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Here are some machining pics for ya......

October 14 2008 at 9:53 PM
  (Login Matospeter)
YF12

Hey guys,
just thought I would post some recent pics of my homebuilt FT rifle's progress. I machined myself a pretty adjustable buttstock for it. The stock is removeable and can be adjusted for the length of pull, the whole butt can be canted, the cheekpiece is adjustable up or down, in or out, and can cant. The hookbutt is adjustable for angle and the buttplate is adjustable for height and can also angle in or out. The buttplate assembly can also twist around the central axis for whatever angle makes ya happy. I also machined myself a new end for the resorvoir tube including an o-ringed endpiece and matching endcap. Here are a few pics.....again keep in mind that this thing is not yet finished and still needs cleanup of the metal and final finish of the metalwork and wood. Hope you like it....peace...














Pete Matos
865-363-9218
Matospeter@charter.net
Safe Journey Space Fans, Wherever you are....

 
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(Login Bowman26)
YFOT

Very nice work...

October 15 2008, 4:36 PM 

I am counting the days till my daughter gets out of college so I can buy some bigger equipment. My small desktop equipment works but the size is very limited to only small parts. Oh to have a full size knee mill and large lathe all CNC'ed.. As if airguns and shooting wasn't expensive enough of a hobby machining has to be was up there in the cost department.



Dee

 
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(Login bigbore)
YFOT

I'll probably take the plunge early next year...

October 15 2008, 6:43 PM 

and buy a mini-lathe but until then I'll have to live vicariously through you guys.

As usual, nice work.


 
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(Login bigbore)
YFOT

Looks like the Toolsnow 7 X12 is the best starter lathe.

October 15 2008, 8:54 PM 

Does it come with the splash guard?

Just add a quick change tool post set and it should keep a guy off the streets and out of trouble for a while.


 
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(Login Bowman26)
YFOT

If you can swing it go a bit larger...

October 16 2008, 12:24 PM 

I have a SMALL lathe made as such for small hobby work. If you can save a bit more and get at least a 9x20 or 12x36" you will have a much larger work area that is likely to be able to handle all the projects your no thinking of right now.

Everyone always says get as big as you can afford which is wise. But always remember the amount you spend on the machine itself will only be 50% or less than the total for everything once you buy tooling and indicators etc.

Dee

 
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(Login bigbore)
YFOT

My aprtment is soooo small...

October 16 2008, 3:09 PM 

If I chucked something in a 19" I would have to open the bedroom door.

I am taking the WVED approach, I just want to see if I'm "into it". Fantasies realized I'd have a Grizzly power feed 3 axis mill.




 
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(Login Matospeter)
YF12

Lon, the 9x 20 and even the.....

October 18 2008, 9:26 AM 

lathemaster lathes are at least a step up from the mini lathes and are not too heavy. Remember that you can take the crossslide and the tailstock off any lathe and lighten it up for moving it. The chuck is also pretty heavy so you can get them down in weight pretty good that way to move into an apartment. I gotta agree with the other poster that said to buy the largest best machine you can afford because while there is always more than one way to machine something there is no substitute for mass and weight in a machine tool. My 12x 36 I feel is about perfect for airgun parts and a lot of other applications as well. It however weights around 1500 pounds. The Lathemaster machines seem to be very well regarded on the forums and several have been converted to cnc lathes as well. You should check them out... My mill is a Lathemaster and Bob Bertrand has taken very good care of me over the years and if I needed anything from him I certainly would not hesitate to give him a call. Nice fellow... Good luck and beleive me once you get bitten by this bug it digs in deep!! You will suddenly see everything around you as either a possible machining project or something to machine itself....peace...

Pete Matos
865-363-9218
Matospeter@charter.net
Safe Journey Space Fans, Wherever you are....

 
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(Login bigbore)
YFOT

I agree, the Lathemasters look great...

October 19 2008, 1:50 AM 

Let me see how I feel at buying time, you guys should have me talked into a Birmingham DL High Speed Precision Engine Lathe by then.


