Back to PuttingZone
 


  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Main  

Redlines LTS2000 Putting Aid

June 11 2007 at 1:49 PM
Christopher  (no login)
from IP address 155.94.62.222

 

Has anyone purchased or used this putting aid? I am looking to get an aid to help with putt alignment...


http://www.dwquailgolf.com/training/redline.html







 
 Respond to this message   
AuthorReply
sammy
(no login)
65.95.128.87

Re: Redlines LTS2000 Putting Aid

June 11 2007, 3:50 PM 

Their website doesn't tell you how many repetitions are necessary before your putting stroke is ingrained into your brain and body.

These laser gizmos are nothing more than indicators and not "training" aids. They don't miraculously impart a great and consistent putting stroke into your arms.

To develop a consistent and controllable putting stroke you must work at it daily .. every day ... because the putting stroke is such a short and stressless movement.

Mounting a laser pointer on your putter shaft will not make you a better putter ... it will only tell you how crummy you are...!!

 
 Respond to this message   

Geoff Mangum
(Login aceputt)
Owner
75.177.5.154

Learning How to See Where the Putter Face Aims

June 11 2007, 9:58 PM 

Dear Christopher,

The Opti-Smart LTS2000 laser at $40 is not bad if used appropriately to learn how to assess the aim of the putter face. (The Smart Golfer Putter Laser Alignment System at $50 is very similar, and Clyde Melancon's simple $27 GTA Putter Face Laser attachment for the putter face is just as good.)





Basically, you want to learn HOW TO CHECK WHERE IN FACT THE PUTTER FACE AIMS, and then PREDICT where you think it aims by identifying a spot on the ground or a spot along the base of a wall where you judge the putter face to aim, and ONLY THEN turn on the laser to find out whether you are any good at this skill. If the laser shows up where you thought it would, you're good; and if to the left or right, then you need to keep working on getting the skill down.

The above learning / practice protocol is opposed to the usual one of just setting up and then turning on the laser and then pointing the laser beam at the target and then sort of trying to absorb something about the "look and feel" of good aim.

Instead, the skill to learn is how to stand at address beside the ball and aimed putter face and run your line of sight like a laser beam straight sideways along the ground on the same line the putter face aims down. This requires three components of body positioning-posture-movement. First, aim the eyes straight perpendicularly out of the face; second, align the line of the throat from base of neck to point of chin with the leading edge of the putter or at least set it parallel to the putter face leading edge; and third, after bending the face down with the gaze held steadily straight out until the back of the ball and the putter sweetspot show up, rotate the head and face to send the line of sight straight sideways like spinning an apple on a stick, the stick being the axis of rotation of the center of the neck out the top of the head. If you also use only the rear eye (close the eye nearest the target) and are sensible about the "peak" where the ascending line of the nose meets the descending line of the eyebrow, the spot on the ground along the line sideways where the putter face actually points will occupy the inside of this peak, as shown in the following drawing:



Once you learn this skill, then light up the laser to see how accurately you have predicted where the putter face actually aims. You will probably find that of the three components, setting the eye gaze straight and setting the throat line to the leading edge of the putter face are easier to get right than the head turn. That is because humans turn their heads all the time while standing up, and this sends the chin at the shoulder, whereas in the bent-over posture at address for putting, the chin needs to stay an equal distance out from the line of the shoulder frame the whole time the head is rotating. To practice this particular aspect, set up next to a line on the floor, make a tiny hole with your rear-side fist and use it like a small telescope held perpendicularly to your rear eye set aiming straight out of the face, bend the face and hand together until the line on the floor shows up inside the timy telescope, and then turn the face on a rotating head SO THAT the line on the floor stays inside the fist telescope as the top of the head where the button on a cap would be simply spins in place without sratching backwards out of position.



Clyde Melancon makes a very neat device for $22.50 called the "GTA Straight Gaze Laser Glasses" with a laser mounted along the sidepiece of a glasses frame, so that a laser line projects where a straight-out gaze should aim, and THEN the laser line will run straight away from the putter face ONLY IF the head turn is done correctly.

Cheers!

Geoff Mangum
Putting Coach and Theorist
PuttingZone.com
Golf's most advanced and comprehensive putting instruction.

