rakhiot (Buhl) Route, but did not make the summit. Now, 11 years later, Christian made good on his vow to return. Joining him this year is his brother Markus (who has climbed four 8000ers), Jörg Stingl, the second German to climb Everest without oxygen, and Jens Triebel and Carsten Beichler, who each have made first ascents on rock climbs in Brooks Range and Grade X sport climbs. Rounding out the team was 65 year-old Günter Jung, who had 40 years of climbing experience and summited several 7,000m peaks.

Nanga Parbat lies in the Western Himalaya and is the 6th tallest mountain and the 2nd most dangerous after Annapurna. Statistically the summit/fatality rate is 28%.

http://www.k2climb.net/story/SummitandTragedyonNangaParbatJul22004.shtml

 
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2 Rescued Following Fall Through Opening in Teton Snowfield

July 6 2004, 4:16 PM 

MOOSE, Wyo. -- Grand Teton National Park rangers rescued two injured backpackers who slipped and fell through an opening in a snowfield during a holiday trek.
They were part of a family hiking down Teton Crest Trail west of 13,770-foot Grand Teton on Sunday.
Will Behrens, 78, of Windsor, Calif., suffered a head injury, and David Behrens, 50, of Idaho Falls, Idaho, injured a knee when they fell through the gap while descending a portion of Cascade Canyon below Hurricane Pass, officials said.
David Behrens' son, 16, was the first to fall, suffering facial injuries and losing several teeth. He fell into running water underneath the snow.
While attempting to help his son, David Behrens fell through the same opening. Will Behrens tried to move to a safer area, but he, too, slipped on the icy slope, dropping into the same hole.
The three managed to get out, set up their tent and put on dry clothes. The boy then hiked out and reached help on a cell phone.
Dodging thunderstorms, rescuers flew in six rangers by helicopter to provide initial care. The hikers were transported to a Jackson hospital.

http://166.70.44.66/2004/Jul/07062004/utah/181350.asp


    
This message has been edited by dipper on Jul 6, 2004 4:16 PM


 
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4 Fatalities on Monte Rosa Massif

July 10 2004, 4:25 PM 

The bodies of the four French climbers who died on the Valdostan side of the Monte Rosa Massif have been recovered. The four bodies have been airlifted by the Valdostan national rescue service to the city morgue of Champoluc. At around six this morning, the helicopter was able to take off because the weather had cleared making it possible to recover the four victims' bodies. The climbers were found near Castore Mountain (4,225 m) between D'Ayas Valley and Gressoney Valley. It seems from the first inquiries, that they fell from the top of the Castore Mountain, slipping down its side. The tragedy took place yesterday. The four, together with two other French climbers were all well-equipped experts; the two survivors, a man and a woman, were brought to Aosta's regional hospital, are in "very serious conditions",
http://www.agi.it/english/news.pl?doc=200407091114-1024-RT1-CRO-0-NF11&page=0&id=agionline-eng.oggitalia

 
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Outward Bound Group Carries Injured Woman 5 Miles in Maine

July 15 2004, 4:13 PM 

A Florida woman is expected to be released from the hospital Thursday, after recovering from an illness that struck while she was hiking on the Appalachian Trail in northern Maine.
Sara Rahaim of Jacksonville became so ill Tuesday she couldn't walk without help. Seven other hikers, who included Outward Bound students and their instructor, carried Rahaim over five miles on their shoulders to a vehicle owned by the outdoors group.
The 63-year-old woman was taken to Charles Dean Memorial Hospital in Greenville and later transferred to Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor.
Rahaim had been hiking on the trail in a remote area west of Millinocket with a friend when she got sick.
Medical officials say Rahaim suffered from bleeding in her stomach caused by medicines she was taking for neck pains.
http://www.wmtw.com/Global/story.asp?S=2043172

 
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Climbing Shoes Placed on Mules to Facilitate Yosemite Rescue

