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Commendation for Btry F, 244th Bn, Coast Artillery

August 11 2011 at 9:44 PM
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Gordon  (Login GGTJr)

 
I have an official letter dated 7 Dec, 1942, from the Commanding General, First Marine Division, commending F Battery, 244th CA. Is mentions the unit arriving (does not say where) on 2 NOV, 1942, when the "enemy was shelling the airfield with paralyzing effect." It says the unit "greatly assisted in the neutralization and ultimate silencing of the enemy batteries, thus restoring our airfield to normal operations."

I also have an official order ("extract") dated 11 Feb 1943, from the Commanding General, Americal Division Artillery, commending Battery B, 259th CA, for "outstanding service in the attack against the Mt Austin and Mataniikau positions and the pursuit of the enemy to Cape Esperance, Guadalcanal" Nov 15 1942 to Feb 9 1943.

I also have a general order redesignating the 244th CA Bn to be the 259th Separate CA Bn, dated 19 Jan, 1943, so I believe F Btry 244th is the same unit as B Btry 259th (same personnel in both).

QUESTION: Does anyone know about F Btry's operations securing the airfield in Nov 1942? How was a 155mm coast artillery unit employed against "enemy batteries"?


 
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Alice W.
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Re: Commendation for Btry F, 244th REGT, Coast Artillery

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August 12 2011, 2:54 PM 

The relevant references in addressing these questions are Shelby Stanton's World War II Order of Battle (despite its numerous errors in fine details, its overall unit histories are good) and Francis D. Cronin's Under the Southern Cross: The Saga of the Americal Division.

Only the 3rd Battalion, 244th Coast Artillery REGIMENT (formerly New York National Guard), went to the Southwest Pacific, and was attached to what became the Americal Division (back in the States, its HHB & First Battalion were inactivated and its 2nd Battalion became the 289th C.A. Battalion, probably sometime in 1943 or early 1944). The 3rd Battalion consisted of E and F Batteries (155mm guns), and almost certainly an HHB. Along with the mix 'n' match that eventually became the Americal Division, it was sent along to New Caledonia, where both firing batteries deployed to defend the harbor at Noumea. At some point, the battalion inherited some British 25-pounders, the only U.S. coast artillery unit to get them. Whether they were incorporated into E Battery, making it a composite battery, or became part of a provisional third firing battery is not clear, at least to me.

In early October 1942, lead components of the Americal Division were sent to Guadalcanal, including the 164th Infantry Regiment and K Battery, 246th Field Artillery Battalion (the only American unit to bring in and use 25-pounders on Guadal); late in the month, it was the turn of F Battery, 244th Coast Artillery, with its 155mm guns (but which type, I'm not certain). By mid-November, the 245th, 247th, and the remainder of the 246th Field Artillery Battalions left New Caledonia for Guadalcanal.

On January 20, 1943, the 244th's 3rd Battalion became the 259th C.A. Battalion, with former E Battery now becoming A Battery and former F Battery becoming B Battery, as Gordon suggests.

Fighting on Guadalcanal was still fierce, and F Battery--still so designated--provided counter-battery fire, as well as firing on troop concentrations, points of resistance, and other targets of opportunity. I'm not sure what "How was a 155mm coast artillery unit employed against 'enemy batteries'?" means. Whether the old GPF or the new M1, the 155mm gun was after all a field artillery piece, which given some simple add-ons, could be adapted to coast artillery use. All you needed on Guadalcanal and other islands was high explosive ammunition rather than armor piercing, to carry out fire missions against land targets. What's the difficulty?

Alice

 
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Alice W.
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a little more on the F.A. battalions

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August 12 2011, 10:19 PM 

Sorry, probably I should have specified: the Americal Division's 245th, 246th, and 247th F.A. Battalions that went to Guadalcanal were equipped with 105mm howitzers. The only exception I know of was the 246's K Battery, provided early on with British 25-pounders, rather lighter than the standard U.S. 105mm piece; this battery is often seen in the literature with "Provisional" appended to it. Significantly, perhaps, it was the first battery of the three battalions sent to The Island, where it served initially to provide artillery support for the 147th Infantry Regiment, which was NOT part of the Americal Division.