Visit the new PuttingZone Blog for podcasts of putting tips:
Site PuttingZone Blog
RSS XML Subscription

 
 Respond to this message   
sammy
(no login)
65.95.173.119

Re: Learning How to See Where the Putter Face Aims

June 11 2007, 10:36 PM 

Geoff .... okay, so you determine that you are aiming too much to the right as revealed by the laser gizmo. What happens when you are playing without the laser? How can you correct your visual bias on your own when you have no way to confirm if you are correct or incorrect in that situation?

Won't you just normally revert to your existing biases because your brain has no way to determine what is correct based on your intrinsic visual fault?

In effect you are lost without the laser gismo, unless you decide to arbitrarily override what you think is correct and adjust it by say 5 degrees. But how are you going to even decide on that if you persist on lateral visual perception?

 
 Respond to this message   

Geoff Mangum
(Login aceputt)
Owner
75.177.5.154

Simple Geometry for All versus Visual "Bias"

June 12 2007, 2:37 AM 

Dear sammy,

If any golfer knows how to use simple geometry, there is no visual bias to contend with. The technique I teach bypasses and renders meaningless for every golfer any visual bias, such as eye dominance.

Setting the gaze straight out of the plane of the face is the same for all golfers. Setting the throat line to match the leading edge of the putter face is the same for all golfers. Turning the head and face like an apple on a stick to send the line of vision straight away from the putter face sideways along the same line the putter face aims down is the same for all golfers. Using the structure of the skull in the rear eye's socket as it circumscribes the field of vision to pinpoint how the spot on the ground across the green along the straight line sideways away from the putter face "shows up" in the field of vision of the rear eye on the skull line as the spot where the putter face actually aims is the same for all golfers.

The question is whether the golfer can "know" whether he is performing these postures of gaze and head-neck to putter face and turning movement of head-on-neck from putter face along the line sideways, and also "know" how to detect the spot on the ground at the end of the head rotation in his field of vision. There are a number of physical and visual cues to "learn" so the golfer can "monitor" whether he is performing these aspects of the beside-the-ball aiming process correctly.

For instance, the golfer uses good posture (inner ear balance, equal weight distribution, alignment in gravity of joints, level eyes to horizon, etc.) to establish the line of the neck perpendicular out of the shoulder frame. He uses similar body cues when setting the gaze direction of the eyes straight and level out of the face perpendicularly to the plane of the face, plus the cues of establishing a line of sight that would align sight with the far horizon line as happens when looking at the sea's horizon from the shore as well as the sense of each eye having a field of vision bounded by structural features of the skull and face so that the line of sight transits the entire field of possible directions solely in the one direction out of the face that is straight and level out. Setting the throat to match the leading edge of the putter face uses the cues of equally bending each shoulder at the same time evenly downward so that the line of the throat remains in the central plane that divides the body into left and right as the eyes equally lower to set the "eyeline" of the skull left-right to the same line of aim of the putter while the throat line lowers to match the leading edge of the putter, like a cross of the head being set to match the cross of the putter's leading edge and aim line. The left eye and its field of vision is equally disposed in relation to the left shoulder as is the right eye and its field of vision to the right shoulder. The throat line after this setting remains perpendicular to the line of the shoulder frame. The line of sight arrives at the sweetspot of the putter face solely because of the bending of the body (back and neck) with the straight-out gaze remaining unchanged, so the eyes continue to aim straight out of the face when looking at the putter face.