July 15 2004, 4:20 PM 

Yosemite National Park (CA)
Rescue of Pack Mules

A park concession mule train supplying the Merced Lake High Sierra Camp wrecked on the Bunnell switchbacks in the Merced River Canyon around noon on July 9th. Four loaded mules, strung together by rope, tumbled and slid for approximately 200 feet across low-angle granite slabs below the trail and came to rest upon a granite bench. The animals sustained only slight injuries in their fall. An NPS trail crew working nearby responded and assisted in stabilizing the mules and assessing the situation. The trail crew members decided that more resources and equipment were needed to safely extricate the animals from where they were now stuck. The concession stables foreman, the park trails branch supervisor, and two SAR team members were flown to the scene in the park’s contract helicopter. The mules’ metal shoes were covered with tape to simulate “sticky rubber” climbing shoes. A rope system was set up to “belay” the mules as they made their way back across the slick rock and up to the trail. Three of four mules danced, high-stepped, and stumbled as they were lead across the slabs back to safety. One mule, weighing about a thousand pounds, slipped and rolled, but was caught by the rope team. She was able to right herself and safely continue. When all four mules were back on the trail, they were repacked and continued up the trail to the camp.[Submitted by Jason Gayeski-Peters, SAR Team] http://data2.itc.nps.gov/morningreport/morningreportold.cfm?date=07%2F13%2F2004

 
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Rescue on Greylock's Mount Prospect Trail

July 15 2004, 5:18 PM 

WILLIAMSTOWN -- An injured Brookline man spent about six hours in a remote, rugged area near the Mount Prospect Trail on Saturday as town and state emergency workers worked urgently to bring him to safety.
The rescue of 49-year-old Frederick Lawrence forced rescuers to hike about three miles in and out of extremely rugged mountain landscapes to reach Lawrence and carry him to a waiting ambulance. Two emergency responders were injured during their rescue efforts.
Town police Sgt. Scott McGowan said that Lawrence used a cellular telephone to alert police that he had slipped while walking and seriously injured his ankle. Lawrence reported the accident at 4 p.m., and police immediately assembled a rescue team. Town officers, Massachusetts Environmental Police, and emergency medical technicians with the Village Ambulance Service were assisted by a Massachusetts State Police helicopter during the initial rescue attempt.
According to McGowan, first reports indicated that that Lawrence was in an area accessible by all-terrain vehicles, and ATVs loaded with rescue gear were sent up the trail. But about 20 minutes into the trek, McGowan said he was notified by radio that the area was very treacherous and just a few minutes after that, one ATV plunged over a 10-foot embankment. The crash left EMT John Meaney of Village Ambulance with a shoulder injury and town police Officer Michael Ziemba with bruises and lacerations. Meaney was taken from the scene and brought to North Adams Regional Hospital; Ziemba continued to work with rescuers and was examined at the hospital after the rescue was completed, McGowan said.
Officials at the scene realized that the rescue would have to be accomplished on foot, and a 21-member rescue team was sent up the mountain. Team members included town and state police officers, EMTs, members of the Berkshire County Search and Rescue agency, state park rangers, state environmental police officers, and members of the Pownal, Vt., fire department.
"This was real dangerous at times," McGowan said, and noted that the rescuers hauled an emergency rescue basket, rope, medical stabilizing equipment, communication radios and portable lights as they made their way to Lawrence.
http://www.thetranscript.com/Stories/0,1413,103~9049~2267819,00.html

 
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63 Airlifted After Being Stranded for Six Days Following Taiwan Tropical Storm

July 15 2004, 5:19 PM 

Sixty-three college student hikers trapped on mountains as Tropical Storm Mindulle swept the nation were rescued by helicopter yesterday. All were recovered and no one was seriously hurt.
The Sea Gull Helicopter Rescue Team in Chiayi County yesterday morning flew into mountain areas in Nantou County to transport the marooned students to a medical station set up at a local stadium.
Most of the students had been trapped in the mountains for at least six days.
Seven students were from Chengchi University, six from National Taiwan Ocean University, eight from Tamkang University and 16 from National Chungshing University.
After alighting from the helicopter at the stadium, several students, some crying, called their parents to tell them they were fine. Others hugged friends and family who had been waiting for them.
The rescued students were tired, some badly bitten by mosquitoes. One student had suffered minor abrasions.
Students from National Taiwan Ocean University told reporters that because of the heavy rain, landslides and falling rocks, they had chosen to shelter in huts and wait for rescue.
http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2004/07/08/2003178112

