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What is 'old school'?

April 2 2011 at 2:13 AM
Patrick Ang  (Login apseong)
Missing-Lynx members
from IP address 60.48.162.71

I've heard of figure painting methods being described as such. Can anyone elaborate on this? Are there books or tutorials teaching this method?

Cheers
Patrick

 
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Brock Hopkins III
(Login PBHIII)
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75.218.117.193

Old School

April 2 2011, 9:32 AM 

Patrick,
Hello I have always thought Old School meant painting like Verlinden did years ago on figures. Drybrushing was old school I have heard, as blending and glazing are new school. Not sure how much of this is true. It's really kinda funny but many years ago I was entering shows. A gent told me if you don't start painting your faces in oils instead of acrylics you'll never place. I learned oils and now it seems every one is using Vallejo's. Same was said about uniforms blending oils gave better shading you should and need to do that. Now they glaze to get that effect. Regards Brock

 
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Cliff Leverette
(Login J.Clifford)
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192.231.71.2

Brock, I hear what you are saying! But I have a family and two jobs and a dog and

April 6 2011, 1:59 PM 

occasionally sleep more than four hours... these guys who excel at figuring this out are amazing. To have to do all the same stuff I do and then still have an extra 8 hours a day to learn and perfect their art. Amazing.

 
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David Schemel
(Login justplanestuff)
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152.72.151.71

"Old School"

April 2 2011, 10:39 AM 

Old School is an American slang term for anything done with older methods. Brock has given you figure painting examples but it is more of a general term.

Thanks

Dave Schemel

Improving my modeling one mistake at a time.

www.justplanestuff.net

 
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Jason Burch
(Login eoyguy)
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98.100.245.208

Not a method

April 2 2011, 12:38 PM 

As pointed out, its a term to denote a time for a modeler when things were done differently. It would be different for each modeler depending on their age. Old school to some people would be Renwal and Aurora kits, maybe balsa wood models, and tube glue. For others, its 1989 DML kits, Testors paint in a bottle and vacuum formed accessories. I look at figure painting old school as a time before acrylics were used extensively, and enamels were the preferred paint. Some look at oils as old school, anything but acrylics being considered a bit old fashioned. I don't know what came before Verlindens tutorial on figure painting, but its how I learned, and is now REALLY old school.
Cheers
Jason

Speaking of old school, back when I was learning model building by experimenting and not asking everything on the Internet (didn't exist in the early 80's), I frequently would "mess up" my paint jobs with a poorly done wash that would stain the underlying base coats a different color. I learned over time to do a wash more precisely (now referred to as a "pin wash", I think), or only over a clear coat. 30 years after these "mistakes", a wash used to change the base coat color became a new fangled technique called a "filter" that everyone seems to think was something new and great and can't be done without. Back in the day (another term like old school) it was nothing but a messed up wash. Who knew???

 
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Cliff Leverette
(Login J.Clifford)
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192.231.71.2

Local museum has historical dioramas made back in the 50s

April 6 2011, 2:05 PM 

And each has scores of figures in various scales and they look like they are made out of different materials, based upon how much detail was needed. They look great, even after 50+ years. Swords uniforms, pikes, muskets, and some have many civilians, shirtless Indians in loin cloths, metal armor, plus BELIEVABLE flora and dirt. This would all be Old School simply because those who did it are dead and nobody would think now of doing these in the same way. One, the landing of Fulton's steam boat at Natchez, Mississippi has forced perspective for the buildings and the steamboat and has a dog in the foreground which has a tail that has wagged this entire time!

 
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Patrick Ang
(Login apseong)
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60.49.91.39

Thanks so much guys

April 8 2011, 1:43 AM 

Appreciate the input. I use both oils and acrylics and don't have a fixed method. Each figure is done differently depending on what is required for a faster and easier job. Lately I noticed I have a fixed method forming unconciously and if it works I stay with it. I know what layering is but could have employed filtering and glazing unknowingly.

Cheers
Patrick

 
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