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plants

April 10 2017 at 8:46 AM
jerry  (Login outbackmac)
Hummingbirder 2012

I live in cincinnati ohio, and looking for a few ideas are perennials that i can plant for the hummingbirds. i currently have Bee Balm. And Lobelia.

i use wendys Wish and black and blue which are great, just looking for a perennials.
Another Day in Paradise Jerry

USDA ZONE 6a

 
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Dan
(Login hawkeye_wx)
Hummingbird lover 2009

Re: plants

April 10 2017, 10:05 AM 

There aren't many good perennials for northern hummingbird gardens. You already grow two of them. Another one would be honeysuckle vine (lonicera sempervirens), if you don't mind dealing with aphids.

 
 

Kathi and Michael Rock
(Login kathirock)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: plants

April 10 2017, 2:56 PM 

I agree with Dan on this 100%.

The issue with many perennials is that they bloom for a few weeks and then they are green plants for the rest of season. I can think of no really outstanding perennial for hummingbirds that blooms in late August and early September when flowers are needed by hummingbirds the most.

Crocosmia 'Lucifer' might another idea. If you have well drained soil and a lot of sun, agastache could be good as most of them have a long bloom period.

If you could get Nicotiana mutabilis going in a hot sunny area, it will reseed for the next season. Salvia subrotunda will do the same.

Native Columbine is also good in late spring/early summer and if you have well drained soil and a lot of sun, the penstemons are good.

The real winners in the north though are Cuphea 'David Verity' and the Salvias (there is a Salvia darcyii X microphylla called 'Windwalker' that is supposed to be hardy to zone 5 in well drained soil:

http://www.selectseeds.com/award-winning-perennials/salvia_windwalker_royal_red_plants.aspx

It blooms summer into fall. If we were in a warmer zone and had better drained soil, I would be planting a lot of this salvia!!

You might also look at the Flowers By The Sea website (www.fbts.com) that has an easy way to search for salvias that are hardy in your particular zone and also attract hummingbirds.
Michael and Kathi Rock
Madison, WI
Zone 5

[linked image]

 
 
Rhonda
(Login rvird01)
Hummingbird Lover 2014

Plants

April 10 2017, 7:49 PM 

Jerry,
Besides the plants you mentioned, if you have room to plant it far from the house, the best hummingbird plant I had by far in central Ohio was campis radicans or trumpet vine. Hummers would sit on the arbor or fence it grew on and chase the others away from "their" trumpet vine. It will pop up several feet from the main plant so you'll need to be diligent pulling them up.
Rhonda
Englewood, Florida 10a

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Donald
(Login Ornithophilous)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: plants

April 10 2017, 8:39 PM 

Jerry:

I think there are some great perennial options for you. You don't need to have a huge variety of plants to feed the hummingbirds--I would suggest you find the hummingbird plants that work best for your garden conditions and then plant large beds of them. A few perennials that should easily survive your winters would include the bee balm and cardinal flower that you already have, as well as the coral honeysuckle, columbine, and trumpet vine that others have already suggested. To that list I would add two native perennials--royal catchfly (Silene regia) and fire pink (Silene virginica). Also, coral bells (Heuchera sanguinea) might be a good choice. One non-native perennial that has worked well for me is siberian catmint (Nepeta sibirica). Also, I would recommend two native reseeding annuals that require little effort to keep going once you have them--spotted jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) and standing cypress (Ipomopsis rubra). Most of these are easy to start from garden collected seed (or, in the case of bee balm, cuttings and division), so it is easy to increase the number of your best plants without breaking the bank. Last year I had bee balm, cardinal flower, standing cypress, and jewelweed blooming into September in my zone 4 garden. Here is a link to a post I made last September 1st which included pictures of the blooms on the last day of August:

http://www.network54.com/Forum/439743/thread/1472700986

In addition to these, I would think as some have suggested that there would be a number of good hummingbird Salvias that would be hardy for you in Ohio.

Donald
Zone 4 Red Wing MN
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Kathi and Michael Rock
(Login kathirock)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: plants

April 11 2017, 12:58 AM 

Jerry,

I apologize that I did not do a very good job in my earlier response to your question, but it was a super busy day for me and I had to squeeze it in.

Anyhow, thank you Donald, I totally left out Nepeta and Silene regia (a real winner in our yard and it's not invasive---nor is Catmint.)

Donald gave you some very good ideas and with his experience, he really is the master.

I wanted to comment that many gardeners think that planting perennials means less work and more flowers for hummingbirds. Actually, just the opposite can often be true. You have a constantly expanding and maturing plant and conditions that are changing from season to season (annuals can often be more forgiving and longer blooming.) Perennials can often demand extremely specific conditions that the average gardener often really struggles to provide. For example, we lost most of our nepeta one season when city trees shaded it out and most of our Monarda 'Jacob Kline' during a very dry winter. As Rhonda mentioned, Trumpet Vine requires constant vigilance, especially in a warm climate and rich soil. Honeysuckle is prone to aphids in zones 6 and above. Penstemons and agastaches will resent a very wet season (penstemon is a very short-lived perennial even in ideal garden conditions) and a poorly drained soil. We have a lot of Impatiens capensis, but one you get it going, it spreads rampantly into all garden areas (but at least unwanted plants are easy to remove---for some reason though, Jewelweed is pretty much done blooming for us by the end of August and September is our busiest hummingbird month.)