 
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Newspaper Editor Fatality in Bid to Plant Birthday Champagne Bottle on Scottish Peak

July 15 2004, 5:20 PM 

CLIMBER died in Glencoe while trying to climb to the top of Buachaille Etive Mhor to leave a surprise bottle of champagne for a friend.
Trevor Walls, 51, editor of The Glaswegian weekly newspaper, slipped and fell while climbing on Friday.
His body was found in East Gully by members of Glencoe mountain rescue team, who found the bottle smashed inside Mr Walls's rucksack.
Last night his mother Jean, 71, said Mr Walls had wanted to leave a bottle of champagne at the summit in celebration of the 50th birthday of a friend, who had been due to climb the mountain later that day.
He had played a leading role in the Daily Record mountain club and members continued with their weekend plans to climb the mountain where he died in his honour.
A club spokesman said: "It was a very emotional day, but we felt it was the right thing to do, and it is what Trevor would have wanted."
Mrs Walls said her son, former supplements editor at the Daily Record, had died doing the thing he loved. "Just two weeks ago, we talked about the risks of his climbing. He said to me 'If I go off a hill, then I'll go happy'. He loved the hills, and we are getting comfort from the fact he died doing something that meant so much to him."
Mr Walls had climbed on Buachaille Etive Mhor several times. Friends and family plan to scatter his ashes on the mountain.
His father John, 75, of Monymusk, Aberdeenshire, said last night: "Trevor always wanted to make people happy and we weren't surprised when we heard what he was doing on the mountain."
Mr Walls's wife Lindsey and Peter, his 15-year-old son, are due to visit the spot where he died later today. "He was a great dad and just adored Peter," added Mrs Walls.
A CLIMBER died in Glencoe while trying to climb to the top of Buachaille Etive Mhor to leave a surprise bottle of champagne for a friend.
Trevor Walls, 51, editor of The Glaswegian weekly newspaper, slipped and fell while climbing on Friday.
His body was found in East Gully by members of Glencoe mountain rescue team, who found the bottle smashed inside Mr Walls's rucksack.
Last night his mother Jean, 71, said Mr Walls had wanted to leave a bottle of champagne at the summit in celebration of the 50th birthday of a friend, who had been due to climb the mountain later that day.
He had played a leading role in the Daily Record mountain club and members continued with their weekend plans to climb the mountain where he died in his honour.
A club spokesman said: "It was a very emotional day, but we felt it was the right thing to do, and it is what Trevor would have wanted."
http://www.theherald.co.uk/news/19827.html

 
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Man Eats Birds and Insects and Drinks Uring to Survive Lost in Arizona Desert

July 20 2004, 12:52 PM 


Tolleson man who was lost in the desert for 36 hours is now recovering from an ordeal that forced him to eat birds and insects to survive.

Ruben Jimenez, 28, was reported missing by his sister Thursday night when he failed to come back from a morning hike in the southwest Valley.

After hours of walking in the desert with only a jug of water, some soda and crackers, Jimenez made his way to a home near 115th and Southern avenues Friday night.

Jimenez was dehydrated and disoriented when he was found and is now recovering at home. He suffered several cuts.

"It's unbelievable, but I made it and I'm alive," he said Saturday from his home. "I was thinking I was going to die, but I'm OK."

Jimenez decided to go out for one last trek with his three dogs before moving to New Mexico. His wife and two small children were already in the state, but flew back Friday.

After six hours of walking, Jimenez tried to take a shortcut and got lost. He said he panicked about 7 p.m. when he ran out of water. To survive the high temperatures, he drank from dirty puddles left behind from the recent monsoon storm and his own urine, he said. He also ate birds and insects.

"At one point, I said, 'That's it, God, take me. I want to die.' "

As for the dogs, one returned Thursday; the others are missing.

It was difficult for the helicopters to find Jimenez once he followed the river because of the dense salt cedar brush, said Sgt. Paul Chagolla of the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office.

