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Margie Griffith Salvia

October 6 2013 at 1:21 AM
  (Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Nancy - The little salvia start you sent me earlier this year is now quite tall and has bloom spikes all over it. The first blooms opened today. BEAUTIFUL!!!! Thanks so much for sharing this plant with me! I am watching to see if the hummers agree!

The first blooms:

[linked image]

And another bud spike getting ready to also bloom:

[linked image]

~Becky~

[linked image]


    
This message has been edited by beckygardener on Oct 6, 2013 9:07 AM
This message has been edited by beckygardener on Oct 6, 2013 1:21 AM


 
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(Login kathirock)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 6 2013, 2:22 AM 

Interesting Salvia Becky. The flowers look a little like Salvia atrocyanea and the leaves look like Salvia 'Phyllis Fancy."

Please let us know if the hummers use it or not.

[linked image]
[linked image]

Michael and Kathi Rock
Madison, WI
Zone 5

[linked image]

 
 

(Login humband1)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 6 2013, 6:52 AM 

Becky,

First flowers on mine are not open yet and the migrants are giving it a good going over to check for flowers. I have 2 plants side by side in the backyard. One is Salvia 'Margie Griffith' and the other is a seedling from the first. Both are nearly 10 feet tall and wide! They will be spectacular in a couple of weeks.

Kathi,

Salvia 'Margie Griffith' is an F2 hybrid of a Salvia mexicana x Salvia involucrata crossed back to Salvia mexicana. It was developed by a friend and is not commercially available. I have 2 other Salvia mexicana cultivars, both of which are in bud, but this one is the only Salvia mexicana I need. It won't do anyone any good north of zone 8 since it is a fall flowering plant.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
USDA Zone 9b
http://www.casacolibri.net/
[linked image]

 
 

(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 6 2013, 9:52 AM 

Kathi - This is my first experience with this hybrid. It gets nice and tall and seems to produce a number of branches. Not so thick as to develop fungus issues, so I like it's growth habit.

Nancy - Has the hybrid from the original ever bloomed for you? If so, what color are the flowers? This is definitely a southern salvia for the bloom time. I am very happy with it because it is surviving and thriving in my garden. I have lost a number of salvia plants this year because of the soil and probably bad nematodes. I am happy with any salvia that can survive despite the odds! [linked image]

Here is a photo of the garden bed that Margie Griffith is in. Because of her height, I put her in the back. You can see that Phyllis's Fancy and Amistad look pretty pathetic. I am waiting to see if they are going to die completely or make a comeback. Salvia oxyphora looks great! Makes a very nice, lush bush. Can't wait to see blooms for the first time!

[linked image]

~Becky~

[linked image]

 
 

(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 6 2013, 10:59 AM 

Behind Phyllis's Fancy in the above photos is Lavender Lace Saliva. It is another one that seems to be thriving in my yard. And it is stunning when in bloom. Phyllis's Fancy is nothing but stems now, very few leaves. Amistad is looking about the same way. I think both plants are on their way out. Will have to grow them in containers next time, should I try them again.

Another salvia that has done really well, is Salvia miniata. I have this growing in 2 places in my backyard. It always has some blooms on it. It is also a semi-shade loving plant. Which works out good because I have quite a bit of shade in the garden beds along the back fence. I do need to put another taller plant behind it to hide the fence. Not sure which plant though ...

Salvia miniata:

[linked image]

~Becky~

[linked image]

 
 

(Login humband1)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 6 2013, 7:02 PM 

Becky asked: " . . . Has the hybrid from the original ever bloomed for you? If so, what color are the flowers? . . . "

The original hybrid was a volunteer in my friend's garden. She called it Salvia 'Raven'. It is a lovely dark blue, somewhat like 'Margie Griffith', but that plant did not get so large. Like the pink parent, Salvia involucrata, the blooms formed in dense clusters [involucres]. It never lasted more than a year or two here and I do not currently have it.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
USDA Zone 9b
http://www.casacolibri.net/
[linked image]

 
 

(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 6 2013, 10:12 PM 

Nancy - How long have you had your current Margie Griffith? And the one next to it, is it a duplicate of Margie Griffith or is it from seed and not exactly the same?

~Becky~

[linked image]

 
 

(Login tbyrnes)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 6 2013, 10:41 PM 

Here's a picture of Margie the last time she was in bloom.

photo 253c2bec-a62b-4c2b-992c-6a3c5070e095_zps5f59f79b.jpg

She's a big beauty. I have her in another place and she is starting to bloom in both places now.

