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Tamiya GB --> JS-2 building step 10

July 4 2012 at 9:57 AM

Ricardo Rodriguez  (Login cmtlu)
MODERATORS ONLY - 1/48 Scale

Hi everyone,

Here it comes the most elaborated assembly step of the model. This step involved very few kit parts but lots of details and improvements to keep me busy for a couple of weeks. When one tries to make one accurate job regarding right shapes, sizes and positions, it takes patience and time.

I restarted the work where I left it, I mean on the hull with the corrected hybrid front.

[linked image]

Although in the beginning I thought the massive engine grill with those thick trenches and solid aspect was the weak point on the kit, I checked out later it is a quite good reproduction of the actual thing. However the small side engine grills cried out for some reworking doubtless.

[linked image]

After enjoying the goodness of resin bolt replacements, I decided to proceed along all bolts on the rear plate. Original ones were hexagonal but lacked of some thickness and definition.

[linked image]

I also had to erase some other small moulded-on elements.

[linked image]

Aside the side cutter, one #15 blade is a very helpful tool for plastic removing. Thanks to its small size it can reach compromised locations preventing side damage.

[linked image]

I recomend to mark the location of the bolts before sanding the surfaces. That helps a lot for a smooth replacement job.

[linked image]

Fiberglass pencil is priceless for sanding places unreachable for sanding paper without side damaging. Its important to move the pencil gently to prevent scratches on the surfaces.

[linked image]

The tiny holes to insert the bolts are easier to make with a pin vise than an electric drill.

[linked image]

In the corners of the engine grills small holes are required to saw the solid area off. Grills were removed leaving some margin to level the perimeter with a plain file.

[linked image]

Instead of just closing the bottom with some black painted styrene, I decided to rebuild the inner struts. I started by the rectangular base.

[linked image]

... and then added the walls.

[linked image]

I treated plastic with water sanding as much as possible. Its not strange that after removing details, there are some scratches here and there that needed some restoration with CA glue.

[linked image]

In the front plate, a modelling razor saw and a scriber are used to reproduce the cutting marks in the plate interlocking. The saw produces parallel marks and the use of the scriber permits to vary the depth and distribution of the lines. The tiny rectangular draining hole in the drivers visor bullet splash guard was made by pressing with pointed tweezers.

[linked image]

Better is to leave for the end the edge-thinning work because thinned parts become weak.

[linked image]

The casting texture was damaged in some areas due to all former work. In order to fix that, I first protected all surrounding areas with masking tape and proceed on the re-texturing with Tamiya liquid cement. This dense glue is really good for casting effects because it melts plastic but also contains resin that deposits on the surfaces and it can be worked with hard brushes for a while. The resin deposits permits to extend the casting texture effect to areas sanded off or treated with CA glue previously.

[linked image]

Over a glass I massed sections of epoxy putty to make weld cords. I leave them harder for a while before making very thin welding cords by rolling. Sharp pointed tooth picks are very useful to texture the welding cords.

[linked image]

Time is to close the hull. The kneadatite welding cords stick to surfaces very well.

[linked image]

Very thin welding seams are added on the rear plates too.

[linked image]

For the new engine grills I used I finest PE mesh I could get. I made a plastic frame to shape the mesh by pressing and make it looks slightly damaged and used.

[linked image]

Frame was made with thin styrene sheet over my own drawings.

[linked image]

The plastic frame was glued to the PE mesh and following the whole part was placed. The inner strut was primed dark grey and everything was glued with Gator Grip this time.

The inserted bolts do not need any glue actually but they can be secured by a light brush of Future.

[linked image]

Nuts and bolts by The Nutter made do really need a drop of future to glue.

1> The rolling method works pretty well to curve plain styrene strips as the case of the showel mount.

[linked image]

Customizing a model does not only requires to add/remove some elements.

2> One also has to leave traces of removed parts like welding marks.

3> To reproduce solid weld at same time you assembly parts, you can add a little excess of black CA cement.

[linked image]

4> Not always one can buy all buts and bolts you need. Some tiny ones are made from fine styrene sheet shaped by file and drilled, one by one.

