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Stachytarpheta

November 12 2009 at 6:10 PM
  (Login Naturelover68)
Hummingbird lover 2009

I'm interested in growing Stachytarpheta next year. Which species is most attractive to hummingbirds?

Gary
Napoleon, OH
USDA Zone 5b

 
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Susan
(Login hummingbird_crazy_aka_Susan)
Hummingbird lover 2009

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 12 2009, 6:19 PM 

Good question, Gary. I toyed with the idea last spring, but didn't buy any plants because I wasn't convinced they would attract hummers.

In older threads I found these mentioned:
-Stachytarpheta Coral Vervain Porterweed
-Stachytarpheta franzii
-red Vervain

What about Stachystarpheta jamaicensis Dwarf Red? I came across someone saying not much hummer action at this variety.

Thanks.

Susan
zone 6a South St. Louis County, MO

 
 
What is "Your Name?"
(Login Priya_S)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 12 2009, 7:52 PM 

I'm not sure of the exact botanical names, but the most popular ones were the pink and purple stachytarphetas I got from Bustani and Almost Eden. The dwarf red did not get a lot of attention, nor did the blue. They are all very pretty though and will find a place on my list next year.
The hummers really go wild for these plants.

Priya
Zone 7, Maryland

 
 


(Login Pennytoo)
Hummingbird Moderator 2005

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 12 2009, 8:33 PM 

I had Stachystarpheta jamaicensis Deep Blue and it was gorgeous! I did see some use on it while it was still in a pot but once I planted it in the ground it was partially hidden from my view by a Black & Blue and an Agastache so I don't know how much use it had after that. I have 18 growing from seed right now. Not sure what colors they will be as they are from mixed seed.

Penny
Niagara Falls, NY
USDA zone 6a/6b
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
[linked image]

 
 

(Login costaricafinca)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 13 2009, 8:31 AM 

As most know, the Stachytarpheta franzii is by far my most favorite plant, as it is for all the hummers. Even with the Ruby-throated hummers that are presently here. They totally ignore all the lovely salvias I have. One of the females is now using the White shrimp plants, but other than that, it is definitely the Stachytarpheta franzii. Now most of my plants are full and about 10ft' in diameter, so offer plentiful blooms to choose from. A striped-headed sparrow has made a nest in one.
We have the S. jamaicensis which offers fewer blooms and grows wild throughout the farm, and it get an occasional visit. The coral flowered species also attracts attention. I found a small lilac flowered one a few days ago and have transplanted it nearer the house but I think this will appeal more to butterflies.
This morning at 6am, when we went outside to have our coffee outside, the hummers were there before us.


    
This message has been edited by costaricafinca on Nov 13, 2009 8:43 AM


 
 


(Login BudOhio)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 13 2009, 11:40 AM 

Gary,

We had Stachytarpheta jamaicensis - purple, and Stachytarpheta mutabilis - a really deep salmon-pink color, and both were in bloom and visited regularly throughout the summer with the peak bloomtime being August / September. I ordered these through Bustani in the spring. They performed equally well in containers and in the ground. I look forward to trying frantzii next year based on Patricia's comments, and I'll order them from Almost Eden Plants. http://www.almostedenplants.com/shopping/shopexd.asp?id=578

I found the dwarf varieties available locally and neither the red or purple were very good hummer plants here. The blooms are very small.

Also, if you've never visited Bench Farms in Curtice, Ohio, you owe it your hummingbird garden to pay them a visit when they open in April. Every year, they offer anywhere between 50-60 species of salvias and several other great hummingbird plants / vines at very reasonable prices. I try to make an annual pilgrimage up there by the second week in April and I always find it to be well worth the four hour drive. http://www.benchfarms.com/index_files/Page2425.html


Stachytarpheta jamaicensis
[linked image]

Stachytarpheta mutabilis
[linked image]

Bud
Southwest Ohio
USDA Plant Zone 6a
[linked image]
Camera: Pentax K20D
Lens: Pentax DA*300 f/4, Sigma 180 f/3.5 Macro
There's 1 or 2 more hummingbird / butterfly pics located here... [linked image]
http://www.pbase.com/budohio

 
 


(Login Pennytoo)
Hummingbird Moderator 2005

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 13 2009, 12:31 PM 

Bud those plants are really beautiful! One of these days I am going to try and get to Bench Farms.

Penny
Niagara Falls, NY
USDA zone 6a/6b
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
[linked image]

 
 

(Login hawkeye_wx)
Hummingbird lover 2009

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 13 2009, 12:49 PM 

I will have to consider this plant next year. I have a lot of flowers picked out for my upgraded hummer garden, but the one color notably absent is purple, and I really like purple. Has anyone tried growing purple stachytarpheta jamaicensis from seed. How did it turn out?

Dan
Zone 5a
East-central Iowa


    
This message has been edited by hawkeye_wx on Nov 13, 2009 2:10 PM


 
 

(Login costaricafinca)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 13 2009, 1:14 PM 

According to my plant book, what you have are S.frantzii, the same as I have. The S. jamaicensis is a 'more weedy' counterpart, and has a much slimmer/darker stalk.
The colors vary with the time of day. In the early morning the S. frantzii is almost magenta.