Clermont.gif

 
 

(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 6 2013, 10:55 PM 

Tom - Oh my goodness!!!! That is a gorgeous plant! I hope mine eventually looks like that! WOW! Talk about "blooming impact"! I am genuinely IMPRESSED!!!! Does it get a lot of hummer use? (I hope!)

~Becky~

[linked image]

 
 


(Login kathirock)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 7 2013, 1:19 AM 

Wow, Tom, that is quite a sight!! In the north, we could only dream about something like that. [linked image]

Nancy, thanks for the detail on this plant but don't even think that I want any more salvias. We already have too many, more than the hummers (the few that we have) will ever use, and some are not yet blooming. As much as I love salvias, it is way too challenging to try and grow unusual ones in a rotten climate with such a short growing season (although we can can grow cuphea very well.) Salvias always grow well, but blooming can be another story. Amistad did both, but only received attention from hummers at the very end of the season.

I know it will be difficult for you or anyone else to believe, but we have successfully grown both Salvia involucrata and Salvia mexicana in our yard and have had hummers at both. Although the photos are not at the level of others on The Forum, here are links to prove it:

https://mywebspace.wisc.edu/mjrock/web/mexicana.htm
https://mywebspace.wisc.edu/mjrock/web/rosebudsage.htm

A few of the other interesting and more unusual salvias we have grown this year with much success include:

-Salvia macrophylla 'Big Swing' (a HUGE hit with our hummers this season!)
-Salvia atrocyanea
-Salvia 'Phyllis Fancy'
-Salvia urica
-Salvia oxyphora
-Salvia 'Mulberry Jam' (another HUGE hit with our hummers this season---great plant!)

Of course, we have all of the standard salvias---guarantica, greggii, miniata, coccinea, microphylla, darcyii.

Now that the hummers are pretty much gone, we are DONE with gardening until next spring. We envy those of you who can garden year-round, but that will never be us in the Upper Midwest. I'm still trying to think of something positive to say about what we can grow here.

Enjoy your winter gardening and hummers everyone and thank you for all of your kind support this year.



[linked image]
[linked image]

Michael and Kathi Rock
Madison, WI
Zone 5

[linked image]

 
 

(Login tbyrnes)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 7 2013, 6:29 AM 

The "Margies" are in places that are difficult for me to see, Becky, so I don't really know how many visits they received. I know they got some.

Kathy, you still have a few hummers, no? If not, I hope you can enjoy the rest that fall and winter bring in Wisconsin. I'm sure the leaves are beautiful now, no?

I'm pretty laid up now with back problems. I had a friend hack though a path in my back yard yesterday. The hamelia patens are now at least ten feet high and some reach 15 feet. The hummers really like them.

Clermont.gif

 
 

(Login RichDufresne)
Hummingbird lover 2013

Salvia mexicana x involucrata Raven

October 7 2013, 9:27 AM 

Nancy, I've had the same experience with Raven as you did. It was a lovely plant, but did not do well over the winter in my greenhouse, and I lost it. Mind you, my greenhouse is not regulated with automatic venting and heating. I can't afford the investment of a second electric service these days; I also rent property a mile from where I rent my residence.


 
 

(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 7 2013, 10:30 PM 

Kathi and Michael - I think your photos are beautiful. Wished I could get some good photos of the hummers using blooms. Always so pretty compared to just a feeder shot.

Tom - I am sorry to hear about your back issue. I you start feeling better ASAP! I am just now trying to catch up on yard work. My yard literally looks like a jungle in some areas. I still can't do any heavy pruning with my right hand/arm. But I am trying to do everything else. If I was a hummer, I'd be all over those Margies of yours! Beautiful sight!

Richard - I hear you about paying for heating (or in my case A/C) in more than one place. I've had great luck with any plants I've gotten from you ... at least until I planted them in my lousy ground soil. So many will be potted plants in the future. I will say that several salvias have survived this first year in the ground much to my delight. I always hope for 100% in ground, but that is probably unreasonable here in Central Florida

~Becky~

[linked image]

 
 

(Login humband1)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 8 2013, 1:39 PM 

Becky asked: "Nancy - How long have you had your current Margie Griffith? And the one next to it, is it a duplicate of Margie Griffith or is it from seed and not exactly the same?"

NLN: This individual Salvia 'Margie Griffith' is about 2 1/2 years old. I was given the original about 5-6 years ago. The first one was put in a 20-inch terra cotta pot behind some other plants in the front yard. It quickly became very tall and top heavy. A strong wind knocked it over, breaking the tap root that had grown through the drain hole and into the ground.