Alice

 
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Forum Owner
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Owner

Hello

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August 13 2011, 2:07 PM 

"I'm not sure what "How was a 155mm coast artillery unit employed against 'enemy batteries'?" means. Whether the old GPF or the new M1, the 155mm gun was after all a field artillery piece, which given some simple add-ons, could be adapted to coast artillery use. All you needed on Guadalcanal and other islands was high explosive ammunition rather than armor piercing, to carry out fire missions against land targets. What's the difficulty?"

I guess the difficulty might be that none of us are used to fire 155mm guns on a daily basis....

Welcome to both of you by the way. Alice, could you contact me offline (email above)? I have a question for you....thanks!

Nuyt


 
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Gordon
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What "How...employed against 'enemy batteries'?" means

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August 13 2011, 6:59 PM 

I seek possible amplification of a story told to me by a veteran (now deceased) of F Btry, 244th CA:

START of Story: The 244th was still aboard their ship while Marines assaulted a Guadalcanal beach; the Marine assault was halted by fire from Japanese with large guns in caves overlooking the beach - the Marines had no weapon to effectively attack the cave guns. The 244th was ordered to the beach, ahead of Marines, and used their 155mm CA howitzers in direct fire mode to defeat the Japanese weapons in the caves and enable the beach assault to proceed. END

The veteran was very proud of his unit "clearing the way for the Marines."

I am just starting to understand the 244th CA unit history (and greatly appreciate the information provided by Alice W).

I wonder:
(1) if anyone can amplify on this story,
(2) if such 155mm direct fire was an technique which the CA trained for, or if it was ingenuity and innovation in response to the enemy, and
(3) if the direct fire by the CA - ahead of Marines in the beach assault - was part of the operation to secure airfield, for which official documents commend the CA unit.

 
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Jim Broshot
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Re: What "How...employed against 'enemy batteries'?" means

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August 14 2011, 5:12 AM 

"I wonder:
(1) if anyone can amplify on this story,
(2) if such 155mm direct fire was an technique which the CA trained for, or if it was ingenuity and innovation in response to the enemy, and
(3) if the direct fire by the CA - ahead of Marines in the beach assault - was part of the operation to secure airfield, for which official documents commend the CA unit."

The battery rates three separate mentions in the official US Army history of the Guadalcanal campaign.

GUADALCANAL THE FIRST OFFENSIVE, which you can download from the CMH site:

http://www.history.army.mil/html/books/005/5-3/index.html

p.177

The battery along with a battery of the USMC 5th Defense Battalion (also equipped with 155mm guns) landed 2 Nov 1942 at Lunga Point, and "brought in the heaviest American artillery which had been sent to Guadalcanal up to that time, the first suitable for effective counterbattery fire."

Prior to that time, the USMC 3rd Defense Battalion with batteries of 5in (127mm) naval guns for coastal defense were the heaviest US guns on the island. The 1st Marine Division artillery consisted of 75mm pack howitzers and some 105mm howitzers.

p.180

The battery was in action less than two hours after it landed against "Pistol Pete", a long range Japanese artillery piece that had been shelling the airfields.

p.188

Later on 14 November, two of the battery's guns were used to shell beached Japanese transports at a range of 19,500yds. The 5inch batteries of 3rd Defense Battalion also engaged these transports, at a range of 15,800yds.

So, FWIW, for the rest of your questions.

2 - I suspect that mobile US Army Coast Artillery battalions did receive training which enabled them to support ground operations. Such units did so in WWI, and in WWII such units were later converted to FA battalions.

At various sites you can find US Army WWII Coast Artillery manuals, and all issues of COAST ARTILLERY JOURNAL, from before WWI to 1948 when it became ANTIAIRCRAFT ARTILLERY JOURNAL, which might have articles on this early form of cross-training.

http://www.airdefenseartillery.com/online/2010/CoastArtilleryHome.htm

(the pre-1922 issues, most of them, can be found at Google Books as the JOURNAL OF THE UNITED STATES ARTILLERY)

3 - the battery did not support a Marine landing to take an airfield. It helped the Marines defend it by engaging and neutralizing Japanese artillery that was firing on the US airfields.

I suspect that when the US Army launched its offensive against the remaining Japanese forces on the island (in which units of the 2nd Marine Division participated), the battery fired in support of such operations.

