Palaima, Scripkunas in Northeast PA

by John Peters

 
Sharleen,

I found a passenger manifest for arrivals in Southampton, England from the U.S. for a couple of folks who might be Alfonse and his mother:

1. UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960
Name: Alfonse Palima
Birth Date: abt 1914
Age: 17
Port of Departure: New York, New York, United States
Arrival Date: 10 Aug 1931
Port of Arrival: Southampton, England
Ports of Voyage: Cherbourg
Ship Name: Majestic
Shipping line: White Star Line
Official Number: 146555

2. UK Incoming Passenger Lists, 1878-1960
Name: Ursule Palima
Birth Date: abt 1893
Age: 38
Port of Departure: New York, New York, United States
Arrival Date: 10 Aug 1931
Port of Arrival: Southampton, England
Ports of Voyage: Cherbourg
Ship Name: Majestic
Shipping line: White Star Line
Official Number: 146555

Both of them were "in transit" to "Memel", which today is Klaipeda. While Alfonse is listed as a citizen of the U.S., his mother (most likely) was listed as a citizen of Lithuania. Both however were listed as last residing in the U.S.

If these two are your Alfonse and his mother, then it appears that Ursule may have been born in Lithuania (an independent nation after WWI) and was returning with her son -- to visit or to stay -- after being in the U.S. for the birth of Alfonse.

I also found an arrival in 1930 for your Alfonse:

New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957 New York Passenger Lists, 1820-1957
Name: Alfons Palaima
Arrival Date: 7 Nov 1930
Birth Year: 1912 [his birth date is given as 05/25/1912]
Birth Location: Pennsylvania
Birth Location Other: exeter borough
Age: 18
Gender: Male
Port of Departure: Hamburg, Germany
Port of Arrival: New York, New York
Ship Name: Washington
His address in the U.S. was 1051 Wyoming Ave., Pittston, PA

The other surname may well be spelled today in Lithuania as Gudz^iauskas (pronounced goo-JAUS-kas, where the "j" sound is as in the English word "jazz." That "z^" is pronounced like the "z" in the English word "azure." The ending "-aite" in Gudz^iauskaite indicates that it is the name of the unmarried daughter of a man named Gudz^iauskas. The letter combination "-ua-" would be rare in Lithuanian, if found at all. Likewise, "gv-" would not be a Lithuanian spelling.

Since the Lithuanian letter "c" has only two forms, one with a little mark or birdie over it (typed "c^" on non-Lithuanian keyboard) is pronounced "ch" as in the English word "church." The other "c" has no mark and is pronounced "ts" as in the English "bits" or the name "Vince." It is never pronounced like the "c" in the English "cousin" -- that sound is rendered by "k" in Lithuanian. So the surname would be Skripkunas.

Here is a 1910 U.S. Census entry for someone who might be your Anthony before he was married:

1910 United States Federal Census
Name: Anthony Scripkonis
Age in 1910: 23
Estimated Birth Year: 1887
Birthplace: Russia
Relation to Head of House: Boarder
Father's Birth Place: Russia
Mother's Birth Place: Russia
Home in 1910: Exeter Ward 2, Luzerne, Pennsylvania
Marital Status: Single
Race: White
Gender: Male
Year of immigration: 1902
He was living there with probably his brother, George, age 20, who also arrived in the U.S. in 1902.

A 1920 U.S. Census has him indexed under a surname transcribed as Shriptune:

1920 United States Federal Census
Name: Anthony Shriptune [Anthony Skriptune] [Anthony Shriftune] [these bracketed names are alternatives that others have interpreted the handwriting to read]
Home in 1920: Exeter Ward 3, Luzerne, Pennsylvania [25 Grove St.]
Age: 36
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1884
Birthplace: Lithuania
Relation to Head of House: Self (Head)
[Head]
Spouse's Name: Monica Shriptune
Father's Birth Place: Lithuania
Mother's Birth Place: Lithuania
Marital Status: Married
Race: White
Sex: Male
Home owned: Rent
Year of immigration: 1904
Able to read: No
Able to Write: No
Household Members:
Name Age
Anthony Shriptune 36
Monica Shriptune 30 [born in Lithuania, arrived in the U.S. in 1909]
Stanley Shriptune 8 [born around 1912]
Gus Shriptune 4 [4 5/12] [again, bracketed items are what someone other than the volunteer at ancestry.com transcribed]
Eva Shriptune 3 [3 3/12]
Frances Shriptune 0 [2/12]
If it is assumed that most immigrants prior to WWI began having children within the first year or two of their marriage, it would appear that Anthony and Monica were married in Exeter around 1910 or 1911. You could search out the original church marriage record (not a marriage certificate) which often contains the names and birth places of the couple's parents, among other useful information.

John Peters




Posted on May 6, 2011, 12:06 AM

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