So, then, I put a started cutting into a 30-inch stone planter outside the office window. In a years time, that plant had grown so large that it blocked my view of the entire back yard. It took considerable effort to deal with that plant, which had fill the entire container with roots as well as sending a root down through the drain hole. Termites had invaded the root system as well.

I had started another one and that one went out back against the cedar fence. Last year, Hurricane Isaac caused it to get far more water than it needed and I thought I was going to lose it, but after a month or so, the plant recovered and bloomed again, into late spring.

At one time, a seedling developed next to the original plant. It was similar in appearance, but the flowers were a bit smaller and not as densely arranged on the stem. This current seedling has not flowered yet, but there are many buds.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
USDA Zone 9b
http://www.casacolibri.net/
[linked image]

 
 

(Login humband1)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 11 2013, 4:45 PM 

Becky,

I have 2 or 3 young male Ruby-throateds today and they are visiting Salvia 'Margie Griffith' regularly. Yesterday's Rufous/Allen's Selasphorus is a 'no show' today.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, Louisiana USA
USDA Zone 9b
http://www.casacolibri.net/
[linked image]

 
 
Tom
(Login tbyrnes)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 12 2014, 11:00 PM 

I'm reviving this thread. We were posting about Margie at this same time last year. This year my plants are just starting to bloom. It looks like they are going to be very pretty. How about yours Becky? Nancy? Have yours grown and are they starting to bloom?

Tom Central Florida, Zone 9B
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Becky
(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 12 2014, 11:47 PM 

Tom - I was just thinking of posting a photo or two today. Mine are really starting to bloom. I have 4 in my backyard. The ones that get mostly all day sun are just loaded with blooms. The one is shade is looking pretty sad and gangly. I hope I don't lose it. This Salvia and Lavender Lace Salvia just blow my mind with the size of the plant and the amount of blooms. A real stunner in the garden in the Fall. Lavender Lace will probably start blooming in another month or two.

Here is a close-up of one of my currently blooming Margie G.

[linked image]

From a distance, you can see how really big this plant is. Pretty amazing actually. Mine aren't quite as large as yours, but the abundance of blooms is what makes this plant so amazing! Thanks again, Nancy, for sharing this plant with me! I just love it! I would be delighted to catch a hummer using the blooms. None of the happy plants are in my view from a window. So ... I need to find the time to sit out in my garden one morning or afternoon to see if it garners any action from the hummers.

From a distance:

[linked image]
~Becky~
Sebastian, Florida USA
Click for Forecast for 32958 from weatherUSA

 
 
Nancy L Newfield
(Login humband1)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 13 2014, 11:43 AM 

First let me reiterate that this fine plant is not commercially available and the name is an informal one. Then, I will say that I lost my large plant in one of last winter's freezes. Tom kindly sent me some cuttings from his plants, all of which rooted and prospered. I kept 2 and passed the rest along to others who had also lost their 'Margie Griffith' plants.

The 2 plants that I retained have grown well. I have them side by side along the back fence. One is more than 6 feet tall while the other is more than 5 feet tall. Both are covered with buds that have not yet shown color. It might well be another week or so before they reach their full glory.

Meanwhile, a seedling came up near the site of last year's plant. It is about 4 feet tall, covered with buds, the first of which opened this morning. In the past, a few seedlings have volunteered and none was as floriferous as the original. This seedling will be allowed to stay so I can evaluate its merit.

Salvia 'Margie Griffith' is truly a treasure for the zone 8 to 10 hummingbird gardener, but it won't be of much value to anyone north of those zones. Flowering is seldom initiated before October and the plant cannot take a lot of cold. I hope that a winterer will come along soon to help me enjoy this F2 hybrid.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA
nancy@casacolibri.net
Find more about Weather in Metairie, LA
Click for weather forecast

 
 

Roger Hammer
(Login Gladesman)
Hummingbird lover 2011

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 13 2014, 3:46 PM 

Becky, if you grow Salvia madrensis you won't need to plant any other salvias for hummingbirds. Plus, it'll probably choke all of the other ones out anyway! [linked image] Mine is about six feet tall and has taken over a space about 14' in all directions. The flowers are yellow and tubular and last about seven months out of the year. If you let it run amok you'll have to call in for air strikes to keep it under control. Hummers visit it constantly.

[linked image]

 
 
Ward Dasey
(Login WardDas)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 13 2014, 3:52 PM 

Beware the Green-eyed Monster. One could almost come to hate gardeners in zone 9 and warmer. Rub it in why don't you!