But eventually, Jimenez found help several miles from the search-and-rescue command post, he said.

"The only reason this individual survived is that he's physically fit," Chagolla said.

http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/0718hikerfollowup18.html

 
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Fatality on Gros Morne in Newfoundland

July 21 2004, 10:03 PM 

Searchers have recovered the body of a hiker who died on a mountain in Gros Morne National Park.
The body of Stephen Latte, 54, of Ottawa, was spotted by helicopter on Monday about halfway down Gros Morne Mountain, but ground crews were unable to reach it due to the steep slope.
An attempt to retrieve the body with the helicopter was made Tuesday, but park warden Peter Deering said the weather closed in quickly and the recovery effort was called off until conditions improve.
The weather cleared on Wednesday morning, allowing searchers to reach the area.
RCMP Sgt. Paul Collins said the body was taken to a hospital in Corner Brook for an autopsy.
Latte was reported missing Sunday evening
http://www.canada.com/ottawa/ottawacitizen/news/story.html?id=03500c69-e944-4232-8556-2eb11db32da2

 
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Fatality in Solo Attempt of North Ridge of Grand Teton

July 21 2004, 10:06 PM 

Piecing together clues, from an alarm clock to a backpack, rescuers found and retrieved Tuesday the body of a climber who fell as much as 1,000 feet while attempting the Grand Traverse.
Grand Teton National Park rangers recovered the body of Dwight Bishop, of Butte, Mont., Tuesday evening after a two-day search, which involved more than 50 rangers and volunteers combing 13 miles of ridge line and 11 peaks in the park. Rangers believe he slipped while climbing the North Ridge of the Grand, a climb rated at 5.8 on the Yosemite Decimal System, without a rope and fell to the bottom of the Grandstand, the 13,770-foot peak’s north sholder.
Bishop had told a friend that he would attempt a solo, one-day traverse Friday of the technical route between Teewinot Mountain and Nez Perce called the Grand Traverse. The coveted route involves climbing the major peaks in the center of the range and involves climbing the north side of the Grand.
On Monday morning, three days after his planned departure, Bishop’s friend and climbing partner, Fred Donich, reported the 49-year-old climber overdue.
Park rangers quickly located Bishop’s car at Lupine Meadows Trailhead. Inside, they discovered a pair of crampons, a cell phone and an alarm clock set for 2 a.m. Rangers also had learned that Bishop had spoken with his mother Thursday.
All clues pointed to a predawn departure Friday for the Grand Traverse, said Andy Fisher, the park’s chief ranger.
Rangers then dispatched a contract helicopter to fly the route, as soon as weather permitted, to look for tracks in the snow and search the most likely areas Bishop might be found. Three teams, including park and Bridger Teton National Forest employees, searched on the ground until dark.
Rangers also hung posters with a picture and description of Bishop to see if other climbers had seen him. At 5-foot-7-inches and 145 pounds, Bishop was fit. He also was an experienced climber, who had completed the Grand Traverse at least once before, park officials said.
At 6 a.m., Tuesday, park rangers more than doubled the rescue effort with 50 searchers, including Teton County Search and Rescue volunteers and five teams of search dogs. A second helicopter from Yellowstone National Park also assisted. Another 20 workers coordinated the search from the ground.
Teams fanned out across various segments of the Grand Traverse, working in technical and dangerous terrain, to find Bishop.
Searchers got a break when two climbers in Valhalla Canyon on the west side of the Grand Teton discovered Bishop’s backpack. The two climbers had encountered searchers earlier in the day and knew rangers were looking for Bishop. The climbers opened the pack and found notes on the Grand Traverse, Anzelmo said.
The climbers then ran into two park rangers searching for Bishop in Valhalla Canyon and showed them the pack, Anzelmo said. The rangers called in a helicopter, which spotted Bishop’s body at 6:20 p.m. while en route to meet the rangers, Anzelmo said.
The pack was about 50 feet from Bishop, who was found at 11,000 feet. Bishop had successfully climbed Teewinot and Mount Owen and was between Mount Owen and the Grand Teton when he fell, Anzelmo said.
“We will never know for sure, but it is likely that he fell as much as a 1,000 feet,” Anzelmo said. Searchers found no rope in Bishop’s pack or on his body.