 
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Jim Broshot
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Re: What "How...employed against 'enemy batteries'?" means

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August 14 2011, 5:22 AM 

And the battery rates two mentions in the USMC official history, which are pretty much the same as found in the US Army official history:

Pearl Harbor to Guadalcanal: History of U.S. Marine Corps Operations in World War II, vol. 1. LtCol Frank O. Hough, USMCR. Maj Verle E. Ludwig, USMC, and Henry I. Shaw, Jr. 1958. 439 pp.

page 342 (footnote) and page 357

http://www.tecom.usmc.mil/HD/PDF_Files/Pubs/WWII/History%20of%20the%20U.S.%20Marine%20Corps%20in%20WWII%20Vol%20I%20-%20Pearl%20Harbor%20to%20Guadacanal%20%20PCN%2019000262400.pdf


(the USMC battery was A/5th Defense Battalion)

 
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Alice W.
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Additional remarks

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August 14 2011, 3:15 PM 

Hello Gordon,

It was my decided impression that you thought the 155mm pieces in the hands of F Battery, 3rd Battalion, 244th Coast Artillery Regiment, were specifically designed for the coast artillery and issued uniquely to that arm. Thus your question of how to use seacoast ordnance in a field artillery role. Your reply to mine, in which you identify the 155mm pieces in question as howitzers supports, more or less, my original impression, but that's fine, I'm willing to expand on my own original response. Some of this information has appeared in this forum in months or years past, so I'll brush over it briefly.

The 155mm pieces under discussion were not howitzers, but guns, which came in two distinct types, the old and the new. The old ones were the 155mm GPF or Grande Puissance Filloux (literally, Filloux's great explosive power or energy, from Captain {later Colonel} L. Filloux, a noted designer of French artillery pieces), adopted by the U.S. Army in WWI, and used throughout WWII, as a mobile field and coast artillery piece, a semi-static coast artillery piece emplaced on the well known Panama mount, and gun only, as the M12 gun motor carriage (mounted on the old M3 medium tank chasis), known casually as the King Kong. On its original wheeled carriage, the gun had a maximum elevation of 35 degrees and was highly accurate up to 10 miles (though it could hit at 12 miles). It was well liked by American artillerymen, and also saw service with the French, then the German, armies, the last also in a coast defense role.

The new 155mm gun was the M1, mounted on the M1 eight-wheeled carriage, which by design could also mount the new 8-inch howitzer. This gun elevated to 65 degrees and had a range in excess of 14 miles. Issued to American forces and its chief allies, the gun was used in both a field artillery and a coast artillery role. In the latter mode, it was emplaced on the Kelly/Kelley mount, particularly in the Pacific Theater. A caution: though artillerymen meticulously restricted the nickname, Long Tom, to the M1 gun, to differentiate it from the shorter GPF, other soldiers were less discriminating, with the same nickname often applied to the GPF when mounted as the M12 gun motor carriage, perhaps in the mistaken impression this self-propelled piece was the M1.

A few more thoughts: combat footage on Guadalcanal shows a variety of older equipment in use by the marines there, including the M1903 infantry rifle, the M2A4 light tank, and the M1918 155mm howitzer. Only the tank's combat service is unique to the island, as previously covered in this forum. The Springfield rifle was used by the marines because there had been an initial lack of interest in the Garand M1 by the Corps (which soon changed its mind); nonetheless, production of the M1 lagged behind demand as the war wore on, so the bolt action rifle saw ample use until war's end. The M1918 155mm howitzer also continued in service until late in the war. The point I wish to make is that this howitzer was in use by field artillerymen of the 11th Marine Regiment on Guadalcanal, not by F Battery, 244th Coast Artillery, which was equipped with guns of the same bore. At the range cited in John Miller's Guadalcanal: The First Offensive, either model gun could have been in use (again, I don't know which).

Although Mr. Broshot has quoted the most relevant pages in Miller's book describing this artillery action, the basic problem existing in mid-October 1942 is laid out on pages 148-49:

"After the last bomber had retired, the long-range 150-mm howitzers which the Japanese had been landing opened fire on the airfield and Kukum Beach from positions near Kokumbona. They first made Kukum Beach untenable. The 1st Marine Division had no sound-and-flash units to locate the enemy howitzers, or suitable counterbattery artillery with which to reply to 'Pistol Pete,' as the troops called the enemy artillery. The field artillery units were armed with 75-mm pack and 105-mm howitzers, and the 3d Defense Battalion had emplaced its 5-inch gun batteries on the beach. On 13 October and the days that followed, the 5-inch guns and the 105-mm howitzers attempted to silence Pistol Pete. But the trajectory of the 5-inch guns was too flat for effective counterbattery fire. Some of the 105's were moved up to the Matanikau River, but they were too light for effective counterbattery fire. Aircraft also attempted to silence the Japanese artillery, but were no more successful than the artillery." [There is no mention of the M1918 155mm howitzers that the 11th Marine Regiment had, so they must have arrived later.]