[linked image]

I did not get much documentation of the left side of the tank, but enough to see the razor is missing. The razor mount was made with styrene sheet by using the original part as pattern.

[linked image]

New front fenders were made with 0.15mm styrene sheet.

5> Another valid way to reproduce welding cords is to use stretched plastic melted and textured by MEK.

[linked image]

6> Among all tiny elements in the front area, there is a tube for the front light connection made with a small section of Lion Roar's 0.4mm brass tube. In order to prevent elbow deformation when folding the tube, I inserted a small section of fine rod first. This way you can curve the tube safely and extract the rod when done.

[linked image]

And here everything under the turret is done finally...

[linked image]

[linked image]

One aside thought about detailing plastic kits. When one practices scratchbuilding, the required time and effort is rarely rewarded. Basically all I am making here is to bring the detail of this 1/48th scale kit up to similar detail level of same brand's 1/35th scale kit, plus some particular modifications, and all that with lots of work. Consequently, So far, I do not see any actual advantage on working on this scale for someone building kits like I do.

Okay, only the turret left. My impression is completing the assembly will be a smooth ride from now on.

Ric.


 
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AuthorReply
Andrew Deeley
(Login deeley)
Missing-Lynx members

super

July 4 2012, 12:05 PM 

Hi Ric

A super build and SBS guide.

I super detailed the hobby Master kit before the Tamiya kit came out. It is interesting to see what you have done and your approach. You replaced some things I didn't and I replaced some things you have left ie the exhaust deflector ( but they are too different kits)

Anyway yours is a great build.

Two qestions.

1. are you going to drill out the hull MG port on the right hand side of the hull ?

2. By the sound of it you prefer 1/35 builds for your extreme level of detaling.

Although I see you point, I think 1/48 has its advantages ( and disadvantages !)

Look forward to the turret detailing

Andrew

 
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Roman Volchenkov
(Login Bizarre616)
Missing-Lynx members

super.

July 4 2012, 2:18 PM 

I enjoy every little detail you are adding. True modelling!

http://roman-bizarre.blogspot.com/

 
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Konrad Schreier
(Login koschrei)
Missing-Lynx members

That's Beautiful Work Ric !

July 4 2012, 4:31 PM 

My hat is waaaay off to the level of detail you are creating here - and I do think it is worth the effort ! Quarterscale seems easier to me, even with the added work that goes into really detailing out a model, because no matter how far you want to go there are practical limits to what you can see and fit in, and - based on my experience with some 1/35 kits built for my AMPS club - in 1/35 reaching those limits requires signoficantly more work than 1/48 does. Your model - and your fantastic build log - is taking it about as far as it goes, that's for sure - Bravo!

A couple of questions and a request - are those Part resin bolts ? Also, the images in your first installment Are no longer visible, any chance of revving them ?

Konrad

 
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Roman Volchenkov
(Login Bizarre616)
Missing-Lynx members

35

July 5 2012, 6:17 AM 

is easier since it is bigger wink.gif

http://roman-bizarre.blogspot.com/

 
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Aron Tabor
(Login MrArchy)
Missing-Lynx members

awsome detailing

July 4 2012, 6:34 PM 



Regards
Archy
[linked image]

 
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Luke Pitt
(Login LukePitt)
Missing-Lynx members

This is a first class piece of work

July 4 2012, 9:02 PM 

A fibre glass pencil....dam, that's a good idea

 
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Andrew Deeley
(Login deeley)
Missing-Lynx members

Fibreglass pencils - important

July 5 2012, 3:47 AM 

Hi All

When using fibre glass pencils - ALWAYS use them with water when sanding with them. Otherwise small fibre which break off can be inhaled and thats not good for your lungs.

I also give the sanded areas a quick brush off with water too and give the bench a quick vacuum too( as after cutting/sanding resin)

Not trying to be a Health and safety freak, but we do use some stuff we need to be careful with.

Andrew

Note its still an awesome build and step by step build guide

 
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Jose Luis Lopez
(Login jl_models)
Missing-Lynx members

No words ....

July 5 2012, 6:01 PM 

.... completely lack of english ..... to say ... how impressed I feel!