 
 

Kathi and Michael Rock
(Login kathirock)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 13 2014, 4:37 PM 

I'm agreeing with Ward on this one. We have salvias still blooming in Wisconsin, but only for another week at the most. The green-eyed monster is really taking over---time to move to Florida (for the winter at least)!!



[linked image]
Michael and Kathi Rock
Madison, WI
Zone 5

[linked image]

 
 
Becky
(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 13 2014, 8:32 PM 

Roger - I have a Salvia madrensis plant but it does not seem to like either my yard or it's location very much. It is an amazing plant, but not so much in my yard. I am slowly (annually) figuring out what grows in my yard and what sulks (or worse). Trial and error. Thanks for the suggestion!
~Becky~
Sebastian, Florida USA
Click for Forecast for 32958 from weatherUSA

 
 

Roger Hammer
(Login Gladesman)
Hummingbird lover 2011

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 14 2014, 8:32 AM 

Becky, my Salvia madrensis gets filtered light in the morning, then full sun for a couple of hours at midday, then it's blocked from sunlight by the house in the late afternoon. It's planted in relatively rich soil because the property was once an avocado grove and avocados create organic soil over the years due to leaf fall, plus I spread a lot of mulch that I get dropped off in huge truckloads.

What about regular ol' shrimp-plant (Justicia brandegeana; Beloperone guttata)? That's another one that I have a hard time keeping under control. The last time I cut mine back it had formed a mound five feet tall and twelve feet wide. The hummers go bonkers over it.

Ward, I'm not rubbing it in.

Yes I am. [linked image]


 
 
June
(Login Juneroses)
Hummingbirder 2010

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 14 2014, 3:11 PM 

I'm salivating over salvia...pictures! Thank you all for posting.

Tom, what is the coral (?) flowering plant forming the beautiful skirt for your Margie Griffith? It's such an eyecatching combo.
June
USDA 9a, Heat Zone 10, Sunset Zone 26
Lady Lake, FL (Central Fl)

 
 
Tom
(Login tbyrnes)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 14 2014, 6:10 PM 

June, those are Cuphea Schumannii. They are the best overall hummer plants that I have. They are ever-blooming and get to be quite tall if they have something to lean on. Right now they are primarily leaning on the giant purple porterweeds that the hummers and butterflies love. They still surround Margie, though.

I'll try to get a picture in another few days when Margie comes into full bloom.

Nancy, it's amazing how fast Margie grows. From a three or four inch cutting to six feet in a little more than seven months or so. She is quite the lady.
Click for Forecast for 34711 from weatherUSA

 
 
Becky
(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 14 2014, 9:40 PM 

Roger - My S. madrensis is growing in similar lighting as yours. My soil though is far from rich and organic.

I also do indeed grow Red Shrimp Plant. And the hummers do enjoy it. I have quite a few nectar plants blooming currently ... hardly any hummers around to enjoy the party!

I also have Cape Honeysuckle starting to bloom. It seems most of my Fall/Winter blooming plants are not disappointing the nectar lovers. Just wished I had a few more hummers here. My Cassia trees are also putting out buds. I actually saw a hummer using those blooms last year. I was quite surprised as I thought only the Sulphur butterflies were attracted to the flowers. And my Orange Geiger tree has numerous flowers on it. Plenty of flowering nectar plants here, just not enough takers currently.

One good thing though ... all these blooming flowers should be a beacon for any hummers flying overhead. Maybe that is why November seems to be the turning point for over-wintering hummers? I hope so! That would certainly make sense!

Tom - I couldn't agree with you more about the lovely blue-eyed lady, Margie! She is my largest salvia species. Lavender Lace is not far behind her in size. I saw tons of buds on Lavender Lace today. So it won't be long before that salvia is also blooming. There will be a buffet in my yard here very soon! I hope any migrating hummers spot my yard and decide it's a good place to hunker down for the winter!
~Becky~
Sebastian, Florida USA
Click for Forecast for 32958 from weatherUSA

 
 
Richard Dufresne
(Login RichDufresne)
Hummingbird lover 2013

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 14 2014, 10:32 PM 

If you Floridians really want to drive your hummers and the rest of us nuts right now, try growing Salvia regla forms. This is the S. regla from the Huntington BG from almost exactly one year ago. It made it through the winter just fine.

[linked image]

 
 
Becky
(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 15 2014, 7:00 AM 

Wow! What a lovely show on that Salvia regla. Will add that one to my wish list next Spring!
~Becky~
Sebastian, Florida USA
Click for Forecast for 32958 from weatherUSA

 
 
Tom
(Login tbyrnes)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 15 2014, 8:17 AM 

I would love to add this plant, Richard. I couldn't find it on your website.