Small bloom is S. jamaicensis
[linked image]

S. jamaicensis is on the right. There is a max of 3 tiny blooms on this species, while the S. frantzii has about 6 at once.

[linked image]

 
 

(Login costaricafinca)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 13 2009, 4:18 PM 

Dan, here many consider Stachystarpheta jamaicensis a weed! Not by me of course, although it is spread round the pastures, and since it 'pops up everywhere, I think this particular species will grow fine from seed. It is around some of the fence lines, but not 'planted...'
The Stachystarpheta frantzii, doesn't seem to pop up' at all. But today, I noticed a coral one has appeared in my compost pile. The other one that was in my garden perished, last year, and the nearest one is a good distance away, probably the equivalent of a street block.

This is a Plain-capped starthroat feeding at one.
[linked image]

 
 

(Login Naturelover68)
Hummingbird lover 2009

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 13 2009, 7:36 PM 

Thanks for the great information, everyone. I'm now planning on growing franzii, mutabilis and jamaicensis next year. If the hummers here like them, I'll plan on growing them every year. I've also read that butterflies like them so that would be an added bonus.

Bud,
I can't believe I've never heard about Bench Farms. They are only 1 hr and 20 minutes away from me. I'm definitely going to have to go there next spring. I better start saving my money now. They have a lot of salvias that I've been wanting to grow.

Gary
Napoleon, OH
USDA Zone 5b

 
 


(Login Pennytoo)
Hummingbird Moderator 2005

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 14 2009, 10:26 AM 

Gary
Bud has been singing the praises of Bench Farm for a few years now and if we ever decide to make another family trip to Cedar Point it will definitely be on my list of places to hit. Bud has gotten some fantiastic plants there that I have only been able to get online.
I sure wish they would accept online orders.
Penny
Niagara Falls, NY
USDA zone 6a/6b
Heat zone 4
Sunset zone 39
[linked image]


    
This message has been edited by Pennytoo on Nov 14, 2009 10:27 AM


 
 


(Login BudOhio)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 14 2009, 12:30 PM 

Gary & Penny - Bench Farms is a very unassuming little nursery that sits right on Rte 2 in Curtice. I drove right by it for years before it was recommended to me by someone locally who makes annual stops when they're in that area for spring migratory bird-watching. The first time I stopped in there 3 or 4 years ago, I was on a business trip and I made the mistake of stopping in the day before my customer appointment. The customer had to drive when we went to lunch, because my trunk, backseat and passenger seat were loaded with plants... wink.gif At that time, the average price on the salvias was around $5 for a 4 inch container... most of the plants had blooms.. I went a little crazy wink.gif

Penny, sometimes I do feel like a promotional representative for Bench Farms wink.gif But, honestly, I have never seen a a nursery in Ohio with the selection of salvias they grow. I didn't make it up there this past spring, but the previous year they also had several cupheas (including David Verity), phygellius, agastache and shrimp plants that I have never seen locally any place else. It definitely satisfies my "kid in a candy store" hummingbird plant needs happy.gif

Patricia - interesting... mine does look frantzii, doesn't it? It seems to me that it starts out with just a few blooms like jamaicensis, and then by August / September has really large bloom clusters. I sent an e-mail to Bustani to see if they can offer some insight or clarification... stay tuned.

Bud
Southwest Ohio
USDA Plant Zone 6a
[linked image]
Camera: Pentax K20D
Lens: Pentax DA*300 f/4, Sigma 180 f/3.5 Macro
There's 1 or 2 more hummingbird / butterfly pics located here... [linked image]
http://www.pbase.com/budohio

 
 

(Login Naturelover68)
Hummingbird lover 2009

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 14 2009, 1:49 PM 

Bench Farms sounds amazing. I better make sure I take something to cover the back seat in my car because I'm sure I won't be able to fit everything I buy in the trunk. I'll be like a kid in a candy store, too.

Gary
Napoleon, OH
USDA Zone 5b

 
 

(Login Naturelover68)
Hummingbird lover 2009

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 28 2009, 1:56 PM 

I ordered and just received franzii, jamaicensis and mutabilis and I want to start proagating them. Do they root easier in soil or in water?

Gary
Napoleon, OH
USDA Zone 5b

 
 

(Login costaricafinca)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 28 2009, 6:02 PM 

I have only ever started mine in soil. I usually use a a piece about "-1" round, or larger, though. At the moment in my 'vivero' I have about 30 'planted' and they are now showing new leaves.
The S. mutabilis (coral species) seems to take longer and is much slower grower altogether.

[linked image]

Why I am starting more, I don't know, but I hate to prune and 'throw potential plants' away. Probably my Scottish blood [linked image]

 
 

(Login Naturelover68)
Hummingbird lover 2009

Re: Stachytarpheta

November 29 2009, 3:54 PM 

Patricia,
Thanks for the information. I took cuttings today of all 3 species and put them in soil. They are a lot smaller than your cuttings, though, so I hope they root.

Gary
Napoleon, OH
USDA Zone 5b

 
 
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