When F Battery, 244th CA, and the marine defense battalion's 155mm battery fired their guns as field artillery pieces, the familar modes of firing would have obtained, using such paraphenalia as the panoramic sight, aiming circle, external aiming point, etc., and with direction (and correction) either from a forward observer or off map coordinates. Coast artillery fire control is generally more precise than field artillery fire, shooting as it usually does against moving and maneuvering naval targets, so the seacoast gunners were already well schooled in the necessary math, and could have accomodated quickly to land firing.

I trust this additional information helps.

Alice


    
This message has been edited by nuyt on Aug 14, 2011 4:51 PM


 
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Gordon
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Thank you for substantive information

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August 14 2011, 4:49 PM 

I am impressed by the interest and depth of knowledge of both J Broshot, and Alice W, and thank you both. Clearly I have much reading to do to improve my knowledge and understanding, but you have pointed me to credible resources and given me a wonderful start.
This appears to be a worthy forum, and thank you for your energy and persistence in making it so.

 
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Jim Broshot
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Re: Additional remarks

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August 14 2011, 5:37 PM 

"The M1918 155mm howitzer also continued in service until late in the war. The point I wish to make is that this howitzer was in use by field artillerymen of the 11th Marine Regiment on Guadalcanal,"

The artillery regiments of both the 1st (11th Marines) and 2nd Marine Divisions (10th Marines) had 155mm howitzer battalions in 1942. But it doesn't appear that either battalion made it to Guadalcanal.

I suspect that 155mm M1918 howitzers on Guadalcanal belonged to Americal (221st FA Bn) or 25th Infantry Divisions (90th FA Bn).

Rottman's U S MARINE CORPS WORLD WAR II ORDER OF BATTLE says assets of 4th Battalion, 11th Marines (the 155mm howitzer battalion) was used to form 1st Corps Artillery Battalion in New Zealand on 11 Dec 1942.

Interestingly enough, Rottman has a second Army CA 155mm gun coast artillery unit deployed on Guadalcanal: "Battery B, 259th Coast Artillery Battalion - Deployed as Provisional Battery H, 3d Battalion, 244th Coast Artillery Regiment (155mm Gun) and was redesignated on 20 Jan 43"; and has it arriving BEFORE F/244th Coast Artillery Regiment.




 
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Jim Broshot
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3rd Battalion, 244th Coast Artillery in COAST ARTILLERY JOURNAL

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August 14 2011, 6:01 PM 

In the July - August (#4) issue of COAST ARTILLERY JOURNAL (previously mentioned) there is an article titled "Narrative of 3d Battalion, --- CA, 1942 - 43, by Lieutenant Colonel Henry G. Fowler Coast Artillery Corps.

http://www.airdefenseartillery.com/online/2010/Coast%20Artillery%20Journal/Extract/CA%201944/Jul-Aug%201944.pdf

It appears to be about the 3rd Bn, 244th Coast Artillery. It specifically mentions the deployment of a Battery F to Guadalcanal.

In the same issue is another article about the use of seacoast defense guns (155mm guns) by a USMC Defense Battalion in support of ground operations in the Munda operation - with photographs.

 
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Bob Burns
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244th CA (AA)

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August 18 2011, 2:56 AM 

Great tread and information: FYI-information taken from the USS President Adams representing Task Group (TG) 62.6 movement form Noumea New Caledonia to Guadalcanal (Jan 1-4, 1943). You will note a sister unit from the 244th CA (AA) was aboard-Battery H, 244th CA (AA):

On 1st January, under Secrete Operations Orders A26-42, Task Group (TG) 62.6 was formed to transport reinforcements to Guadalcanal. Captain Reifsnider was in command of the five transports: USS President Jackson (flag ship), USS President Adams, USS President Hayes and USS Crescent City, USS Hunter Liggett (flag ship), USS Libra and USAT (Frederick) Funston. The Task Group was escorted by the destroyers: USS Grayson (flag ship), USS Gransevoort, USS Russell, USS Hughes and USS Frazier, USS Hovey and USS Manley. (27. p. 2 "President Adams")