The head turn "like an apple on a stick" has the curious property of sending the lead-side eye and its field of vision straight away from the putter face on a straight line along the ground, and the rear-side eye's field of vision follows exactly where the lead-side eye has already been and seen. This is like two dogs in harness one behind the other on a dogsled team, or like two gondolas on a Ferris Wheel (for a vertical plane of the head turn, which is not strictly required, as a Tilt-a-Whirl turn works as well with a straight-out gaze). In the case of a Ferris Wheel sort of head turn, the lead eye is followed exactly by the rear eye the same way a forward gondola is followed by the gondola immediately behind it. There is no "skewing" of the following eye out of the line traversed by the leading eye. This "linear progression" of vision against the still background of the green surface as the two fields of vision are turned along a single line on the surface has certain distinct properties of "optical flow" of the background: i.e., the channel of focused vision is bordered above and below the "sideways roving spotlight of focused vision" by blurred boundaries above and below the straight path along the ground not unlike the way a passenger in a car facing forward experiences the blur of the world to either side while gazing straight ahead. For the car passenger, the optical flow of the periphery occurs in the corners of each eye to the left and right of straight ahead, but in the golfer's head-turn sideways along the ground, the optical blur at the periphery occurs above and below the focal view. There is a sense that these upper and lower borders maintain a linearity as the head-turn progresses, with no skewing of these optical flow borders. Other visual cues that the head-turn is progressing properly include the sense that the head-turn is sending the focual point of the lead-side gaze in the same direction as the lead-side corner of the eye, so whatever spot on the ground occupies the outside corner of the lead eye in peripheral vision is the same spot that the head-turn very quickly delivers focal vision over as the head-turn continues. Additional physical cues come from the way the inner ear experiences an apple-on-a-stick head turn, the way the chin remains equidistant from the shoulder frame, the way the axis of turn in the center of the neck out the top of the head stays unwandering in space as the axis simply rotates in place, the way the base of the neck as a plate stays in the same plane as the shoulder frame despite the head rotation without any sense of the base of the neck twisting in relation to the shoulder frame, and other cues.

These visual and physical cues are all the same for all golfers, and tell the golfers that the aiming process is proceeding with unbiased geometry. Even though almost all golfers would not be able to articulate this collection of "monitoring cues", all golfers nonetheless experience these same features of a good gaze and head-turn and can at least "learn" these cues in an implicit manner, although a conscious awareness of the body's visual and physical cues is always superior.

In a word, what visual biases? It's just the same geometry for all golfers.

Cheers!

Geoff Mangum
Putting Coach and Theorist
PuttingZone.com
Golf's most advanced and comprehensive putting instruction.

Visit the new PuttingZone Blog for podcasts of putting tips:
Site PuttingZone Blog
RSS XML Subscription



 
 Respond to this message   
Christopher
(no login)
155.94.62.222

Re: Simple Geometry for All versus Visual "Bias"

June 12 2007, 9:01 AM 

Sammy and Geoff:

Thanks for the reply and the valuable information. My putter aim, especially on 8-10 foot putts this year has been very weak. I am missing putts to the right and then compensating and pulling to the left. Last week I left 8 strokes on the course because of this problem. I would have broken 75 which is my personal best. I realized I needed to do something ASAP. Geoff I will consider your aiming advice here and elsewhere on your sight before dropping $40-50 on a laser device...thanks.


Chris

 
 Respond to this message   

Geoff Mangum
(Login aceputt)
Owner
75.177.5.154

Aiming to the Outside / Right, Pulling to the Inside / Left

June 12 2007, 10:30 AM 

Dear Christopher,

Your combination is typical -- aiming outside, pulling inside. This usually means that the gaze is not really directed straight oput of the face, as this causes the head to shift backwards at the top during the turn to look down the line. The neck plate at the juncture of the shoulder frame then also shifts "closed" (right side back, left side forward), and this creates a conflict between where the body aims and where the eyes are looking. The body (neck) aims outside, while the eyes "gaze" only at the wished-for target and think there is "no problem." The body wins the stroke battle, and the first few strokes go straight to the outside, but the golfer doesn't know what is the matter and trust the eyes (erroneously). then he aims outside and pulls the stroke not straight but to the inside.

Fixing the gaze is half the battle, and then you need to make sure the head turn proceeds with the button on your cap only spinning in place and not scratching backwards in the head turn. Work on 8-10 foot straight putts with this aiming process until you like it.

Cheers!

Geoff Mangum
Putting Coach and Theorist
PuttingZone.com
Golf's most advanced and comprehensive putting instruction.

Visit the new PuttingZone Blog for podcasts of putting tips:
Site PuttingZone Blog
RSS XML Subscription

 
 Respond to this message   
Greg
(Login GSH119)
209.242.166.189

Re: Aiming to the Outside / Right, Pulling to the Inside / Left

February 16 2017, 5:28 PM 

I realize this thread is a bit old, but any chance that someone still sells the "laser eye-glasses" for working on your straight out of the head gaze?

the links above are dead and a google search didn't come up with anything.

Greg


 
 Respond to this message   
 
  << Previous Topic | Next Topic >>Main  
Find more forums on GolfCreate your own forum at Network54
 Copyright © 1999-2017 Network54. All rights reserved.   Terms of Use   Privacy Statement  
Back to PuttingZone