Great work! Hat off!!!


 
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Juan Gabriel Sevilla
(Login juangabrielsevilla)
Missing-Lynx members

Impressive work

July 6 2012, 4:08 AM 

That if they are details, see you soon.

 
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Rob
(Login docpye2)
Missing-Lynx members

Re: Impressive work

July 6 2012, 9:10 AM 

Outstanding work of a master model builder!!!!!!!!!!!!! Looking forward to your completing the turret. I must admit I will be sad to see this baby covered in paint, as it is a really great piece of work. One question, how many hours do you have into this project already???


 
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Luciano Rodriguez
(Login cmtlu)
MODERATORS ONLY - 1/48 Scale

Full real names must be used at all times.

July 6 2012, 12:10 PM 

Rob,

Please respect the rules here like we all do. Can you please edit your post and fix that when you have time?

Thanks in advance
Lu

148.gif


 
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Alvaro Rodriguez
(Login CMT_Alvaro)
Missing-Lynx members

Plastic surgery! :)

July 6 2012, 1:43 PM 

Hi Ricardo!

That´s a detailing work! Looking at your SBS many people could think that the JS is not a good kit but I´m sure that´s not the case here.

Knowing the precise and clean assembly you use to apply to most of your -mainly, winged things!- models, to see such extensive improvements it is not a surprise to me.

I look forward to see the completed thing soon!

Regards!
Alvaro

 
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Gaston Marty
(Login GastonMarty)
Missing-Lynx members

Beautiful work, but I disagree with your statement...

July 6 2012, 11:07 PM 


You say: "Basically all I am making here is to bring the detail of this 1/48th scale kit up to similar detail level of same brand's 1/35th scale kit, plus some particular modifications, and all that with lots of work. Consequently, So far, I do not see any actual advantage on working on this scale for someone building kits like I do."

Well it is of course all subjective, but my impression is your statement is too focussed on the details themselves, a very common trait I observe in many modellers (naturally), and as a result you lose sight of the overall impression a model makes: In 1/48th, an x level of detail objectively looks FAR more impressive in the smaller scale than the exact same x-level equivalent detail in 1/35th: To my eyes there is no comparison. It is not even close: What you have achieved is great in that regard...

The reason for that is similar to why many 1/32 aircraft models look superficially more impressive, but are at the same time more "phony"-seeming in 1/32 scale than inferior-detailed models look in 1/48th: In 1/32 scale, ordinary modelling conventions like engraved panel lines and hollow "pin-hole" rivetting simply don't work as well in the less forgiving larger scales.

In a larger scale, the plastic-moulded nature of the model becomes increasingly apparent as pinched sheet-metal "oil canning", or metal surface striations around exposed edges, or the sharpness of square metal machined edges, all become increasingly glaring with their absence as you go up the scale...

At the same time as this lack of "machined or stamped metal" sensation becomes more apparent, there is sometimes in 1/35 a lot of detail that would not normally be seen at the equivalent viewing distance which you DO see on a large super-detailed model, and that is sometimes a case of less is more...

It is true that, for armor at least, the larger scale armor models definitely do have far more "presence", since armor is smaller than aircraft typically... (As I said above, I don't think this extra "presence" is worthwhile for aircrafts, which tend to be cleaner and much more revealing as to the materials they are made from, an issue for which the larger scale is a problem more than a help.) However, if you match the quality and detail of 1/35th scale in smaller scale armor, it should then objectively look more impressive in 1/48th, though I'll admit that my observation is that 1/48th armor models tend to get completely ignored sitting on a table next to just about anything else...

It simply seems typical observers are more impressed with the overall size and the overall amount of detail visible, even if some of it should not be so obvious, rather than the finesse and petiteness of a smaller number of individual items that they indeed should see at the viewing distance... A general perception bias doesn't have to be adhered to as if it was fact...

I've been near real tanks, and they often don't strike me like monstrously detailed items at all... I have the strange feeling sometimes a real Sherman magically shrunk down would fail to place in many contests... happy.gif

Gaston Marty





    
This message has been edited by GastonMarty on Jul 6, 2012 11:11 PM


 
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