 
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(Login Matospeter)
YF12

Well that fact that you are aware of a ....

October 19 2008, 10:05 AM 

Birmingham DL high precision lathe is evidence that you are at least looking at one!! It really is a sickness ya know, I am terminal I am afraid.... Bitten by the machining bug real hard and now I have a couple homebuilt airguns to show for it as well as a custom built Recumbent bicycle that I rode about 18 1/2 miles on last weekend as well as too many little projects to list here. Once you have the ability to build anything you might want the sky is really the limit. Only downside is that I spend a lot of time out in the shop that I might be doing other things with. I have managed to make every one of my machines pay for itself and some many times over. Pretty cool to be able to say that. The Lathe is really an amazing machine and makes it possible to do a great many different things that you really could not do on any other machine. I have really enjoyed owning my lathes and could not imagine not having one.....peace.....



Pete Matos
865-363-9218
Matospeter@charter.net
Safe Journey Space Fans, Wherever you are....

 
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(Login bigbore)
YFOT

1 more question...

October 20 2008, 2:05 AM 

The Grizzly 9 X 19 looks good too.

How do the features on the Grizzly G4000 compare to the lathemaster, am I overlooking something?
http://grizzly.com/products/G4000 .

The size is more apartment friendly and it's a couple hudred cheaper for what appears to be a smaller version of the lathemaster. NO WAY can I put the 9 X 30 in my apartment.





    
This message has been edited by bigbore on Oct 20, 2008 2:07 AM
This message has been edited by bigbore on Oct 20, 2008 2:06 AM


 
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(Login Matospeter)
YF12

Lon to be honest I can only tell you what I have read......

October 20 2008, 7:25 PM 

when it comes to these machines. The Grizzly is a decent lathe but has its shortcomings in that from what I understand the hold down fixture for the crossslide is a little weak and most guys have machined a new steel plate with four screws instead of the two and it also does not have a reverse gearset I think so some have machined themselves a jackshaft with a lever the reverse. The Lathemaster is from what I have read a much more capable machine and I am speaking of the 9x30. It is unfortunate that you say the 9x30 is too big for your apartment since that would be a VERY good starter lathe and have enough capacity to do some decent turning without modification. The machine only weighs around 300 lbs and as I said before you could remove the tailstock, the chuck and the compound assembly and make it light enough for a single unwimpy fella to carry it. The grizzly has a decent rep once you fix the compound to crossslide weakness and many have made all kinda cool stuff on them but it just takes a little more tweaking initially to get it where you need it to be. I do not know if you have ever seen one of these machines in person but they are not too big really. Even on a sturdy bench they take up about as much room as a side table or couch table in reality. If you are real strapped for room you can not buy the factory stand and get yourself a heavy duty butcher block table from grizzly and matching steel stand and make use of the rest of the room for something else you already have in your home. The biggest thing you must understand tho is that a metal lathe is a pretty messy machine in operation. I know mine slings aluminum and steel swarf quite a ways from the machine and if it gets real stringy sometimes it gets caught in the chuck and spins around and around and finally flies off with some force sometimes landing all the way across the shop. Please remember to never try to pick this swarf aluminum or not off the chuck while it is spinning despite the tendency to want to do so. I once took a screwdriver and tried to grab a thin strand and get it away from the chuck to keep machining and it basically jerked it outta my hand and threw the screwdriver across the shop. Won't do that again any time soon..... These machines can be very dangerous so please be careful when you get started with it. They are extremely powerful even the small ones and basic shop safety should always be observed I.E. no loose clothing, no jewelry, always wear saftely glasses, never touch any moving parts etc etc. I am absolutely sure you know this but it never hurts to say it....

I do not think you could go real wrong with either machine but you do get what you pay for. Good luck and if you have any specific questions just give me an e-mail....peace dude!!

Pete Matos
865-363-9218
Matospeter@charter.net
Safe Journey Space Fans, Wherever you are....

 
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