Any others you would strongly recommend for us Floridians?
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Richard Dufresne
(Login RichDufresne)
Hummingbird lover 2013

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 15 2014, 11:26 AM 

I'm trying to root as much as possible of the three regla forms: Jame (arboreal), Queretaro (formerly Hidalgo, most subtropical, coppice-like growth, shortest and densest form), and Huntington BG (probably a hybrid of Queretaro and a west Texas Big Bend form, since they probably did not have any other ones like Jame when they found it). I already have about 10 of the Jame and about 19 of the Queretaro rooted and growing (too small to ship), and will go all out for more. The Huntington form isn't putting out so much growth, so I will be behind on that one. None available right now.

I hope to use what little garden space I have to plant all three for a comparison. And I want to get some of the west Texas forms back (Warnock's Choice, Mt. Emory). As far as the other related sages are concerned, Salvia sessei, S. libanensis are just getting into the trade, and we need starts of S. betulifolia (acts a lot like Jame) and S. pubescens (acts like a cross of regla Hidalgo and sessei).

 
 

Kathi and Michael Rock
(Login kathirock)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 15 2014, 12:18 PM 

We saw that Salvia regla at Huntington when we were there about five years ago. It is really spectacular. We tried to get this to bloom for years in Wisconsin with no luck.

Plant Delights carries it and so does Vincent Gardens (we have had great luck with them and they send large plants for a very reasonable price):

http://vincentgardens.com/Salvia-regla-Jame-Coahuila-Mountain-Sage-P1691232.aspx

Michael and Kathi Rock
Madison, WI
Zone 5

[linked image]

 
 
Tom
(Login tbyrnes)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 16 2014, 6:27 AM 

Can you tell us something about Salvia sessei, S. libanensis, Richard?
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Roger Hammer
(Login Gladesman)
Hummingbird lover 2011

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 16 2014, 7:16 AM 

I've found that some salvias grow rampant in southern Florida while others don't do so well, and I can only assume it's because of our heavy limestone soils, 65 inches of rain each year between June and October, or our high humidity. I'll give Salvia regia a try and see what happens. For Floridians, however, you'll not find a more floriferous, easy-to-grow salvia than the native Salvia coccinea. And your neighbors will have it in no time, whether they want it or not!

 
 
Richard Dufresne
(Login RichDufresne)
Hummingbird lover 2013

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 16 2014, 9:22 AM 

In southern Florida, another tropical sage that has been almost a weed like S. coccinea is S. miniata, since it is found in the low mountains o0f Belize. That's not a surprise, since Belize and the Yucutan Peninsula are separated by the Yucutan Channel, western Cuba, and the Straits of Florida. The less you have to compensate for latitude with altitude, the more successful the adaptation to a new location will be. There will be more compatible seasons and variations of day lengths, and the presence of similarly adapted and compatible flora and fauna.

This makes me wonder how Salvias from the higher elevations of Cuba and other Caribbean Islands will do. Dr. Scott Zona has pursuing this idea, and has introduced S. arborescens amongst others. He brought S. oxyphora to us from England.

http://www.worldatlas.com/aatlas/infopage/gulfofmexico.htm

Salvia regla from Queretaro should be the best adapted for this reason. I anticipate S. libanensis to be a good candidate as well, since it comes from the Santa Marta Mountains, which are located close to the Caribbean shore of Colombia. S. sessei and S. pubescens are from the mountains of central Mexico, and may stand the best chance of hardiness in the USA outside of southern California in southern Florida. The heat and humidity of summer nights will be the most confounding factors for growing these sages. Optimization experiments should be done with watering and soil fertility as well, and the regla forms, especially the Queretaro form, will help determine the direction of the experiments.

 
 
Becky
(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 16 2014, 8:36 PM 

Richard - I agree about S. miniata. At first mine didn't seem to grow well, but after the first year, it is holding it's own and seems to be adapting nicely to my soil and zone conditions. It has not died, so that is always a good sign in my yard. I have another S. miniata growing not too far away from the original and it, too, is doing pretty good. Neither of them seem to get very tall though. Not sure why. But they do bloom much of the year.

In my garden currently, Margie Griffith, Lavender Lace, Amistad, Salvia miniata, and Hot Lips are the salvia species that have the best performances (IN THE GROUND) in my yard. AND ... S. Coccinea ...but that species is more of a weed in my yard which I typically let grow wherever the seeds sprout.

The Salvia regla from Queretaro sounds promising. I am always looking for a new plant (particularly salvia) to try in my garden.