http://www.jhzone.com/viewinfo.cfm?ObjectID=459EB81A-BDD6-4C7D-B66BF9875D01761B

 
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85 Year Old Glacier Climbing Author Perishes on Divide Mountain

July 21 2004, 10:15 PM 


 
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Climbing Fatality at Black Cliffs, Idaho

July 23 2004, 11:31 PM 

A rock climbing accident claims the life of a Boise woman east of Boise at a spot popular with rock climbers.
The Ada County Sheriff's Department says a man, his 27-year old wife, and seven year old daughter were climbing the Black Cliffs in Ada County when the wife got hit by a falling rock.
Undersheriff Gary Raney says as the man was climbing, and as he pulled himself up, a rock came loose, fell and hit his wife on the head around 6:30 Thursday night.
She then fell.
Deputy Steve Russell says life saving measures were taken, but to no avail.
The exact cause of death has yet to be determined.
Deputy Russell says people getting hurt at the base of climbing areas isn't uncommon.
"Usually, most of the calls that we get--it's not the climbers that get injured, it's the people that are spectating, either getting hit by loose rocks and debris that fall from the mountain," he says.
http://www.kbcitv.com/x5154.xml?ParentPageID=x5157&ContentID=x55958&Layout=KBCI.xsl&AdGroupID=x5154

 
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300 Foot Fall On Hood South Climbing Route

July 24 2004, 8:45 AM 

It took most of the day Friday to rescue a 20-year-old man who had fallen about 300 feet during his descent of Mount Hood.
Zach Usadi-Henrickson was descending the mountain on the well-used south climbing route at about 10,500 feet with two climbing partners when he fell, said Sgt. Nick Watt of the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office.
"We heard him yelling, and we saw him sliding over the rocks," said Robert Chambers, 45, of Doylestown, Pa., who was descending the mountain with his brother. "There were a lot of rocks . . . and that hurts."
Chambers said he watched as Usadi-Henrickson was able to use an ice ax to stop his slide. He came to rest at the base of Crater Rock, about 200 feet west of the Hogsback, and was suffering from leg lacerations and possible back and neck injuries, officials said. He was taken to Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center in Gresham for treatment.
Steve Rollins of Portland Mountain Rescue was in the Timberline Lodge parking lot when Usadi-Henrickson fell. He was the first to reach the fallen climber.
Watt said that Usadi-Henrickson was climbing with two other men and that none of them had signed the climbing register at the Timberline Day Lodge before beginning their ascent of the 11,240-foot mountain.
Jeff Jaqua of the U.S. Forest Service said that signing the climbing registry is voluntary but that filling out a wilderness permit when heading into the Mount Hood Wilderness is mandatory. He said that it appears the men did not get the required permit and that they could face a fine as a result.
http://www.oregonlive.com/metroeast/oregonian/index.ssf?/base/metro_east_news/1090671256144450.xml

 
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Homicide Suspected in Joshua Tree Hiking Fatality