I do hope you'll consider the Salvia darcyi X microphylla 'Windwalker', Silene regia and Siberian catmint though.

You may also want to look at our website, www.hummingbirdgardening.net for more information.

[linked image] Jerry!!
Michael and Kathi Rock
Madison, WI
Zone 5

[linked image]

 
 
jerry
(Login outbackmac)
Hummingbirder 2012

plants

April 11 2017, 10:41 AM 

Maybe i didnt give all info. i have Jacob Cline Bee Balm, which i assume is a perennial. It looks like it reseeds. Wendy,s wish not a perennial, also black and blue. so i guess to be accurate either reseeding plants or perennials.
Another Day in Paradise Jerry

USDA ZONE 6a

 
 
Larry-Southaven, MS USDA Zone 7B
(Login LarryForce)
Hummingbird Lover 2017

perennial plants

April 19 2017, 8:08 AM 

I love spigelia marilandica (Indian Pink)will grow in sun or part shade. Should be hardy in your zone. Takes several years to get a large established clump but very showy while in bloom. Of course does not bloom all summer, but most perennials don't. Hummingbirds have arrived before it blooms though. Will try to post a picture if I can figure out how to post one on this site.


    
This message has been edited by LarryForce on Apr 19, 2017 4:40 PM


 
 
Indy Steve
(Login SteveWnindy)
Hummingbird lover 2007

Re: plants

April 19 2017, 10:14 AM 

Jerry

I just wanted to comment that my inground sal. black and blue has come back the last two years with no more covering than mulch but we did mild winters in my zone 6. Most years though I cut everything to the ground and cover with tarp in my 12x25' garden and usually get 100% return with that method. Sal guaranitica sal greggii no problem, cupheas I take cuttings. Other more tender types can be dug up and stored in basement , garage or sunroom.
Steve
Martinsville In.
Zone 6

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I love Hummingbirds
(Login Reenb)
Hummingbirder 2012

Re: plants

April 19 2017, 11:05 AM 

Delphiniums and penstemon Iron Maiden are both terrific.
Renee
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
zone 3A

 
 
Joni
(Login Yodlei44)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: plants

April 19 2017, 8:14 PM 

I agree with Dan. Most of the perennials that supposedly are Hummer attractants haven't been. Lonicera sempervirens & Agastache rupestris definitely are tops. Spigelia that Larry mentioned is a perennial in my Zone 5. Had trouble at first but both plants are now 3 years old & finally took. Never saw a hummer near them or my Coral Bell 'Firefly'. Aquilegia Canadensis is there but never saw use either. Bee balm doesn't reseed that I know of but does creep by underground runners although not invasively.

I haven't tried Salvia 'Windwalker' yet but I do get a few greggii/microphylla types to overwinter or reseed from time to time (depending on the winter).

Joni
Elwood, IL
Zone 5
[linked image]

 
 
jerry
(Login outbackmac)
Hummingbirder 2012

plants

April 24 2017, 9:27 PM 

Ive been starting cardinal climber from seeds for 3 years now and honest getting to be a pain. any ideas to replace this?
Another Day in Paradise Jerry

USDA ZONE 6a

 
 

Kathi and Michael Rock
(Login kathirock)
Hummingbird Member 2006

Re: plants

April 25 2017, 1:09 AM 

Small Red or Yellow Morning Glory, which would be a vigorous reseeder and would never need to be replanted again in your zone and the flowers are similar to Cardinal Climber. Here's a recent thread about that plant as I don't have time to retype all of this information:

http://www.network54.com/Forum/439743/thread/1491344103/last-1491531391/Little+Red+and+Yellow+Morning+Glory.

Here is the Dave's Garden page about the plant:

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/51759/

Here is a source for seeds:

https://fairdinkumseeds.com/products-page/ethnobotanical-or-medicinal-plants/ipomoea-coccinea-mexican-scarlet-morning-glory-seeds/

And an E-Bay source:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Ipomoea-coccinea-Red-Star-Morning-Glory-Cool-Seeds-/150977763750
Michael and Kathi Rock
Madison, WI
Zone 5

[linked image]

 
 
Joni
(Login Yodlei44)
Hummingbirder 2008

Re: plants

April 26 2017, 7:20 PM 

Ipomoea luteola is a good replacement. Seeds are very collectible where you wouldn't need to buy them again but never had them reseed naturally so maybe it is a little better behaved than coccinea??

Joni
Elwood, IL
Zone 5
[linked image]

 
 
 
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