Black and Blue (Salvia guaranitica), too, but I don't dare let that one grow in the ground. It spreads too fast and too much! I also have Wendy's Wish (also in a container) that does well. It doesn't do well in the ground in my yard.

S. oxyphora is undecided. I have one doing okay and another that isn't. It seems to be very picky about where it is planted.

And oh yes! How could I forget about Hidalgo? It is another that does well in my yard. I get compliments for the deep pink blooms on that salvia.

I got several of these salvias from you, Richard! I hope to get some more this coming Spring!
~Becky~
Sebastian, Florida USA
Click for Forecast for 32958 from weatherUSA

 
 

Roger Hammer
(Login Gladesman)
Hummingbird lover 2011

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 17 2014, 5:47 PM 

Richard,

Scott Zona is a good friend of mine. I didn't know he was working on salvias. My Salvia miniata came from rooted stems at Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden and there it forms dense mounds of leafy stems about four feet tall and twice as wide. The stems root wherever they touch the ground. I've not known it to spread from seed like Salvia coccinea does. If there's bare soil then Salvia coccinea takes it over.

 
 
Tom
(Login tbyrnes)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 17 2014, 7:31 PM 

On my property miniata spreads like crazy, but only in shady areas and not, apparently, by seed--although I'm not sure. I have two shady areas in particular where it has spread quite a bit. It will get to be around five feet tall in some areas. It likes to be deadheaded and it is very much liked by the hummers.

I'm trying not to purchase any more plants, but if I do I would really like some that are large and a color other than red or orange. Amistad is doing well here. It likes a lot of water and fertilizer, and it also likes to be deadheaded.

Margie is just a few days from being in total bloom stage. I hope to post a few pictures when she is ready. She is very impressive.
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Becky
(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 17 2014, 9:15 PM 

I was sitting outside this afternoon trying to get a photo of the Painted Buntings. No luck there. Instead I heard that familiar squeaking very close by, glanced over a few feet from where I was sitting and saw an adult male RTH hitting many of the Margie Griffith blooms. A skipper butterfly was all over those blooms too! Going from bloom to bloom. It appears that Margie is a good nectar salvia in my yard! Glad that I have 4 of them planted around my backyard. I wondered about whether the hummers would use it. Now I know! [linked image]

Tom - I look forward to seeing your Margie salvia in bloom. I remember yours being huge and quite the show stopper!
~Becky~
Sebastian, Florida USA
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Becky
(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 19 2014, 10:44 AM 

I've been using the back bedroom window to observe the Painted Buntings. I've had a challenge so far this season as to the best feeder. I recently purchased yet another seed feeder. I finally found a "cage" seed feeder .... from all places but Wally World. Go figure! I think I could have saved myself some money if I had only gotten that one to begin with it! (sigh)

Anyway .....

I have a Margie planted right outside that bedroom window. While watching the Painted Buntings, I had a little visitor within a foot of the window using the Margie blooms. That bird was going to every bloom. What I noted was it lingered at each bloom as if there was lots of nectar. Typically, the birds will quickly go from bloom to bloom. Not on the Margie blooms. All I can say .... this is an outstanding salvia for the southern states! It blooms in Fall/Winter while birds are down here for the Winter and it is a hardy, large salvia species! What a great hybrid!

Nancy - I wonder if it would be possible to cross this salvia with others? Does this Salvia produce seeds? I've never seen seeds from it, but that could be that I wasn't specifically looking for seeds.
~Becky~
Sebastian, Florida USA
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Richard Dufresne
(Login RichDufresne)
Hummingbird lover 2013

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 21 2014, 11:39 AM 

Under the right conditions, S. mexicana plants can set ample seed.

 
 
Tom
(Login tbyrnes)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 30 2014, 4:23 PM 

I'm a very poor photographer, but here is Margie now. She is about eight or nine feet high at her tallest.
photo Margie_zps812a0ce6.jpg

This is the large purple porterweed (Stachytarpheta frantzii) that is next to her. This one is about 10 ft at the tallest.

photo Stachytarphetafrantzii_zpsa35fd3bf.jpg
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Ward Dasey
(Login WardDas)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 30 2014, 4:33 PM 

To a northerner facing a freeze in the next couple of days your photos are positively pornographic. Those are really superbly grown plants.