Colonel Gilder D. Jackson will oversee the Sixth Marines, Reinforced disembarking and Lieutenant Colonel Landers will oversee disembarking: the 221st Field Artillery Battalion; 25th Division Third Echelon; Battery F, 214th Coast Artillery Battalion; Battery H, 244th Coast Artillery Battalion; Section, Advanced Depot, 7th Medical Supply; Detachment Co. C, 60th QM Laundry Battalion; Rear Echelon, Americal Division, 51st Ordnance Co.; Marine Air Depot Squadron; Naval Construction Battalion Personnel, and miscellaneous Naval Personnel to Guadalcanal. (27. p. 2;"President Adams")
I may have posted this before but will add this info to this tread for convenience.

 
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Gordon
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History of 3rd Bn, 244th CA Unit - Jan 42 to Jan 43

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August 19 2011, 11:58 PM 

Here is a very interesting 5-page unit history for the period Jan 1942-Jan 1943, focusing on F Battery, 3rd Bn, 244th CA Regiment.

The author is unknown, but the document contains 2 official orders and appears to be the type that would have been written by a unit historian. The title ("History of the Old Ninth") refers to the unit's lineage and history as the 9th Regiment, of the NY guard.

History244thCA-1.jpg
History244thCA-2.jpg
History244thCA-3.jpg
History244thCA-4.jpg
History244thCA-5.jpg

 
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Nelson
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relevant answers in the Fowler article

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September 9 2011, 8:58 PM 

Guys,

A careful reading of LTC Henry G. Fowler's "Narrative of 3d Battalion, --- CA, 1942-43", in the July-August 1944 Coast Artillery Journal, 87(4): 19-21, reveals some answers to questions arising in the later thread originated by me on September 6, 2011. First, good find by Jim Broshot, considering the cryptic "3d Battalion, --- CA", with the oh-so-essential "244th" being obliterated from the title (but why such journal security in late 1944 puzzles one). Some of the questions arising, from either other posters or me, find their answers, at least in part, in this article.

The following passage clearly confirms the four 25-pounders given to this coast artillery battalion and used subsequently in a beach defense role on New Caledonia.

p. 20, "With a battalion already called on to man four Australian 25-lbrs. [pdrs] on beach defense missions, the job of manning and providing range sections for these widely separated positions presented serious problems both as to personnel and equipment."

As revealed or hinted at in the next passage, F Battery, 3rd Battalion, 244th C.A. Regt, arrived in early November 1942 (either the 1st or 3rd, depending upon which one prefers to believe). And as Bob Burns has already pointed out, the personnel of H Battery arrived in early January 1943, so it did not precede F Battery there, thus Gordon Rottman's info is mistaken. It may be that such battery designation did not exist until these men reached Guadalcanal, but whatever, it is virtually certain they did not bring 25-pounders to the island.

p. 21, "In December, 1942, the battalion was called on to organize a provisional battery to relieve Marines manning 5-in/51 naval rifes on barbette mounts at Guadalcanal. The arrival of a New Zealand Heavy Artillery Regiment (the equivalent of a Coast Artillery battalion) permitted the withdrawal of the platoon which had taken over Battery F's original position and around this was built Battery H, which arrived at Guadalcanal early in January. While this battery never fired a shot in anger, its positions close to a fighter strip brought plenty of excitement and experience. They could never be sure whether the strip or the battery was the target of Jap bombers."

The third passage mentions only 155mm GPFs--and their Panama mounts--but no M1 155mm guns, as long-range ordnance available on Guadalcanal.

p. 21, "Early in April, 1943, the battalion was reassembled at Guadalcanal where, with the seacoast elements of three Marine Defense Battalions, it formed the Seacoast Defense Command of the Guadalcanal-Florida Area. Again a provisional battery was organized to man two naval 6-in/50s, in addition to the GPFs and 5-in/51s. Again Panama Mounts were constructed but this time with the active assistance of Engineers."