July 25 2004, 11:59 PM 

Helicopter crews looking for lost hiker Eric Sears likely searched the same rugged stretch of Joshua Tree National Park where volunteers later found a body presumed to be that of the missing 17-year-old Carlsbad youth, a park official said Saturday.
Even after the grisly discovery Friday near the Twin Tanks backcountry trailhead, helicopter crews still had trouble finding the searchers and the body in the harsh landscape of towering boulders and thick brush, Supervising Park Ranger Cindy Von Halle said by phone.
She explained that most of the park's earlier searches for Sears had targeted the Jumbo Rocks area, about 2 ½ miles from the Twin Tanks region. Sears' longtime friend, Ben Fogelstrom, also 17, had told another camper on July 15 that he and Sears had become separated during a hike.
"The campground itself is so rocky, we spent a lot of time looking in crevices and holes," said Von Halle, adding that it is not uncommon for rangers to find lost hikers in the fissures around Jumbo Rocks. "We thought he had fallen into a crack or crevice, so that's where we focused our search."
The decomposed body, believed to be that of a white male in his late teens to early 30s, will not be positively identified until after an autopsy, scheduled for Monday at the Riverside County Coroner's Office in Perris, according to Riverside County sheriff's officials.
Investigators probed the site of the body's discovery from 3 until 10 p.m. Friday, sheriff's spokesman Cpl. Dennis Gutierrez said.
On Monday, homicide investigators launched a criminal investigation into Sears' disappearance after receiving reports from park visitors of possible foul play. Three days later, detectives served a search warrant at Fogelstrom's house, removing unspecified evidence. At the time, authorities called Fogelstrom a focus of the investigation, but said he has not been arrested and is not considered a suspect.
A relative at the Fogelstrom's Carlsbad home declined to comment Saturday.
Jordan Ahle, a close friend of Sears', said Saturday that he had heard that Fogelstrom "is hurting really bad from this. He really wanted Eric to come home."
The Sears family could not be located for comment Saturday.
Will Despathy, 70, of Indio was among the team of 14 volunteer searchers - many of whom were Sears family friends - that found the body Friday. The group was led by Carlsbad firefighter and Sears family friend Mark Berklite.
http://www.pe.com/localnews/inland/stories/PE_News_Local_sears25.a0ed7.html




 
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Helicopter Rescue Offtrail in Avalanche Canyon in Grand Teton

July 27 2004, 7:28 PM 

Rangers rescued a stranded hiker from a steep, 200-foot canyon wall in Grand Teton National Park.

Oren Lambert, 19, of Shorewood, Wis., and Chelsea Caldwell, 20, of Liberty, Mo., were hiking off trail in lower Avalanche Canyon on Saturday when they decided to climb up a wall, according to Jackie Skaggs, park spokeswoman. Both are working in the park this summer.

Lambert became stuck on the steep rock face and was unable to either ascend or descend safely, Skaggs said.


Caldwell called rangers on a cell phone at 3:30 p.m.

A helicopter dropped four rangers off about 4:25 p.m. at the nearest possible landing zone. They hiked down the canyon and then climbed to just above where Lambert was stuck and rappelled down to him, Skaggs said.

Rangers then lowered Lambert 100 feet into a nearby gully, where he could walk out safely. Rangers escorted Lambert and Caldwell out of the canyon, reaching the trailhead at 10:30 p.m.

It was the seventh major search and rescue effort in the park this year.
http://www.billingsgazette.com/index.php?id=1&display=rednews/2004/07/25/build/wyoming/28-canyonrescue.inc

 
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Woman Without Helmet Climbing Fatality in Yoho National Park in Canada

July 27 2004, 7:31 PM 

A 40-year-old Quebec woman is dead following a climbing accident near Lake O'Hara in Yoho National Park.
Wardens say the incident happened around 7:30 p.m. Sunday.
The woman and her climbing partner were on a steep slope below the Abbot Pass hut when a football-sized rock bounced down the escarpment and hit the victim in the head.
A helicopter later took her directly to the coroner's office in Golden.
Wardens say the woman was not wearing a helmet.
http://calgary.cbc.ca/regional/servlet/View?filename=0726climbing_deathJuly262004

 
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Fatality in Stevens Canyon in Mount Rainier National Park

July 27 2004, 7:32 PM 

Searchers have spotted the body of a missing kayaker from the Portland area in Mount Rainier National Park, officials said.


Now, rangers are working to recover the body from the remote location in the river near Sylvia Falls.


The man, whose name has not been released, was reported overdue Monday by his wife. She said he left Portland on Saturday with plans to hike and kayak on some trails and rivers on Mount Rainier, according to park spokeswoman Lee Taylor.


The man's pickup truck was found Monday, with his kayak and bike missing.


His red kayak was found later that day, on a sandbar in Stevens Canyon near Sylvia Falls.


Taylor said searchers also found the kayaker's paddle nearby.


Teams zeroed in on that area and Tuesday morning, rangers found the body in the river near where the man's kayak and paddle turned up.

http://www.kgw.com/news-local/stories/kgw_072704_news_dead_kayaker.1b6a0354.html

 
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