 
 
Dan
(Login hawkeye_wx)
Hummingbird lover 2009

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 30 2014, 8:16 PM 

Very impressive! We can't grow em like that up here.
Dan
Zone 5
East-central Iowa

[linked image]

 
 
Becky
(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 30 2014, 9:11 PM 

Tom - That is magnificent! Bravo! I bet the hummers flying overhead put on their brakes the minute they spot your yard and do a dive bomb to your blooming plants! What a great habitat and a wonderful species of Margie Griffith! Amazing!!!!!
~Becky~
Sebastian, Florida USA
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joan
(Login joangarvey)
Hummingbird lover 2013

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 30 2014, 10:28 PM 

Stunning! My Margie Griffiths are still struggling after the big freeze.
Joan Garvey
New Orleans, LA

 
 

Kathi and Michael Rock
(Login kathirock)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 31 2014, 1:09 AM 

Tom,

Your plants are very stunning. As I'm always saying, we northerners could only dream about something like this!

Since this is a winter blooming salvia, we would never even have the chance to grow this plant at all.

Sometimes I really hate living in the Upper Midwest. [linked image]

Anyhow, thanks for posting and enjoy!!

[linked image]
Michael and Kathi Rock
Madison, WI
Zone 5

[linked image]

 
 
Tom
(Login tbyrnes)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

October 31 2014, 3:35 PM 

Yes, Kathy, it's a joy living in Florida for us gardeners. I really appreciate it.

Still, the most important things are friends and family. I'm originally from Chicago and most of my extended family still lives there. I really miss them and my children have grown up without many cousins and aunts and uncles living nearby. One of my sisters lives close to me and my brother and his family are in northern Florida. Anyway, I still wonder if it was wise of me to move here. I really love it, but there are major things that I miss.

However, I am still seeing many, many butterflies, at least one hummer and the garden is really going well... Have to be thankful for what I have.
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Nancy L Newfield
(Login humband1)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

November 1 2014, 9:24 AM 

Joan,

Both my new Salvia 'Margie Griffith', which came into full flower last week, were practically shredded by last night's wicked gale force winds. They were tied up to sturdy bamboo stakes, which in turn were secured to the back fence, but about 75% of the stems are broken. Will have to get out and make some more cuttings. I had already started 1 and it is OK.

Additionally, most of the Cuphea micropetala and Canna indica are laying flat. Steve had wired the huge Nicotiana glauca to the house and it seems to be holding OK.

Still, no hummers here either and there is still plenty of nectar left for any to enjoy should they care to pass by. This is the first year since 2008 that Buffy has not made her return appearance in October. The 20 foot tall Sambucus nigra where she liked to hang out has also been shredded. I have not given up hope, but being pragmatic, I always knew that there would come a time when she did not or could not come back. Our wild creatures are not guaranteed tomorrow and neither are we. Live life to the fullest.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA
nancy@casacolibri.net
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Kathi and Michael Rock
(Login kathirock)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

November 1 2014, 10:09 AM 

Nancy,

I'm so sorry to hear about all of your garden damage and lack of hummers. And how sad that your Buffy did not return. We are waiting with baited breath to see if our Screech Owl will return this winter. As you say, nature is a cruel teacher and there are unfortunately no guarantees. Hopefully, brighter days will be ahead.

[linked image]
Michael and Kathi Rock
Madison, WI
Zone 5

[linked image]

 
 
Nancy L Newfield
(Login humband1)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

November 1 2014, 11:21 AM 

Kathi & Michael Rock said:
Quote:
And how sad that your Buffy did not return.

NLN: Well, I guess I spoke too soon. A Buff-bellied Hummingbird, presumably the longtime returnee, appeared while I was out inspecting the damage, which is worst than I thought. Needless to say, I am elated about Buffy's apparent return!
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA
nancy@casacolibri.net
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Ward
(Login WardDas)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

November 1 2014, 11:51 AM 

Six straight years, that is super!

 
 
Tom
(Login tbyrnes)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

November 1 2014, 12:24 PM 

Congratulations, Nancy. It appears that the cold and the wind convinced the little lady that she should find her winter home.

The wind should let up today, no?

Windy and pretty cold here today also--though nothing like the days you guys are getting up north.
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Gary
(Login Naturelover68)
Hummingbird lover 2009

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

November 1 2014, 12:27 PM 

Congratulations on the return of your buffy. Hopefully that lessens the pain of your garden's damage.
Gary
Napoleon, OH
Zone 6a
Napoleon.gif

 
 
Becky
(Login beckygardener)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

November 1 2014, 12:55 PM 

Nancy - Glad to hear your Buffy returned. Does she use the feeder? I am so sorry to hear about the wind damage to your plants. That's pretty discouraging, but hopefully they will all make a recovery and survive the winter.

