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Which (Bilstein ?) crane

March 25 2012 at 3:58 AM
Erich Christ  (Login trex10)
Missing-Lynx members
from IP address 91.113.121.123

Gentleman,

Can anyone identify this Bilstein (?) version ont his german 3-ton truck ?

[linked image]
Source: Axis history forum

As the boom is not fixed by a cable, but with 2 tubes (so seems not to be movable) I dont think its a 3 ton type.
Even because a 3 ton truck could used for this weight.

Has anyone more infos (drawings, photos)about this crane ?

Thanks in advance
Erich


    
This message has been edited by trex10 from IP address 91.113.121.123 on Mar 25, 2012 3:59 AM


 
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AuthorReply
Ilian Filipov
(Login ilfil)
Missing-Lynx members
194.63.137.67

Hard to say

March 25 2012, 5:19 AM 

Erich,
It is too hard to recognize this one, you know there are too many variatons of this crane type, with different load capacities. More, as you mentioned, it is possible this crane isn't Bilstein at all.
I think the best you can do is to ask some railroad fan or modeller for plans and pictrues. Such cranes were popular and were used mostly in the coaling pits of the smaller railroad stations in the steam era.
Good luck!
HTH

 
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