The final passage confirms that a typical C.A. battery armed with mobile weapons could function in a field artillery role, firing counterbattery and/or in support of attacking infantry. That is, it had the necessary training, math smarts, and shooting ability to do the job. One must note, however, that this battery fired from static or semi-static emplacements, so whether it had the necessary vehicle train and other materiel allowed by its TO&E to keep up with a modern mobile field army under other conditions elsewhere is, of course, the real question.

p. 21, "At Guadalcanal the battalion proved that well-trained Coast Artillerymen can outshoot any other artillery at normal field artillery targets. This fact, together with the capabilities of Coast Artillery against seaborne attack, makes the Coast Artillery Battalion a highly valuable unit in amphibious operations where economy of personnel and equipment are of paramount importance, The normal sequence in such operations makes it possible to utilize the Coast Artillery as the primary long range weapon in support of ground operations without interfering with its missions against hostile naval operations. Even in those situations where the two missions cannot be accomplished from the same positions, the time factors involved will frequently permit one unit to handle both successfully by judicious selection of alternate positions. The fire missions assigned to 155mm guns in ground operations can in many, if not most, instances be handled by one or two guns."

Nelson

 
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Nancy Viola
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Can you help

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January 7 2012, 6:05 PM 

I just figured out that my father was in the 3rd Coast Artillery by patches stuck in his cap.
His name is Gerald F Ensman. He passed away March of 1992. He would never talk about the war so
I can't find any information on a unit he was in or the movements of the unit.
Please tell me how to go about finding any information.

Nancy Viola
Daughter of Gerald F Ensman

 
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Jim Broshot
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3rd Coast Artillery

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January 8 2012, 2:50 AM 

Since no one has yet answered, here is some details.

According to Shelby Stanton's ORDER OF BATTLE U S ARMY WORLD WAR II (1984),

"3rd Coast Artillery Regiment (Harbor Defense) (Type B)
Stationed at Fort MacArthur Calif under Harbor Defenses of Los Angeles and upgraded to Type A in 1941; regiment, less 1st and 3rd Bns, redesignated there as as 521st CA Battalion 18 Oct 1944; 1st and 3rd Bns redesignated 520th and 522nd CA Battalions respectively."

In other words, this regiment was a regular army coast defense unit stationed in the Los Angeles area at the start of the war, manning fixed coastal defense guns and some antiaircraft batteries. It remained there until it was broken up into separate battalions in 1944. These battalions did not go overseas and 521st and 522nd were disbanded 15 September 1945, and the 520th CA Battalion was again redesignated 3rd Coast Artillery Battalion on 1 December 1944 and also was disbanded on 15 September 1945.

There are others who frequent this board who are much more knowledgeable than I about such things, especially US Coast Artillery matters, so hopefully they will speak up.


 
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Henry Lowry
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My Dad's Unit

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April 28 2012, 6:16 PM 

Thank you for sharing the letter about the 244th. My father, Staff Sergeant George A Lowry, from the Bronx had been drafted in 1940 into the NY guard and became part of the 244th at Camp Pendleton. I have a photograph of the unit taken in July 1941 at Camp Pendleton.
He had told me about his part in the Pacific as a child but we never documented it as I was older. He passed away in 1996 and until I found the letter of the "The Old Ninth" I had no way of knowing what he had done during his service overseas.
Thank You

 
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Jeff
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155mm

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June 28 2012, 9:24 AM 

Hi I am hoping someone can help. My grandfather served in the Coastal Artillery in the Pacific. He manned a 155mm. He was involved in fierce fighting and was lucky to escape with his life as many of his crewmen did not. He was in one battle where a lot of the soldiers become sterile. He did not talk much about his experience and when he passed away all his medals and paperwork were sold by my grandmother. I am trying to peice together were he fought. It was an usually outfit he was in as the used to put the 155mm in the landing craft when they started their shelling of the island out in the ocean in the little landing crafts. He was from Long Island NY so mabye the 3rd Battalion might be the one ?

 
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Jeff
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Grandfathers Army ?

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June 28 2012, 9:33 AM 

My grandfather fought in the costal artillery during WW2. He never talked about it and when he passed my grandmother sold his paperwork and medals. I am trying to piece together if this was his unit. He fought in the pacific and was involved in a lot of shelling. He was from Long Island New York and did not actually fight until late 43 onwards. I know a lot of the men that fought with him become sterile as a result of where they fought in one major battle. Does this sound like Guadalcanal ? and the 3rd Battalion 244th Troop F ?

 
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Bob Burns
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History of 3rd Bn, 255th CA Unit-Jan 42 to Jan 43

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September 2 2012, 6:11 PM 

Gordon: Thank you for sharing the original "History of the OLD NINTH." Please drop me an e-mail I would like to ask you some questions.
Thanks,
Bob

 
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