We are getting the wind gusts here now. Cooler temps have moved in temporarily. I LOVE IT!!!! I will be going out to work in the yard very shortly. Went to the bank and the voting poll just a bit ago and having lunch now. Then it's outside to spend the rest of the day working in the backyard. Restoring the other half of the raised bed around my backyard Oak tree. I had done the other side of the raised bed 3 weeks ago. The remaing area is already dug up and waiting for me to unload the bags of dirt, pine fines, and compost. And then replant all the Rain Lilies and anything else I think might survive in that area. I've been trying to get as many plants out of pots as possible and into the ground before winter. Some will stay in their pots until Spring, but many need to be planted.

The juvie Ruby-throated (RTH) male from last weekend is gone. He was pretty fat, so I suspect he has moved on. He has been replaced by a rather stout adult male RTH. This male is actually using the cinch-waist 3-port feeder. I hung it in the Cassia Tree hoping one of the birds would notice. The other adult male RTH that guards the east garden bed is still here, currently perching on the power line. I think he is here for the Winter. This may be the same male that has been here for awhile now. I've yet to see him use a feeder. None of the other feeders are being used from what I have observed. I hope that changes soon.

I think the migrating birds are on the move. This cold front seems to be pushing them south here into central and south FL judging by Journey South and ebird sightings (especially along the east coast of FL). I am still hoping that 3 or 4 RTHs settle in here near my property. It's all about having enough feeder users to warrant a bander coming here. I don't remember when the over-wintering birds typically arrive. Is it now or later this month?

More Painted Buntings showing up as well from what my neighbor told me yesterday. The bander is coming on the 10th. So we shall see if any are returnees. I've not seen any banded PB.

I love this cooler weather! It is only for a couple of days and then 80's return. But Fall is here .... finally! Good sleeping weather! Time change tonight! Yay!

Joan and Nancy - When do your over-wintering birds usually arrive in the Fall? Are they late this year or still to be determined?
~Becky~
Sebastian, Florida USA
Click for Forecast for 32958 from weatherUSA

 
 
Dan
(Login hawkeye_wx)
Hummingbird lover 2009

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

November 1 2014, 2:28 PM 

Congrats on the buffy, Nancy, and sorry about the wind damage. That's always tough to watch beautiful plants break apart.
Dan
Zone 5
East-central Iowa

[linked image]

 
 
Nancy L Newfield
(Login humband1)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

November 1 2014, 4:32 PM 

Ward said:
Quote:
Six straight years, that is super!

NLN: Actually, Ward, if I calculate correctly, this is her 8th consecutive season here. She was a youngster when I banded her on 4 January 2008 [so the 2007-2008 season]. She was one of three Buffies present on that day. One had been banded the previous day and I was trying to catch the other one, not being aware that there were 2 unbanded Buffies. The target bird entered the trap, but this Buffy roared in and chased it out, so when I triggered the release, I got the second unbanded bird.

That was the last time I ever recorded multiple Buff-bellieds in my yard as she immediately chased the other 2 away. She stayed until 6 April that year. Going back over the records, I find that she returned 1 November 2008, so her initial return date was not in October after all.

Each time she has returned, she is observed only sporadically for about 10 days. After that, she remains a very audible member of the suite of garden visitors. Like most members of her species, she prefers to stay in a rather secluded spot, dashing out to vanquish any interloper that may dare to challenge her dominance. I have heard her a few times today, but I have not definitely seen her again.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA
nancy@casacolibri.net
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Kathi and Michael Rock
(Login kathirock)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

November 2 2014, 1:37 AM 

Nancy,

[linked image] on this very exciting return of your Buffy!! The Buffy we saw in Louisiana was a very elusive bird despite its size---so different from a Ruby-throat. Enjoy!!

[linked image]
Michael and Kathi Rock
Madison, WI
Zone 5

[linked image]

 
 
Nancy L Newfield
(Login humband1)
Hummingbird Member 2005

Re: Margie Griffith Salvia

November 7 2014, 4:52 PM 

Buffy has been erratic in her appearances as usual early in her residency, but this afternoon, she is staying in the Elderberries near the back fence. I've noted her visiting the Salvia 'Margie Griffith' a couple of times and she has sipped from a Sinningia sellovii as well. She has not used the feeder much this afternoon. Although an adult male Rufous put in an appearance on Wednesday, he did not stay to fight with her. The yard he wintered in last season had 4 Buffies, so he knows how mean they can be.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Nancy L Newfield
Casa Colibrí
Metairie, LA USA
nancy@casacolibri.net
Find more about Weather in Metairie, LA
Click for weather forecast

 
 
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